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The 20th century Danish facial cleft population--epidemiological and genetic-epidemiological studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33384
Source
Cleft Palate Craniofac J. 1999 Mar;36(2):96-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
K. Christensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, Epidemiology, Odense University, Denmark. k-christensen@win-chs.ou.dk
Source
Cleft Palate Craniofac J. 1999 Mar;36(2):96-104
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Cleft Lip - epidemiology - genetics
Cleft Palate - epidemiology - genetics
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - genetics
Epidemiology, Molecular
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Seasons
Sex Factors
Twin Studies
Variation (Genetics)
Abstract
Since Dr. Fogh-Andersen's legendary 1942 thesis, the Danish facial cleft population has been one of the most extensively studied in terms of epidemiology and genetic-epidemiology. The etiology of cleft lip and/or palate (CLP) is still largely an enigma, and different results concerning environmental and genetic risk factors are obtained in different countries and regions. This may be due to etiological heterogeneity between settings. Therefore, an in-depth studied area with an ethnically homogeneous population, such as Denmark, has provided one of the best opportunities for progress in CLP etiological research. The present review summarizes epidemiological and genetic-epidemiological studies conducted in the 20th century Danish facial cleft population. Furthermore, analyses of sex differences, time trends and seasonality for more than 7000 CLP cases born in Denmark in the period 1936 to 1987 are presented. The review also points toward the excellent opportunities for continued etiological CLP research in Denmark in the 21st century using already established resources and an on-going prospective cohort study of 100,000 pregnant women.
PubMed ID
10213053 View in PubMed
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Accidental deaths among British Columbia Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112073
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Jan 29;94(5):228-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-29-1966
Author
N. Schmitt
L W Hole
W S Barclay
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Jan 29;94(5):228-34
Date
Jan-29-1966
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholic Intoxication
British Columbia
Burns
Child
Child, Preschool
Drowning
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Abstract
A statistical and epidemiological review of British Columbia native Indian and non-Indian mortality revealed that accidents were the leading cause of death among Indians but ranked only fourth among non-Indians. Comparison of accidental death rates by age and sex showed that, without exception, the rates among Indians were considerably higher than the corressponding rates for non-Indians. While the Indians represented some 2% of the total population of British Columbia, they accounted for over 10% of the total accident fatalities, 29% of drownings, and 21% of fatal burns.Socioeconomic, environmental and psychosocial factors and excessive drinking are considered the chief causes responsible for this rather unusual epidemiological phenomenon.This study revealed certain hazardous conditions which are specific to the Indian's present way of life. In the authors' opinion the recognition of these specific hazards is imperative for the planning of effective preventive campaigns.
Notes
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1962 Oct;53:409-1213992080
PubMed ID
5902238 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Aug 20;111(19):2404-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-1991
Author
H. Reiso
N. Homb
J. Båtnes
N. Holm
T D Christiansen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Aug 20;111(19):2404-6
Date
Aug-20-1991
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Abstract
All accidents treated by the Primary Health Services in Vågå Municipality in 1988, were registered. There were altogether 498 accidents (124 accidents per 1,000 inhabitants per year). 418 injured persons were treated by the local health service, 80 were referred to hospital. The major mechanism of injury was falling (38%). The accidents occurred most frequently at home (38%), at the sports-ground/outdoors (23%) or at work (17%). 11 injuries were very serious, none were lethal. 44 occurred during skiing. Our work to prevent accidents will give priority to: the mother and child clinic; environmental health; skiing accidents.
PubMed ID
1926074 View in PubMed
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Acute effects of particulate air pollution on respiratory admissions: results from APHEA 2 project. Air Pollution and Health: a European Approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15434
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2001
Author
R W Atkinson
H R Anderson
J. Sunyer
J. Ayres
M. Baccini
J M Vonk
A. Boumghar
F. Forastiere
B. Forsberg
G. Touloumi
J. Schwartz
K. Katsouyanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, St. George's Hospital Medical School, London, United Kingdom. atkinson@sghms.ac.uk
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Date
Nov-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergencies
England - epidemiology
France - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Italy - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Ozone - adverse effects - analysis
Particle Size
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Population Surveillance
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Spain - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Weather
Abstract
The APHEA 2 project investigated short-term health effects of particles in eight European cities. In each city associations between particles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microm (PM(10)) and black smoke and daily counts of emergency hospital admissions for asthma (0-14 and 15-64 yr), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and all-respiratory disease (65+ yr) controlling for environmental factors and temporal patterns were investigated. Summary PM(10) effect estimates (percentage change in mean number of daily admissions per 10 microg/m(3) increase) were asthma (0-14 yr) 1.2% (95% CI: 0.2, 2.3), asthma (15-64 yr) 1.1% (0.3, 1.8), and COPD plus asthma and all-respiratory (65+ yr) 1.0% (0.4, 1.5) and 0.9% (0.6, 1.3). The combined estimates for Black Smoke tended to be smaller and less precisely estimated than for PM(10). Variability in the sizes of the PM(10) effect estimates between cities was also investigated. In the 65+ groups PM(10) estimates were positively associated with annual mean concentrations of ozone in the cities. For asthma admissions (0-14 yr) a number of city-specific factors, including smoking prevalence, explained some of their variability. This study confirms that particle concentrations in European cities are positively associated with increased numbers of admissions for respiratory diseases and that some of the variation in PM(10) effect estimates between cities can be explained by city characteristics.
PubMed ID
11734437 View in PubMed
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Acute fatal effects of short-lasting extreme temperatures in Stockholm, Sweden: evidence across a century of change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107127
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Nov;24(6):820-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Daniel Oudin Åström
Bertil Forsberg
Sören Edvinsson
Joacim Rocklöv
Author Affiliation
From the aDepartment of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; bAgeing and Living Conditions Programme, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; cCentre for Population Studies, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; and dDepartment of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Nov;24(6):820-9
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Extreme Cold - adverse effects
Extreme Heat - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Risk
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Climate change is projected to increase the frequency of extreme weather events. Short-term effects of extreme hot and cold weather and their effects on mortality have been thoroughly documented, as have epidemiologic and demographic changes throughout the 20th century. We investigated whether sensitivity to episodes of extreme heat and cold has changed in Stockholm, Sweden, from the beginning of the 20th century until the present.
We collected daily mortality and temperature data for the period 1901-2009 for present-day Stockholm County, Sweden. Heat extremes were defined as days for which the 2-day moving average of mean temperature was above the 98th percentile; cold extremes were defined as days for which the 26-day moving average was below the 2nd percentile. The relationship between extreme hot/cold temperatures and all-cause mortality, stratified by decade, sex, and age, was investigated through time series modeling, adjusting for time trends.
Total daily mortality was higher during heat extremes in all decades, with a declining trend over time in the relative risk associated with heat extremes, leveling off during the last three decades. The relative risk of mortality was higher during cold extremes for the entire period, with a more dispersed pattern across decades. Unlike for heat extremes, there was no decline in the mortality with cold extremes over time.
Although the relative risk of mortality during extreme temperature events appears to have fallen, such events still pose a threat to public health.
PubMed ID
24051892 View in PubMed
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Acute impacts of extreme temperature exposure on emergency room admissions related to mental and behavior disorders in Toronto, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256377
Source
J Affect Disord. 2014 Feb;155:154-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Xiang Wang
Eric Lavigne
Hélène Ouellette-kuntz
Bingshu E Chen
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Centre for Food-Borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Environmental Issues Division, Canada; Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, Canada. Electronic address: wanqus@gmail.com.
Source
J Affect Disord. 2014 Feb;155:154-61
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Cities
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Extreme Cold - adverse effects
Extreme Heat - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Nonlinear Dynamics
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Risk
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of extreme ambient temperature on hospital emergency room visits (ER) related to mental and behavioral illnesses in Toronto, Canada.
A time series study was conducted using health and climatic data from 2002 to 2010 in Toronto, Canada. Relative risks (RRs) for increases in emergency room (ER) visits were estimated for specific mental and behavioral diseases (MBD) after exposure to hot and cold temperatures while using the 50th percentile of the daily mean temperature as reference. Poisson regression models using a distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) were used. We adjusted for the effects of seasonality, humidity, day-of-the-week and outdoor air pollutants.
We found a strong association between MBD ER visits and mean daily temperature at 28?C. The association was strongest within a period of 0-4 days for exposure to hot temperatures. A 29% (RR=1.29, 95% CI 1.09-1.53) increase in MBD ER vists was observed over a cumulative period of 7 days after exposure to high ambient temperature (99th percentile vs. 50th percentile). Similar associations were reported for schizophrenia, mood, and neurotic disorers. No significant associations with cold temperatures were reported.
The ecological nature and the fact that only one city was investigated.
Our findings suggest that extreme temperature poses a risk to the health and wellbeing for individuals with mental and behavior illnesses. Patient management and education may need to be improved as extreme temperatures may become more prevalent with climate change.
PubMed ID
24332428 View in PubMed
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Acute infections and environmental exposure to organochlorines in Inuit infants from Nunavik.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4455
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Oct;112(14):1359-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Frédéric Dallaire
Eric Dewailly
Gina Muckle
Carole Vézina
Sandra W Jacobson
Joseph L Jacobson
Pierre Ayotte
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, and Public Health Research Unit, CHUQ-Laval University Medical Center, 945 Wolfe Street, Sainte-Foy, Québec G1V 5B3, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Oct;112(14):1359-65
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Cohort Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - analysis - poisoning
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - poisoning
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Insecticides - analysis - poisoning
Inuits
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology - etiology
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - poisoning
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The Inuit population of Nunavik (Canada) is exposed to immunotoxic organochlorines (OCs) mainly through the consumption of fish and marine mammal fat. We investigated the effect of perinatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) on the incidence of acute infections in Inuit infants. We reviewed the medical charts of a cohort of 199 Inuit infants during the first 12 months of life and evaluated the incidence rates of upper and lower respiratory tract infections (URTI and LRTIs, respectively), otitis media, and gastrointestinal (GI) infections. Maternal plasma during delivery and infant plasma at 7 months of age were sampled and assayed for PCBs and DDE. Compared to rates for infants in the first quartile of exposure to PCBs (least exposed), adjusted rate ratios for infants in higher quartiles ranged between 1.09 and 1.32 for URTIs, 0.99 and 1.39 for otitis, 1.52 and 1.89 for GI infections, and 1.16 and 1.68 for LRTIs during the first 6 months of follow-up. For all infections combined, the rate ratios ranged from 1.17 to 1.27. The effect size was similar for DDE exposure but was lower for the full 12-month follow-up. Globally, most rate ratios were > 1.0, but few were statistically significant (p
PubMed ID
15471725 View in PubMed
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Additional thyroid dose factor from transportation sources in Russia after the Chernobyl disaster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21799
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1997 Dec;105 Suppl 6:1491-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
E M Parshkov
I V Chebotareva
V A Sokolov
C E Dallas
Author Affiliation
Medical Radiological Research Center of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Obninsk, Kaluga Region, Russia. indep@mrrc.obninsk.su
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1997 Dec;105 Suppl 6:1491-6
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Power Plants
Railroads
Russia - epidemiology
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Ukraine
Abstract
Beginning approximately 4 years after the Chernobyl nuclear accident a steady increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer was observed in children and adolescents of the Bryansk Oblast, which received the highest level of radionuclide contaminants in Russia. We examined the spatial relationship between the residence location of patients with identified thyroid cancer (0-18 years old at the time of the accident) and a number of geographic parameters to better account for the etiology of thyroid cancer spatial distribution. Geographic parameters analyzed included spatial distribution of 137Cs and 131I in soil, population demographics, measurements and reconstructions. of absorbed thyroid 131I doses in the population, and maps of major transportation arteries. An interesting finding is the lack of a consistent correlation between the spatial distribution of radionuclides in the soil and thyroid cancer incidence. Instead, most of the thyroid cancer cases were diagnosed in settlements situated on major railways and roads. Correlating population with thyroid cancer cases and transportation arteries reveals a much higher cancer rate on or near major roads and railways than at a distance from them, again independent of radionuclide soil concentration. There are other important factors, of course, that must be considered in future evaluations of this phenomenon. These include the influence of iodine endemic zones, genetic predisposition to thyroid cancer, and duration of residence time in contaminated areas. The feasibility of radionuclide transport on railways and roads is discussed, together with the vectors for transfer of the contaminants to the human population. Developing a model to reconstruct the radiation dose to the thyroid over time in this geographic region is proposed in light of the impact of transportation arteries. Specific studies are outlined to provide the data necessary to develop this model as well as to better characterize the feasibility and scientific validity of the contribution to human health effects of this transport factor. Transport factor refers to the transport of radionuclides on transportation arteries and the transfer of these agents to the human population residing in the vicinity of these arteries. If the impact on thyroid cancer of the transport of radionuclides on major railways and roads is indeed significant, a major reappraisal of the risk of large-scale radioactive release into the environment is necessary.
PubMed ID
9467070 View in PubMed
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Age- and sex-specific relative thyroid radiation exposure to 131I in Ukraine after the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32325
Source
Health Phys. 2001 Mar;80(3):242-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
W F Heidenreich
I. Kayro
M. Chepurny
P. Jacob
V. Spak
G M Goulko
H G Paretzke
Author Affiliation
GSF--Institut für Strahlenschutz, Neuherberg, Germany. heidenreich@gsf.de
Source
Health Phys. 2001 Mar;80(3):242-50
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Infant
Iodine Radioisotopes - analysis - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Power Plants
Radiation Dosage
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Thyroid Gland - metabolism - radionuclide imaging
Ukraine
Abstract
The age- and sex-dependence of the 131I induced count rates is determined for the measurements performed in Ukraine after the Chernobyl accident on the thyroids of over 60,000 persons. For this, the individual measurements are scaled in such a way that the mean values over age and sex on one side and the mean values over measurement series on the other side are normalized to one. The resulting distribution of all scaled measurements is roughly log-normal. Half of them lie within a factor 1.6 of the median. 131I induced count rates have a minimum at birth year 1986, about half the value of adults. The maximum count rates with about 30% above adults are reached for males around age 16 y. The count rates are up to about 40% (at age 14-17 y) higher for males than for females. The results are within statistical uncertainties independent of the geographical area and the urban or rural nature of the settlements. Starting from the relative count rates, the age- and sex-dependence is calculated for the thyroid activities 1 mo after the accident for the integrated activities and for the doses. The dose of young children is a factor of about 6.5 higher than that of adults. Uncertainties are estimated throughout.
PubMed ID
11219536 View in PubMed
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Age dependencies of 90Sr incorporation in dental tissues: comparative analysis and interpretation of different kinds of measurements obtained for residents on the Techa River.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183632
Source
Health Phys. 2003 Oct;85(4):409-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Evgenia I Tolstykh
Elena A Shishkina
Marina O Degteva
Denis V Ivanov
Valentina A Shved
Sergey N Bayankin
Lynn R Anspaugh
Bruce A Napier
Albrecht Wieser
Peter Jacob
Author Affiliation
Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, 454076 Chelyabinsk, Russia. evgenia@urcrm.chel.su
Source
Health Phys. 2003 Oct;85(4):409-19
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Bone and Bones - radiation effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Dental Enamel - radiation effects
Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Radioactive fallout
Russia
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis
Time Factors
Tooth - growth & development - radiation effects
Abstract
Human teeth have been considered as dosimeters for decades. Methods include the in vivo measurement of 90Sr/90Y in teeth with a tooth-beta counter, the radiochemical determination of 90Sr in whole teeth, and the measurement of dose in teeth by use of electron paramagnetic resonance. Presented in this paper are results of 2,514 tooth-beta counter measurements, 334 radiochemical measurements, and 218 electron paramagnetic resonance measurements for residents living in settlements along the Techa River. All three kinds of measurements indicate a sharp peak that corresponds to the uptake of 90Sr by tooth tissue. The results can be interpreted in terms of an intake function for 90Sr only if the period of calcification of each individual tooth is considered--such detail on a tooth-by-tooth basis is presented in this paper. The conclusion is reached that the tooth-beta counter data are the most reliable in terms of reconstruction of 90Sr intake; this is due in part to the fact that the tooth-beta counter measures four teeth (all at position 1) with essentially the same time periods of mineralization and because there are a large number of tooth-beta counter measurements. The main utility of electron paramagnetic resonance measurements is considered to be the validation of estimates of external dose; but for this purpose teeth with 90Sr taken up into enamel must be avoided.
PubMed ID
13678281 View in PubMed
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Agricultural, socioeconomic and environmental variables as risks for human verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) infection in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130372
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2011;11:275
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Katri Jalava
Jukka Ollgren
Marjut Eklund
Anja Siitonen
Markku Kuusi
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Disease Surveillance and Control, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. katri.jalava@thl.fi
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2011;11:275
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Environmental Exposure
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Molecular Typing
Risk factors
Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Socioeconomic Factors
Virulence Factors - genetics
Abstract
Verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) is the cause of severe gastrointestinal infection especially among infants. Between 10 and 20 cases are reported annually to the National Infectious Disease Register (NIDR) in Finland. The aim of this study was to identify explanatory variables for VTEC infections reported to the NIDR in Finland between 1997 and 2006. We applied a hurdle model, applicable for a dataset with an excess of zeros.
We enrolled 131 domestically acquired primary cases of VTEC between 1997 and 2006 from routine surveillance data. The isolated strains were characterized by virulence type, serogroup, phage type and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. By applying a two-part Bayesian hurdle model to infectious disease surveillance data, we were able to create a model in which the covariates were associated with the probability for occurrence of the cases in the logistic regression part and the magnitude of covariate changes in the Poisson regression part if cases do occur. The model also included spatial correlations between neighbouring municipalities.
The average annual incidence rate was 4.8 cases per million inhabitants based on the cases as reported to the NIDR. Of the 131 cases, 74 VTEC O157 and 58 non-O157 strains were isolated (one person had dual infections). The number of bulls per human population and the proportion of the population with a higher education were associated with an increased occurrence and incidence of human VTEC infections in 70 (17%) of 416 of Finnish municipalities. In addition, the proportion of fresh water per area, the proportion of cultivated land per area and the proportion of low income households with children were associated with increased incidence of VTEC infections.
With hurdle models we were able to distinguish between risk factors for the occurrence of the disease and the incidence of the disease for data characterised by an excess of zeros. The density of bulls and the proportion of the population with higher education were significant both for occurrence and incidence, while the proportion of fresh water, cultivated land, and the proportion of low income households with children were significant for the incidence of the disease.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22008456 View in PubMed
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Airborne endotoxin is associated with respiratory illness in the first 2 years of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169949
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Apr;114(4):610-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Robert Dales
David Miller
Ken Ruest
Mireille Guay
Stan Judek
Author Affiliation
Air Health Effects Division, Health Canada, Ottawa Hospital (General Campus), 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6, Canada. rdales@ottawahospital.on.ca
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Apr;114(4):610-4
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Child, Preschool
Endotoxins - toxicity
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Prince Edward Island
Respiratory Tract Diseases - chemically induced
Abstract
To determine the influence of endotoxin on the incidence of acute respiratory illness during the first 2 years of life, we carried out a longitudinal follow-up study, beginning at birth, of 332 children born in Prince Edward Island, Canada. We measured 5-day averaged air endotoxin in the homes of children, whose parents provided information by daily symptom diaries and twice-monthly telephone contact for up to 2 years. Endotoxin concentration was 0.49 +/- 3.49 EU/m3 (geometric mean +/- geometric SD), and number of annualized illness episodes was 6.83 +/- 2.80 (mean +/- SD). A doubling of the air endotoxin concentration was associated with an increase of 0.32 illness episodes per year (p = 0.0003), adjusted for age, year of study, breast-feeding, environmental tobacco smoke, child care attendance, indoor temperature, and income. Indoor mold surface area and fungal ergosterol were not significantly associated with endotoxin. Airborne endotoxin appears to be a risk factor for clinically symptomatic respiratory illnesses during the first 2 years of life independent of indoor fungus.
Notes
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Comment In: Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Jul;118(7):A30420601319
PubMed ID
16581554 View in PubMed
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Airborne enteric micro-organisms and ammonia levels in diaper-changing rooms in kindergartens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126489
Source
Lett Appl Microbiol. 2012 May;54(5):462-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
P E Vaattovaara
M. Kivimäenpää
P. Vaattovaara
P. Pasanen
H. Heinonen-Tanski
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. piia.vaattovaara@uef.fi
Source
Lett Appl Microbiol. 2012 May;54(5):462-7
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Ammonia - analysis
Finland
Humans
Incontinence Pads
Infant
Infant care
Abstract
We evaluated risks associated with diaper changing in Finnish kindergartens where children were using either modern disposable paper or reusable cloth diapers.
We determined enteric micro-organisms and ammonia in diaper-changing rooms in four kindergartens in autumn and winter in the ambient air. No coliphages were detected in the air. The numbers of faecal coliforms and enterococci in air were typically low regardless of whether the children used either paper or cloth diapers. Ammonia concentrations increased over the background level because of diaper changing.
The numbers of bacteria or coliphages are not expected to pose any high air hygiene risks, and increased ammonia air concentrations are unlikely to impair the health of staff or children when diapers are changed in modern kindergartens. However, increased ammonia gas concentrations indicate that some other diaper-related gas-phase emissions should be studied to understand better diaper-related health risks.
Modern reusable cloth baby diapers and the modern paper baby diapers used in this study are equally safe with respect to risks from airborne virus, bacteria or ammonia.
PubMed ID
22385430 View in PubMed
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Airborne particulate matter from primarily geologic, non-industrial sources at levels below National Ambient Air Quality Standards is associated with outpatient visits for asthma and quick-relief medication prescriptions among children less than 20 years old enrolled in Medicaid in Anchorage, Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80178
Source
Environ Res. 2007 Mar;103(3):397-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Chimonas Marc-Andre R
Gessner Bradford D
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA. mchimonas@msn.com
Source
Environ Res. 2007 Mar;103(3):397-404
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska - epidemiology
Ambulatory Care - statistics & numerical data
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medicaid
Models, Statistical
Particle Size
Particulate Matter - adverse effects - analysis - standards
Abstract
In Anchorage, Alaska, particulates with aerodynamic diameter or = 34 micro g/m(3). A significant 18.1% increase (RR: 1.181, 95% CI: 1.010-1.381) in the rate of quick-relief medication prescriptions occurred during days with PM(10) of 34-60 micro g/m(3), and a 28.8% increase (RR: 1.288, 95% CI: 1.026-1.619) occurred during days with PM(10) > or = 61 micro g/m(3). Similar results for outpatient asthma visits and quick-relief medication occurred in weekly models. There were no significant associations with PM(2.5) in either daily or weekly models. These subtle but statistically significant associations suggest that non-industrial, geologic sources of PM(10) may have measurable health effects at levels below current national standards.
PubMed ID
17049511 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and emergency department visits for chest pain and weakness in Edmonton, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143778
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2010;23(1):15-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Brian Rowe
Author Affiliation
Air Health Effects Research Section, Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. mietek_szyszkowicz@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2010;23(1):15-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Chest Pain - chemically induced
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Fatigue - chemically induced
Female
Humans
Humidity
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Temperature
Young Adult
Abstract
Chest pain or weakness can be first signal of health problems. Many studies demonstrate that these conditions can be related to air pollution. This work uses time-series data to investigate the association.
This is a study of 68,714 emergency department (ED) visits for chest pain (ICD-9: 786) and of 66,092 ED visits for weakness (ICD-9: 780). The hierarchical method was applied to analyse the associations between daily counts of ED visits for chest pain and weakness (separately) and the levels of the air pollutants and meteorological variables. The counts of visits for all patients, males and females were analysed separately by whole period (I-XII), warm (IV-IX) and cold (X-III).
The results are presented in the form of the excess risks associated with an increase in the interquartile range (IQR) for the pollutant. Chest pain: 2.4% (95% CI: 1.0-3.9) for CO, females, I-XII; 3.8% (95% CI: 0.0-7.8) for NO(2), males, IV-IX; 4.5% (95% CI: 0.9-8.3) for O(3) (1-day lagged), males, IV-IX; 2.8% (95% CI: 0.5-5.2), for PM(10), males, X-III; 2.0% (95% CI: 0.0-4.0), for SO(2), females, X-III; 2.1% (95% CI: 0.2-4.0) for PM(2.5), all, X-III. Weakness: 2.1% (95% CI: 0.4-3.7) for CO (2-day lagged), males, X-III; 3.4% (95% CI: 1.0-5.9) for NO(2) (2-day lagged), males, X-III; 2.4% (95% CI: 0.9-3.9) for SO(2), females, I-XII; 4.6% (95% CI: 1.0-8.2) for O(3) (1-day lagged), females, IV-IX.
Obtained findings provide support for the hypothesis that ED visits for chest pain and weakness are associated with exposure to ambient air pollution.
PubMed ID
20442058 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and emergency department visits for otitis media: a case-crossover study in Edmonton, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141881
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Nov;118(11):1631-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Roger Zemek
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Brian H Rowe
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario and University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Nov;118(11):1631-6
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Alberta
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Child, Preschool
Cross-Over Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Humans
Infant
Inhalation Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Odds Ratio
Otitis Media - epidemiology
Ozone - analysis
Particle Size
Particulate Matter - analysis
Risk factors
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis
Weather
Abstract
Otitis media (OM) is one of the most common early childhood infections, resulting in an enormous economic burden to the health care system through unscheduled doctor visits and antibiotic prescriptions.
The objective of this study was to investigate the potential association between ambient air pollution exposure and emergency department (ED) visits for OM.
Ten years of ED data were obtained from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, and linked to levels of air pollution: carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3), sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter (PM) of median aerometric diameter
Notes
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PubMed ID
20663739 View in PubMed
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Air pollution from traffic at the residence of children with cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19980
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Mar 1;153(5):433-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2001
Author
O. Raaschou-Nielsen
O. Hertel
B L Thomsen
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen 0, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Mar 1;153(5):433-43
Date
Mar-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Benzene - adverse effects
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Vehicle Emissions - adverse effects
Abstract
The hypothesis that exposure to traffic-related air pollution increases the risk of developing cancer during childhood was investigated. The authors enrolled 1,989 children reported to the Danish Cancer Registry with a diagnosis of leukemia, tumor of the central nervous system, or malignant lymphoma during 1968-1991 and 5,506 control children selected at random from the entire childhood population. The residential histories of the children were traced from 9 months before birth until the time of diagnosis of the cases and a similar period for the controls. For each of the 18,440 identified addresses, information on traffic and the configuration of streets and buildings was collected. Average concentrations of benzene and nitrogen dioxide (indicators of traffic-related air pollution) were calculated for the relevant period, and exposures to air pollution during pregnancy and during childhood were calculated separately. The risks of leukemia, central nervous system tumors, and all selected cancers combined were not linked to exposure to benzene or nitrogen dioxide during either period. The risk of lymphomas increased by 25% (p for trend = 0.06) and 51% (p for trend = 0.05) for a doubling of the concentration of benzene and nitrogen dioxide, respectively, during the pregnancy. The association was restricted to Hodgkin's disease.
PubMed ID
11226975 View in PubMed
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Alaska Maternal and Child Health Data Book 2011: Alaska Native Edition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287909
Source
A collaboration of the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, and the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Alaska Native Epidemiology Center. 118 pages.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2011
Alaska Maternal and Child Health Data Book 2011: Alaska Native Edition Alaska Division of Public Health  Alaska Native Epidemiology Center Alaska Maternal and Child Health Data Book 2011: Alaska Native Edition Alaska Division of Public Health  Alaska Native Epidemiology Center
  1 document  
Author
Young MB
Perham-Hester KA
Kemberling MM.
Source
A collaboration of the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, and the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Alaska Native Epidemiology Center. 118 pages.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
19458292
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Maternal
Child
Reproductive health care
Demographics
Substance use
Infant
Abstract
This edition of the Alaska MCH Data Book will provide policy makers, public health professionals and health care providers with critical data on leading issues affecting women before, during and after pregnancy, and preschool age children. This book is unique in that it reports all analyses by Alaska Native status and, in some cases, by tribal health region. The goal of this book is to provide data that can be used in both tribal and non-tribal programs to design, implement, monitor, and evaluate programs. By focusing on Alaska Native status these data will be particularly helpful to health care staff and administrators in areas of rural Alaska that serve predominantly Alaska Native people. Please share with us how you have used the data published here. You may contact the PRAMS/CUBS staff by e-mail at mch-epi@alaska.gov or by phone at 1-888-269-3470.
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