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The Arctic as a food producing region. Phase 1: Current status in five Arctic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295345
Source
Nofima. Report 10/2018. 99 pp.
Publication Type
Report
Date
April 2018
. Food production in this region is however associated with some challenges. The food producers are often faced with challenging environmental conditions, poor and/or costly infrastructure, limited entrepreneurial capacity and qualified labor and long distance to export markets. Climate change is
  1 document  
Author
Silje Elde
Ingrid Kvalvik
Bjørg Helen Nøstvold
Rune Rødbotten
Sigridur Dalmannsdottir
Hilde Halland
Eivind Uleberg
Ólafur Reykdal
Jón Árnason
Páll Gunnar Pálsson
Rakel Halldórsdóttir
Óli Þór Hilmarsson
Gunnar Þórðarson
Þóra Valsdóttir
Rebekka Knudsen
David Natcher
Daria Sidorova
Source
Nofima. Report 10/2018. 99 pp.
Date
April 2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Denmark
Greenland
Iceland
Norway
Russia
Publication Type
Report
File Size
5515073
Keywords
Arctic
Food
Production
Industry and market
Possibilities
Challenges
Abstract
The "Arctic as a food producing region" is a project funded by the Nordic Council of Ministries, the Canadian Arctic Council office, the University of Saskatchewan (Canada), the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Nofima – Norwegian Institute of Food, fisheries and Aquaculture Research, the Icelandic Foreign Ministry, and endorsed by the Arctic Council Sustainable Development Working Group (SDWG). The project has participation from Canada, Denmark, Greenland, Iceland, Norway and Russia. The aim of the "Arctic as a food producing region" - project is to assess the potential for increased production and added value of food from the Arctic region, with the overarching aim of improving economic and social conditions of Arctic communities. This report is the output from the first phase of the project, providing a description of the main food production and examples of conditions for food production in the Arctic areas of the countries involved.
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Center for International Climate and Environmental Research: Oslo (CICERO)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288438
Publication Type
Database
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Center for International Climate and Environmental Research: Oslo (CICERO)
Language
English
Norwegian
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Database
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Arctic Environmental Health
Ocean, Atmosphere, & Weather
Climate change
Climate
Research
International Cooperation
Public Policy
Abstract
Conducts research and provide reports, information and expert advice about issues related to global climate change and international climate policy with the aim of acquiring knowledge that can help mitigate the climate problem and enhance international climate cooperation.
Online Resources
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Source
The Arctic University of Norway, Department of Community Medicine.
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Source
The Arctic University of Norway, Department of Community Medicine.
Language
English
Norwegian
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Website
Keywords
Governments and Organizations
Norway
Research Personnel
Inuits
Research
Environmental health
Abstract
The Centre for Sami Health Research (CSHR), Sámi dearvvašvuodadutkama guovvdáš, is an independent centre under the Department of Community Medicine at UiT The Arctic University of Norway. The main aim of the CSHR is to enhance knowledge of the health and life of Sami people in Norway.
The emphasis in the CSHR is on interdisciplinary research, mainly population-based studies using quantitative methods. The Population-based Study on Health and Living Conditions – the SAMINOR Study is the most important research project of the centre.
Online Resources
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Source
Norwegian Ministry of Climate and Environment. Meld. St. 33 (2012–2013) Report to the Storting (white paper). 107 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2015
........................... 11 2.2 The climate of the future – climate projections for 2050–2100 ............. 12 3 Impacts of climate change on nature and society ...................... 16 3.1 The natural environment .............. 16 3.2 Food production ............................. 22 3.3 Human life and health
  1 document  
Source
Norwegian Ministry of Climate and Environment. Meld. St. 33 (2012–2013) Report to the Storting (white paper). 107 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
12235129
Keywords
Climate change
Sami
Documents

stm201220130033000engpdfs.pdf

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Climate change and displacement for Indigenous Communities in Arctic Scandinavia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297122
Source
Brookings LSE. Project on Internal Displacement. 35 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
January 30, 2013
Ilan Kelman Marius Warg Næss Center for International Climate and Environmental Research—Oslo Climate Change and Displacement for Indigenous Communities in Arctic Scandinavia January 30, 2013 Cover image: Winifried
  1 document  
Author
Kelman, Ilan
Næss, Marius Warg
Author Affiliation
Center for International Climate and Environmental Research—Oslo
Source
Brookings LSE. Project on Internal Displacement. 35 p.
Date
January 30, 2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Report
File Size
646676
Keywords
Saami
Climate change
Migration
Reindeer
Displacement
Documents

30-arctic-scandinavia-kelman-paper.pdf

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Comparison of cancer incidence in Norway and Arkhangelskaja Oblast in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84162
Source
Pages 99-104 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49(2 Suppl):99-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
cancer types appears to have been quite different in a northern Russian population than in Norway. The incidence among women was relatively low, except for stomach cancer. Key words: stomach cancer, northern Russia, site specific cancer rate INTRODUCTION It is recognised that environmental and
  1 document  
Author
Vaktskjold, A.
Lebedintseva, J.
Korotov, D.
Podjakova, T.
Tkatsjov, A.
Lund, E.
Author Affiliation
Institutt for samfunnsmedisin, Universitetet i Troms�¸, 9037 Troms�¸, Norway
Source
Pages 99-104 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49(2 Suppl):99-104
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Northern Russia
Site-specific cancer rate
Stomach cancer
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this investigation was to estimate the site-specific cancer incidence rates in Arkhangelskaja Oblast (AO), and to make a comparison with the incidence in Norway. STUDY DESIGN: AO is an administrative unit in Northwestern Russia with 1.3 million inhabitants. A population-based cancer registry covering the whole population of the oblast was set up at the central oncological hospital. All new cancer cases in the period 1993 - 2001 among official residents of AO were registered in the registry and included in the study. The annual gender- and age-group-specific population figures for AO were obtained from the regional statistics office. Gender- and site-specific frequencies cancer figures from Norway were obtained from the Norwegian Cancer Registry. RESULTS: A total of 34,697 cases of primary cancers in AO were included. The age-adjusted incidence rate for all sites combined was 164/100,000 for women and 281/100,000 for men. The incidence among women was 31% lower than in Norway, while the rate among men was the same. Among men, the incidence of stomach, lung, oesophagus, larynx, liver and pancreas cancer was markedly higher in AO than in Norway, while the incidence of cancer in the prostate, colon, bladder, testicle and melanoma was markedly lower in AO. For women, of the common cancer sites only the incidence of stomach cancer was higher in AO. Cancers of the lung, colon, rectum and ovaries were markedly lower. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of most major cancer types appears to have been quite different in a northern Russian population than in Norway. The incidence among women was relatively low, except for stomach cancer.
PubMed ID
17929616 View in PubMed
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Competitive binding of persistent organic pollutants to the thyroid hormone transport protein transthyretin in glaucous gull ( Larus hyperboreus ).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297153
Source
Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Department of Biology. ix, 63, 12 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2015
, precipitation, sea ice conditions) and combined with the effect of contaminations and anthropogenic stressors, organisms may be vulnerable to detrimental effects (Bustnes et al., 2008). Climate change might adverse this by increasing the amount of stress in wildlife when adapting to the environmental
  1 document  
Author
Mortensen, Åse-Karen
Source
Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Department of Biology. ix, 63, 12 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
2569706
Keywords
Arctic
Glaucous gull
Persistent orgnic pollutants (POPS)
Metabolites
Thyroid
Svalbard
Abstract
The glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus) is one of the largest avian top predators in the Arctic. High levels of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and their metabolites have been detected in the glaucous gull, and several studies indicate that high levels of different POPs can contribute to detrimental effects. The mechanism behind these disruptions could be that chemicals interfere with the endocrine system. Thyroid hormones (THs) are important for thermogenesis, reproduction, growth and differentiation. They are transported in the circulation system of glaucous gull mainly bound to the transport proteins globulin, albumin and transthyretin (TTR). The aim of this study was to use molecular modeling to construct a homology model of the TTR in glaucous gull and to dock several well-known and new emerging POPs in the models to predict the binding affinity of POPs to the TH binding site in glaucous gull TTR...
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Current trends in arctic medical research in the Nordic countries with special reference to Sweden

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94088
Source
Pages 8-11 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
be better utilized and the investigations may be broadened to examine a greater number of variables. Further- more, by comparing various ethnic groups living in similar environments, it may be possible to distinguish the signi- ficance of environmental contra-genetic factors. It may finally be
  1 document  
Author
Linderholm, H
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden
Source
Pages 8-11 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Finland
Norway
Sweden
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic medical research
Denmark
Environmental contra-genetic factors
Ethnic minorities
Finland
Greenland
Human adaptability
Iceland
Lapps
Nordic Council for Arctic Medical Reserach (NCAMR)
Nordic countries
Norway
Sweden
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Determinants of adolescents' soft drink consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162882
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2008 Jan;11(1):49-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Elling Bere
Elin Sørli Glomnes
Saskia J te Velde
Knut-Inge Klepp
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. ellingb@medisin.uio.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2008 Jan;11(1):49-56
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Attitude to Health
Carbonated Beverages
Drinking
Drinking Behavior
Female
Food Preferences
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Norway
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Schools
Sex Distribution
Abstract
To identify determinants of adolescents' consumption of carbonated soft drinks (regular and diet), both of total consumption and of consumption at school.
Regular and diet soft drink consumption was measured by food frequency questions that were dichotomised. Several potential environmental and personal determinants of consumption were measured. A total of 2870 (participation rate: 85%) 9th and 10th graders, within 33 Norwegian schools, participated in the study. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were preformed for total soft drink consumption (twice a week or more vs. less) and for consumption at school (once a week or more vs. less).
A total of 63% and 27% of the participants reported to drink respectively regular and diet soft drinks twice a week or more, and 24% and 8%, respectively, reported to drink soft drinks once a week or more at school. Preferences, accessibility, modelling and attitudes were the strongest determinants of both regular and diet soft drink consumption. In addition, gender, educational plans and dieting were related to both total soft drink consumption and consumption at school. Pupils with longer distance from school to shop and those in schools with rules concerning soft drink consumption tended to have lower odds of drinking both regular and diet soft drinks at school.
This study shows that gender, educational plans, dieting, accessibility, modelling, attitudes and preferences all seem to be strong determinants of adolescents' soft drink consumption. Parents and the home environment appear as great potential intervention targets.
PubMed ID
17582242 View in PubMed
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Distribution of apoB/apoA-1 ratio and blood lipids in Sami, Kven and Norwegian populations: the SAMINOR Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296262
Source
International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2008; 67(1):67-81.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
69International Journal of Circumpolar Health 67:1 2008 ApoB/apoA-1 ratio in Sami, Kven and Norwegian populations ORIGINAL ARTICLE DISTRIBUTION OF APOB/APOA-1 RATIO AND BLOOD LIPIDS IN SAMI, KVEN AND NORWEGIAN POPULATIONS: THE SAMINOR STUDY Tove Nystad 1, Egil Utsi 2, Randi Selmer 3, Jan
  1 document  
Author
Nystad, Tove
Utsi, Egil
Selmer, Randi
Brox, Jan
Melhus, Marita
Lund, Eiliv
Source
International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2008; 67(1):67-81.
Date
2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
File Size
315938
Keywords
Sami
SAMINOR
apoB/apoA-1 ratio
Total cholesterol
Ethnic
Cardiovascular disease
Abstract
Objectives. To assess the distribution of blood lipids, lipoprotein and apoB/apoA-1 ratio in a multi-ethnic population of Sami, Kvens and Norwegians in Norway. Study design. A population-based cross-sectional study was carried out in 2 003-2004 in an area with a mixed Sami, Kvens/Finns and Norwegian population, the SAMINOR study. Methods. A self-administrated questionnaire was distributed and total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, apoB and apoA-1 counts were analysed in 6,461 women and 5 ,772 men between the ages of 36 and 79. Results. In 3 6–64 age group, Sami men and women had the highest apoB/apoA-1 ratio of the ethnic groups. The ethnic differences remained after adjustment for waist hip ratio, cigarette smoking, systolic and diastolic pressures, alcohol consumption, physical activity during leisure time and family history of myocardial infarction (MI). There were no significant ethnic differences in apoB/apoA-1 ratio in the older age group. Total cholesterol was significantly lower among Sami men and women, aged 65–79 years, than among the Norwegian. The opposite occurred in the 3 6–49 age group, with higher levels in the Sami population. We found no ethnic differences in HDL cholesterol and triglycerides. Conclusions. Middle-aged Sami women and men have increased levels of apoB/apoA-1 ratio and total cholesterol compared with Norwegians.
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The epidemiology of injuries in Svalbard compared with Harstad

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32033
Source
Pages 184-195 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Health care 60 I 200 I THE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF INJURIES IN SVALBARD COMPARED WITH HARSTAD &r9e Ytterstad and Arne Johan Norheim /0>tUu1' (°'community med;dne.s University ofTroms0. 9037 Troms0, Norway nternational Journal ef Circumpolar Health ABSTRACT Study objective - To survey all
  1 document  
Author
Ytterstad, B
Norheim, A.J
Author Affiliation
Institute for Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, 9037 Tromsø, Norway. boergey@online.no
Source
Pages 184-195 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Infant
Injury
Leisure
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Prevention
Svalbard
Work
Wounds and injuries - classification - epidemiology
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To survey all injuries treated in Longyearbyen hospital, Svalbard and to describe the injury epidemiology for Svalbard (residents and visitors), comparing it with Harstad. SETTING: The Norwegian arctic archipelago, Svalbard and the mainland city Harstad during three years from 8 March 1997. PARTICIPANTS: The person years of the study were 4211 for Svalbard residents and 69,014 for Harstad. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The variables followed the Nordic system. Of 630 recorded injuries, 107 were snowmobile related. Crude injury rates (per 1000 person years) [corrected] for Svalbard residents were for men 100.9 and for women 76.3. Corresponding rates were not significantly higher for men in Harstad (115.4, p = 0.19) and for women (80.1, p = 0.56). Home injuries were more prevalent in Harstad (30.5%) compared to Svalbard residents (13.1%, p
Notes
Erratum In: Int J Circumpolar Health 2002 May;61(2):184
PubMed ID
11507968 View in PubMed
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Exploration of biomarkers for total fish intake in pregnant Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98999
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jan;13(1):54-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Anne Lise Brantsaeter
Margaretha Haugen
Yngvar Thomassen
Dag G Ellingsen
Trond A Ydersbond
Tor-Arne Hagve
Jan Alexander
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Department of Food Safety and Nutrition, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, NO-04030 Oslo, Norway. anne.lise.brantsaeter@fhi.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jan;13(1):54-62
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arsenic - administration & dosage - blood
Biological Markers - blood - urine
Cohort Studies
Diet Records
Erythrocytes - chemistry
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage - analysis
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Iodine - administration & dosage - urine
Mercury - administration & dosage - blood
Norway
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Seafood - analysis
Selenium - administration & dosage - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Few biomarkers for dietary intake of various food groups have been established. The aim of the present study was to explore whether selenium (Se), iodine, mercury (Hg) or arsenic may serve as a biomarker for total fish and seafood intake in addition to the traditionally used n-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA. DESIGN: Intake of fish and seafood estimated by an FFQ was compared with intake assessed by a 4 d weighed food diary and with biomarkers in blood and urine. SETTING: Validation study in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). SUBJECTS: One hundred and nineteen women. RESULTS: Total fish/seafood intake (median 39 g/d) calculated with the MoBa FFQ was comparable to intake calculated by the food diary (median 30 g/d, rS = 0.37, P
Notes
RefSource: Public Health Nutr. 2009 Dec;12(12):2536-7
PubMed ID
19490733 View in PubMed
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Healthy living, nutrition and food waste in the Barents region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296270
Source
Nordic Council of Ministers Arctic Cooperation Programme. 35 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2015
). Rapid societal, environmental and climate changes are happening all over the Arctic, seen as risks for human health and well-being both in rural and urban communities. Demographic changes, like population aging and migration, and urbanization challenge the human development in the Arctic. The
  1 document  
Author
Rautio, Arja
Piippo, Sari
Pongracz, Eva
Golubeva, Elena
Soloviev, Andrey
Grini, Ida S.
Altintzoglou, Themistoklis
Helgesen, Hilde
Source
Nordic Council of Ministers Arctic Cooperation Programme. 35 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Norway
Russia
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1454021
Keywords
Barents Region
Sami
Food waste
Nutrition
Notes
"Healthy food and lifestyle choices in the Arctic"
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Interactions between Pollutant Exposure and the Physiology in Adult Kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) at Svalbard.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297156
Source
Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Department of Biology. xii, 53 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2015
movement has been scientifically addressing environmental issues regarding ecology and health. Due to increasing human activity and the introduction of new chemicals into the environment, these two issues are more important today than ever. Some of these chemicals degrade slowly in the environment
  1 document  
Author
Svendsen, Niels Borup
Source
Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Department of Biology. xii, 53 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1326344
Keywords
Svalbard
Black-legged kittiwakes
Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs)
Polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs)
Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs)
Phosphorous flame retardants (PFRs)
Abstract
The present study investigated the use of feathers as a useful non-destructive biomonitoring tool for novel organic pollutants in black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla), and evaluated the interaction of both novel and legacy pollutants on body condition and thyroid hormones. In July and August 2014, feather and blood samples were collected from 20 black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) at two colonies (Blomstrandhalvøya and Krykkjefjellet) in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard. Samples were analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and phosphorous flame retardants (PFRs).
All compound classes were detected and quantified in feathers ranging from
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Interior surface materials in the home and the development of bronchial obstruction in young children in Oslo, Norway

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33500
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1999 Feb;89(2):188-192
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
  1 website  
Author
Jaakkola, JJ
Oie, L
Nafstad, P
Botten, G
Samuelsen, SO
Magnus, P
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Health Sciences, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1999 Feb;89(2):188-192
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bronchial Diseases - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Child, Preschool
Constriction, Pathologic - etiology
Construction Materials - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Floors and Floorcoverings
Follow-Up Studies
Housing
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Interior Design and Furnishings
Logistic Models
Norway
Odds Ratio
Polyvinyl Chloride - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Textiles - adverse effects
Urban health
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the role of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastics and textile materials in the home in the development of bronchial obstruction during the first 2 years of life. METHODS: The study was a matched pair case-control study based on a cohort of 3754 newborns in Oslo in 1992 and 1993 who were followed up for 2 years. The case group consisted of 251 children with bronchial obstruction; the control group was matched one-to-one for date of birth. RESULTS: In conditional logistic regression analysis, the risk of bronchial obstruction was related to the presence of PVC flooring (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.89; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.14, 3.14) and textile wall materials (adjusted OR = 1.58; 95% CI = 0.98, 2.54). The reference category was wood or parquet flooring and painted walls and ceiling. Further analysis revealed an exposure-response relationship between the assessed amount of PVC and other plasticizer-containing surface materials and the risk of bronchial obstruction. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides new evidence of the role of PVC and textile wall materials in the development of bronchial obstruction in young children.
PubMed ID
9949747 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Is increase in malignant melanoma a likely outcome of ozone depletion at northern latitudes? A behavioural perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102196
Source
Pages 393-396 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
and Social Research on the f~ Environment (CSERGE), School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, England. Abstract: Norway has the highest incidence of malignant melanoma in Europe in spite of the general trend of an increase towards the equator. This anomaly may be due to
  1 document  
Author
Aase, A
Bentham, G
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, University of Trondheim, Norway
Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment (CSERGE), School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, England
Source
Pages 393-396 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Epidemiology
Incidence
Melanoma
Norway
Ozone depletion
Ultraviolet radiation
UV radiation
Abstract
Norway has the highest incidence of malignant melanoma in Europe in spite of the general trend of an increase towards the equator. This anomaly may be due to a combination of genetic and behavioral characteristics. Within the country, however, there is a decrease towards the north. No impact of ozone depletion on disease incidence has so far been observed. A future risk zone may be in environments far enough to the north for ozone depletion to be significant, yet warm enough for body exposure during leisure.
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Levels and Effects of Organohalogens on Corticosterone Hormones in glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus) from Kongsfjorden, Svalbard.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297158
Source
Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Department of Biology. vii, 85 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2014
Levels and Effects of Organohalogens on Corticosterone Hormones in glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus) from Kongsfjorden, Svalbard Mari Engvig Løseth Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Supervisor: Bjørn Munro Jenssen, IBI Co-supervisor: Geir Wing Gabrielsen, Polarinstituttet, NP
  1 document  
Author
Løseth, Mari Engvig
Source
Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Department of Biology. vii, 85 p.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1691408
Keywords
Svalbard
Glaucous gull
Organohalogenated contaminants (OHCs)
Corticosterone
Stress
Abstract
Long-range atmospheric transport, ocean currents, sea ice and rivers are transporting environmental contaminants into the Arctic. Some of these contaminants can reach high concentrations in the upper trophic levels in the Arctic food web due to processes of bioaccumulation and biomagnification. The present study indicates a sex-specific pattern of levels and effects of selected organohalogenated contaminants (OHCs) in the avian top predator, glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus), breeding in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard. The aim of this present study was to report levels of OHCs and investigate whether the high levels detected in glaucous gulls can induce stress and thereby influence the stress response (measured by corticosterone concentration). No statistical differences were recorded for stress-induced or baseline corticosterone concentrations for males and female glaucous gulls. In females, a significant negative association was reported for lipid weight in blood plasma and baseline corticosterone. In male glaucous gulls, positive associations were found between levels of twenty-two OHCs and elevated baseline levels of corticosterone; indicating for the first time a “cocktail” effect of specific OHCs in blood plasma associated with high baseline levels of corticosterone in male glaucous gulls. It is suggested that the high levels of OHCs may act as a chronic stressor. The OHCs may interfere with the Arctic seabirds’ ability to respond to environmental stressors, such as climate change and food availability, by disrupting the baseline levels of corticosterone and weakening the feedback mechanisms of the stress axis. Elevated baseline levels may lead to suppression of immune parameters and reduced survival rate. Due to a small sample size assessed in the present study, more research is needed to confirm a possible relationship between the disrupted stress axis and environmental contaminants in the Arctic seabirds.
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Lower respiratory tract infections among Norwegian infants with siblings in day care

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34633
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1996 Oct;86(10):1456-1459
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
  1 website  
Author
Nafstad, P
Hagen, JA
Botten, G
Jaakkola, JJ
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1996 Oct;86(10):1456-1459
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Day Care
Environmental Exposure
Family Health
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Norway - epidemiology
Nuclear Family
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the role of siblings in day care as a determinant of infants' risk of lower respiratory tract infections. METHODS: A total of 3238 children (86%) out of 3754 Oslo, Norway, newborns recruited in 1992/93 were followed for 1 year. RESULTS: In logistic regression analysis, the risk of infection was increased in (1) infants with one or more siblings compared with infants without siblings (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.84, 2.85) and (2) infants with one or more siblings in day care compared with infants with siblings not in day care (adjusted OR = 1.7; 95% CI = 1.21, 2.26). CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that siblings in day care outside the home increase infants' risk of lower respiratory tract infections.
PubMed ID
8876520 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Man and polar bear in Svalbard: a solvable ecological conflict?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2902
Source
Pages 532-534 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Man and Polar Bear in Svalbard: A Solvable Ecological Conflict? T. Risholt1.2, E. Persen3.4, and O.I. Solem1 1 Longyearbyen Hospital, Longyearbyen, Norway 2 Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Telemark Central Hospital, Skien, Norway 3 Environmental Officer, Governor of
  1 document  
Author
Risholt, T.
Persen, E.
Solem, O.I.
Author Affiliation
Longyearbyen Hospital, Norway
Source
Pages 532-534 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Injury prevention
Norway
Polar bear-human interaction
Svalbard
Abstract
The objective of this study is twofold. First, it is to assess the nature and magnitude of the polar bear-human conflict with respect to injuries to man and bear. Second, a major concern has been to minimize injurious interactions in order to safeguard the people who live and work in the Arctic, and, at the same time, secure the future of the polar bear in one of the last relatively unspoiled habitats on earth for big carnivores. From 1971 to 1995, approximately 80 bears were involved in serious bear-human interactions. Of these, 77 bears were killed and 3 escaped after having injured people. During the same period, 10 people were injured, 4 of them fatally, in 7 separate interactions, each involving a single bear. None of the victims carried an appropriate firearm. The circumstances leading up to the confrontations give strong reasons for supposing that the majority of the attacks were predatory in nature. Seven of the injured, including the four who were killed, sustained bites to the head and neck. Correct use of firearms could probably have prevented all the fatalities. However, the keeping and use of firearms caused two accidental deaths in the same period. We conclude that alertness, the absence of attractants (food, garbage), and appropriate bear repellents to secure field camps are important items in preventing conflicts and should always be available. However, as a last but indispensable resort, a firearm (rifle or shotgun) carried by an experienced user is the only safe precaution for avoiding injuries in polar bear country. Killing a bear on the rare occasions when humans are in danger presents no threat to the bear population. With regard to physical injury to people, the problem is a minor one. Bears have a dual impact on everyday life in the Svalbard settlements. While there is some anxiety related to the presence of bears, the polar bear is a source of breathtaking adventure highly valued by both residents and visitors.
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Maternal health in northern Norway. Time trends.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4613
Source
Pages 475-480 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
regions than further south. As a working hypo- thesis, maternal health is affected directly by adverse environmental conditions of subarctic latitudes, but the effects can be allayed through improved social con- ditions and better health care. The problem is to design a study in which conditions due to
  1 document  
Author
Bergsjø, P.
Bergsjo, P
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Bergen, Norway
Source
Pages 475-480 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Maternal mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
PubMed ID
3272667 View in PubMed
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