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696 records – page 1 of 35.

[4th International Symposium on arctic medicine]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4380
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1979 Feb;(2):60
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Feb-1979

7th International Symposium on Neurobehavioral Methods and Effects in Occupational and Environmental Health. 20-23 June 1999. Stockholm, Sweden. Abstracts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49214
Source
Neurotoxicology. 2000 Oct;21(5):867-910
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Oct-2000

43rd Nordic work environment meeting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49285
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1994 Dec;20(6):468-70
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Dec-1994
Author
T. Leino
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1994 Dec;20(6):468-70
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Environmental health
Humans
Norway
Occupational Health
PubMed ID
7701294 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and celiac disease risk in second-generation immigrants: a nationwide cohort study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122335
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2012 Oct;47(10):1174-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Carl Johan Wingren
Daniel Agardh
Juan Merlo
Author Affiliation
Unit for Social Epidemiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. carl_johan.wingren@med.lu.se
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2012 Oct;47(10):1174-80
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Celiac Disease - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Effect
Cohort Studies
Cost of Illness
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Environmental health
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mothers - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The burden of celiac disease (CD) is increasingly recognized as a global problem. However, whether this situation depends on genetics or environmental factors is uncertain. The authors examined these aspects in Sweden, a country in which the risk of CD is generally considered to be high. If environmental factors are relevant, CD risk in second-generation immigrant children should be related to maternal length of stay in Sweden before delivery.
Linking the Swedish Medical Birth Registry to other national registries, the authors investigated all singleton children (n = 792,401) born in Sweden between 1987 and 1993. They studied the risk of CD in children before age 6 as a function of the mother's geographical region of birth and length of stay in Sweden before delivery using Cox regression models.
In children whose mothers immigrated to Sweden from a country outside of Europe, a maternal length of stay in Sweden of more than 5 years increased the hazard ratio (HR) of CD (1.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-2.81). The authors observed a similar result among children born to mothers from a Nordic country outside of Sweden (HR 1.57, 95% CI 0.89-2.75), but a non-conclusive protective effect was observed in second-generation immigrant children from a non-Nordic European country (HR 0.65, 95% CI 0.39-1.09).
The risk of CD among second-generation immigrants seems to be conditioned by maternal length of stay in Sweden before delivery, suggesting that environmental factors contribute to the variation in CD risk observed across populations.
PubMed ID
22827636 View in PubMed
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[A concept of promoting health in the population of the circumpolar regions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4359
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 1993 Sep-Oct;(8):32-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
V I Khasnulin
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 1993 Sep-Oct;(8):32-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Antarctic Regions
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate
Ecology
English Abstract
Environmental health
Health promotion
Health status
Humans
Siberia
Abstract
The preservation of human health in polar and circumpolar regions depends mainly on the strategy for future development of these regions. The consequences of human intervention into northern ecology are irreversible, as in the case of greenhouse effect, industrial and atomic pollutions of polar nature, tundra devastation, destruction of northern flora and fauna, etc. The ongoing creation of large-scale industrial population centers in the North due to newcomers is to be stopped. Polar regions are to be used for biospheric reservation and tourist sanitary zones, to preserve specific flora and fauna, to provide the rhythms and customs necessary to survive in extreme climatic and geophysical conditions of high latitudes. The programme for securing man's survival in circumpolar regions should comprise several stages of practical measures to provide necessary resources and to combine international efforts. The preservation of human health should be based on the understanding of the relationship between the health status and biospheric processes and the assessment of the role of human intervention into polar ecology. A programme facilitating the preservation of human health and survival in the North and in the Antarctic should be launched.
PubMed ID
7507378 View in PubMed
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[Adolescents' physical development in a poor environmental area].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156996
Source
Gig Sanit. 2008 Mar-Apr;(2):89-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
A N Uzunova
I P Tsvetova
S V Neriakhina
O V Lopatina
M L Zaitseva
A G Ural'shin
Source
Gig Sanit. 2008 Mar-Apr;(2):89-91
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development - physiology
Child
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental health
Environmental Illness - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Male
Morbidity - trends
Russia - epidemiology
Sexual Development - physiology
Abstract
Physical and sexual developments were determined in 285 schoolchildren aged 12 to 17 years from the town of Karabash, an area of ecological ill-being in the environmental levels of heavy metal salts. The atmospheric air pollution was in parallel monitored at route observational stations. It was found that 39% of the schoolchildren had disharmonic physical development; of them a fourth had lower body weight and decreased chest circumference with normal growth indices. The girls were observed to have a high frequency of a microsomatotype of harmonic physical development and disharmonic physical development mainly at the expense of underweight (52.9% of all the disharmonically developed girls) as compared with the boys. There was a preponderance of female adolescents with sexual retardation. In the population of Karabash girls, the mean age at menarche was 12 years and 9 months +/- 1.5 months.
PubMed ID
18507177 View in PubMed
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Source
Arctic Med Res. 1993 Oct;52(4):142
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Oct-1993
Author
J P Hansen
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1993 Oct;52(4):142
Date
Oct-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Delivery of Health Care
Environmental health
Health Services, Indigenous
PubMed ID
7905735 View in PubMed
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[A genetic and demographic study of Dagestan highland populations and migrants to the lowlands. The relationship between levels of consanguinity, homozygosity and physiologic sensitivity].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213559
Source
Genetika. 1996 Jan;32(1):93-102
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1996
Author
K B Bulaeva
T A Pavlova
S M Charukhilova
I E Bodia
G G Guseinov
S Kh Akhkuev
Source
Genetika. 1996 Jan;32(1):93-102
Date
Jan-1996
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Altitude
Consanguinity
Dagestan
Demography
Environmental health
Female
Genetics, Population
Homozygote
Humans
Male
Transients and Migrants
Abstract
This is a continuation of a series of papers devoted to studying the genetic mechanisms of adaptation in migrants from isolated highland populations of Dagestan to new ecological conditions (lowlands). This paper describes the main results of studying the relationship between levels of inbreeding, homozygosity, and physiological sensitivity. Earlier, we found that decreased resistance to changing environmental factors in migrants to lowlands from the Dagestan highlands was connected with their high level of homozygosity. The data obtained allow us to assume that missing links in this chain of events include, in addition to parameters of inbreeding level, parameters of neurophysiological sensitivity, including absolute and differential sensitivity of various analyzers sensory systems, which are from 65 to 75% genetically determined. Migrants from highland auls (villages) to lowlands exhibited a decreased rate of sensomotor reactions in response to light and sound of various intensities, as well as decreased differential color sensitivity in the long-, medium-, and short-wave ranges of the spectrum, compared to highlanders. The results suggest the selective mortality of migrants from highlands to lowlands during adaptation to new conditions. Those migrants who dies were characterized by specific gene complexes that determined the characteristic features of expression of a number of interrelated polymorphic and quantitative traits. Thus, the high levels of homozygosity and inbreeding were accompanied by a greater neurophysiological sensitivity and lower indices of body weight and height.
PubMed ID
8647428 View in PubMed
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[A genetic-epidemiological model of predisposition to ischemic heart disease (1)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222353
Source
Kardiologiia. 1993;33(10):18-21, 3-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
T A Rozhkova
V A Koshechkin
E I Drigalenko
G S Zhukovskii
E Iu Solov'eva
Source
Kardiologiia. 1993;33(10):18-21, 3-4
Date
1993
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Chi-Square Distribution
Disease Susceptibility
Environmental health
Gene Frequency
Genes, Dominant
Genes, Recessive
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Genetic
Moscow - epidemiology
Myocardial Ischemia - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Pedigree
Prevalence
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A genetic and epidemiological sample of 20-59-year-old males, Moscow residents (n = 3141), was surveyed. The authors obtained data on the prevalence of coronary heart disease from epidemiological criteria and genealogical data on cardiovascular diseases by the "Familial History" questionnaire in the first-degree relatives who were interviewed by using a genetic and mathematical monolocus diallelic model. It was found that out of the 10 possible variants under study a genetic and environmental variant with independent penetrance of 3 genotypes adequately describes the prevalence of coronary heart disease in the families and in the population. This suggest that both genetic and environmental factors have an influence on the prevalence of coronary heart disease and that there is a possible genetic polymorphism of the disease.
PubMed ID
8139164 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Jan 20;122(2):198-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-2002
Author
Teresa Løvold Berents
Bjørgulf Claussen
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for arbeids- og trygdemedisin Institutt for allmenn- og samfunnsmedisin Postboks 1130 Blindern 0317 Oslo. tvlovold@hotmail.com
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Jan 20;122(2):198-201
Date
Jan-20-2002
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental health
Health status
Humans
Morbidity
Mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Feb 28;122(6):65111998725
PubMed ID
11873580 View in PubMed
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Air pollution as a cause of heart disease. Time for action.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191008
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2002 Mar 20;39(6):943-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2002
Author
Stanton A Glantz
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2002 Mar 20;39(6):943-5
Date
Mar-20-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Environmental health
Heart Diseases - chemically induced
Humans
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2002 Mar 20;39(6):935-4211897432
PubMed ID
11897433 View in PubMed
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Air pollution in the Cook Inlet Basin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4405
Source
Alaska Med. 1968 Mar;10(1):45-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1968
Author
C P Judkins
J C Emerson
Source
Alaska Med. 1968 Mar;10(1):45-7
Date
Mar-1968
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution
Alaska
Environmental health
Humans
Industrial Waste
PubMed ID
5648913 View in PubMed
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Alaska Environmental Health Association (AEHA)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288383
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Alaska Environmental Health Association
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Public Health
Environmental health
Health Personnel
Environment
Abstract
AEHA is a professional group of sanitarians and environmental health professionals who work to control those factors of the environment that result or may result in harmful effects to the health and well-being of all Alaskans.
Online Resources
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Source
Public Health Reports. 1960 Oct;75(10):877-912
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1960
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
U.S. Public Health Service
Source
Public Health Reports. 1960 Oct;75(10):877-912
Date
Oct-1960
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
University of Alaska Anchorage
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Keywords
Dental services
Diet, general
Environmental health
Health services
Health status
Hospitals
Mental health services
Physicians
Public health nursing
Abstract
Alaska is in a particularly critical period. The transition from territory to state presents complex tasks of organization to be accomplished with as little disturbance of functions as is humanly possible. New sources of revenue are to be tapped. New programs are to be initiated. Established services, formerly provided by federal agencies, are passing to the state. Alaska is in many respects still a frontier, undergoing settlement and early growth. A large segment of the population is moving from a primitive hunter's culture to the culture of the nuclear age almost in a single generation. Another segment is composed of transient military personnel and their dependents. The remainder is a complex of established settlers, newcomers, and seasonal workers, with multiplying demands for public services. A review of Alaska's health at this juncture seems timely. The successful development of Alaska as a home and as a resource for a democratic people depends on what is done to promote the health and vigor of all who live and work there, for this generation and generations to come. It is with this thought above all that the following pages consider the status and development of health in Alaska, the largest and the least developed of the 50 States.
Notes
Alaska Medical Library - From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 106.
UAA - ALASKA RA447.A4A4 1960
UAF - ALASKA RA447.A4A4 1960
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 375.
Online Resources
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Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Epidemiology Center. 250 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
August 2017
.................................................................................. 156 Adult Immunizations......................................................................................... 158 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH HIGHLIGHTS.................................................................... 161 Rural Water & Wastewater Service
  1 document  
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Epidemiology Center. 250 p.
Date
August 2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
19812419
Keywords
Alaska
Natives
Cancer
Demographics
Lifestyle risk factors
Maternal and child health
Morbidity
Mortality
Regional profiles
Medical care
Health and hygiene
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium
Alaska Statistics
Preventive care
Environmental health
Notes
Second edition.
Documents

AN_HealthStatusReport_FINAL2017.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
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Alaska Natives assessing the health of their environment

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4347
Source
Pages 479-486 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Health care 6012001 ALASKA NATIVES ASSESSING THE HEALTH OFTHEIR ENVIRONMENT ABSTRACT The changes in Alaska's ecosystems caused by pollution, contami- nants and global climate change are negatively impacting Alaska Natives and rural residents who rely on natural resources for food, culture
  1 document  
Author
Garza, D
Author Affiliation
Marine Advisory Program, University of Alaska, Ketchikan 99901, USA. ffdag@uaf.edu
Source
Pages 479-486 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Alaska
Attitude to Health
Environmental health
Environmental pollution
Food Contamination
Humans
Indians, North American
Information Services
Abstract
The changes in Alaska's ecosystems caused by pollution, contaminants and global climate change are negatively impacting Alaska Natives and rural residents who rely on natural resources for food, culture and community identity. While Alaska commerce has contributed little to these global changes and impacts, Alaska and its resources are nonetheless affected by the changes. While Alaska Natives have historically relied on Alaska's land, water and animals for survival and cultural identity, today their faith in the safety and quality of these resources has decreased. Alaska Natives no longer believe that these wild resources are the best and many are turning to alternative store-bought foods. Such a change in diet and activity may be contributing to a decline in traditional activities and a decline in general health. Contaminants are showing up in the animals, fish and waters that Alaska Natives use. Efforts need to be expanded to empower Alaska Native Tribes to collect and analyze local wild foods for various contaminants. In addition existing information on contaminants and pollution should be made readily available to Alaska residents. Armed with this type of information Alaska Native residents will be better prepared to make informed decisions on using wild foods and materials.
PubMed ID
11768422 View in PubMed
Documents
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Allergic and non-allergic students' perception of the same high school environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49228
Source
Indoor Air. 1999 Jun;9(2):92-102
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
L. Lundin
Author Affiliation
Kristianstad University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Sweden. lundin.lena@telia.com
Source
Indoor Air. 1999 Jun;9(2):92-102
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air pollution, indoor
Attitude to Health
Environmental health
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - psychology
Male
Sick Building Syndrome - psychology
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
The aim of the study was to describe how allergics and non-allergics perceive the same environment. All high school students in a town in southern Sweden were invited to answer a questionnaire concerning allergy, subjective symptoms, annoyance reactions and perception of the environment (response rate: 81%). The results show that only 45% of the students were non-allergic (n = 1,715). Since the symptom frequency among non-allergic students was normal, the schools were classified as healthy. However, compared to the non-allergic students, a higher percentage among the allergics suffered from symptoms every week, a lower percentage was satisfied with the air quality and the cleaning, and a higher percentage was bothered every week by temperature, stuffy/stale air, bad odor, passive smoke, bad lighting, noise, dust and dirt (ANOVA, P
PubMed ID
10390934 View in PubMed
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696 records – page 1 of 35.