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A 10-year follow-up study on subjective well-being and relationships to person-environment (P-E) fit and activity of daily living (ADL) dependence of older Swedish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154920
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2009 Jul-Aug;49(1):e16-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
Monica Werngren-Elgström
Gunilla Carlsson
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden.
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2009 Jul-Aug;49(1):e16-22
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Environment
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
In order to investigate how well-being and ill health is affected by the process of aging, the main aim was to investigate these self-perceived aspects of health over a 10-year period among older Swedish adults. The aim was also to study how these aspects correlated with objectively assessed functional limitations, use of mobility device, person-environment (P-E) fit (also denoted accessibility), problems in housing, and activity of daily living (ADL) dependence. Using the Swedish national population register, a baseline sample of persons aged 75-84 years was identified. Out of the 133 participants at baseline (1994), the 31 participants still available 10 years later were included. The data were collected by means of interview and observation at home visits. Overall, the participants rated their subjective well-being as high and a stable prevalence of ill-health symptoms over time was reported. Changes in subjective well-being as related to changes in functional aspects seem to mainly occur earlier in the aging process, while as time goes by these relations weaken. ADL dependence, however, is more influential in more advanced age. The results confirm the complexity of the construct of health. A main contribution is that the results shed light on the importance of taking the impact of environmental factors into consideration.
PubMed ID
18829123 View in PubMed
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Accidental ingestions in children with peanut allergy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168012
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2006 Aug;118(2):466-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Joyce W Yu
Rhoda Kagan
Nina Verreault
Nathalie Nicolas
Lawrence Joseph
Yvan St Pierre
Ann Clarke
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology, McGill University Health Centre, 1650 Cedar Avenue L10-413, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2006 Aug;118(2):466-72
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Male
Peanut Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Abstract
Accidental exposure to peanut has been reported to occur frequently. Total avoidance of peanut is difficult because of its widespread use, manufacturing and labeling errors, utensil contamination, and label misinterpretation.
Given the apparent increased awareness of peanut allergy by both consumers and food manufacturers, we aimed to determine the current frequency of accidental exposures occurring in peanut allergic children in Quebec and to identify factors associated with exposure.
The parents of children with peanut allergy diagnosed at the Montreal Children's Hospital completed questionnaires about accidental exposure to peanut occurring over the period of the preceding year. Logistic regression was used to identify associated factors.
Of 252 children, 62% were boys, with a mean age of 8.1 years (SD, 2.9). The mean age at diagnosis was 2.0 years (SD, 2.1). Thirty-five accidental exposures occurred in 29 children over a period of 244 patient-years, yielding an annual incidence rate of 14.3% (95% CI, 10.0% to 19.9%). Fifteen reactions were mild, 16 moderate, and 4 severe. Of 20 reactions that were moderate to severe, only 4 received epinephrine. Eighty percent of children attended schools prohibiting peanut, and only 1 accidental exposure occurred at school. No associated factors were identified.
Accidental exposure to peanut occurs at a lower frequency than previously reported, but most reactions are managed inappropriately.
Enhanced awareness, access to safer environments, and good food manufacturing practices may have contributed to a lower incidence of inadvertent peanut exposure, but a further reduction and better education on allergy management are desirable.
PubMed ID
16890773 View in PubMed
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Accidents and close call situations connected to the use of mobile phones.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127715
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2012 Mar;45:75-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Leena Korpinen
Rauno Pääkkönen
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland. leena.korpinen@tut.fi
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2012 Mar;45:75-82
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Causality
Cellular Phone
Educational Status
Finland
Human Engineering
Humans
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of our work was to study the accidents and close call situations connected to the use of mobile phones. We have analyzed how the accidents/close call situations are connected to background information, in particular age, gender and self-reported symptoms. The study was carried out as a cross-sectional study by posting the questionnaire to 15,000 working-age Finns. The responses (6121) were analyzed using the logistic regression models. Altogether 13.7% of respondents had close call situations and 2.4% had accidents at leisure, in which the mobile phone had a partial effect, and at work the amounts were 4.5% and 0.4% respectively, during the last 12 months. Essentially, we found that: (1) men tend to have more close calls and accidents while on a mobile phone, (2) younger people tend to have more accidents and close calls while on a mobile phone, but it does not appear to be large enough to warrant intervention, (3) employed people tend to have more problems with mobile phone usage and accidents/close calls, and (4) there was a slight increase in mobile-phone-related accidents/close calls if the respondent also reported sleep disturbances and minor aches and pains. In the future, it is important to take into account and study how symptoms can increase the risk of accidents or close call situations in which a mobile phone has a partial effect.
PubMed ID
22269487 View in PubMed
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Acidic deposition and human exposure to toxic metals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234401
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1987 Dec;67(2-3):101-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1987
Author
B G Svensson
A. Björnham
A. Schütz
U. Lettevall
A. Nilsson
S. Skerfving
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1987 Dec;67(2-3):101-15
Date
Dec-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cadmium - blood
Environmental Exposure
Health status
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Lead - blood
Life Style
Mercury - blood
Metals - analysis - blood
Questionnaires
Selenium - blood
Sweden
Water Pollutants - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
Acid precipitation affects the solubility of several metals in aquatic systems and in soil. Cadmium levels in tap water samples from geological areas having low resistance to acidic pollution were significantly higher than those in samples from a neighbouring reference area where there was a different geological structure. The median cadmium levels and pH values were 0.14 microgram l-1 and 5.6 respectively, for the acidic areas compared with 0.07 microgram l-1 and 6.4 respectively for the reference area. Further, there was a significant inverse relationship between both cadmium and lead contents and the pH values of the samples. The mobility of the metals was thus dependent on the acidity. The blood lead levels in 195 subjects from the acidic areas were lower than those in 91 subjects from the reference area (medians 60 vs. 70 micrograms l-1); no significant differences were found in blood cadmium or blood mercury levels. Subjects in the acidic areas had lower plasma selenium levels than those from the reference area (medians 85 vs. 90 micrograms l-1); the difference was mainly attributed to subjects with private wells. The data may indicate a negative effect of the acidic pollution on selenium intake via water and/or foods. There was also a positive relationship between intake of fish on the one hand and blood mercury and plasma selenium on the other, which is in accordance with the role of fish as a source of these metals.
PubMed ID
3438737 View in PubMed
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Actual vs best practice for families post-stroke according to three rehabilitation disciplines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161684
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2007 Sep;39(7):513-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Annie Rochette
Nicol Korner-Bitensky
Johanne Desrosiers
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Quebec, Canada. annie.rochette@umontreal.ca
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2007 Sep;39(7):513-9
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Community Health Services
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physical Therapy Modalities
Questionnaires
Speech Therapy
Spouses - psychology
Stroke - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
To investigate occupational therapists', physiotherapists' and speech language pathologists' family-related rehabilitation practice post-stroke and its association with clinician and environmental variables.
A Canadian cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted on 1755 clinicians. Three case studies describing typical patients after stroke receiving acute care, in-patient rehabilitation, or community rehabilitation, and including specific descriptors regarding family stress and concern, were used to elicit information on patient management.
One-third of the sample identified a family-related problem and offered a related intervention, but only 12/1755 clinicians indicated that they would typically use a standardized assessment of family functioning. Working in the community out-patient setting was associated (OR 9.16), whereas working in a rehabilitation in-patient setting was negatively associated (OR 0.58) with being a problem identifier, the reference group being acute care. Being a PT (OR 0.53) or an SLP (OR 0.49) vs an OT was negatively associated with being a problem identifier, whereas being older (OR 1.02 ) or working in Ontario (OR 1.58) was associated with being a problem identifier. To work in a community out-patient setting (OR 2.43), being older clinicians (OR 1.02) or not perceiving their work environment being supportive of an on-going professional learning (OR 1.72) was associated with being an intervention user,whereas being a PT (OR 0.50) was negatively associated with being a user.
For these 3 disciplines, the prevalence of a family-related focus is low post-stroke. Given the increasing evidence regarding the effectiveness of family-related interventions on stroke outcomes, it is imperative that best practice is implemented.
PubMed ID
17724549 View in PubMed
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Acute otitis media and sociomedical risk factors among unselected children in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3493
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 1999 Jun 15;49(1):37-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1999
Author
P. Homøe
R B Christensen
P. Bretlau
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. rh03259@rh.dk
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 1999 Jun 15;49(1):37-52
Date
Jun-15-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Environment
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the sociomedical risk factors associated with episodes of acute otitis media (AOM), recurrent AOM (rAOM), and chronic otitis media (COM) in Greenlandic children and especially to point out children at high risk of rAOM (defined as > 5 AOM episodes since birth) and COM which are prevalent among Inuit children all over the Arctic. METHODS: The study design was cross-sectional and included 740 unselected children, 3, 4, 5, and 8-years-old, living in two major Greenlandic towns, Nuuk and Sisimiut. All children were otologically examined and the parents answered a questionnaire containing sociomedical variables including ethnicity, family history of OM, housing, insulation, crowding, daycare, passive cigarette smoking, breast feeding, type of diet, allergy, and chronic diseases. Historical data were cross-checked in medical records which also formed the basis for the drop-out analyses. Statistical analyses included frequency tests, calculation of odds ratio (OR), and multiple logistic regression. RESULTS: The attendance rate was 86%. Former episode of AOM was reported by 2/3 of the children, rAOM by 20%, and COM by 9%. The following variables were found significantly more often in children with AOM by simple frequency testing: Parental (OR = 1.83), sibling (OR = 1.62), and parental plus sibling (OR = 2.56) history of OM, crowding (OR = 5.55), long period of exclusive breast feeding ( > 4 months) (OR = 2.47), and recent acute disease (P = 0.034). The following variables were found significantly more often in children with rAOM or COM by simple frequency testing: Parental history of OM (OR = 1.60; OR = 2.11, respectively) and no recall of breast feeding (P = 0.005; P = 0.003, respectively). Also, COM was found significantly more often in children with two Greenlandic parents (OR = 3.07). A multiple logistic regression test denoted only parental history of OM (OR = 1.82) and long period of exclusive breast feeding (OR = 1.14) as significant predictors of AOM. CONCLUSIONS: Many of the risk factors usually associated with AOM could not be confirmed as risk factors in this survey. Parental history of OM and long period of exclusive breast feeding were the strongest factors associated with AOM in Greenlandic children and ethnicity was associated with COM. However, the study confirms that AOM is a multifactorial disease determined by a number of genetic and environmental factors.
PubMed ID
10428404 View in PubMed
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Addressing historic environmental exposures along the Alaska Highway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107704
Source
Pages 787-795 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):787-795
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
NUTRITION Addressing historic environmental exposures along the Alaska Highway Anna Godduhn 1*, The Northway Health Study Team2 and Lawrence Duffy 1 1 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, USA; 2Northway, AK, USA Background. A World War
  1 document  
Author
Anna Godduhn
Lawrence Duffy
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA
Source
Pages 787-795 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):787-795
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Animals, Wild
Diet - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - history
Fishes
Food Contamination
Health status
History, 20th Century
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Thyroid Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
A World War II defense site at Northway, Alaska, was remediated in the 1990s, leaving complex questions regarding historic exposures to toxic waste. This article describes the context, methods, limitations and findings of the Northway Wild Food and Health Project (NWFHP).
The NWFHP comprised 2 pilot studies: the Northway Wild Food Study (NWFS), which investigated contaminants in locally prioritized traditional foods over time, and the Northway Health Study (NHS), which investigated locally suspected links between resource uses and health problems.
This research employed mixed methods. The NWFS reviewed remedial documents and existing data. The NHS collected household information regarding resource uses and health conditions by questionnaire and interview. NHS data represent general (yes or no) personal knowledge that was often second hand. Retrospective cohort comparisons were made of the reported prevalence of 7 general health problems between groups based on their reported (yes or no) consumption of particular resources, for 3 data sets (existing, historic and combined) with a two-tailed Fisher's Exact Test in SAS (n = 325 individuals in 83 households, 24 of which no longer exist).
The NWFS identified historic pathways of exposure to petroleum, pesticides, herbicides, chlorinated byproducts of disinfection and lead from resources that were consumed more frequently decades ago and are not retrospectively quantifiable. The NHS found complex patterns of association between reported resource uses and cancer and thyroid-, reproductive-, metabolic- and cardiac problems.
Lack of detail regarding medical conditions, undocumented histories of exposure, time lapsed since the release of pollution and changes to health and health care over the same period make this exploratory research. Rather than demonstrate causation, these results document the legitimacy of local suspicions and warrant additional investigation. This article presents our findings, with discussion of limitations related to study design and limitations that are inherent to such research.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23984298 View in PubMed
Documents
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Adipose organochlorine concentrations and risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal Danish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17245
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Jan;14(1):67-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Marian Pavuk
Alain Leblanc
Pierre Dumas
Jean Philippe Weber
Anja Olsen
Anne Tjønneland
Kim Overvad
Jørgen H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Jan;14(1):67-74
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - analysis
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Pesticide Residues - analysis
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Postmenopause
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Exposure to environmental organochlorines has been examined as a potential risk factor for human breast cancer with mixed results. Our purpose was to examine associations between organochlorines and the development of breast cancer in a large prospective study using stored adipose tissue. METHODS: We conducted a nested case-control study of 409 postmenopausal women who developed breast cancer and 409 controls selected from the 29,875 women enrolled in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort between 1993 and 1997. We measured concentrations of 14 pesticides and 18 polychlorinated biphenyls in adipose tissue, collected upon enrollment, and estimated relative risk (RR) of breast cancer using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: The results showed no higher risk of breast cancer among women with higher levels of any pesticides or polychlorinated biphenyls; the RR associated with the upper quartile of 1,1-dichloro-2, 2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene concentration was 0.7 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.5-1.2] contrasting the lower quartile, and for the sum of polychlorinated biphenyls the similar risk was 1.1 (95% CI, 0.7-1.7). We observed a pattern of substantially lower risk of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer in association with higher levels of most of the pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls; the RR for the higher quartile of 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene was 0.1 (95% CI, 0.0-0.5) and for the sum of polychlorinated biphenyls it was 0.3 (95% CI, 0.1-0.9). CONCLUSION: The results do not support that higher organochlorine body levels increase the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. The interpretation of the inverse association for estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer is currently unclear.
PubMed ID
15668478 View in PubMed
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Adult smoking as a proxy for environmental tobacco smoke exposure among children - comparing the impact of the level of information in Estonia, Finland and Latvia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150353
Source
Prev Med. 2009 Aug-Sep;49(2-3):240-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kristiina Patja
Samu Hakala
Ritva Prättälä
Kirstel Ojala
Elena Boldo
Mattias Oberg
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland. Kristiina.patja@promedico.fi
Source
Prev Med. 2009 Aug-Sep;49(2-3):240-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Latvia - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Parents - psychology
Prevalence
Proxy - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
International comparability of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure levels is difficult. This study assesses whether estimating children's exposure from information on adult smoking and exposure to ETS makes international comparisons more reliable.
The exposure among children was estimated using three different combinations (models) based on different sets of information on adult smoking, household composition or adult exposure to ETS at home in three cross-sectional nationally representative samples drawn from data sets from Estonia (n=2650), Finland (n=2829) and Latvia (n=5440) in the years 2002 and 2004. The first two models were based on adult smoking and the third also included ETS exposure.
The parental smoking rate was similar to the general smoking prevalence. ETS exposure in non-smoking parents ranged from 22% in Finland to 60% in Latvia. All models gave rather comparative ranges except in Latvia, where the proportion of children with exposure varied from 67% with the simplest model to 81% with the most complex one.
Adult exposure at home or adult smoking prevalence, preferably among people with children, could be used as a proxy for children's exposure to ETS. It is recommended that population questionnaires include detailed information on exposure and household composition.
PubMed ID
19520109 View in PubMed
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Advancing employee engagement through a healthy workplace strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157634
Source
J Health Serv Res Policy. 2008 Jan;13 Suppl 1:35-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Andrea Seymour
Kathryne Dupré
Author Affiliation
Health Information, River Valley Health, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. Andrea.Seymour@rvh.nb.ca
Source
J Health Serv Res Policy. 2008 Jan;13 Suppl 1:35-40
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Health facilities
Health Personnel
Humans
Male
Occupational Health
Organizational Culture
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Risk Reduction Behavior
Abstract
In recent years, there has been increased focus on improving the quality of the working lives of staff in health care organizations. Research shows that improvements can be achieved through a comprehensive organizational approach to workplace health. Improved worker engagement is a realizable outcome of such an approach, provided that it is based on reliable and relevant data and is tailored to the specific environment in which it is being implemented.
An intervention project was designed to develop an organization-wide approach to employee workplace health. A comprehensive health risk assessment was undertaken, along with a staff survey on workplace culture, individual health practice and environmental effects on physical health.
In general, the findings present a positive picture of the culture and factors that influence psychological wellbeing. However, improvement is needed in some areas: satisfaction is only marginally outweighing stress, and musculoskeletal disorders account for much absenteeism. Employee health needs include weight management, improving fitness and nutrition, and decreasing coronary risk.
Results have prompted this organization to pursue the development of a Healthy Workplace Policy that will be used as a filter for all other policies relating to workplace culture, environment and practice, and have provided the impetus and focus to review the organization of employee health services.
Three major administrative activities are necessary to move from planning to sustained action: ensure adherence of all staff to any policy derived from a health risk assessment; ensure staff feel proposed changes are relevant and important; and create a road map to guide the development of a strategic and an implementation plan. The findings outlined in this report can be addressed by organizations that are willing to commit to a comprehensive approach to workplace health.
PubMed ID
18325167 View in PubMed
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The aesthetic dimension in hospitals--an investigation into strategic plans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81540
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Sep;43(7):851-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Caspari Synnøve
Eriksson Katie
Nåden Dagfinn
Author Affiliation
Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo, Norway. Synnove.Caspari@su.hio.no
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Sep;43(7):851-9
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Art
Environment Design - standards
Esthetics
Food Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Guidelines
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Hospital Design and Construction - standards
Hospitals, General - organization & administration
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings - standards
Noise - prevention & control
Norway
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Patients' Rooms - organization & administration
Philosophy, Medical
Plants
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE: The underlying assumption was that the aesthetics of the hospital surroundings are often neglected. AIMS: This article is the first part of a larger study into the aesthetics of general hospitals. The aim of the study is to throw light on the influence of aesthetics on the health and well-being of patients and the professional personnel, and to examine how aesthetic considerations are dealt with. We present a survey of how the aesthetic dimension is planned and it is considered important in the strategic plans of Norwegian general hospitals. METHODS: Data were sampled by analyzing the strategic plans of somatic hospitals. Sixty-four of 86 hospitals responded (74%). Concepts were categorized in a matrix of 11 main categories, each with subcategories. The method was quantitative, in that the analyzed material was amenable to counting. RESULTS: Very few concrete guidelines or directions for the aesthetic dimension have been included in written documents. This indicates that the aesthetic area is a neglected field in the directions for the daily management of hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: The research available today on the contribution of environmental aesthetics to health, rehabilitation, and well-being suggests that it is important to have concrete guidelines recorded in strategic plans. This field concerns the maintenance of high quality in the caring professions.
PubMed ID
16824528 View in PubMed
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The age- and sex-specific occurrence of bothersome neck pain in the general population--results from the Stockholm public health cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120422
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2012;13:185
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Eva Skillgate
Cecilia Magnusson
Michael Lundberg
Johan Hallqvist
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, Stockholm, SE-17177, Sweden. Eva.Skillgate@ki.se
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2012;13:185
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Public Health - methods - trends
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Neck pain is very common but the occurrence of bothersome neck pain is not well described. Therefore our objective was to report on the prevalence and incidence of, as well as the rate of recovery from, bothersome neck pain in men and women of different ages in the general population.
We used data from a recently conducted population-based cohort study, comprising 23,794 individuals in Stockholm County, Sweden. Study participants were surveyed with a self-administered questionnaire in 2002/2003 and 2007, and information on episodes of neck pain was gathered at baseline and at follow-up. We then measured bothersome neck pain in 2005 and 2006 retrospectively in 2007 using the follow-up questionnaire.
The one-year prevalence of bothersome neck pain for at least seven consecutive days was 25% (95% confidence interval (CI): 24-25) among women and 16% (95% CI: 15-16) among men, peaking in individuals aged 30-59 years. The one-year incidence proportion of bothersome neck pain was 7% (95% CI: 6-7) among women, and 4% (95% CI: 4-5) among men. Women recovered more infrequently than men. The one-year incidence proportion of recovery (of at least one year duration) was 11% (95% CI: 10-12) among women and 14% (95% CI: 12-16) among men.
Bothersome neck pain is most common in middle-aged individuals. Women are more likely than men to have and to develop bothersome neck pain, and less likely to recover from such pain. Younger men and women have a higher incidence, but recover more often from bothersome neck pain than older individuals.
Notes
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Cites: Pain. 2001 Sep;93(3):317-2511514090
PubMed ID
23006655 View in PubMed
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Age at first experience of intercourse among Norwegian adolescents: a lifestyle perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12090
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1991;33(2):207-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
P. Kraft
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1991;33(2):207-13
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Coitus
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Incidence
Interpersonal Relations
Life Style
Male
Norway
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sexual Behavior
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Behavior
Social Values
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Age at first intercourse among Norwegian adolescents was studied by means of survival analysis. The data stemmed from a nation-wide survey of 3000 Norwegian adolescents aged 17-19, yielding a response rate of 61.8%. Median age at first intercourse was 17.3 years among girls and 18.0 years among boys. By means of Cox regression analysis associations between age at onset of intercourse and some correlates were estimated. Age at first intercourse was significantly associated with educational aspirations, smoking behaviour, alcohol consumption, peer affiliation, and frequency of visiting a discotheque. These inter-relationships confirm that age at onset of intercourse comprise an important indicator of the lifestyle of an individual. In order to influence sexual behaviour of adolescents it may thus be appropriate to employ health promotion activities focusing upon environmental and structural factors, as a supplement to traditional methods of sex education.
PubMed ID
1887284 View in PubMed
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Age trajectories of genetic variance in physical functioning: a longitudinal study of Danish twins aged 70 years and older.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183160
Source
Behav Genet. 2003 Mar;33(2):125-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Kaare Christensen
Henrik Frederiksen
James W Vaupel
Matt McGue
Author Affiliation
The Danish Twin Registry, Epidemiology, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5000 Odense, Denmark. kchristensen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Behav Genet. 2003 Mar;33(2):125-36
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Denmark
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Questionnaires
Abstract
Genetic-evolutionary theories of aging predict that the genetic variance for fitness traits increases with age, while epidemiological-gerontological theories predict an increase in the environmental variance for most traits. In this study we examine the age trajectories of the genetic and environmental variance in physical functioning in a sample of 4731 Danish twins aged 70+ who are being followed longitudinally every second year with up to four assessments completed. A biometric growth model (Neale and McArdle, 2000) was applied to a validated physical ability score. The model included an overall level effect, a rate of linear change effect, and residual effects. The best-fitting model was a sex-specific model including additive genetic and nonshared environmental factors affecting level and rate of change and only nonshared environmental factors affecting the wave-specific levels. For both sexes there is an approximate doubling of both the total variance and the genetic variance in the physical ability score over the four waves and, hence, a rather stable heritability. However, the heritability is approximately.10 for males and.30 for females in all four waves. The heritability of level and slope showed a similar pattern:.11-14 in males and.35-.39 in females. The increase in both additive genetic variance and environmental variance is in agreement with genetic-evolutionary and epidemiological-gerontological theories of aging, respectively. The present study suggests that overall level of strength may be a better phenotype for future molecular genetic studies on physical functioning in the elderly than rate of change, because rate of change is vulnerable to sample attrition due to mortality and dropout and because four waves were needed to be able to detect a heritability for rate of change of the same magnitude as the heritability for level of physical functioning.
PubMed ID
14574147 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aircraft noise annoyance and average versus maximum noise levels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223180
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1992 Sep-Oct;47(5):326-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Björkman
U. Ahrlin
R. Rylander
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1992 Sep-Oct;47(5):326-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aircraft
Humans
Middle Aged
Noise, Transportation - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
A questionnaire study was performed in seven areas located around the airports of Landvetter and Save, Gothenburg, in an attempt to elucidate the extent of annoyance in populations exposed to aircraft noise. Noise exposure was estimated as the energy equivalent level (Aircraft Noise Level--FBN) or as the number of aircraft with levels that exceeded 70 dBA, combined with the maximum noise level. The results were compared with data obtained from the earlier Scandinavian Aircraft Noise Investigation. The results supported the conclusion that the annoyance reaction is better related to the number of aircraft and the maximum noise level than to energy equivalent levels for noise exposure.
PubMed ID
1444593 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and childhood respiratory health: exposure to sulfate and ozone in 10 Canadian rural communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217580
Source
Environ Res. 1994 Aug;66(2):125-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
B R Stern
M E Raizenne
R T Burnett
L. Jones
J. Kearney
C A Franklin
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Environ Res. 1994 Aug;66(2):125-42
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Lung - physiology
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Ozone - analysis
Questionnaires
Rural Population
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Sulfates - analysis
Abstract
This study was designed to examine differences in the respiratory health status of preadolescent school children, aged 7-11 years, who resided in 10 rural Canadian communities areas of moderate and low exposure to regional sulfate and ozone pollution. Five of the communities were located in central Saskatchewan, a low-exposure region, and five were located in southwestern Ontario, an area with moderately elevated exposures resulting from long-range atmospheric transport of polluted air masses. In this cross-sectional study, the child's respiratory symptoms and illness history were evaluated using a parent-completed questionnaire, administered in September 1985. Respiratory function was assessed once for each child in the schools between October 1985 and March 1986, by the measurement of pulmonary function for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1.0), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), mean forced expiratory flow rate during the middle half of the FVC curve (FEF25-75), and maximal expiratory flow at 50% of the expired vital capacity (V50max). The 1986 annual mean of the 1-hr daily maxima of ozone was higher in Ontario (46.3 ppb) than in Saskatchewan (34.1 ppb), with 90th percentile concentrations of 80 ppb in Ontario and 47 ppb in Saskatchewan. Summertime 1-hr daily maxima means were 69.0 ppb in Ontario and 36.1 ppb in Saskatchewan. Annual mean and 90th percentile concentrations of inhalable sulfates were three times higher in Ontario than in Saskatchewan; there were no significant differences in levels of inhalable particles (PM10) or particulate nitrates. Levels of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were low in both regions. After controlling for the effects of age, sex, parental smoking, parental education, and gas cooking, no significant regional differences were observed in rates of chronic cough or phlegm, persistent wheeze, current asthma, bronchitis in the past year, or any chest illness that kept the child at home for 3 or more consecutive days during the previous year. Children living in southwestern Ontario had statistically significant (P 0.05).
PubMed ID
8055835 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and general practitioner access and utilization: a population based study in Sarnia, 'Chemical Valley,' Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132343
Source
Environ Health. 2011;10:71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Tor H Oiamo
Isaac N Luginaah
Dominic O Atari
Kevin M Gorey
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. thoiamo@uwo.ca
Source
Environ Health. 2011;10:71
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental monitoring
Female
General Practitioners - utilization
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - analysis - toxicity
Male
Middle Aged
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis - toxicity
Ontario
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis - toxicity
Urban Health Services - utilization
Volatile Organic Compounds - analysis - toxicity
Young Adult
Abstract
Health impacts of poor environmental quality have been identified in studies around the world and in Canada. While many of the studies have identified associations between air pollution and mortality or morbidity, few have focused on the role of health care as a potential moderator of impacts. This study assessed the determinants of health care access and utilization in the context of ambient air pollution in Sarnia, Ontario, Canada.
Residents of Sarnia participated in a Community Health Study administered by phone, while several ambient air pollutants including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2) and the volatile organic compounds benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, mp- and o-xylene (BTEX) were monitored across the city. Land Use Regression models were used to estimate individual exposures to the measured pollutants and logistic regression models were utilized to assess the relative influence of environmental, socioeconomic and health related covariates on general practitioner access and utilization outcomes.
The results show that general practitioner use increased with levels of exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2- Odds Ratio [OR]: 1.16, p 0.05).
This study provides evidence for inequitable health care access and utilization in Sarnia, with particular relevance to its situation as a sentinel high exposure environment. Levels of exposure to pollution appears to influence utilization of health care services, but poor access to primary health care services additionally burden certain groups in Sarnia, Ontario, Canada.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21827645 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and respiratory health among children with asthmatic or cough symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207815
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1997 Aug;156(2 Pt 1):546-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
K L Timonen
J. Pekkanen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Environmental Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1997 Aug;156(2 Pt 1):546-52
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Asthma - diagnosis - etiology
Child
Cough - diagnosis - etiology
Finland
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Questionnaires
Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology
Seasons
Suburban Population - statistics & numerical data
Temperature
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
During the winter of 1994, the association between daily changes in air pollution and in the respiratory health of children 7 to 12 yr of age were studied in Kuopio, Finland. Seventy-four children with asthmatic symptoms and 95 children with cough only, living either in urban or suburban areas, were followed for 3 mo. During the study period, the mean daily concentration of particulate air pollution (PM10) was 18 micrograms/m3 in the urban area and 13 micrograms/m3 in the suburban area. Lagged concentrations of PM10, black smoke, and NO2 were significantly associated with declines in morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) among asthmatic children. The regression coefficient (x10) for a 2-d lag of PM10 was -0.911 (SE, 0.386) in the urban and -1.05 (0.596), in the suburban area. Among children with cough only, PM10, black smoke, and NO2 were not significantly associated with PEF. In the urban area, there was a significant association between SO2 and morning and evening PEF and incidence of upper respiratory symptoms among children who cough only. No other associations between air pollution and evening PEF or respiratory symptoms were observed. This study suggests that particulate air pollution is associated with respiratory health, especially among children with asthmatic symptoms.
PubMed ID
9279238 View in PubMed
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Airways symptoms, immunological response and exposure in powder painting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15090
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2005 Mar;78(2):123-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Anna Blomqvist
Meltem Düzakin-Nystedt
Carl-Göran Ohlson
Lennart Andersson
Bo Jönsson
Jörn Nielsen
Hans Welinder
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2005 Mar;78(2):123-31
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aerosols - toxicity
Aged
Anhydrides - blood - immunology - urine
Comparative Study
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Humans
Immunoglobulin G
Industry
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Lung Volume Measurements
Mass Fragmentography
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Paint - toxicity
Powders - toxicity
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - chemically induced - epidemiology - immunology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Powder painting is an alternative to solvent-based spray painting. Powder paints may contain organic acid anhydrides (OAAs), which are irritants to the airways and may cause sensitisation. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and immunological response among powder painters and to describe the exposure to OAAs. METHODS: In all, 205 subjects in 32 enterprises participated: 93 exposed and 26 formerly exposed workers in 25 powder paint shops and 86 unexposed workers. They completed a questionnaire about working conditions and symptoms and took part in a medical examination, which included a lung function test. Urine samples, for determination of two OAAs, and blood samples, for analysis of specific antibodies against the OAAs, were taken. In addition, 33 paint samples were analysed for nine OAAs. RESULTS: The powder painters reported more work-related respiratory symptoms than unexposed subjects did. The prevalence of three or more symptoms was 24% in subjects with low exposure, 44% in highly exposed individuals, 46% in formerly exposed subjects and 19% in unexposed workers. Asthma symptoms were frequent, 7%, 40%, 15% and 2%, respectively. Regression analyses of the lung volumes did not show any influence of exposure. IgG, but not IgE, against the OAAs and metabolites of OAAs was found in some subjects, but no associations with the exposure could be observed. OAAs were found in only small amounts in the paint samples. CONCLUSIONS: The exposure to organic acid anhydrides was estimated to be low, and yet, IgG antibodies to OAA were observed in some subjects. The prevalence of work-related symptoms from the eyes and the airways was relatively high among the powder painters, and these symptoms, but not the lung volumes, were clearly related to exposure. The symptoms were probably caused by irritative properties of the powder paint dust.
PubMed ID
15726393 View in PubMed
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Airway symptoms and lung function in the local population after the oil tank explosion in Gulen, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118172
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2012;12:76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jens-Tore Granslo
Magne Bråtveit
Bjørg Eli Hollund
Ågot Irgens
Cecilie Svanes
Nils Magerøy
Bente Elisabeth Moen
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. jens-tore.granslo@helse-bergen.no
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2012;12:76
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Explosions
Female
Humans
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Respiration Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Spirometry
Abstract
Oil tanks containing a mixture of hydrocarbons, including sulphuric compounds, exploded and caught fire in an industrial harbour. This study assesses airway symptoms and lung function in the nearby population 1½ years after the explosion.
A cross-sectional study included individuals =18 years old. Individuals living 20 km away formed a control group. A questionnaire and spirometry tests were completed by 223 exposed individuals (response rate men 70%, women 75%) and 179 control individuals (response rate men 51%, women 65%). Regression analyses included adjustment for smoking, occupational exposure, atopy, infection in the preceding month and age. Analyses of symptoms were also adjusted for stress reactions related to the accident.
Exposed individuals experienced significantly more blocked nose (odds ratio 1.7 [95% confidence interval 1.0, 2.8]), rhinorrhoea (1.6 [1.1, 3.3]), nose irritation (3.4 [2.0, 5.9]), sore throat (3.1 [1.8, 5.5]), morning cough (3.5 [2.0, 5.5]), daily cough (2.2 [1.4, 3.7]), cough >3 months a year (2.9 [1.5, 5.3]) and cough with phlegm (1.9 [1.2, 3.1]) than control individuals. A significantly increasing trend was found for nose symptoms and cough, depending on the proximity of home address to explosion site (daily cough, 3-6km 1.8 [1.0, 3.1],
Notes
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PubMed ID
23234609 View in PubMed
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898 records – page 1 of 45.