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The association between endotoxin and lung function among children and adolescents living in a rural area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128591
Source
Can Respir J. 2011 Nov-Dec;18(6):e89-94
Publication Type
Article
Author
Joshua A Lawson
James A Dosman
Donna C Rennie
Jeremy Beach
Stephen C Newman
Ambikaipakan Senthilselvan
Author Affiliation
Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. josh.lawson@usask.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2011 Nov-Dec;18(6):e89-94
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Cotinine - analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dust - analysis
Endotoxins - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Rural Health
Saliva - chemistry
Saskatchewan
Sex Factors
Spirometry
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Vital Capacity
Abstract
BACKGROUND/
Knowledge of the effects of domestic endotoxin on children's lung function is limited. The association between domestic endotoxin and asthma or wheeze and lung function among school-age children (six to 18 years of age) was examined. The interaction between endotoxin and other personal and environmental characteristics and lung function was also assessed.
A case-control study was conducted in and around the rural community of Humboldt, Saskatchewan, between 2005 and 2007. Parents of cases reported either doctor-diagnosed asthma or wheeze in the previous year. Controls were randomly selected from those not reporting these conditions. Data were collected by questionnaire to ascertain symptoms and conditions, while spirometry was used to measure lung function including forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s. Dust collected from the child's play area floor and the child's mattress was used to quantify endotoxin, and saliva was collected to quantify cotinine levels and assess tobacco smoke exposure.
There were 102 cases and 207 controls included in the present study. Lower forced expiratory volume in 1 s was associated with higher mattress endotoxin load among female cases (beta=-0.25, SE=0.07 [P
Notes
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PubMed ID
22187693 View in PubMed
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Differences in respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function in children in 2 Saskatchewan communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181705
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2004 Jan;92(1):52-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Donna C Rennie
Joshua A Lawson
Donald W Cockcroft
Ambikaipakan Senthilselvan
Helen H McDuffie
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, Institute of Agricultural, Rural and Environmental Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. rennied@sask.usask.ca
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2004 Jan;92(1):52-9
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Lung - physiology
Male
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - physiopathology
Respiratory Tract Diseases - physiopathology
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Abstract
Asthma prevalence is known to vary among different geographical regions both nationally and internationally. However, there is limited understanding of the nature of differences within geographical regions.
To evaluate the prevalence of asthma in 2 prairie communities and differences in the patterns of respiratory symptoms between the communities.
A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was sent through schools in Estevan and Swift Current, Saskatchewan, to parents of 2,231 children in grades 1 to 6. Asthma prevalence was determined by questionnaire report of physician-diagnosed asthma. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) using spirometry were conducted in children in grades 1 to 4. To evaluate respiratory morbidity without the use of a diagnostic label, similar comparisons were made between communities for respiratory symptoms.
The overall response rate to the survey questionnaire was 91.3%. The prevalence of ever asthma in Estevan was 21.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 20.1%-22.7%) compared with 16.2% (95% CI, 15.1%-17.3%) in Swift Current. A higher proportion of girls in Estevan (19.7%; 95% CI, 17.9%-21.5%) compared with girls in Swift Current (12.5%; 95% CI, 11.1%-13.9%) reported a history of asthma. There was no difference found between towns for boys. These findings were supported by findings for respiratory symptoms, including wheeze and cough. For both boys and girls, the forced expiratory flow at 25% to 75% of forced vital capacity and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity were lower in Estevan compared with Swift Current.
Differences in the distribution of childhood asthma can be found within regions. These results are strengthened by PFTs and cannot be fully explained by diagnostic biases.
PubMed ID
14756465 View in PubMed
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Factors contributing to risks for pediatric asthma in rural Saskatchewan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120391
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2012 Oct;109(4):255-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Rebecca J Barry
William Pickett
Donna C Rennie
Ambikaipakan Senthilselvan
Donald W Cockcroft
Joshua A Lawson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2012 Oct;109(4):255-9
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Pets
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Rural Population
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Abstract
Rural children have lower reported rates of asthma compared with urban children. Although reasons for these differences remain unclear, 3 possible explanations exist: (1) environmental differences, (2) variations in health care access, and (3) variations in health risk behaviors.
We investigated asthma among children living on farms and in small towns and its potential determinants, including personal, behavioral, and environmental factors.
School children (n = 842, ages 6-13; participation rate = 72.0%) were involved in a 2003 cross-sectional study. Their parents completed a lung health survey that included questions about asthma, asthma-like symptoms, and potential determinants of asthma (demographic, environmental, health risk behaviors). Participating children were classified into farm dwellers (live on farm or acreage) and small town dwellers. Multiple logistic regression was used to investigate the association between asthma and wheeze with demographic, environmental, and behavioral exposures with simultaneous adjustment for confounders.
Asthma and wheeze prevalence was not significantly different between farm and small town areas (current asthma: 16% vs 13%, respectively; current wheeze: 27% vs 21%, respectively) and followed consistent patterns. Factors associated with diagnosed asthma were dampness (odds ratio [OR] = 1.85; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08-3.17), with enrollment in daycare found to be protective (OR = 0.53; 95% CI = 0.33-0.85). Being obese or overweight was associated with wheeze (OR = 1.77; 95% CI = 1.06-2.97).
Given the differences between areas and the associations between environmental risk factors and obesity with asthma and wheeze, the study findings support environment and health risk behavior explanations for the observed geographic variations.
PubMed ID
23010231 View in PubMed
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Occurrence of new-onset wheeze in a 3-year follow-up study of schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159154
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2007 Dec;99(6):502-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Joshua A Lawson
Donna C Rennie
Ambikaipakan Senthilselvan
Helen H McDuffie
Donald W Cockcroft
Author Affiliation
Institute of Agricultural, Rural and Environmental Health, Royal University Hospital, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. josh.lawson@usask.ca
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2007 Dec;99(6):502-8
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - epidemiology
Body mass index
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory Sounds
Rural Population
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Abstract
Different wheeze phenotypes have been identified, primarily in preschool children.
To explore the characteristics of children in primary school without a history of wheeze or asthma and the onset of wheeze during a 3-year follow-up period.
Students in grades 1 to 3 participated in a cross-sectional study in 2000 and again in 2003, creating a prospective cohort. Data were collected using questionnaires in both years. Children without a history of asthma or wheeze in or before 2000 were selected for this analysis (n = 212). Associations between baseline characteristics and an outcome of the onset of new wheeze were evaluated.
Twenty-two children (10.4%) reported new wheeze by 2003. Significant associations were found between new-onset wheeze and body mass index (odds ratio [OR], 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.62) and history of allergic disease (OR, 7.17; 95% CI, 2.48-20.72); significant inverse associations were found with farming exposures in the first year of life (OR, 0.17; 95% CI, 0.05-0.64) and with having a fireplace in the home (OR, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.05-0.83). After stratification by sex, the associations were typically stronger in girls than in boys.
Allergic disease in childhood and early and current exposures affect the development of wheeze. These results support efforts to lead healthy lifestyles and direct continued research into wheeze phenotypes, especially by sex.
PubMed ID
18219830 View in PubMed
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Regional variations in risk factors for asthma in school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172295
Source
Can Respir J. 2005 Sep;12(6):321-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Joshua A Lawson
Donna C Rennie
Ambikaipakan Senthilselvan
Donald W Cockcroft
Helen H McDuffie
Author Affiliation
Institute of Agricultural, Rural and Environmental Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon. lawson@sask.usask.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2005 Sep;12(6):321-6
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - epidemiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Abstract
The authors have previously reported an increased prevalence of asthma in Estevan, Saskatchewan (21.4%) compared with Swift Current, Saskatchewan (16.2%).
To determine the association between asthma and personal and indoor environmental risk factors in these communities.
A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted in January 2000. A questionnaire was distributed to school children in grades 1 to 6 for completion by a parent. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine associations between various risk factors and physician-diagnosed asthma.
Asthma was associated with respiratory allergy (adjusted OR [adjOR]=8.85, 95% CI 6.79 to 11.54), early respiratory illness (adjOR=2.81, 95% CI 1.96 to 4.03) and family history of asthma (adjOR=2.37, 95% CI 1.67 to 3.36). Several environmental factors varied with asthma by town. In Estevan, asthma was associated with home mould or dampness (adjOR=1.82, 95% CI 1.23 to 2.69) and was inversely associated with air conditioning (adjOR=0.56, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.85). The risk of asthma was increased if the child had previous exposure to environmental tobacco smoke from the mother in both communities (Swift Current: OR=1.87, 95% CI 1.06 to 3.30; Estevan: OR=2.00, 95% CI 1.17 to 3.43), and there was an inverse association with current exposure to environmental tobacco smoke from the mother in Estevan (OR=0.64, 95% CI 0.40 to 1.00). When multivariate analyses were stratified by sex, the relationship between home mould or dampness and asthma was most prominent in girls in Estevan.
Despite a similar regional location, different risk factors for asthma were identified in each community. Local environmental factors are important to consider when interpreting findings and planning asthma care.
PubMed ID
16247530 View in PubMed
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Urban-rural differences in asthma prevalence among young people in Canada: the roles of health behaviors and obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131809
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2011 Sep;107(3):220-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Joshua A Lawson
Ian Janssen
Mark W Bruner
Koroush Madani
William Pickett
Author Affiliation
Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada. josh.lawson@usask.ca
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2011 Sep;107(3):220-8
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Asthma - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Milk
Motor Activity
Obesity - epidemiology
Prevalence
Rural Health - statistics & numerical data
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Vegetables
Abstract
Asthma prevalence has been reported to be lower in rural regions, but the reasons for this are not known.
To confirm the existence of an urban-rural geographic gradient in asthma prevalence among Canadian youths and to evaluate whether this gradient was mediated by health behaviors.
Cross-sectional data from 4,726 Canadian youth (grades 6-10) were collected during the 2001-02 Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children survey. Geographic region was categorized as metro (urbanized), non-metro but adjacent to metro, and rural. Asthma was defined via self-report of doctors' diagnoses and at least 1 of: (1) asthma symptoms or (2) a health care visit for asthma in the past year. Health behaviors (diet and physical activity) as well as obesity were also assessed.
Asthma prevalence was lowest in rural regions (metro = 17.7%, non-metro-adjacent = 15.6%, rural = 14.8%). A lower risk of asthma was associated with rural region (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.61-0.95) and living in non-metro-adjacent regions (adjusted OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.65-1.01). Health behaviors and obesity status did not mediate the association between geographic region and asthma. Being overweight or obese, having a high physical activity level, and exposure to passive smoking independently elevated the risk of asthma, whereas increased consumption of whole milk or vegetables were each protective.
Although asthma prevalence among youth was lower in rural areas, this association was not mediated by health behaviors or obesity. Other exposures, likely environmental, are the logical mechanisms through which rural geographic status is related to lower asthma prevalence.
PubMed ID
21875540 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.