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Phenotypic interactions between tree hosts and invasive forest pathogens in the light of globalization and climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287271
Source
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2016 Dec 05;371(1709)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-05-2016
Author
Jan Stenlid
Jonàs Oliva
Source
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2016 Dec 05;371(1709)
Date
Dec-05-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ascomycota - physiology
Climate change
Commerce
Forests
Host-Pathogen Interactions
Internationality
Plant Diseases - microbiology
Sweden
Trees - microbiology
Abstract
Invasive pathogens can cause considerable damage to forest ecosystems. Lack of coevolution is generally thought to enable invasive pathogens to bypass the defence and/or recognition systems in the host. Although mostly true, this argument fails to predict intermittent outcomes in space and time, underlining the need to include the roles of the environment and the phenotype in host-pathogen interactions when predicting disease impacts. We emphasize the need to consider host-tree imbalances from a phenotypic perspective, considering the lack of coevolutionary and evolutionary history with the pathogen and the environment, respectively. We describe how phenotypic plasticity and plastic responses to environmental shifts may become maladaptive when hosts are faced with novel pathogens. The lack of host-pathogen and environmental coevolution are aligned with two global processes currently driving forest damage: globalization and climate change, respectively. We suggest that globalization and climate change act synergistically, increasing the chances of both genotypic and phenotypic imbalances. Short moves on the same continent are more likely to be in balance than if the move is from another part of the world. We use Gremmeniella abietina outbreaks in Sweden to exemplify how host-pathogen phenotypic interactions can help to predict the impacts of specific invasive and emergent diseases.This article is part of the themed issue 'Tackling emerging fungal threats to animal health, food security and ecosystem resilience'.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28080981 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2005;66(1):3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Dawna Royall
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2005;66(1):3
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Food Supply
Humans
Hunger - physiology
Poverty
PubMed ID
15780149 View in PubMed
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A questionnaire to examine food service satisfaction of elderly residents in long-term care facilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175652
Source
J Nutr Elder. 2004;24(2):5-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Christina O Lengyel
Joan T Smith
Susan J Whiting
Gordon A Zello
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, USA.
Source
J Nutr Elder. 2004;24(2):5-18
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Food Services - standards
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Personal Autonomy
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Saskatchewan
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to develop a survey tool for assessing the satisfaction of elderly long-term care (LTC) residents with the meals and food services they receive, as well as to assess quality of life issues related to eating. Food service delivery should be provided in an environment that fosters autonomy, interpersonal relations, and security. The questionnaire was administered as face-to-face interviews with 205 residents (> or = 65 years of age) of 13 LTC facilities in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada (participation rate = 67%). Residents expressed some concern with food variety, quality, taste, and appearance, and with the posting of menus. Quality of life issues were mostly positive; however, residents were less satisfied with areas related to their autonomy such as food choice and snack availability.
PubMed ID
15778154 View in PubMed
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The social construction of anemia in school shelters for indigenous children in Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170413
Source
Qual Health Res. 2006 Apr;16(4):503-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Bernardo Turnbull
Gloria Martínez-Andrade
Miguel Klünder
Tania Carranco
Ximena Duque-López
Rosa Isela Ramos-Hernández
Marco González-Unzaga
Sergio Flores-Hernández
Homero Martínez-Salgado
Author Affiliation
Unidad de Investigación en Epidemiología Nutricional (UIEN), Instituto Méxicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), México D.F., México.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2006 Apr;16(4):503-16
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - epidemiology - ethnology
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Cultural Characteristics
Diet
Food Supply
Humans
Indians, North American
Malnutrition - epidemiology
Mexico - epidemiology
Poverty Areas
Schools - organization & administration
Abstract
Indigenous children in school shelters in Mexico suffer from anemia in spite of food that is subsidized, prepared, and served to them. Economically and biomedically centered strategies to reduce anemia have achieved only partial and short-term success. An interdisciplinary team investigated the food security system of the school shelters and collected data through interviews and participant observation. The analysis revealed that the children's nutrition depends on a frail chain of events in which a single link's failure can lead to nutritional insecurity. The authors conclude that the social actors involved in the process are mainly considering the economic aspects of nutrition, but anemia persists as a social construction of the faulty relationship between the institution that runs the shelters and the indigenous culture. The authors make suggestions for an intervention that empowers the community by involving it actively in solving the problem.
Notes
Comment In: Qual Health Res. 2006 Dec;16(10):1315-617079795
PubMed ID
16513993 View in PubMed
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"We are not being heard": Aboriginal perspectives on traditional foods access and food security.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116942
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2012;2012:130945
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Bethany Elliott
Deepthi Jayatilaka
Contessa Brown
Leslie Varley
Kitty K Corbett
Author Affiliation
Population and Public Health, Provincial Health Services Authority, Vancouver, BC, Canada. bethany.elliott@phsa.ca
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2012;2012:130945
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Focus Groups
Food
Food Supply
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Population Groups
Young Adult
Abstract
Aboriginal peoples are among the most food insecure groups in Canada, yet their perspectives and knowledge are often sidelined in mainstream food security debates. In order to create food security for all, Aboriginal perspectives must be included in food security research and discourse. This project demonstrates a process in which Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal partners engaged in a culturally appropriate and respectful collaboration, assessing the challenges and barriers to traditional foods access in the urban environment of Vancouver, BC, Canada. The findings highlight local, national, and international actions required to increase access to traditional foods as a means of achieving food security for all people. The paper underscores the interconnectedness of local and global food security issues and highlights challenges as well as solutions with potential to improve food security of both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples alike.
Notes
Cites: Annu Rev Nutr. 2000;20:595-62610940347
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1996 Feb;96(2):155-628557942
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2009 Sep;12(9):1504-1119144239
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2004 Nov-Dec;95(6):465-915622799
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):46-5415776992
Cites: J Nutr. 1997 Nov;127(11):2179-869349845
PubMed ID
23346118 View in PubMed
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Psychical problems of the Inuit woman in industrial confrontation

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76684
Source
Pages 461-463 in B. Harvald and J.P. Hart Hansen, eds. Circumpolar Health 81. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 5th, Copenhagen, 9-13 August, 1981
Publication Type
Article
Date
[1982?]
influence in the different stages of development. The upbringing would prepare for the particular life that was provided. We see the apparent paradox that they were able to form a life of maximal security for the children even though they lived as nomads at the border of existence, often without
  1 document  
Author
Lynge, I.
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Dronning Ingrids, Hospital, Nuuk/Godthåb, Greenland
Source
Pages 461-463 in B. Harvald and J.P. Hart Hansen, eds. Circumpolar Health 81. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 5th, Copenhagen, 9-13 August, 1981
Date
[1982?]
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Documents
Less detail

The International Biomedical Expedition to the Antarctic (IBEA)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76711
Source
Pages 620-622 in B. Harvald and J.P. Hart Hansen, eds. Circumpolar Health 81. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 5th, Copenhagen, 9-13 August, 1981
Publication Type
Article
Date
[1982?]
· sonnel faced considerable exposure to the ele- ments as they travelled by motorised toboggan and lived in tents during the ten week journey on the plateau inland of the French Antarctic station, Dumont d'Urville. Fig. 1 shows the route of IBEA EPF provided field security and traverse support with
  1 document  
Author
Lugg, D.J.
Rivolier, J.
Author Affiliation
Human Biology and Medicine Working Group, Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research, Australia
Source
Pages 620-622 in B. Harvald and J.P. Hart Hansen, eds. Circumpolar Health 81. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 5th, Copenhagen, 9-13 August, 1981
Date
[1982?]
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Documents
Less detail

High incidence of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in children in Finland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76779
Source
Pages 535-539 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Arctic Medical Research, Vol. 4 7: Suppl. 1, pp. 535 - 539, 1988 HIGH INCIDENCE OF INSULIN-DEPENDENT DIABETES MELLITUS (IDDM) IN CHILDREN IN FINLAND A. Reunanen (1), H.K. Akerblom (2) and J. Tuomilehto (3) Research Institute for Social Security, the Social Insurance Institution (1), the
  1 document  
Author
Reunanen, A.
Ã?kerblom, H. K.
Akerblom, H.K.
Tuomilehto, J.
Author Affiliation
Research for Institute for Social Security, the Social Insurance Institution
The Children's Hospital, II Department of Pediatrics, University of Helsinki
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland
Source
Pages 535-539 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Dietary factors
Environmental factors
Finland
Genetic determinants
Incidence rates
Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM)
International comparison
Documents
Less detail

Disease and health aspects under equator and on the polar circle

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76642
Source
Pages 229-240 in B. Harvald and J.P. Hart Hansen, eds. Circumpolar Health 81. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 5th, Copenhagen, 9-13 August, 1981.
Publication Type
Article
. The security of the old structure has been replaced by insecurity as regards values and norms and matiY feel to belong nowhere and being useless 115)- We do not know if. when and how en equilibrium between the old and the new will be establittied but that this is a painful process, the price of
  1 document  
Author
Bennike, T.
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Dronning Ingrids Hospital, Nuuk/Godthåb, Greenland
Source
Pages 229-240 in B. Harvald and J.P. Hart Hansen, eds. Circumpolar Health 81. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 5th, Copenhagen, 9-13 August, 1981.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Documents
Less detail

Pharmaceutical health care and Inuit language communications in Nunavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107694
Source
Pages 955-961 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):955-961
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
, Rostas L, Caughey A, Kuhnlein H, et al. Food security in Nunavut, Canada: barriers and recommendations. Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006;65: 416-30. 33. Munch-Andersen T, Olsen DB, Sondergaard H, Daugaard JR, Bysted A, Christensen DL, et al. Metabolic profile in two physically active 1nuit groups
  1 document  
Author
Sandra J Romain
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Source
Pages 955-961 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):955-961
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Health Policy
Health Services, Indigenous - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Humans
Inuits
Language
Nunavut - epidemiology
Pharmaceutical Services - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Abstract
Pharmaceutical communication is an essential component of pharmaceutical health care, optimally ensuring patients understand the proper administration and side effects of their medications. Communication can often be complicated by language and culture, but with pharmaceuticals, misunderstandings can prove particularly harmful. In Nunavut, to ensure the preservation and revitalization of Inuit languages, the Inuit Language Protection Act and Official Languages Act were passed requiring that all public and private sector essential services offer verbal and written communication in Inuit languages (Inuktitut and Inuinnaqtun) by 2012.
While the legislation mandates compliance, policy implementation for pharmaceutical services is problematic. Not a single pharmacist in Nunavut is fluent in either of the Inuit languages. Pharmacists have indicated challenges in formally translating written documentation into Inuit languages based on concerns for patient safety. These challenges of negotiating the joint requirements of language legislation and patient safety have resulted in pharmacies using verbal on-site translation as a tenuous solution regardless of its many limitations.
The complex issues of pharmaceutical health care and communication among the Inuit of Nunavut are best examined through multimethod research to encompass a wide range of perspectives. This methodology combines the richness of ethnographic data, the targeted depth of interviews with key informants and the breadth of cross-Canada policy and financial analyses.
The analysis of this information would provide valuable insights into the current relationships between health care providers, pharmacists and Inuit patients and suggest future directions for policy that will improve the efficacy of pharmaceuticals and health care spending for the Inuit in Canada.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23984309 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail

Collaborating toward improving food security in Nunavut.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107695
Source
Pages 803-810 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):803-810
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
NUTRITION CQ\C-~ION Collaborating toward improving food security in Nunavut Jennifer Wakegijig, Geraldine Osborne, Sara Statham and Michelle Doucette lssaluk* Government of Nunavut Department of Health, Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada Background. Community members, Aboriginal organizations
  1 document  
Author
Jennifer Wakegijig
Geraldine Osborne
Sara Statham
Michelle Doucette Issaluk
Author Affiliation
Government of Nunavut Department of Health, Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada.
Source
Pages 803-810 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):803-810
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Food Supply - methods
Humans
Indians, North American
Nunavut
Poverty - prevention & control
Quality Improvement
Abstract
Community members, Aboriginal organizations, public servants and academics have long been describing a desperate situation of food insecurity in the Eastern Canadian Arctic.
The Nunavut Food Security Coalition, a partnership of Inuit Organizations and the Government of Nunavut, is collaborating to develop a territorial food security strategy to address pervasive food insecurity in the context of poverty reduction.
The Nunavut Food Security Coalition has carried out this work using a community consultation model. The research was collected through community visits, stakeholder consultation and member checking at the Nunavut Food Security Symposium.
In this paper, we describe a continuous course of action, based on community engagement and collective action, that has led to sustained political interest in and public mobilization around the issue of food insecurity in Nunavut.
The process described in this article is a unique collaboration between multiple organizations that has led to the development of a sustainable partnership that will inform policy development while representing the voice of Nunavummiut.
Notes
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):137020568912
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Cites: Geogr J. 2011;177(1):44-6121560272
PubMed ID
23984307 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail
Source
Pages 937-945 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):937-945
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
factors impacting on Inuit well-being. The priority issues for ICC are the centrality of Inuit culture and traditional knowledge, access to traditiona l or country foods and food security, the impact of climate change and other environmental factors, addressing sub- stance abuse and improving access
  1 document  
Author
Leanna Ellsworth
Annmaree O'Keeffe
Author Affiliation
Inuit Circumpolar Council, Ottawa, ON, Canada
Source
Pages 937-945 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):937-945
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Canada
Greenland
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Health status
Humans
Inuits
Life expectancy
Siberia
Abstract
The Inuit are an indigenous people totalling about 160,000 and living in 4 countries across the Arctic - Canada, Greenland, USA (Alaska) and Russia (Chukotka). In essence, they are one people living in 4 countries. Although there have been significant improvements in Inuit health and survival over the past 50 years, stark differences persist between the key health indicators for Inuit and those of the national populations in the United States, Canada and Russia and between Greenland and Denmark. On average, life expectancy in all 4 countries is lower for Inuit. Infant mortality rates are also markedly different with up to 3 times more infant deaths than the broader national average. Underlying these statistical differences are a range of health, social, economic and environmental factors which have affected Inuit health outcomes. Although the health challenges confronting the Inuit are in many cases similar across the Arctic, the responses to these challenges vary in accordance with the types of health systems in place in each of the 4 countries. Each of the 4 countries has a different health care system with varying degrees of accessibility and affordability for Inuit living in urban, rural and remote areas.
To describe funding and governance arrangements for health services to Inuit in Canada, Greenland, USA (Alaska) and Russia (Chukotka) and to determine if a particular national system leads to better outcomes than any of the other 3 systems.
Literature review.
It was not possible to draw linkages between the different characteristics of the respective health systems, the corresponding financial investment and the systems' effectiveness in adequately serving Inuit health needs for several reasons including the very limited and inadequate collection of Inuit-specific health data by Canada, Alaska and Russia; and second, the data that are available do not necessarily provide a feasible point of comparison in terms of methodology and timing of the available data collection.
Despite the variations in the health systems as well as national, political and economic approaches, none is adequately addressing Inuit health needs. All Inuit populations still have significant gaps between their health status and those of broader national populations. Meaningful measurement and evaluation of the effectiveness of the respective health systems is severely hindered by the lack of relevant, Inuit-specific health data. The inadequacy, and in a number of cases absence of relevant data, hinders the design and development of a better and potentially more effective approach to delivering health services to Inuit.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Dec;69(5):437-4721118636
Cites: CMAJ. 2011 Feb 8;183(2):209-1421041430
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Dec;69(5):424-3621073825
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2004;32(5):390-515513673
PubMed ID
23984305 View in PubMed
Documents
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Addressing historic environmental exposures along the Alaska Highway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107704
Source
Pages 787-795 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):787-795
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
49. Paci CJ, Dickson C, Nickels S, Chan L, Furgal C, editors. Food Security of Northern Indigenous Peoples in a Time of Uncertainty 3rd Northern Research Forum Open Meeting, Yellowknife; 2004. *Anna Godduhn Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Alaska Fairbanks PO Box 756160
  1 document  
Author
Anna Godduhn
Lawrence Duffy
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA
Source
Pages 787-795 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):787-795
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Animals, Wild
Diet - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - history
Fishes
Food Contamination
Health status
History, 20th Century
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Thyroid Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
A World War II defense site at Northway, Alaska, was remediated in the 1990s, leaving complex questions regarding historic exposures to toxic waste. This article describes the context, methods, limitations and findings of the Northway Wild Food and Health Project (NWFHP).
The NWFHP comprised 2 pilot studies: the Northway Wild Food Study (NWFS), which investigated contaminants in locally prioritized traditional foods over time, and the Northway Health Study (NHS), which investigated locally suspected links between resource uses and health problems.
This research employed mixed methods. The NWFS reviewed remedial documents and existing data. The NHS collected household information regarding resource uses and health conditions by questionnaire and interview. NHS data represent general (yes or no) personal knowledge that was often second hand. Retrospective cohort comparisons were made of the reported prevalence of 7 general health problems between groups based on their reported (yes or no) consumption of particular resources, for 3 data sets (existing, historic and combined) with a two-tailed Fisher's Exact Test in SAS (n = 325 individuals in 83 households, 24 of which no longer exist).
The NWFS identified historic pathways of exposure to petroleum, pesticides, herbicides, chlorinated byproducts of disinfection and lead from resources that were consumed more frequently decades ago and are not retrospectively quantifiable. The NHS found complex patterns of association between reported resource uses and cancer and thyroid-, reproductive-, metabolic- and cardiac problems.
Lack of detail regarding medical conditions, undocumented histories of exposure, time lapsed since the release of pollution and changes to health and health care over the same period make this exploratory research. Rather than demonstrate causation, these results document the legitimacy of local suspicions and warrant additional investigation. This article presents our findings, with discussion of limitations related to study design and limitations that are inherent to such research.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23984298 View in PubMed
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An examination of the social determinants of health as factors related to health, healing and prevention of foetal alcohol spectrum disorder in a northern context--the Brightening Our Home Fires Project, Northwest Territories, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107711
Source
Pages 169-174 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):169-174
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
related to interge- nerational trauma. Cameron offers a contemporary review of the SDH and indicates that health is largely linked to socio-economic factors including: accultura- tion, productivity, income distribution, housing, educa- tion, food security, healthcare services, social safety nets, the
  1 document  
Author
Dorothy Badry
Aileen Wight Felske
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. badry@ucalgary.ca
Source
Pages 169-174 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):169-174
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - prevention & control
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods
Female
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders - prevention & control - therapy
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Maternal Health Services - methods - organization & administration
Northwest Territories
Pregnancy
Social Determinants of Health
Abstract
The Brightening Our Home Fires (BOHF) project was conceptualized as an exploratory project to examine the issue of the prevention of foetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) from a women's health perspective in the Northwest Territories (NT). While dominant discourse suggests that FASD is preventable by abstention from alcohol during pregnancy, a broader perspective would indicate that alcohol and pregnancy is a far more complex issue, that is, bound in location, economics, social and cultural views of health. This project was prevention focused and a social determinant of health (SDH) perspective informed this research.
The BOHF project was a qualitative research project using a participatory action research framework to examine women's health and healing in the north. The methodology utilized was Photovoice. Women were provided training in digital photography and given cameras to use and keep. The primary research question utilized was: What does health and healing look like for you in your community? Women described their photos, individually or in groups around this central topic. This research was FASD informed, and women participants were aware this was an FASD prevention funded project whose approach focused on a broader context of health and lived experience.
This project drew 30 participants from: Yellowknife, Lutsel 'ke, Behchokö and Ulukhaktok. These four different communities across the NT represented Dene and Inuit culture. The qualitative data analysis offered themes of importance to women's health in the north including: land and tradition; housing; poverty; food; family; health, mental health and trauma, and travel. Photovoice provides a non-threatening way to engage in dialogue on complex health and social issues.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Sep;70(4):428-3321878184
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1959 Nov 15;81:837-4113852329
PubMed ID
23984290 View in PubMed
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Adverse health effects of experiencing food insecurity among Greenlandic school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107728
Source
Pages 774-780 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):774-780
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
- Centre for Applied Biostatistics, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; 3 1nstitute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Background. In vulnerable populations, food security in children has been found to be associated with negative health effects. Still, little is
  1 document  
Author
Birgit Niclasen
Max Petzold
Christina W Schnohr
Author Affiliation
Greenlandic Branch, National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark
Source
Pages 774-780 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):774-780
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Greenland - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Hunger
Male
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
In vulnerable populations, food security in children has been found to be associated with negative health effects. Still, little is known about whether the negative health effects can be retrieved in children at the population level.
To examine food insecurity reported by Greenlandic school children as a predictor for perceived health, physical symptoms and medicine use.
The study is based on the Greenlandic part of the Health Behavior in School-aged Children survey. The 2010 survey included 2,254 students corresponding to 40% of all Greenlandic school children in Grade 5 through 10. The participation rate in the participating schools was 65%. Food insecurity was measured as going to bed or to school hungry because there was no food at home.
Boys, the youngest children (11-12 year-olds), and children from low affluence homes were at increased risk for food insecurity. Poor or fair self-rated health, medicine use last month and physical symptoms during the last 6 months were all more frequent in children reporting food insecurity. Controlling for age, gender and family affluence odds ratio (OR) for self-rated health was 1.60 (95% confidence interval (CI 1.23-2.06) (p
Notes
Cites: Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2009 May;12(3):310-619333121
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PubMed ID
23984271 View in PubMed
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[Diet and caloric sufficiency in the migrant indigenous population of the Altos Region of Chiapas, México].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160395
Source
Arch Latinoam Nutr. 2007 Jun;57(2):155-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Isabel Reyes Posadas
Austreberta Nazar Beutelspacher
Erin Estrada Lugo
Verónica Mundo Rosas
Author Affiliation
Colegio de la Frontera Sur. San Cristóbal de las Casas Chiapas, México.
Source
Arch Latinoam Nutr. 2007 Jun;57(2):155-62
Date
Jun-2007
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mexico
Nutritional Requirements
Socioeconomic Factors
Transients and Migrants
Urban Population
Abstract
The population that has migrated from rural zones to urban areas is subject to changes in their dietary patterns and is considered a vulnerable population group in terms of food security. This article describes the diet of the immigrant indigenous population in the city of San Cristóbal de Las Casas, analyzing the factors that contribute to adequate calorie consumption in 143 families. This is a cross-sectional study based on a structured interview in which information was obtained related to socio-economic variables, the variety and types of foods in the home, and adequate calorie consumption per capita based on requirements according to age and sex. Using nonparametric statistical tests, the relationship between the population's income level and the number of calories available was determined. Results show a significant association between the income level of the population and the number of calories available in homes; however, there is not a significant association between the amount of time a family has lived in the city and the type and variety of foods available to and consumed by these families. Results show that 91.3% of these families ingest the suggested calorie consumption; the population with the lowest income levels represents a lower percentage of this indicator, and also showed significant deficiencies in proteins and nutrients such as calcium and vitamin A. The implications of rural-urban migration by indigenous populations in relation to diet quality are discussed.
PubMed ID
17992979 View in PubMed
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Canadian Arctic Contaminants Assessment Report II: Sources, occurrence, trends and pathways in the physical environment

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76388
Source
Government of Canada, Ministry of Indian Affairs and Northern Development. Ottawa. 361 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2003
risks to human health that may result from current levels of contamination in key Arctic food species as well as deter- mining the temporal trends of contaminants of concern in key Arctic indicator species and air. It addressed these issues under a number of subprograms: human health; monitoring the
  1 document  
Author
Bidleman, T.
Macdonald, R.
Stow, J.
Source
Government of Canada, Ministry of Indian Affairs and Northern Development. Ottawa. 361 p.
Date
2003
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
15434725
Keywords
Aboriginal peoples
Contamination
NCP human health studies
Northern Canada
Toxicology
Abstract
The Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) was established in 1991 in response to concerns about human exposure to elevated levels of contaminants in fish and wildlife species that are important to the traditional diets of northern Aboriginal peoples. Early studies indicated that there was a wide spectrum of substances: persistent organic pollutants, heavy metals, and radionuclides, many of which had no Arctic or Canadian sources, but which were, nevertheless, reaching unexpectedly high levels in the Arctic ecosystem. Under the first phase of the NCP (NCP-I), research was focussed on gathering the data required to determine the levels, geographic extent, and source of contaminants in the northern atmosphere, environment and its people, and the probable duration of the problem. Results generated through NCP-I were synthesized and published in 1997 in the first Canadian Arctic Contaminants Assessment Report (CACAR-I). In 1998, the NCP began its second phase (NCP-II), which will continue until March 2003. NCP-II focussed upon questions about the impacts and risks to human health that may result from current levels of contamination in key Arctic food species as well as determining the temporal trends of contaminants of concern in key indicator Arctic species and air. It addressed these issues under a number of subprograms: human health; monitoring the health of Arctic peoples and ecosystems and the effectiveness of international controls; education and communications; and international policy.The priority areas in the human health subprogram during NCP-II included: exposure assessment, toxicology, epidemiology, and risk and benefit characterization. The key objectives of this, the human health technical report in the CACAR-II series, are to summarize the knowledge produced since the first CACAR on human exposure to and possible health effects of current levels of environmental contaminants in the Canadian Arctic, and to identify the data and knowledge gaps that need to be filled by future human health research and monitoring. The CACAR-II series consists of a Highlights report and four technical reports: human health, biological environment, physical environment and knowledge in action.
Notes
ISBN 0-662-33468-X
Documents

CACAR-Source-Occur-Trend.pdf

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Improving the health status of Alaskans: University of Alaska's role

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76390
Source
University of Alaska Anchorage. 15 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
May-2004
recently garnered biomedical research capacity building grants. With the addition of new biomedical facilities in Anchorage and Fairbanks, the faculty will have the space necessary to secure a signifi- cant share of federal funding for biomedical research important to Alaska. Alaska also does not have any
  1 document  
Author
Perdue, K
Happ, G
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Anchorage
Source
University of Alaska Anchorage. 15 p.
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
381844
Keywords
Alaska
Health care
Abstract
The University of Alaska has a major role to play in improving the health status of Alaskans by educating the workforce needed in the health care field and by tackling tough health research questions. Health education and research has become a major focus of UA. That's because the University is responding to a tremendous need, as expressed by industry, for a trained health care workforce, especially in nursing, allied health, and behavioral health.
Notes
Available online
Documents

UA_Improving-the-Health-Status-of-Alaskans_n.d.pdf

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Linkages between human health and ocean health: a participatory climate change vulnerability assessment for marine mammal harvesters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107731
Source
Pages 759-765 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):759-765
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
advances local, rather than academic, use of traditional knowledge. Keywords: qualitative methods; climate change; adaptation; vulnerability; food security; indigenous CQ\C-~ION T he Bering Strait Region is facing both rapid climactic changes and accelerating industrial de- velopment (1), which
  1 document  
Author
Lily Gadamus
Author Affiliation
Natural Resources Division, Kawerak, Inc., Nome, Alaska AK-99762, USA
Source
Pages 759-765 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):759-765
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Climate change
Focus Groups
Food Safety
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Inuits
Oceans and Seas
Seals, Earless
Walruses
Abstract
Indigenous residents of Alaska's Bering Strait Region depend, both culturally and nutritionally, on ice seal and walrus harvests. Currently, climate change and resultant increases in marine industrial development threaten these species and the cultures that depend on them.
To document: (a) local descriptions of the importance of marine mammal hunting; (b) traditional methods for determining if harvested marine mammals are safe to consume; and (c) marine mammal outcomes that would have adverse effects on community health, the perceived causes of these outcomes, strategies for preventing these outcomes and community adaptations to outcomes that cannot be mitigated.
Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with 82 indigenous hunters and elders from the Bering Strait region. Standard qualitative analysis was conducted on interview transcripts, which were coded for both inductive and deductive codes. Responses describing marine mammal food safety and importance are presented using inductively generated categories. Responses describing negative marine mammal outcomes are presented in a vulnerability framework, which links human health outcomes to marine conditions.
Project participants perceived that shipping noise and pollution, as well as marine mammal food source depletion by industrial fishing, posed the greatest threats to marine mammal hunting traditions. Proposed adaptations primarily fell into 2 categories: (a) greater tribal influence over marine policy; and (b) documentation of traditional knowledge for local use. This paper presents 1 example of documenting traditional knowledge as an adaptation strategy: traditional methods for determining if marine mammal food is safe to eat.
Participant recommendations indicate that 1 strategy to promote rural Alaskan adaptation to climate change is to better incorporate local knowledge and values into decision-making processes. Participant interest in documenting traditional knowledge for local use also indicates that funding agencies could support climate change adaptation by awarding more grants for tribal research that advances local, rather than academic, use of traditional knowledge.
Notes
Cites: Science. 2007 May 11;316(5826):847-5117495163
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Sep 25;104(39):15188-9317881580
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2003 Jul 8;100(14):8074-912792023
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Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Dec 21;107(51):22026-3121135232
PubMed ID
23984268 View in PubMed
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Food insecurity and nutritional biomarkers in relation to stature in Inuit children from Nunavik.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261557
Source
Can J Public Health. 2014 Jul-Aug;105(4):e233-8
Publication Type
Article
children. Prevalence of short stature was 18.7%. Food-insecure children were an average of 2 cm shorter (95% CI: -0.48, -3.17) than food-secure children (p<0.01). CONCLUSION: In this population, food-insecure children have greater burdens of nutritional deficiencies and slower linear growth
  1 document  
Author
Catherine M Pirkle
Michel Lucas
Renée Dallaire
Pierre Ayotte
Joseph L Jacobson
Sandra W Jacobson
Eric Dewailly
Gina Muckle
Source
Can J Public Health. 2014 Jul-Aug;105(4):e233-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
295913
Keywords
Adolescent
Anemia - epidemiology
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - epidemiology
Biological Markers - blood
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Cohort Studies
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Growth Disorders - epidemiology
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Iron - blood - deficiency
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Nutritional Status
Abstract
Inuit in Canada experience alarming levels of food insecurity, but nutritional and physiological consequences are poorly documented, especially in school-age children. The objective of this study was to assess the relation of food insecurity to iron deficiency and stature in school-aged Inuit children from Nunavik (Northern Quebec).
Food insecurity, iron deficiency, and stature were assessed in a cohort of children. Food insecurity was determined by interviewing the children's mothers. Multiple logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of food insecurity to iron deficiency and short stature. We defined short stature as a height in the lowest tertile for age and sex, based on Canadian growth charts. The relation of food insecurity to height (cm) was analyzed with a general linear model. Statistical models controlled for age, sex, normal/overweight/obese status, prenatal lead exposure and postnatal polychlorinated biphenyls exposure.
Half of the children (49.7%, n=145) were food insecure, while one third were iron depleted, 12.6% had anaemia, and 8.7% had iron-deficiency anaemia. The multivariate odds ratio of anaemia was 1.82 (95% CI: 0.97, 3.42, p=0.06) for food-insecure children. Prevalence of short stature was 18.7%. Food-insecure children were an average of 2 cm shorter (95% CI: -0.48, -3.17) than food-secure children (p
PubMed ID
25166123 View in PubMed
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662 records – page 1 of 34.