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Fine and coarse particulate air pollution in relation to respiratory health in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117286
Source
Eur Respir J. 2013 Oct;42(4):924-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Saskia M Willers
Charlotta Eriksson
Lars Gidhagen
Mats E Nilsson
Göran Pershagen
Tom Bellander
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2013 Oct;42(4):924-34
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Cities
Cough - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure
Female
Geography
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Particulate Matter - adverse effects
Regression Analysis
Respiration Disorders - chemically induced - epidemiology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - etiology
Sweden
Vehicle Emissions - analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
Health effects have repeatedly been associated with residential levels of air pollution. However, it is difficult to disentangle effects of long-term exposure to locally generated and long-range transported pollutants, as well as to exhaust emissions and wear particles from road traffic. We aimed to investigate effects of exposure to particulate matter fractions on respiratory health in the Swedish adult population, using an integrated assessment of sources at different geographical scales. The study was based on a nationwide environmental health survey performed in 2007, including 25,851 adults aged 18-80 years. Individual exposure to particulate matter at residential addresses was estimated by dispersion modelling of regional, urban and local sources. Associations between different size fractions or source categories and respiratory outcomes were analysed using multiple logistic regression, adjusting for individual and contextual confounding. Exposure to locally generated wear particles showed associations for blocked nose or hay fever, chest tightness or cough, and restricted activity days with odds ratios of 1.5-2 per 10-µg·m(-3) increase. Associations were also seen for locally generated combustion particles, which disappeared following adjustment for exposure to wear particles. In conclusion, our data indicate that long-term exposure to locally generated road wear particles increases the risk of respiratory symptoms in adults.
PubMed ID
23314898 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of self-reported allergic and non-allergic rhinitis symptoms in Stockholm: relation to age, gender, olfactory sense and smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15280
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2003 Jan;123(1):75-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Petter Olsson
Niklas Berglind
Tom Bellander
Pär Stjärne
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. petter.olsson@ent.hs.sll.se
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2003 Jan;123(1):75-80
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Attitude to Health
Causality
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diagnosis, Differential
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Olfaction Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rhinitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of isolated self-reported allergic and non-allergic rhinitis symptoms in an adult population and to explore the relations to age, gender, olfaction and smoking habits. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Self-judged health and environmental exposures were investigated by means of a questionnaire survey administered to a stratified random sample of 15,000 adults in Stockholm County. RESULTS: A total of 10,670 individuals were included in the analysis, corresponding to a response rate of 73%. The results revealed a high prevalence of self-reported non-allergic rhinitis, 19%, almost as high as the prevalence of self-reported allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, 24%. In contrast to current clinical opinion, we did not find a significant increase in the prevalence of non-allergic symptoms with increased age. There were no statistically significant gender differences in the prevalence of either allergic or non-allergic symptoms. A reduced sense of smell was twice as common in the non-allergic group, 23%, as in the healthy population. The prevalence of rhinitis symptoms differed according to smoking habits. CONCLUSION: Both self-reported allergic rhinitis symptoms and non-allergic nasal symptoms are frequent in the population sample. Self-reported non-allergic nasal symptoms seem to occur independent of age and reduced olfactory sense is a common complaint among these subjects. The prevalence of self-reported allergic and non-allergic nasal symptoms did not differ much between men and women or between individuals with different smoking habits.
PubMed ID
12625578 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of self-reported hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields in a population-based questionnaire survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49193
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Feb;28(1):33-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Lena Hillert
Niklas Berglind
Bengt B Arnetz
Tom Bellander
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health, Norrbacka/Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. lena.hillert@medhs.ki.se
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Feb;28(1):33-41
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electricity - adverse effects
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Participation
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Probability
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The prevalence of medically unexplained symptoms attributed to exposure to electromagnetic fields is still largely unknown. Previous studies have investigated reported hypersensitivity to electricity in selected groups recruited from workplaces or outpatient clinics. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of self-reported hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields in the general population and to describe characteristics of the group reporting such hypersensitivity with regard to demographics, other complaints, hypersensitivities, and traditional allergies. METHODS: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted in 1997 among 15,000 men and women between 19 and 80 years of age in Stockholm County. The response rate was 73%. RESULTS: One and a half percent of the respondents reported hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields. Prevalence was highest among women and in the 60- to 69-year age group. The hypersensitive group reported all symptoms, allergies, and other types of hypersensitivities included in the survey (as well as being disturbed by various factors in the home) to a significantly greater extent than the rest of the respondents. No specific symptom profile set off the hypersensitive group from the rest of the respondents. CONCLUSIONS: The results should be interpreted with caution. But they suggest that there is widespread concern among the general population about risks to health posed by electric and magnetic fields. More research is warranted to explore ill health among people reporting hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields.
PubMed ID
11871850 View in PubMed
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Traffic noise and cardiovascular health in Sweden: the roadside study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121324
Source
Noise Health. 2012 Jul-Aug;14(59):140-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Charlotta Eriksson
Mats E Nilsson
Saskia M Willers
Lars Gidhagen
Tom Bellander
Göran Pershagen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Charlotta.eriksson@ki.se
Source
Noise Health. 2012 Jul-Aug;14(59):140-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Vehicles
Noise, Transportation - adverse effects
Railroads
Risk
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Long-term exposure to traffic noise has been suggested to increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). However, few studies have been performed in the general population and on railway noise. This study aimed to investigate the cardiovascular effects of living near noisy roads and railways. This cross-sectional study comprised 25,851 men and women, aged 18-80 years, who had resided in Sweden for at least 5 years. All subjects participated in a National Environmental Health Survey, performed in 2007, in which they reported on health, annoyance reactions and environmental factors. Questionnaire data on self-reported doctor's diagnosis of hypertension and/or CVD were used as outcomes. Exposure was assessed as Traffic Load (millions of vehicle kilometres per year) within 500 m around each participant's residential address. For a sub-population (n = 2498), we also assessed road traffic and railway noise in L(den) at the dwelling façade. Multiple logistic regression models were used to assess Prevalence Odds Ratios (POR) and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI). No statistically significant associations were found between Traffic Load and self-reported hypertension or CVD. In the sub-population, there was no association between road traffic noise and the outcomes; however, an increased risk of CVD was suggested among subjects exposed to railway noise =50 dB(A); POR 1.55 (95% CI 1.00-2.40). Neither Traffic Load nor road traffic noise was, in this study, associated with self-reported cardiovascular outcomes. However, there was a borderline-significant association between railway noise and CVD. The lack of association for road traffic may be due to methodological limitations.
PubMed ID
22918143 View in PubMed
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