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Alcohol Consumption and Long-Term Labor Market Outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291234
Source
Health Econ. 2017 Mar; 26(3):275-291
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Petri Böckerman
Ari Hyytinen
Terhi Maczulskij
Author Affiliation
Turku School of Economics, Labour Institute for Economic Research and IZA, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Health Econ. 2017 Mar; 26(3):275-291
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Male
Self Report
Smoking
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
This paper examines whether alcohol consumption is related to long-term labor market outcomes. We use twin data for Finnish men and women matched to register-based individual information on employment and earnings. The twin data allow us to account for the shared environmental and genetic factors. The quantity of alcohol consumption was measured by weekly average consumption using self-reported data from three surveys (1975, 1981 and 1990). The average of an individual's employment months and earnings were measured in adulthood over the period 1990-2009. The models that account for the shared environmental and genetic factors reveal that former drinkers and heavy drinkers both have almost 20% lower earnings compared with moderate drinkers. On average, former drinkers work annually approx. 1 month less over the 20-year observation period. These associations are robust to the use of covariates, such as education, pre-existing health endowment and smoking. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
PubMed ID
26634338 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol use disorder and divorce: evidence for a genetic correlation in a population-based Swedish sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290102
Source
Addiction. 2017 Apr; 112(4):586-593
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Jessica E Salvatore
Sara Larsson Lönn
Jan Sundquist
Paul Lichtenstein
Kristina Sundquist
Kenneth S Kendler
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.
Source
Addiction. 2017 Apr; 112(4):586-593
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Keywords
Aged
Alcoholism - epidemiology - genetics
Divorce - statistics & numerical data
Environment
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Siblings
Sweden - epidemiology
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Abstract
We tested the association between alcohol use disorder (AUD) and divorce; estimated the genetic and environmental influences on divorce; estimated how much genetic and environmental influences accounted for covariance between AUD and divorce; and estimated latent genetic and environmental correlations between AUD and divorce. We tested sex differences in these effects.
We identified twin and sibling pairs with AUD and divorce information in Swedish national registers. We described the association between AUD and divorce using tetrachorics and used twin and sibling models to estimate genetic and environmental influences on divorce, on the covariance between AUD and divorce and the latent genetic and environmental correlations between AUD and divorce.
Sweden.
A total of 670?836 individuals (53% male) born 1940-1965.
Life-time measures of AUD and divorce.
AUD and divorce were related strongly (males: rtet  = +0.44, 95% CI = 0.43, 0.45; females rtet  = +0.37, 95% CI = 0.36, 0.38). Genetic factors accounted for a modest proportion of the variance in divorce (males: 21.3%, 95% CI = 7.6, 28.5; females: 31.0%, 95% CI = 18.8, 37.1). Genetic factors accounted for most of the covariance between AUD and divorce (males: 52.0%, 95% CI = 48.8, 67.9; females: 53.74%, 95% CI = 17.6, 54.5), followed by non-shared environmental factors (males: 45.0%, 95% CI = 37.5, 54.9; females: 41.6%, 95% CI = 40.3, 60.2). Shared environmental factors accounted for a negligible proportion of the covariance (males: 3.0%, 95% CI = -3.0, 13.5; females: 4.75%, 95% CI = 0.0, 6.6). The AUD-divorce genetic correlations were high (males: rA = +0.76, 95% CI = 0.53, 0.90; females +0.52, 95% CI = 0.24, 0.67). The non-shared environmental correlations were modest (males: rE = +0.32, 95% CI = 0.31, 0.40; females: +0.27, 95% CI = 0.27, 0.36).
Divorce and alcohol use disorder are correlated strongly in the Swedish population, and the heritability of divorce is consistent with previous studies. Covariation between AUD and divorce results from overlapping genetic and non-shared environmental factors. Latent genetic and non-shared environmental correlations for alcohol use disorder and divorce are high and moderate.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27981669 View in PubMed
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Diabetes in midlife and risk of cancer in late life: A nationwide Swedish twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297740
Source
Int J Cancer. 2018 08 15; 143(4):793-800
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Date
08-15-2018
Author
Cuiping Bao
Nancy L Pedersen
Rongrong Yang
Anna Marseglia
Weige Xu
Yaogang Wang
Xiuying Qi
Weili Xu
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2018 08 15; 143(4):793-800
Date
08-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - epidemiology
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Humans
Intestinal Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Liver Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Pharyngeal Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The association between diabetes and cancer risk remains controversial. Hence, we examined whether midlife diabetes is related to the risk of cancer in late-life, and whether genetic and early-life environmental factors play a role in this association. This study included 25,154 twin individuals born in 1958 or earlier from the Swedish Twin Registry. Information on cancer diagnosis in late life (aged?=?65) during 1998-2014, was derived from the National Patient and Cancer Registries. Diabetes was ascertained based on self- or informant-reported history, patient registry and antidiabetic medication use. Midlife diabetes was defined when diabetes was diagnosed before 65 years. Data were analyzed following two strategies: (i) unmatched case-control analysis for all participants using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models, and (ii) co-twin control analysis for cancer-discordant twin pairs using conditional logistic regression. Overall, 1,766 (7.0%) had midlife diabetes and 5,293 (21.0%) had cancer in late-life. In multiadjusted GEE models, the odds ratios (95% CIs) of diabetes were 10.55 (2.95-37.67) for pharynx cancer, 5.78 (1.72-19.40) for small intestine cancer, 2.37 (1.14-4.91) for liver cancer and 0.48 (0.35-0.67) for prostate cancer. In people with diabetes, diabetes duration was dose-dependently associated with cancer risk. In conditional logistic regression analysis of 176 prostate cancer-discordant twin pairs, the association between midlife diabetes and prostate cancer in later life became stronger. Midlife diabetes increases the risk of pharynx, small intestine and liver cancers, but reduces prostate cancer risk in late life. Genetic and early-life environmental factors may partially contribute to the diabetes-prostate cancer association.
PubMed ID
29566433 View in PubMed
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Early maturation and substance use across adolescence and young adulthood: A longitudinal study of Finnish twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295201
Source
Dev Psychopathol. 2018 02; 30(1):79-92
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Date
02-2018
Author
Jeanne E Savage
Richard J Rose
Lea Pulkkinen
Karri Silventoinen
Tellervo Korhonen
Jaakko Kaprio
Nathan Gillespie
Danielle M Dick
Author Affiliation
Virginia Commonwealth University.
Source
Dev Psychopathol. 2018 02; 30(1):79-92
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - genetics - psychology
Child
Diseases in Twins
Female
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Parenting
Peer Group
Social Environment
Substance-Related Disorders - etiology - genetics - psychology
Twins
Young Adult
Abstract
Early maturation, indexed by pubertal development (PD), has been associated with earlier initiation and greater frequency of adolescent substance use, but this relationship may be biased by confounding factors and effects that change across development. Using a population-based Finnish twin sample (N = 3,632 individuals), we conducted twin modeling and multilevel structural equation modeling of the relationship between PD and substance use at ages 12-22. Shared environmental factors contributed to early PD and heavier substance use for females. Biological father absence was associated with early PD for boys but not girls, and did not account for the relationship between PD and substance use. The association between early PD and heavier substance use was partially due to between-family confounds, although early PD appeared to qualitatively alter long-term trajectories for some substances (nicotine), but not others (alcohol). Mediation by peer and parental factors did not explain this relationship within families. However, higher peer substance use and lower parental monitoring were themselves associated with heavier substance use, strengthening the existing evidence for these factors as targets for prevention/intervention efforts. Early maturation was not supported as a robust determinant of alcohol use trajectories in adolescence and young adulthood, but may require longer term follow-up. Subtle effects of early PD on nicotine and illicit drug use trajectories throughout adolescence and adulthood merit further investigation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28424107 View in PubMed
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Genetic architecture of motives for leisure-time physical activity: a twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290452
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2017 Nov; 27(11):1431-1441
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Date
Nov-2017
Author
S Aaltonen
J Kaprio
E Vuoksimaa
C Huppertz
U M Kujala
K Silventoinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2017 Nov; 27(11):1431-1441
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Keywords
Adult
Environment
Exercise
Female
Finland
Gene-Environment Interaction
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Models, Statistical
Motivation
Quantitative Trait, Heritable
Abstract
The aim of this study was to estimate the contribution of genetic and environmental influences on motives for engaging in leisure-time physical activity. The participants were obtained from the FinnTwin16 study. A modified version of the Recreational Exercise Motivation Measure was used to assess the motives for leisure-time physical activity in 2542 twin individuals (mean age of 34.1 years). Linear structural equation modeling was used to investigate the genetic and environmental influences on motive dimensions. The highest heritability estimates were found for the motive dimensions of "enjoyment" [men 33% (95% CI 23-43%), women 53% (95% CI 45-60%)] and "affiliation" [men 39% (95% CI 0.28-0.49%), women 35% (95% CI 0.25-0.43%)]. The lowest heritability estimates were found for others' expectations [men 13% (95% CI 0.04-0.25%), women 15% (95% CI 0.07-0.24%)]. Unique environmental influences explained the remaining variances, which ranged from 47% to 87%. The heritability estimates for summary variables of intrinsic and extrinsic motives were 36% and 32% for men and 40% and 24% for women, respectively. In conclusion, genetic factors contribute to motives for leisure-time physical activity. However, the genetic effects are, at most, moderate, implying the greater relative role of environmental factors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27704630 View in PubMed
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If you drink, don't smoke: Joint associations between risky health behaviors and labor market outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295488
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2018 06; 207:55-63
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Date
06-2018
Author
Petri Böckerman
Ari Hyytinen
Jaakko Kaprio
Terhi Maczulskij
Author Affiliation
University of Jyväskylä, School of Business and Economics, Labour Institute for Economic Research and IZA, Pitkänsillanranta 3A, FI-00530 Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: petri.bockerman@labour.fi.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2018 06; 207:55-63
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Risk Behaviors
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Male
Registries
Sedentary lifestyle
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Twins - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This paper examines the links between risky health behaviors and labor market success. We provide new evidence on the joint relationships between the most prominent forms of risky health behavior?-?alcohol consumption, smoking and physical inactivity?-?and long-term labor market outcomes. We use twin data for Finnish men and women linked to register-based individual information on earnings and labor market attachment. The twin data allow us to account for shared family and environmental factors and to measure risky health behaviors in 1975 and 1981. The long-term labor market outcomes were measured in adulthood as an average over the period 1990-2009. The sample sizes are 2156 and 2498 twins, for men and women, respectively. We find that being both a smoker and a heavy drinker in early adulthood is negatively related to long-term earnings and employment later in life, especially for men. We conclude that how and why risky health behaviors cluster and how that affects individual level outcomes call for more attention.
PubMed ID
29730550 View in PubMed
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Openness declines in advance of death in late adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298975
Source
Psychol Aging. 2019 Feb; 34(1):124-138
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Emily Schoenhofen Sharp
Christopher R Beam
Chandra A Reynolds
Margaret Gatz
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine.
Source
Psychol Aging. 2019 Feb; 34(1):124-138
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Keywords
Achievement
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Attitude to Death
Cognition - physiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation - physiology
Neuroticism - physiology
Personality - physiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Twins - psychology
Abstract
Openness to experience has been found to be a correlate of successful aging outcomes yet also has been found to decline from middle age onward. We hypothesized that decline in openness would be associated with death. Using longitudinal data from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA), the analytic sample encompassed 1954 individuals, approximately two-thirds of whom were deceased. We tested whether openness declines across late adulthood and, central to our hypothesis, whether the decline correlated with age at death. Multivariate modeling adjusted for age at study entry, sex, education, as well as the time-varying effects of physical illness, depressive symptoms, and cognitive ability. Correlations between change in neuroticism and extraversion and death were modeled for comparison. A follow-up cotwin control analysis adjusted for genetic and environmental familial confounders. Significant mean-level change was identified in all personality traits, but only for openness was change correlated with age at death, in support of our hypothesis. The findings were not explained by health factors or cognition. Cotwin control analyses indicated that the twin who died earlier showed a greater drop in openness prior to death, compared with their cotwin measured at the same time points. There was no cotwin finding for neuroticism or extraversion. We suggest that declines in openness may reflect a change in goal orientation due to the experience of a shortened time horizon, leading to an optimized selection of experiences as people approach the end of life. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).
PubMed ID
30667240 View in PubMed
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Prediction of alcohol use disorder using personality disorder traits: a twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294336
Source
Addiction. 2018 Jan; 113(1):15-24
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Twin Study
Date
Jan-2018
Author
Tom Rosenström
Fartein Ask Torvik
Eivind Ystrom
Nikolai Olavi Czajkowski
Nathan A Gillespie
Steven H Aggen
Robert F Krueger
Kenneth S Kendler
Ted Reichborn-Kjennerud
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Disorders, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Addiction. 2018 Jan; 113(1):15-24
Date
Jan-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Twin Study
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Antisocial Personality Disorder - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Borderline Personality Disorder - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Comorbidity
Conduct Disorder - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Female
Humans
Impulsive Behavior
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Personality
Personality Disorders - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Young Adult
Abstract
The DSM-IV personality disorders (PDs) are comorbid with alcohol use disorder (AUD) and with each other. It remains unclear which PD criteria are most likely to drive onset and recurrence of AUD and which are merely confounded with those criteria. We determine which individual PD criteria predict AUD and the degree of underlying genetic and/or environmental aetiology.
A prospective observational twin study.
Norway 1999-2011.
A total of 2528 and 2275 Norwegian adult twins in waves 1 and 2 variable-selection analyses, and 2785 in biometric analyses.
DSM-IV PDs and their 80 criteria were assessed using a structured personal interview, and AUD using the World Health Organization's Composite International Diagnostic Interview.
In a variable-selection analysis, two PD criteria were associated with AUD even after taking all the other criteria into account: criterion 8 of antisocial PD (childhood conduct disorder) and criterion 4 of borderline PD (self-damaging impulsive behaviours). Adjusting for each other, their respective odds ratios were 3.4 [confidence interval (CI) = 2.1-5.4] and 5.0 (CI = 3.3-7.7). Endorsement strength of the criteria was associated with AUD in a dose-response manner and they explained 5.5% of variation in AUD risk-more than the full diagnoses of antisocial and borderline PDs together (0.5%). The association between borderline criterion 4 and AUD 10 years later derived mainly from their overlapping genetic factors, whereas the association between antisocial criterion 8 and AUD 10 years later was due to both genetic and non-genetic factors.
Conduct disorder and self-harming impulsivity are the foremost risk traits for alcohol use disorder among the 80 personality disorder criteria of DSM-IV, predicting alcohol use disorder more effectively than personality disorder diagnoses. The twin-study analysis suggested that conduct disorder represents a joint genetic and developmental risk for alcohol use disorder and that impulsivity is a genetic risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28734091 View in PubMed
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Stability and change in etiological factors for alcohol use disorder and major depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289801
Source
J Abnorm Psychol. 2017 Aug; 126(6):812-822
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Fartein Ask Torvik
Tom Henrik Rosenström
Eivind Ystrom
Kristian Tambs
Espen Røysamb
Nikolai Czajkowski
Nathan Gillespie
Gun Peggy Knudsen
Kenneth S Kendler
Ted Reichborn-Kjennerud
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Disorders, Norwegian Institute of Public Health.
Source
J Abnorm Psychol. 2017 Aug; 126(6):812-822
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alcoholism - genetics
Depressive Disorder, Major - genetics
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Genomic Instability - genetics
Humans
Male
Norway
Phenotype
Registries
Risk factors
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Young Adult
Abstract
Alcohol use disorder (AUD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) are often comorbid. It is not understood how genetic risk factors for these disorders relate to each other over time and to what degree they are stable. Age-dependent characteristics of the disorders indicate that different genetic factors could be relevant at different stages of life, and MDD may become increasingly correlated with AUD over time. DSM-IV diagnoses of AUD and MDD were assessed by interviews of 2,801 young adult twins between 1999 and 2004 (T1) and 2,284 of the same twins between 2010 and 2011 (T2). Stability, change, and covariation were investigated in longitudinal biometric models. New genetic factors explained 56.4% of the genetic variance in AUD at T2. For MDD, there was full overlap between genetic influences at T1 and T2. Genetic risk factors for MDD were related to AUD, but their association with AUD did not increase over time. Thus, genetic risk factors for AUD, but not MDD, vary with age, suggesting that AUD has age-dependent heritable etiologies. Molecular genetic studies of AUD may therefore benefit from stratifying by age. The new genetic factors in AUD were not related to MDD. Environmental influences on the 2 disorders were correlated in middle, but not in young adulthood. The environmental components for AUD correlated over time (r = .27), but not for MDD. Environmental influences on AUD can have long-lasting effects, and the effects of preventive efforts may be enduring. Environment influences seem to be largely transient. (PsycINFO Database Record
Notes
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PubMed ID
28541064 View in PubMed
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Testing Genetic and Environmental Associations Between Personality Disorders and Cocaine Use: A Population-Based Twin Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295880
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2018 02; 21(1):24-32
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Date
02-2018
Author
Nathan A Gillespie
Steven H Aggen
Amanda E Gentry
Michael C Neale
Gun P Knudsen
Robert F Krueger
Susan C South
Nikolai Czajkowski
Ragnar Nesvåg
Eivind Ystrom
Tom H Rosenström
Fartein A Torvik
Ted Reichborn-Kjennerud
Kenneth S Kendler
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry,Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics,Virginia Commonwealth University,Richmond,VA,USA.
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2018 02; 21(1):24-32
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Keywords
Adult
Antisocial Personality Disorder - genetics
Cocaine-Related Disorders - genetics - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diseases in Twins - genetics
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Personality Disorders - genetics
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
Until now, data have not been available to elucidate the genetic and environmental sources of comorbidity between all 10 DSM-IV personality disorders (PDs) and cocaine use. Our aim was to determine which PD traits are linked phenotypically and genetically to cocaine use. Cross-sectional data were obtained in a face-to-face interview between 1999 and 2004. Subjects were 1,419 twins (µage = 28.2 years, range = 19-36) from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health Twin Panel, with complete lifetime cocaine use and criteria for all 10 DSM-IV PDs. Stepwise multiple and Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) regressions were used to identify PDs related to cocaine use. Twin models were fitted to estimate genetic and environmental associations between the PD traits and cocaine use. In the multiple regression, antisocial (OR = 4.24, 95% CI [2.66, 6.86]) and borderline (OR = 2.19, 95% CI [1.35, 3.57]) PD traits were significant predictors of cocaine use. In the LASSO regression, antisocial, borderline, and histrionic were significant predictors of cocaine use. Antisocial and borderline PD traits each explained 72% and 25% of the total genetic risks in cocaine use, respectively. Genetic risks in histrionic PD were not significantly related to cocaine use. Importantly, after removing criteria referencing substance use, antisocial PD explained 65% of the total genetic variance in cocaine use, whereas borderline explained only 4%. Among PD traits, antisocial is the strongest correlate of cocaine use, for which the association is driven largely by common genetic risks.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29369040 View in PubMed
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