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Rebuilding northern foodsheds, sustainable food systems, community well-being, and food security.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107889
Source
Pages 87-90 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):87-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
FEATURED PRESENTATIONS Rebuilding northern foodsheds, sustainable food systems, community well-being, and food security S. Craig Gerlach 1 * and Philip A. Loring2 1 Center for Cross-Cultural Studies, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, USA; 2Alaska Center for Climate Assessment
  1 document  
Author
S Craig Gerlach
Philip A Loring
Author Affiliation
Center for Cross-Cultural Studies, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99712, USA. scgerlach@alaska.edu
Source
Pages 87-90 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):87-90
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Culture
Diet - ethnology
Environment
Food Supply - methods
Humans
Rural Population
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Multiple climatic, environmental and socio-economic pressures have accumulated to the point where they interfere with the ability of remote rural Alaska Native communities to achieve food security with locally harvestable food resources. The harvest of wild foods has been the historical norm, but most Alaska Native villages are transitioning to a cash economy, with increasing reliance on industrially produced, store-bought foods, and with less reliable access to and reliance on wild, country foods. While commercially available market foods provide one measure of food security, the availability and quality of market foods are subject to the vagaries and vulnerabilities of the global food system; access is dependent on one's ability to pay, is limited to what is available on the shelves of small rural stores, and, store-bought foods do not fulfill the important roles that traditional country foods play in rural communities and cultures. Country food access is also constrained by rising prices of fuel and equipment, a federal and state regulatory framework that sometimes hinders rather than helps rural subsistence users who need to access traditional food resources, a regulatory framework that is often not responsive to changes in climate, weather and seasonality, and a shifting knowledge base in younger generations about how to effectively harvest, process and store wild foods.
The general objective is to provide a framework for understanding the social, cultural, ecological and political dimensions of rural Alaska Native food security, and to provide information on the current trends in rural Alaska Native food systems.
This research is based on our long-term ethnographic, subsistence and food systems work in coastal and interior Alaska. This includes research about the land mammal harvest, the Yukon River and coastal fisheries, community and village gardens, small livestock production and red meat systems that are scaled appropriately to village size and capacity, and food-system intervention strategies designed to rebuild local and rural foodsheds and to restore individual and community health.
The contemporary cultural, economic and nutrition transition has severe consequences for the health of people and for the viability of rural communities, and in ways that are not well tracked by the conventional food security methodologies and frameworks. This article expands the discussion of food security and is premised on a holistic model that integrates the social, cultural, ecological, psychological and biomedical aspects of individual and community health.
We propose a new direction for food-system design that prioritizes the management of place-based food portfolios above the more conventional management of individual resources, one with a commitment to as much local and regional food production and/or harvest for local and regional consumption as is possible, and to community self-reliance and health for rural Alaska Natives.
Notes
Cites: J Nutr. 2004 Jun;134(6):1447-5315173410
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Jun 2;291(21):2545-615173144
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2006 Mar-Apr;38(2):114-2016595290
Cites: Conserv Biol. 2013 Feb;27(1):55-6322988912
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2006 Dec;9(8):1013-917125565
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Feb;66(1):62-7017451135
Cites: CMAJ. 2010 Feb 23;182(3):243-820100848
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2006 Jul;106(7):1055-6316815122
PubMed ID
23967414 View in PubMed
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Household food security and breast-feeding duration among Canadian Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290128
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Jan; 20(1):64-71
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Kathryn E McIsaac
David C Stock
Wendy Lou
Author Affiliation
1Dalla Lana School of Public Health,University of Toronto,30 Bond Street,Toronto,Ontario,Canada,M5B 1W8.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Jan; 20(1):64-71
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding
Canada - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Supply
Health Surveys
Humans
Inuits
Lost to Follow-Up
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
There have been few studies investigating the association between food security and breast-feeding duration and none have been conducted among Canadian Inuit, a population disproportionately burdened with food insecurity. We evaluated the association between household food security and breast-feeding duration in Canadian Inuit children.
Data were obtained from the Nunavut Inuit Child Health Survey, a population-based cross-sectional survey.
The Canadian Territory of Nunavut in 2007 and 2008.
Caregivers of Inuit children aged 3-5 years. Participating children were randomly sampled from community medical centre lists.
Out of 215 children, 147 lived in food-insecure households (68·4 %). Using restricted mean survival time models, we estimated that children in food-secure households were breast-fed for 16·8 (95 % CI 12·5, 21·2) months and children in food-insecure households were breast-fed for 21·4 (95 % CI 17·9, 24·8) months. In models adjusting for social class, traditional knowledge and child health, household food security was not associated with breast-feeding duration (hazard ratio=0·82, 95 % CI 0·58, 1·14).
Our research does not support the hypothesis that children living in food-insecure households were breast-fed for a longer duration than children living in food-secure households. However, we found that more than 50 % of mothers in food-insecure households continued breast-feeding well beyond 1 year. Many mothers in food-secure households also continued to breast-feed beyond 1 year. Given the high prevalence of food insecurity in Inuit communities, we need to ensure infants and their caregivers are being adequately nourished to support growth and breast-feeding, respectively.
PubMed ID
27465413 View in PubMed
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Setting the table for food security: policy impacts in Nunavut.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295952
Source
Canadian Jounral of Native Studies XXIV(2):425-445.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
SETTING THE TABLE FOR FOOD SECURITY: POLICY IMPACTS IN NUNAVUT Heather Myers University of Northern British Columbia 3333 University Way Prince George, British Columbia Canada, V2N 4Z9 myers@unbc.ca Stephanie Powell 1031 Francois Crescent Prince George, British Columbia Canada, V2M 4H2
  1 document  
Author
Myers, Heather
Powell, Stephanie
Duhaime, Gerard
Source
Canadian Jounral of Native Studies XXIV(2):425-445.
Date
2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
1171717
Keywords
Nunavut
Food security
Traditional diet
Food Mail Program
Contaminants
Abstract
Food security comprises availability, accessibility, acceptability (by the population) and adequacy (for human health) of food. A number of federal and territorial legislative and policy initiatives impinge on food production or acquisition as well: the Federal Food Mail program and Firearms Act, and the Nunavut Social Assistance, Hunter Support, country food development and gas subsidy programs. The paper concludes with policy recommendations regarding meeting the four conditions of food security.
Documents

cjnsv24no2_pg425-445.pdf

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Food security: what the community wants. Learning through focus groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216722
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1994;55(4):188-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
D. Hargrove
J A Dewolfe
L. Thompson
Author Affiliation
Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox and Addington Health Unit, Ontario.
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1994;55(4):188-91
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Planning - methods
Educational Status
Focus Groups
Food Services - organization & administration
Humans
Income
Interviews as Topic
Mental health
Ontario
Public Health Administration
Self Concept
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
We used focus groups to learn the range of issues threatening food security of low income residents in our community. Five major themes emerged from the discussions: literacy, money, time, mental health and self-esteem, suggesting several approaches that could help ensure food security: 1) education, 2) sharing of resources, 3) coalition building, and 4) advocacy. Education programs have to be practical, allowing for demonstrations and hands-on learning while emphasizing skill building and problem solving. Incorporating a social aspect into learning may compensate for the social isolation and would capitalize on the impressive mutual support we witnessed. Strategies based on self-help and peer assistance may counteract low self-esteem and overcome suspicion of health professionals. A community-wide effort is needed to address the factors contributing to food insecurity. We envision the formation of a coalition of professionals, agencies, and low income people to develop a comprehensive strategy for achieving food security.
PubMed ID
10139320 View in PubMed
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Food security in Nunavut: a knowledge-sharing tool for policymakers

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284466
Source
Page 53 and page 334 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
FOOD SECURITY IN NUNAVUT, A KNOWLEDGE SHARING TOOL FOR POLICY-MAKERS M. Bzdell, G.K. Healey Oaujigiartiit Arctic Health Research Network Nunavut Background: Food security exists "when all people, at all times, have access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs
  1 document  
Author
M.Bzdell
G.K. Healey
Author Affiliation
Qaujigiartiit Arctic Health Research Network, Nunavut, Canada
Source
Page 53 and page 334 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Posters. Chapter 1. Public Health Perspectives.
Part of Abstracts: Posters. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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Household food security and breast-feeding duration among Canadian Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274770
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2016 Jul 28;:1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-28-2016
Author
Kathryn E McIsaac
David C Stock
Wendy Lou
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2016 Jul 28;:1-8
Date
Jul-28-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
There have been few studies investigating the association between food security and breast-feeding duration and none have been conducted among Canadian Inuit, a population disproportionately burdened with food insecurity. We evaluated the association between household food security and breast-feeding duration in Canadian Inuit children.
Data were obtained from the Nunavut Inuit Child Health Survey, a population-based cross-sectional survey.
The Canadian Territory of Nunavut in 2007 and 2008.
Caregivers of Inuit children aged 3-5 years. Participating children were randomly sampled from community medical centre lists.
Out of 215 children, 147 lived in food-insecure households (68·4 %). Using restricted mean survival time models, we estimated that children in food-secure households were breast-fed for 16·8 (95 % CI 12·5, 21·2) months and children in food-insecure households were breast-fed for 21·4 (95 % CI 17·9, 24·8) months. In models adjusting for social class, traditional knowledge and child health, household food security was not associated with breast-feeding duration (hazard ratio=0·82, 95 % CI 0·58, 1·14).
Our research does not support the hypothesis that children living in food-insecure households were breast-fed for a longer duration than children living in food-secure households. However, we found that more than 50 % of mothers in food-insecure households continued breast-feeding well beyond 1 year. Many mothers in food-secure households also continued to breast-feed beyond 1 year. Given the high prevalence of food insecurity in Inuit communities, we need to ensure infants and their caregivers are being adequately nourished to support growth and breast-feeding, respectively.
PubMed ID
27465413 View in PubMed
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Complexity of food preparation and food security status in low-income young women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131583
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2011;72(3):133-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Rachel Engler-Stringer
Bernadette Stringer
Ted Haines
Author Affiliation
University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2011;72(3):133-6
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cooking
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Supply
Humans
Income
Interviews as Topic
Poverty
Quebec
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
This study was conducted to explore whether preparing more complex meals was associated with higher food security status.
This mixed-methods, community-based study involved the use of semistructured interviews to examine the cooking practices of a group of young, low-income women in Montreal. Fifty participants aged 18 to 35 were recruited at 10 locations in five low-income neighbourhoods. Food security status was the main outcome measure and the main exposure variable, "complex food preparation," combined the preparation of three specific food types (soups, sauces, and baked goods) using basic ingredients.
Low-income women preparing a variety of meals using basic ingredients at least three times a week were more than twice as likely to be food secure as were women preparing more complex meals less frequently.
Women who prepared more complex meals more frequently had higher food security. Whether this means that preparing more complex foods results in greater food security remains unclear, as this was an exploratory study.
PubMed ID
21896250 View in PubMed
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Food Security Reference Group: Building the evidence to support decision-making at policy and community planning levels and improve food security for First Nations and Inuit

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96123
Source
Page 318-319 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
FOOD SECURITY REFERENCE GROUP, BUILDING THE EVIDENCE TO SUPPORT DECISION-MAKING AT POLICY AND COMMUNITY PLANNING LEVELS AND IMPROVE FOOD SECURITY FOR FIRST NATIONS AND INUIT A. Nahwegahbow, J. Cheechoo, M. Guyot First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada Available data
  1 document  
Author
Nahwegahbow, A.
Cheechoo, J.
Guyot, M.
Author Affiliation
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada
Source
Page 318-319 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Aboriginal populations
Community-based initiatives
First Nations
Food Security Reference Group (FSRG)
Inuit
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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Food security for First Nations and Inuit in Canada: background paper.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295948
Source
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada. 32 pp.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2007
FOOD SECURITY FOR FIRST NATIONS AND INUIT IN CANADA BACKGROUND PAPER Prepared by Elaine Power for First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada 30 March 2007 The views expressed
  1 document  
Author
Power, Elaine
Source
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada. 32 pp.
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
295825
Keywords
First Nations
Inuit
Food security
Traditional diet
Documents

Food-Security-First-Nations-and-Inuit-Background-Paper-by-Elaine-Power.pdf

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Sustainability and vulnerability: Aboriginal arctic food security in a toxic world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295949
Source
Breaking Ice: Renewable Resource and Ocean Management in the Canadian North : University of Calgary Press : Chapter 3. p 47-69.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2005
47 CH A PTER 3 SUSTAINABILITY AND VULNERABILITY: ABORIGINAL ARCTIC FOOD SECURITY IN A TOXIC WORLD Shirley Thompson (University of Manitoba) It is not so much that humanity is trying to sustain the natural world, but rather that humanity is trying to sustain itself. The precariousness of
  1 document  
Author
Thompson, Shirley
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba
Source
Breaking Ice: Renewable Resource and Ocean Management in the Canadian North : University of Calgary Press : Chapter 3. p 47-69.
Date
2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
834259
Keywords
Food security
Subsistence
Traditional diet
Documents
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Exploring food security with collective kitchens participants in three Canadian cities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166067
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Jan;17(1):75-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Rachel Engler-Stringer
Shawna Berenbaum
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montreal, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Jan;17(1):75-84
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cooking - standards
Diet - standards
Female
Food Services - organization & administration
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Poverty
Residence Characteristics
Social Welfare
Abstract
Collective kitchens are small groups of people who pool their resources to cook large quantities of food. With the help of semi-participant observation and in-depth individual interviews, this study is an exploration of participants' perceptions of changes in food security since becoming involved in a collective kitchen. Several important themes emerged, including Increased Variety, Making Ends Meet, and Comparisons to Food Banks. Participants in groups that cooked large quantities of food (upwards of five meals monthly) reported some increases in their food resources. Participants also reported increased dignity associated with not having to access charitable resources to feed their families. Some participants reported decreased psychological distress associated with food insecurity. Overall, participants reported increases in food security; however, collective kitchens are not a long-term solution to the income-related food insecurity experienced by many Canadian families.
PubMed ID
17170245 View in PubMed
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Validity of a single item food security questionnaire in Arctic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104271
Source
Pediatrics. 2014 Jun;133(6):e1616-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Helga Bjørnøy Urke
Zhirong R Cao
Grace M Egeland
Source
Pediatrics. 2014 Jun;133(6):e1616-23
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Inuits
Male
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Newfoundland and Labrador
Northwest Territories
Nunavut
Nutrition Surveys
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Assess sensitivity and specificity of each of the 18 US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Household Food Security Scale Module (HFSSM) questionnaire items to determine whether a rapid assessment of child and adult food insecurity is feasible in an Inuit population.
Food insecurity prevalence was assessed by the 18-item USDA HFSSM in a randomized sample of Inuit households participating in the Inuit Health Survey and the Nunavut Inuit Child Health Survey. Questions were evaluated for sensitivity, specificity, predictive value (+/2), and total percent accuracy for adult and child food insecurity (yes/no). Child food security items were evaluated for both surveys.
For children, the question “In the last 12 months, were there times when it was not possible to feed the children a healthy meal because there was not enough money?” had the best performance in both samples with a sensitivity and specificity of 92.3% and 97.3%, respectively, for the Inuit Health Survey, and 88.5% and 95.4% for the Nunavut Inuit Child Health Survey. For adults, the question “In the last 12 months, were there times when the food for you and your family just did not last and there was no money to buy more?” demonstrated a sensitivity of 93.0% and a specificity of 93.4%.
Rapid assessment of child and adult food insecurity is feasible and may be a useful tool for health care and social service providers. However, as prevalence and severity of food insecurity change over time, rapid assessment techniques should not replace periodic screening by using the full USDA HFSSM questionnaire.
PubMed ID
24864166 View in PubMed
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Climate change and food security among females in an Inuit community

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102655
Source
Page 325 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
CLIMATE CHANGE AND FOOD SECURITY AMONG FEMALES IN AN INUIT COMMUNITY J.D. Ford, M. Beaumier McGill University The territory of Nunavut has the highest incidence of food insecurity in Canada, where over 5oo/o of Inuit households are believed to experience difficulties in obtaining sufficient
  1 document  
Author
Ford, J.D.
Beaumier, M.
Author Affiliation
McGill University
Source
Page 325 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Aborginal
Climate change
Food security
Inuit
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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"We are not being heard": Aboriginal perspectives on traditional foods access and food security.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116942
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2012;2012:130945
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Bethany Elliott
Deepthi Jayatilaka
Contessa Brown
Leslie Varley
Kitty K Corbett
Author Affiliation
Population and Public Health, Provincial Health Services Authority, Vancouver, BC, Canada. bethany.elliott@phsa.ca
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2012;2012:130945
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Focus Groups
Food
Food Supply
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Population Groups
Young Adult
Abstract
Aboriginal peoples are among the most food insecure groups in Canada, yet their perspectives and knowledge are often sidelined in mainstream food security debates. In order to create food security for all, Aboriginal perspectives must be included in food security research and discourse. This project demonstrates a process in which Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal partners engaged in a culturally appropriate and respectful collaboration, assessing the challenges and barriers to traditional foods access in the urban environment of Vancouver, BC, Canada. The findings highlight local, national, and international actions required to increase access to traditional foods as a means of achieving food security for all people. The paper underscores the interconnectedness of local and global food security issues and highlights challenges as well as solutions with potential to improve food security of both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples alike.
Notes
Cites: Annu Rev Nutr. 2000;20:595-62610940347
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1996 Feb;96(2):155-628557942
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2009 Sep;12(9):1504-1119144239
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2004 Nov-Dec;95(6):465-915622799
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):46-5415776992
Cites: J Nutr. 1997 Nov;127(11):2179-869349845
PubMed ID
23346118 View in PubMed
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Workshop: Food (in)Security in the Arctic: Contribution of Traditional and Local Food to promote Food Security with Particular Reference to the European High North.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295541
Source
Council of Baltic Sea States. Report of the First Workshop. 9 pp.
Publication Type
Report
Date
13 October 2017
Report of the First Workshop Workshop: Food (in)Security in the Arctic: Contribution of Traditional and Local Food to promote Food Security with Particular Reference to the European High North 13 October 2017 Council of Baltic Sea States (CBSS) Slussplan 9 ∙ P.O. Box 2010 103
  1 document  
Source
Council of Baltic Sea States. Report of the First Workshop. 9 pp.
Date
13 October 2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
855531
Keywords
Traditional diet
Arctic
Food security
Documents

Stockholm-Report_Final_18Oct2017-Assi_Harkoma.pdf

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Food security in older adults: community service provider perceptions of their roles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158582
Source
Can J Aging. 2007;26(4):317-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Heather H Keller
John J M Dwyer
Vicki Edwards
Christine Senson
H. Gayle Edward
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON. hkeller@uoguelph.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2007;26(4):317-28
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Community Health Services
Focus Groups
Food
Food Services - organization & administration
Geriatric Assessment
Health education
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Ontario
Social Class
Social Support
Abstract
Food insecurity in older adults is influenced by financial constraints, functional disability, and isolation. Twenty-eight social- and community-service providers participated in four focus groups to report (a) perceptions and experiences with food insecurity in their older clients, (b) beliefs about their potential role(s) in promoting food security, and (c) opinions about constraints that influenced these roles. A constant comparison analysis identified key themes. The formal caregivers reported six roles for improving food security: (a) monitoring, (b) coordination, and (c) promoting services, (d) education, (e) advocacy, and (f) providing a social environment. The final theme summarizes these roles as "the need for personalization of service". Social and community service providers are involved in roles that can promote the health of older adults by addressing their food insecurity. Social service providers need to be acknowledged and supported in this health promotion role.
PubMed ID
18304920 View in PubMed
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Food security and nutrition in the Russian Federation - a health policy analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271143
Source
Glob Health Action. 2015;8:27537
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Karsten Lunze
Elena Yurasova
Bulat Idrisov
Natalia Gnatienko
Luigi Migliorini
Source
Glob Health Action. 2015;8:27537
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture - history
Choice Behavior
Diet - economics - history
Economics
Energy intake
Food Supply - economics - history
Health Policy
History, 20th Century
Humans
Nutritional Status
Obesity - epidemiology - history
Russia - epidemiology
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
In the Russian Federation (Russia), an elevated burden of premature mortality attributable to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) has been observed since the country's economic transition. NCDs are largely related to preventable risk factors such as unhealthy diets.
This health policy study's aim was to analyze past and current food production and nutritional trends in Russia and their policy implications for Russia's NCD burden.
We examined food security and nutrition in Russia using an analytical framework of food availability, access to food, and consumption.
Agricultural production declined during the period of economic transition, and nutritional habits changed from high-fat animal products to starches. However, per-capita energy consumption remained stable due to increased private expenditures on food and use of private land. Paradoxically, the prevalence of obesity still increased because of an excess consumption of unsaturated fat, sugar, and salt on one side, and insufficient intake of fruit and vegetables on the other.
Policy and economic reforms in Russia were not accompanied by a food security crisis or macronutrient deprivation of the population. Yet, unhealthy diets in contemporary Russia contribute to the burden of NCDs and related avoidable mortality. Food and nutrition policies in Russia need to specifically address nutritional shortcomings and food-insecure vulnerable populations. Appropriate, evidence-informed food and nutrition policies might help address Russia's burden of NCDs on a population level.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26112143 View in PubMed
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Bringing home the right to food in Canada: challenges and possibilities for achieving food security.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164472
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Jun;10(6):566-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Karen Rideout
Graham Riches
Aleck Ostry
Don Buckingham
Rod MacRae
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia, 2357 main mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V6T 124. krideout@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Jun;10(6):566-73
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altruism
Canada
Food Supply - standards
Human Rights - standards
Humans
International Cooperation
Nutrition Policy
Politics
Relief Work
Social Responsibility
Abstract
We offer a critique of Canada's approach to domestic food security with respect to international agreements, justiciability and case law, the breakdown of the public safety net, the institutionalisation of charitable approaches to food insecurity, and the need for 'joined-up' food and nutrition policies. We examined Canada's commitments to the right to food, as well as Canadian policies, case law and social trends, in order to assess Canada's performance with respect to the human right to food. We found that while Canada has been a leader in signing international human rights agreements, including those relating to the right to food, domestic action has lagged and food insecurity increased. We provide recommendations for policy changes that could deal with complex issues of state accountability, social safety nets and vulnerable populations, and joined-up policy frameworks that could help realise the right to adequate food in Canada and other developed nations.
PubMed ID
17381908 View in PubMed
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Putting food on the public health table: Making food security relevant to regional health authorities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168392
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97(3):233-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Karen Rideout
Barbara Seed
Aleck Ostry
Author Affiliation
Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. krideout@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97(3):233-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Family Characteristics
Food Supply - standards
Health promotion
Humans
Hunger
Models, organizational
Nutrition Policy
Nutritive Value
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Public Health - trends
Regional Health Planning - methods
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Food security is emerging as an increasingly important public health issue. The purpose of this paper is to describe a conceptual model and five classes of food security indicators for regional health authorities (RHAs): direct, indirect, consequence, process, and supra-regional. The model was developed after a review of the food security literature and interviews with British Columbia community nutritionists and public health officials. We offer this conceptual model as a practical tool to help RHAs develop a comprehensive framework and use specific indicators, in conjunction with public health nutritionists and other community stakeholders. We recommend using all five classes of indicator together to ensure a complete assessment of the full breadth of food security. This model will be useful for Canadian health authorities wishing to take a holistic community-based approach to public health nutrition to develop more effective policies and programs to maximize food security. The model and indicators offer a rational process that could be useful for collaborative multi-stakeholder initiatives to improve food security.
PubMed ID
16827415 View in PubMed
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Traditional food attributes must be included in studies of food security in the Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84426
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Sep;66(4):308-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Lambden Jill
Receveur Olivier
Kuhnlein Harriet V
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Sep;66(4):308-19
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The objective was to explore some typically understudied characteristics of food security in Arctic Canada: observed changes to traditional food systems, perceived advantages and health benefits of traditional food and traditional food preferences. STUDY DESIGN: Data analysis used a cross-sectional survey of Yukon First Nations, Dene/Métis and Inuit women in 44 Arctic communities. METHODS: Open-ended responses to 4 questions were used to qualitatively investigate roles traditional foods play in Arctic food security. Chi-square tests were applied to responses to ascertain differences by age and region. A fifth question explored agreement with cultural responses to harvesting and using traditional food. RESULTS: Traditional food was regarded as natural and fresh, tasty, healthy and nutritious, inexpensive, and socially and culturally beneficial. Between 10% and 38% of participants noticed recent changes in the quality or health of traditional food species, with physical changes and decreasing availability being reported most often. Caribou, moose and seal were among the foods considered particularly healthy and held special values in these populations. The opinion that all traditional food was healthy was also popular. More than 85%, of participants agreed with most cultural attributes of traditional food. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that traditional food remains important to Arctic indigenous women and that food security in the Arctic is contingent upon access to these foods.
PubMed ID
18018844 View in PubMed
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