Skip header and navigation

Refine By

585 records – page 1 of 30.

"We are not being heard": Aboriginal perspectives on traditional foods access and food security.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116942
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2012;2012:130945
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Bethany Elliott
Deepthi Jayatilaka
Contessa Brown
Leslie Varley
Kitty K Corbett
Author Affiliation
Population and Public Health, Provincial Health Services Authority, Vancouver, BC, Canada. bethany.elliott@phsa.ca
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2012;2012:130945
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Focus Groups
Food
Food Supply
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Population Groups
Young Adult
Abstract
Aboriginal peoples are among the most food insecure groups in Canada, yet their perspectives and knowledge are often sidelined in mainstream food security debates. In order to create food security for all, Aboriginal perspectives must be included in food security research and discourse. This project demonstrates a process in which Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal partners engaged in a culturally appropriate and respectful collaboration, assessing the challenges and barriers to traditional foods access in the urban environment of Vancouver, BC, Canada. The findings highlight local, national, and international actions required to increase access to traditional foods as a means of achieving food security for all people. The paper underscores the interconnectedness of local and global food security issues and highlights challenges as well as solutions with potential to improve food security of both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples alike.
Notes
Cites: Annu Rev Nutr. 2000;20:595-62610940347
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1996 Feb;96(2):155-628557942
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2009 Sep;12(9):1504-1119144239
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2004 Nov-Dec;95(6):465-915622799
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):46-5415776992
Cites: J Nutr. 1997 Nov;127(11):2179-869349845
PubMed ID
23346118 View in PubMed
Less detail

Phenotypic interactions between tree hosts and invasive forest pathogens in the light of globalization and climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287271
Source
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2016 Dec 05;371(1709)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-05-2016
Author
Jan Stenlid
Jonàs Oliva
Source
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2016 Dec 05;371(1709)
Date
Dec-05-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ascomycota - physiology
Climate change
Commerce
Forests
Host-Pathogen Interactions
Internationality
Plant Diseases - microbiology
Sweden
Trees - microbiology
Abstract
Invasive pathogens can cause considerable damage to forest ecosystems. Lack of coevolution is generally thought to enable invasive pathogens to bypass the defence and/or recognition systems in the host. Although mostly true, this argument fails to predict intermittent outcomes in space and time, underlining the need to include the roles of the environment and the phenotype in host-pathogen interactions when predicting disease impacts. We emphasize the need to consider host-tree imbalances from a phenotypic perspective, considering the lack of coevolutionary and evolutionary history with the pathogen and the environment, respectively. We describe how phenotypic plasticity and plastic responses to environmental shifts may become maladaptive when hosts are faced with novel pathogens. The lack of host-pathogen and environmental coevolution are aligned with two global processes currently driving forest damage: globalization and climate change, respectively. We suggest that globalization and climate change act synergistically, increasing the chances of both genotypic and phenotypic imbalances. Short moves on the same continent are more likely to be in balance than if the move is from another part of the world. We use Gremmeniella abietina outbreaks in Sweden to exemplify how host-pathogen phenotypic interactions can help to predict the impacts of specific invasive and emergent diseases.This article is part of the themed issue 'Tackling emerging fungal threats to animal health, food security and ecosystem resilience'.
Notes
Cites: Mol Plant Pathol. 2008 Nov;9(6):729-4019019002
Cites: Mol Plant Microbe Interact. 2009 Mar;22(3):362-819245330
Cites: Nature. 2015 Apr 23;520(7548):542-425903634
Cites: Tree Physiol. 2000 Nov;20(17):1191-119712651495
Cites: Heredity (Edinb). 2013 Apr;110(4):372-923211794
Cites: Sci Rep. 2016 Feb 22;6:2189526900083
Cites: PLoS One. 2016 Mar 30;11(3):e015253727028433
Cites: Science. 2009 May 8;324(5928):755-619423818
Cites: Trends Ecol Evol. 2011 Oct;26(10):523-3221802765
Cites: New Phytol. 2014 Sep;203(4):1028-3524824859
Cites: Tree Physiol. 2014 Mar;34(3):215-724619516
Cites: Evol Appl. 2014 Jan;7(1):123-3924454552
Cites: New Phytol. 2006;169(3):561-7016411958
Cites: Science. 2013 Nov 15;342(6160):123577324233727
Cites: Plant Signal Behav. 2012 Jul;7(7):767-7022751307
Cites: New Phytol. 2007;176(4):749-6317997761
Cites: Tree Physiol. 2012 Jun;32(6):764-7522302370
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2003 Jul 22;270(1523):1433-4012965006
Cites: PLoS Genet. 2012;8(11):e100308823209441
Cites: Tree Physiol. 2015 Mar;35(3):229-4225724949
Cites: Curr Opin Plant Biol. 2005 Aug;8(4):441-915922652
Cites: Tree Physiol. 2012 Apr;32(4):478-8922499595
Cites: Am Nat. 2006 Jul;168(1):E15-3716874611
Cites: Nature. 2012 Apr 11;484(7393):186-9422498624
Cites: Plant Cell Environ. 2016 Jan;39(1):38-4926081870
Cites: Nature. 2010 Aug 12;466(7308):824-520703294
Cites: Trends Ecol Evol. 2013 Jan;28(1):58-6622889499
Cites: New Phytol. 2008 Jul;179(2):505-1419086294
Cites: J Ecol. 2011 Jan;99(1):96-11221243068
Cites: Ecol Appl. 2008 Jul;18(5):1171-8118686579
Cites: Phytopathology. 2015 Sep;105(9):1191-725822186
Cites: Tree Physiol. 2003 Apr;23(6):397-40412642241
Cites: PLoS One. 2014 Dec 11;9(12):e11497125500822
Cites: PLoS One. 2010 Dec 06;5(12):e1423421151911
Cites: Science. 2015 Aug 21;349(6250):814-826293952
Cites: New Phytol. 2013 Jan;197(1):238-5023057437
Cites: Science. 2002 Jul 26;297(5581):537-4112142520
Cites: Genetics. 2013 Dec;195(4):1353-7224121773
Cites: Trends Ecol Evol. 2007 Sep;22(9):472-8017509727
Cites: Heredity (Edinb). 2015 Oct;115(4):276-8425293873
Cites: Trends Ecol Evol. 2004 Aug;19(8):446-5216701303
PubMed ID
28080981 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cooking in prison--from crook to cook.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267555
Source
Int J Prison Health. 2014;10(4):228-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Linda Kjaer Minke
Source
Int J Prison Health. 2014;10(4):228-38
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Cooking - methods
Denmark
Diet
Humans
Prisoners - psychology
Prisons - organization & administration
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyse the principle and practice of self-catering system in a Danish prison. Self-catering is a reflection of the Danish correctional principle of normalisation between prison and community life. Unlike some other jurisdiction, issues of control in meal preparation are subordinate to prisoners' right to choose and prepare their own food.
Findings are derived from 13 months of ethnographic fieldwork in a Danish maximum security prison for men, including in-depth interviews with 68 prisoners.
Overall findings showed that thinking about meals and their preparation is time consuming for prisoners who tend to be positive about the system making connections with their ability to exercise responsibility for making healthily choices. The research concludes that prisoners' possibility for developing cooking competences during incarceration could support prisoners change in social identity from crook to cook.
Food is a fundamental need and the ability to choose what to eat and to prepare one's own food should be a right for all people, including prisoners. This research shows that Danish prisoners are very pleased about the system of self-catering. Most prisoners are concerned about preparing their own meals according to their taste and cultural diversity. If the prison offers the opportunity to train as a chef during imprisonment it could support the prisoner's change in social identity from crook to cook on the outside.
PubMed ID
25764291 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Healthc Prot Manage. 2002;18(2):99-107
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Dan Krefting
Author Affiliation
Protection Services, Children's & Women's Health Center of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.
Source
J Healthc Prot Manage. 2002;18(2):99-107
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Awareness
British Columbia
Child
Data Collection
Female
Food Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Humans
Inservice Training - organization & administration
Management Audit
Maternal-Child Health Centers
Security Measures - organization & administration
Theft - prevention & control
Abstract
Following a recent increase in reported theft, embezzlement, and pilferage in the storage and production areas of the hospital's Nutrition & Food Services, department, the protective service department, in cooperation with the NFS director, conducted a survey of overall security systems and staff awareness as well as specific vulnerabilities to theft which required correction.
PubMed ID
12371252 View in PubMed
Less detail

Food policy in the Canadian North: Is there a role for country food markets?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269705
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2016 Jan 25;152:35-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-25-2016
Received in revised form 11 January 2016 Accepted 22 January 2016 Available online 25 January 2016 Keywords: Nunavut Canada Greenland Food policy Food security Food systems Inuit Country food markets * Corresponding author. E-mail address: james.ford@mcgill.ca (J.D. Ford). http://dx.doi.org/10.1016
  1 document  
Author
James D Ford
Joanna Petrasek Macdonald
Catherine Huet
Sara Statham
Allison MacRury
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2016 Jan 25;152:35-40
Date
Jan-25-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
188882
Abstract
Food insecurity is widely reported to be at a crisis level in the Inuit territory of Nunavut, Canada. Various policies, programs, and initiatives have been proposed to tackle the problem, with increasing interest in developing a system of country food markets (CFMs) similar to Greenland. We examine if CFMs offer a feasible, sustainable, and effective model for strengthening food systems in Nunavut, examining the model of Greenland and drawing on semi-structured interviews with key informants (n = 45). The Greenland experience indicates that CFMs can provide access to sufficient, safe, and nutritious food on a regular basis, and can diversify locally available foods. These benefits are transferable to Nunavut, although knowledge gaps, regulatory and institutional conditions, and concerns over how CFMs might affect the cultural basis of food systems, underlies apprehension over their development in the territory. We conclude that Nunavut is not currently in the position to develop CFMs, but the role of such markets in potentially strengthening food systems should not be discounted. Future development would need to solicit community input on CFMs, resolve regulatory issues around wildlife management and harvesting, and study how future risks would affect sustainability and effectiveness.
PubMed ID
26829007 View in PubMed
Documents

Food-policy-in-the-Canadian-North.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

Introducing Food Fraud including translation and interpretation to Russian, Korean, and Chinese languages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270201
Source
Food Chem. 2015 Dec 15;189:102-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2015
Author
John Spink
Douglas C Moyer
Hyeonho Park
Yongning Wu
Victor Fersht
Bing Shao
Miao Hong
Seung Yeop Paek
Dmitry Edelev
Source
Food Chem. 2015 Dec 15;189:102-7
Date
Dec-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
China
Food Contamination - prevention & control
Food Quality
Food Safety
Fraud - prevention & control
Language
Public Health
Republic of Korea
Russia
Abstract
This paper introduces the topic of Food Fraud with translations to Russian, Korean, and Chinese. The concepts provide a system-wide focus leading to prevention. The goal is not to detect Food Fraud but to adjust entire food supply chains to reduce fraud opportunities. Food Fraud is a recently defined area of Food Protection between Food Safety (such as Salmonella or pesticide residue), and Food Defense (malicious intent to harm such as terrorism). Food Fraud is intentional with no intent to harm but only for economic gain. As with improving Food Safety and Food Defense, preventing Food Fraud is good for society and the economy. Society benefits through fewer public health threats from unauthorized acts. Society also benefits from increased consumer satisfaction and harmony. Food Security is increased through the production of more, higher-value products for consumers, commerce, and exporting. Food Fraud can reduce economic output because sickened citizens cannot work and it also reduces consumer confidence leading to less commerce.
PubMed ID
26190607 View in PubMed
Less detail

Food insecurity, vitamin D insufficiency and respiratory infections among Inuit children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270339
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:29954
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Sze Man Tse
Hope Weiler
Tom Kovesi
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:29954
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Food insecurity, vitamin D deficiency and lower respiratory tract infections are highly prevalent conditions among Inuit children. However, the relationship between these conditions has not been examined in this population.
The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between food insecurity and severe respiratory infections before age 2 years and health centre visits for a respiratory problem in the past year. We also explored the relationship between serum vitamin D status and respiratory outcomes in this population.
We included children aged 3-5 years who participated in a cross-sectional survey of the health of preschool Inuit children in Nunavut, Canada, from 2007 to 2008 (n=388). Parental reports of severe respiratory infections in the first 2 years of life and health care visits in the past 12 months were assessed through a questionnaire. Child and adult food security were assessed separately and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels were measured in a subgroup of participants (n=279). Multivariate logistic regression was performed to assess the association between food security, vitamin D and each of the 2 respiratory outcomes.
Child and adult food insecurity measures were not significantly associated with adverse respiratory outcomes. Household crowding [odds ratio (OR)=1.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-2.09, p=0.01 for the child food security model] and higher birth weight (OR=1.21, 95% CI: 1.02-1.43, p=0.03) were associated with reported severe chest infections before age 2 years while increasing age was associated with decreased odds of reported health care visits for a respiratory problem (OR=0.66, 95% CI: 0.48-0.91, p=0.02). Neither vitamin D insufficiency nor deficiency was associated with these respiratory outcomes.
Using a large cross-sectional survey of Inuit children, we found that household crowding, but not food security or vitamin D levels, was associated with adverse respiratory outcomes. Further studies are warranted to examine the impact of decreasing household crowding on the respiratory health of these children.
Notes
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 2012 Jan;101(1):38-4221767310
Cites: Exp Diabetes Res. 2011;2011:21859822144985
Cites: J Nutr. 2012 Mar;142(3):541-722323760
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2012 Jul;130(1):53-60.e422608570
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(7):e4069222866178
Cites: Pediatrics. 2012 Sep;130(3):429-3622869837
Cites: Pediatrics. 2012 Sep;130(3):e561-722908115
Cites: Nutr Rev. 2012 Sep;70(9):548-5222946854
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71. doi: 10.3402/ijch.v71i0.1843522973567
Cites: J Acad Nutr Diet. 2012 Dec;112(12):1949-5823174682
Cites: Ann Nutr Metab. 2012;61 Suppl 1:39-4523343946
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2013 Aug;57(3):392-723677871
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72. doi: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.2160623971011
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72. doi: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.2122523986902
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(11):e7898724223871
Cites: J Nutr. 2013 Dec;143(12):2015-2124089419
Cites: Eur J Pediatr. 2014 Jan;173(1):25-3224146165
Cites: Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2014 Feb;18(2):198-20424429313
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014;73:2269124455492
Cites: Pediatr Pulmonol. 2014 Feb;49(2):189-20023401398
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Apr;68(4):363-924385548
Cites: J Paediatr Child Health. 2014 Jul;50(7):512-824943250
Cites: Nutr J. 2013;12:8123758744
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2015 Mar;105(3):e122-3225602890
Cites: Transl Res. 2015 Jun;165(6):667-7625234352
Cites: Health Rep. 2015 Nov;26(11):21-726583694
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Jun 26;164(13):1847-5011450280
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2001 Aug;60(3):375-911590877
Cites: Pediatrics. 2002 Feb;109(2):210-611826197
Cites: Pediatrics. 2002 Oct;110(4):e4112359814
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1978 Dec;118(6 Pt 2):1-120742764
Cites: Trop Med Int Health. 1998 Aug;3(8):678-869735938
Cites: Pediatrics. 2006 Sep;118(3):e859-6816950971
Cites: Matern Child Health J. 2006 Mar;10(2):177-8516328705
Cites: J Nutr. 2006 Apr;136(4):1073-616549481
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2006 Sep-Oct;97(5):362-817120873
Cites: JAMA. 2007 Apr 25;297(16):1784-9217456820
Cites: CMAJ. 2007 Jul 17;177(2):155-6017638953
Cites: Pediatrics. 2008 Jan;121(1):65-7218166558
Cites: J Nutr. 2008 Mar;138(3):604-1218287374
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009 Feb;63(2):297-917971825
Cites: Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2009 May;12(3):310-619333121
Cites: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2009 Aug;28(8):697-70119461554
Cites: J Health Econ. 2009 Sep;28(5):971-8319631399
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Nov;90(5):1358-7119776137
Cites: CMAJ. 2010 Feb 23;182(3):243-820100848
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 May;91(5):1255-6020219962
Cites: J Nutr. 2010 Oct;140(10):1839-4520702752
Cites: Pediatrics. 2011 Jan;127(1):35-4121187309
Cites: Pediatrics. 2011 Jan;127(1):e180-721187313
Cites: J Asthma. 2011 Apr;48(3):241-721391880
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2011 Jun;22(6):1745-5320848081
Cites: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2011 Jun;30(6):480-521593705
PubMed ID
26895394 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation of a collective kitchens program: using the Population Health Promotion Model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179482
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2004;65(2):72-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Tara J Fano
Sheila M Tyminski
Mary A T Flynn
Author Affiliation
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Nutrition and Active Living, Calgary Health Region, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2004;65(2):72-80
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Food Services - organization & administration - utilization
Health Promotion - organization & administration - utilization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Social Facilitation
Social Support
Abstract
To evaluate the impact of the Calgary Health Region Collective Kitchen Program on various Population Health Promotion Model health determinants, data were collected through mail-in questionnaires that examined the members' (n=331) and coordinators' (n=58) perspectives of the program. Seventy-nine members (24%) and 26 coordinators (45%) were included in the study. Three incomplete questionnaires (from prenatal program members) were discarded. Sixty-one percent of members who reported income level and family size (n=61) had incomes below the low-income cut-off. Fifty-eight members (73%) reported improvements in their lives because of the program. Sixty-four members (81%) perceived they learned to feed their families healthier foods. The members reported their fruit and vegetable consumption before and since joining a collective kitchen, and the proportion of those consuming at least five fruit and vegetable servings a day rose from 29% to 47%. The most common reasons for joining this program concerned social interactions and support. Over 90% of the coordinators perceived that they were competent to coordinate a kitchen. The results indicate that the collective kitchens program addresses several health determinants, and may increase members' capacity to attain food security and to achieve improved nutritional health.
PubMed ID
15217525 View in PubMed
Less detail

Back to the future: using traditional food and knowledge to promote a healthy future among Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295969
Source
In: Indigenous People's Food Systems by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment. Chapter 1. p. 9-22.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2009
-rule government in 1993 illustrate the rapid changes occurring in Northern Canada and the adaptive nature of Inuit. General description of the food system Dietary surveys have found that food security is a primary concern throughout Northern Canada (Lawn and Harvey, 2001; Lawn and Langer, 1994) and
  1 document  
Author
Egeland, Grace M.
Charbonneau-Roberts, Guylaine
Kuluguqtuq, Johnny
Kilabuk, Jonah
Okalik, Looee
Soueida, Rula
Kuhnlein, Harriet V.
Source
In: Indigenous People's Food Systems by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment. Chapter 1. p. 9-22.
Date
2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
704305
Keywords
Inuit
Traditional foods
Pangnirtung, Nunavut
Traditional knowledge
Abstract
Evidence of nutrition and epidemiologic transition in Inuit communities prompted a case study where traditional knowledge and traditional food is used as a basis for a community health-promotion effort to help improve overall diet quality including healthy market food choices. The current Inuit diet in the Baffin community involves a mix of traditional and market food. Caribou was the most commonly consumed traditional food item. Overall, 41 percent of energy was obtained from traditional food among 62 percent of respondents reporting traditional food consumption within the past 24 hours in the community health screening. Simultaneously, 58 percent of adults reported consuming an average of two cans of carbonated beverages in the past day, amounting to 10 percent of energy intake. Furthermore, the percent of n-3 fatty acids in plasma as a marker of traditional food consumption was inversely related to the percent of transfat in plasma as a marker of unhealthy market food choices (Spearman rho = -.44, p-value =.01). The data illustrate that traditional food is replaced by unhealthy market food choices.
A high prevalence of metabolic syndrome was observed (34 percent of 47 non-diabetic participants) using the new International Diabetes Federation criteria. Further, food insecurity was commonly reported, with 48 percent indicating that it was true or sometimes true that they “eat less or skip a meal because there isn’t enough money to buy food”; and 28 percent indicating “yes” to “in the last month there was not enough to eat in your house”. Fortunately, nearly all respondents (82 percent) indicated that friends and relatives shared their traditional food. The data illustrate that costs of market food items need to be considered in health promotion campaigns, and that traditional food promotion and sharing networks can help mitigate the rapid acculturation and transitions being observed. Finally, using traditional knowledge of indigenous food systems may be an effective way to promote healthy market food choices in an effort to prevent the adverse effects of acculturation.
Documents
Less detail

Background Paper: Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295970
Source
Arctic Transform & Arctic Centre. 33 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
4 September 2008
resources may mean for many people impoverishment and may threaten their food security.72 Northern economies are also expected to change due to northward advancement of agriculture.73 Increased agriculture and fisheries productivity may however provide alternative subsistence opportunities for some
  1 document  
Author
Koivurova, Timo
Tervo, Henna
Stepien, Adam
Author Affiliation
Arctic Centre
Source
Arctic Transform & Arctic Centre. 33 p.
Date
4 September 2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
408147
Keywords
Traditional harvesting
Governance
Empowerment
Economy
Documents
Less detail

Factors associated with the intake of traditional foods in the Eeyou Istchee (Cree) of northern Quebec include age, speaking the Cree language and food sovereignty indicators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299315
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1536251
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Willows Noreen
Louise Johnson-Down
Moubarac Jean-Claude
Michel Lucas
Elizabeth Robinson
Malek Batal
Author Affiliation
a Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science , University of Alberta , Edmonton , AB , Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1536251
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Arctic Regions
Blood glucose
Blood pressure
Body Weights and Measures
Diet - ethnology
Female
Food Supply - methods
Health Behavior
Humans
Indians, North American
Language
Lipids - blood
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Public Assistance - statistics & numerical data
Quebec
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The Eeyouch are a First Nations (Cree) population that live above 49.6°N latitude in Eeyou Istchee in northern Quebec. Eeyouch rely on traditional foods (TF) hunted, fished or gathered from the land. The overarching aim of this study was to achieve an understanding of the factors associated with TF intake among Eeyouch. Data were from 465 women and 330 men who participated in the Nituuchischaayihtitaau Aschii Multi-Community Environment-and-Health (E&H) study. The relationship between TF consumption and dietary, health, sociodemographic and food sovereignty (i.e. being a hunter or receiving Income Security to hunt, trap or fish) variables was examined using linear and logistic regression. Analyses were stratified by sex because of the male/female discrepancy in being a hunter. Among respondents, almost all (99.7%) consumed TF, 51% were hunters and 10% received Income Security. Higher intake of TF was associated with lower consumption of less nutritious ultra-processed products (UPP). In women, TF intake increased with age, hunting and receiving Income Security, but decreased with high school education. In men, TF intake increased with age and speaking only Cree at home. The findings suggest that increased food sovereignty would result in improved diet quality among Eeyouch through increased TF intake and decreased UPP intake.
PubMed ID
30360700 View in PubMed
Less detail

Design of a human biomonitoring community-based project in the Northwest Territories Mackenzie Valley, Canada, to investigate the links between nutrition, contaminants and country foods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299330
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1510714
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Mylene Ratelle
Matthew Laird
Shannon Majowicz
Kelly Skinner
Heidi Swanson
Brian Laird
Author Affiliation
a School of Public Health and Health Systems , University of Waterloo , Waterloo , Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1510714
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Communication
Community Participation - methods
Cooperative Behavior
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Food contamination - analysis
Food Supply - standards
Humans
Indians, North American
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Abstract
Community-based projects place emphasis on a collaborative approach and facilitate research among Indigenous populations regarding local issues and challenges, such as traditional foods consumption, climate change and health safety. Country foods (locally harvested fish, game birds, land animals and plants), which contribute to improved food security, can also be a primary route of contaminant exposure among populations in remote regions. A community-based project was launched in the Dehcho and Sahtù regions of the Northwest Territories (Canada) to: 1) assess contaminants exposure and nutrition status; 2) investigate the role of country food on nutrient and contaminant levels and 3) understand the determinants of message perception on this issue. Consultation with community members, leadership, local partners and researchers was essential to refine the design of the project and implement it in a culturally relevant way. This article details the design of a community-based biomonitoring study that investigates country food use, contaminant exposure and nutritional status in Canadian subarctic First Nations in the Dehcho and Sahtù regions. Results will support environmental health policies in the future for these communities. The project was designed to explore the risks and benefits of country foods and to inform the development of public health strategies.
PubMed ID
30157724 View in PubMed
Less detail

Commentary - The Climate Change and Health Adaptation Program: Indigenous Climate Leaders' Championing Adaptation Effort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299531
Source
Health Promot Chronic Dis Prev Can. 2019 Apr; 39(4):127-130
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Gabrielle Richards
Jim Frehs
Erin Myers
Marilyn Van Bibber
Author Affiliation
Climate Change and Health Adaptation Program (CCHAP), Indigenous Service Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Promot Chronic Dis Prev Can. 2019 Apr; 39(4):127-130
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The Climate Change and Health Adaptation Program (CCHAP) is a program within the First Nations Inuit Health Branch of Indigenous Services Canada (which was previously under the responsibility of Health Canada). The CCHAP supports Inuit and First Nation communities in mitigating and adapting to the health impacts of climate change. The impacts of climate change on Indigenous health can be observed in multiple areas including, but not limited to, food security, cultural medicines, mental health and landbased practices. This program seeks to address the needs of climate change and health in First Nation and Inuit communities to support resiliency and adaptation to a changing climate both now and in the future through its emphasis on youth and capacity building. The commentary is based on the Program's eleven years of experience working with and for Indigenous communities and provides an overview of the CCHAP model and the work it has and continues to support. This paper demonstrates three examples of community-based projects to mitigate and adapt to the health impacts of climate change to demonstrate climate change resiliency within Indigenous communities.
Le Programme sur le changement climatique et l’adaptation du secteur de la santé (PCCASS) est un programme qui relève de la Direction générale de la santé des Premières nations et des Inuits de Services aux Autochtones Canada (qui relevait auparavant de Santé Canada). Le PCCASS aide les collectivités des Premières Nations et des Inuits à réduire l’impact des changements climatiques sur la santé et à s’adapter à ces derniers. Les conséquences des changements climatiques sur la santé des Autochtones se font sentir dans plusieurs secteurs, notamment la sécurité alimentaire, les remèdes traditionnels, la santé mentale et les pratiques reposant sur l’utilisation des terres. Le programme vise à répondre aux besoins des collectivités des Premières Nations et des Inuits engendrés par les changements climatiques et les problèmes de santé qui en découlent, afin de favoriser la résilience et l’adaptation face aux changements climatiques actuels et à venir, et ce, en mettant au premier plan les jeunes et le renforcement des compétences. Cet article, qui se fonde sur les onze années d’expérience du PCCASS avec les collectivités autochtones, fournit un aperçu de son modèle et des travaux qu’il a soutenus et qu’il continue de soutenir. On y présente trois exemples de projets communautaires pour réduire les conséquences des changements climatiques sur la santé et s’y adapter, projets qui témoignent de la résilience des collectivités autochtones face aux changements climatiques.
The Climate Change and Health Adaptation Program (CCHAP) for First Nations South of 60N directly supports First Nations communities to develop and undertake adaptation and mitigation projects to build upon their needs within a changing climate. This commentary outlines the CCHAP’s work and history, and highlights three cases, in Selkirk First Nation, Arviat and The Mi’kmaw Climate Action, which demonstrate the work these communities have undertaken with support from the Program.
Le Programme sur le changement climatique et l’adaptation du secteur de la santé (PCCASS) pour les Premières Nations au nord du 60e parallèle apporte un soutien direct aux communautés des Premières Nations dans l’élaboration et la mise en oeuvre de projets d’adaptation et d’atténuation pour subvenir à leurs besoins dans le cadre d’un climat en mutation. Ce commentaire fournit un aperçu du travail et de l’historique du PCCASS et présente trois projets, sur le territoire de la Première Nation de Selkirk, à Arviat et sur le territoire Mi’kmaq, qui illustrent le travail entrepris par ces communautés avec le soutien du Programme.
PubMed ID
31021063 View in PubMed
Less detail

Opportunities and challenges in Arctic System Synthesis: a consensus report from the Arctic Research Community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299969
Source
New York, NY. City University of New York. 82 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
July 2018
extreme reduction in summer ice extent, in turn affecting phytoplank- ton blooms, which can then subsequently affect consumers up the food chain. Extreme events in the Arctic system can originate in the region itself—or find their origins well outside. For example, atmospheric rivers giving rise to
  1 document  
Author
Vorosmarty, C.
Rawlins, M.
Hinzman, L.
Francis, J.
Serreze, M.
Liljedahl, A.
McDonald, K.
Piasecki, M.
Rich, R.
Source
New York, NY. City University of New York. 82 p.
Date
July 2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
26635611
Abstract
This report is a product of a set of Community Workshops for Synthesis Studies of the Pan-Arctic/Earth System that took place in 2016 and 2017. The workshops were funded by the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Arctic System Science Program and explored the current state of affairs with respect to Arctic systems science and identified future research opportunities and investments. Earlier in 2018, a draft of the report was made available for comment from the Arctic research community, and revisions were made in response to comments received. The final report was submitted to NSF and other Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee (IARPC) agencies.
Documents

arctic_system_synthesis.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

Temporal trends, lake-to-lake variation, and climate effects on Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) mercury concentrations from six High Arctic lakes in Nunavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299998
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 May 02; 678:801-812
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-02-2019
Author
Karista E Hudelson
Derek C G Muir
Paul E Drevnick
Günter Köck
Deborah Iqaluk
Xiaowa Wang
Jane L Kirk
Benjamin D Barst
Alice Grgicak-Mannion
Rebecca Shearon
Aaron T Fisk
Author Affiliation
Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON N9B 3P4, Canada; Centre Eau Terre Environnement, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université du Québec, Québec, QC G1K 9A9, Canada. Electronic address: karistaeh@gmail.com.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 May 02; 678:801-812
Date
May-02-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Climate warming and mercury (Hg) are concurrently influencing Arctic ecosystems, altering their functioning and threatening food security. Non-anadromous Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) in small lakes were used to biomonitor these two anthropogenic stressors, because this iconic Arctic species is a long-lived top predator in relatively simple food webs, and yet population characteristics vary greatly, reflecting differences between lake systems. Mercury concentrations in six landlocked Arctic char populations on Cornwallis Island, Nunavut have been monitored as early as 1989, providing a novel dataset to examine differences in muscle [Hg] among char populations, temporal trends, and the relationship between climate patterns and Arctic char [Hg]. We found significant lake-to-lake differences in length-adjusted Arctic char muscle [Hg], which varied by up to 9-fold. Arctic char muscle [Hg] was significantly correlated to dissolved and particulate organic carbon concentrations in water; neither watershed area or vegetation cover explained differences. Three lakes exhibited significant temporal declines in length-adjusted [Hg] in Arctic char; the other three lakes had no significant trends. Though precipitation, temperature, wind speed, and sea ice duration were tested, no single climate variable was significantly correlated to length-adjusted [Hg] across populations. However, Arctic char Hg in Resolute Lake exhibited a significant correlation with sea ice duration, which is likely closely linked to lake ice duration, and which may impact Hg processing in lakes. Additionally, Arctic char [Hg] in Amituk Lake was significantly correlated to snow fall, which may be linked to Hg deposition. The lack of consistent temporal trends in neighboring char populations indicates that currently, within lake processes are the strongest drivers of [Hg] in char in the study lakes and potentially in other Arctic lakes, and that the influence of climate change will likely vary from lake to lake.
PubMed ID
31085496 View in PubMed
Less detail

Food insecurity among Latin American recent immigrants in Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141183
Source
J Immigr Minor Health. 2011 Oct;13(5):929-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Mandana Vahabi
Cynthia Damba
Cecilia Rocha
Elizabeth Cristina Montoya
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Community Services-Daphne Cockwell, School of Nursing, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, M5B 2K3, Canada. mvahabi@ryerson.ca
Source
J Immigr Minor Health. 2011 Oct;13(5):929-39
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Food Supply
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Latin America - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Food security is an important social determinant of health. The 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.2 reported high prevalence of food insecurity among low income households and those formed by recent immigrants. Exploration of the extent and correlates of food insecurity among recent Latin Americans (LA) immigrants is essential considering they encompasses an increasing number of young immigrants, many of whom, despite relatively high education, are unemployed or have low wage positions. This study examines the extent of food insecurity and its correlates among recent Latin American (LA) immigrants in Toronto. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a convenience sample of 70 adult LA recent immigrants. Participants were recruited from selected community health centres across Toronto using snow ball sampling. Data were collected using questionnaires in face-to-face interviews with primary household care givers. A considerably high rate of food insecurity (56%) was found among participants. Household food insecurity was highly related to: being on social assistance; limited proficiency in English; and the use of foodbanks. Our findings indicate that the primary correlate of a household's food security status is income, which suggests the potential for strategies to improve the financial power of new immigrants to purchase sufficient, nutritious, and culturally acceptable food. Enhancing the employability of new immigrants, reforming the income structure for working adults beyond social assistance, and providing more subsidized English language and housing programs may be effective.
PubMed ID
20803253 View in PubMed
Less detail

Food insecurity among Inuit women exacerbated by socioeconomic stresses and climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141282
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 May-Jun;101(3):196-201
Publication Type
Article
Author
Maude C Beaumier
James D Ford
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, McGill University, Room 308C Burnside Hall, 805 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal, QC H3A 2K6.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 May-Jun;101(3):196-201
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Climate change
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Financing, Personal
Focus Groups
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hunger
Interviews as Topic
Inuits - psychology
Middle Aged
Nunavut - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's health
Abstract
To identify and characterize the determinants of food insecurity among Inuit women.
A community-based study in Igloolik, Nunavut, using semi-structured interviews (n = 36) and focus groups (n = 5) with Inuit women, and key informants interviews with health professionals (n = 13).
There is a high prevalence of food insecurity among Inuit females in Igloolik, with women in the study reporting skipping meals and reducing food intake on a regular basis. Food insecurity is largely transitory in nature and influenced by food affordability and budgeting; food knowledge; education and preferences; food quality and availability; absence of a full-time hunter in the household; cost of harvesting; poverty; and addiction. These determinants are operating in the context of changing livelihoods and climate-related stresses.
Inuit women's food insecurity in Igloolik is the outcome of multiple determinants operating at different spatial-temporal scales. Climate change and external socio-economic stresses are exacerbating difficulties in obtaining sufficient food. Coping strategies currently utilized to manage food insecurity are largely reactive and short-term in nature, and could increase food system vulnerability to future stresses. Intervention by local, territorial and federal governments is required to implement, coordinate and monitor strategies to enhance women's food security, strengthen the food system, and reduce vulnerability to future stressors.
PubMed ID
20737808 View in PubMed
Less detail

A health and nutritional evaluation of changes in agriculture in the past quarter century in British Columbia: implications for food security.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142054
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2010 Jun;7(6):2653-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Aleck Ostry
Kathryn Morrison
Author Affiliation
Social Sciences, Department of Geography, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada. ostry@uvic.ca
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2010 Jun;7(6):2653-65
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture - history - statistics & numerical data
Animals
British Columbia
Cattle
Cereals
Dietary Fats
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Health Policy - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Nutritional Status
Poultry
Vegetables
Abstract
This paper describes change in local food production in British Columbia with a focus on changes in the production of foods recommended for increased consumption by nutritionists. We determine, in one of the most productive agricultural provinces in Canada, whether secular trends in agricultural land use and food production, over the past quarter century, have resulted in increased production of foods recommended by nutritionists as more healthy and nutritious. In particular we are concerned with estimating the extent to which changes in agriculture and food production are congruent with official nutrition advice to avoid less healthy foods and to consume more vegetables, fruit, and whole grains. We demonstrate, using regularly collected agricultural census data, in spite of nutritionists' advocacy for improved access to locally produced fruits, vegetables, and grains, since 1986, that BC agriculture is moving firmly in the opposite direction with greater production of animal fats, and hay and grain for animal feed and much reduced production of traditional fruits, vegetables, and grains designed mainly for human consumption. While nutritionists advise us to increase consumption especially of whole grains, vegetables and fruit, local production capacity of these foods in BC has decreased markedly between 1986 and 2006. In conclusion, there is a structural disconnect between the kinds of foods produced in BC and the nutritional needs of the population.
Notes
Cites: Lipids. 2003 Feb;38(2):103-812733740
Cites: J Long Term Eff Med Implants. 2005;15(1):15-3215715513
Cites: J Health Soc Policy. 2005;20(2):1-1416048879
Cites: Health Place. 2006 Dec;12(4):656-6416253540
Cites: Avian Dis. 2007 Mar;51(1 Suppl):309-1217494572
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 2010 Mar-Apr;29(3):454-6220194987
Cites: Public Health. 2007 Jul;121(7):492-617399752
Cites: Health Place. 2009 Jun;15(2):491-519022700
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Apr 15;169(8):927-3619270048
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2009 Nov;69(10):1493-50019766372
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 2010 Mar-Apr;29(3):411-820194981
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2007 Jul;65(1):20-3117467130
PubMed ID
20644694 View in PubMed
Less detail

Climate change and the Inuit: bringing an effective human rights claim to the United Nations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295205
Source
Indiana International and Comparative Law Review. 2014; 24(2):515-546.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
sources of food are dropping as well.5 With the * Andrew Emhardt is a 2014 graduate from Robert H. McKinney School of Law and IUPUI School of Public and Environmental Affairs with a dual
  1 document  
Author
Emhardt, Andrew D.
Source
Indiana International and Comparative Law Review. 2014; 24(2):515-546.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
File Size
250720
Keywords
Inuit
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Human Rights
United Nations
Documents
Less detail

585 records – page 1 of 30.