Skip header and navigation

Refine By

21 records – page 1 of 2.

An update on risk communication in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289269
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:33822
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
2016
Author
Eva-Maria Krümmel
Andrew Gilman
Author Affiliation
Inuit Circumpolar Council, Ottawa, Canada; ekruemmel@scientissime.com.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:33822
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Communicable Disease Control - organization & administration
Environmental Exposure - prevention & control
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Food Contamination
Health Communication
Humans
Inuits
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Public Health
Abstract
Arctic residents can be exposed to a wide range of contaminants through consumption of traditional (country) foods (i.e. food from wild animals and plants that are hunted, caught or collected locally in the Arctic). Yet these foods provide excellent nutrition, promote social cohesion, meet some spiritual needs for connectedness to the land and water, reinforce cultural ties, are economically important and promote overall good health for many. The risk and benefit balance associated with the consumption of traditional Arctic foods is complicated to communicate and has been referred to as the "Arctic Dilemma". This article gives an update on health risk communication in the Arctic region. It briefly summarizes some research on risk communication methodologies as well as approaches to an evaluation of the outcomes of risk communication initiatives. It provides information on specific initiatives in several Arctic countries, and particularly those that were directed at Indigenous populations. This article also summarizes some international versus local risk communication activities and the complexity of developing and delivering messages designed for different audiences. Finally, the potential application of social media for risk communication and a summary of "best practices" based on published literature and a survey of Inuit in a few Arctic countries are described.
Several of the risk communication initiatives portrayed in this article indicate that there is only limited awareness of the outcome of risk communication messages. In some cases, risk communication efforts appear to have been successful, at least when effectiveness is measured in an indirect way, for example, by lower contaminant levels. However, due to missing effectiveness evaluation studies, uncertainty remains as to whether a specific risk communication method was successful and could be clearly linked to behavioural changes that resulted in decreased contaminant exposure.
Notes
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2014 Feb;122(2):178-86 PMID 24345328
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2010 Oct 15;408(22):5165-234 PMID 20728918
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012 Jul 10;71:18594 PMID 22789518
Cites: Arctic Med Res. 1988;47 Suppl 1:159-62 PMID 3152417
Cites: Transbound Emerg Dis. 2013 Aug;60(4):345-50 PMID 22747976
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Oct;111(13):1660-4 PMID 14527847
Cites: Risk Anal. 1994 Feb;14(1):35-45 PMID 8146401
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012 Jul 10;71:18588 PMID 22789516
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012 Jul 10;71:18592 PMID 22789517
Cites: Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 1989 Nov;43(5):641-6 PMID 2508801
Cites: Risk Anal. 1998 Oct;18(5):649-59 PMID 9853397
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2003 Sep;60(9):693-5 PMID 12937194
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1999 Jan-Feb;54(1):40-7 PMID 10025415
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1999;(25):15-20 PMID 10854451
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2009;30:273-92 PMID 19296777
Cites: Risk Anal. 2009 May;29(5):729-42 PMID 19220800
Cites: Am Psychol. 1992 Sep;47(9):1102-14 PMID 1329589
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012 Jul 17;71:18591 PMID 22818717
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Oct;118(10):1434-8 PMID 20562056
Cites: J Health Commun. 1996 Apr-Jun;1(2):197-217 PMID 10947360
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012 Jul 27;71:19003 PMID 22868192
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Aug 05;72:null PMID 23984297
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2015 Mar 15;509-510:248-59 PMID 25135671
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 1992 Jul 15;122(1-2):247-78 PMID 1514105
PubMed ID
27974140 View in PubMed
Less detail

"Back to the Future": Time for a Renaissance of Public Health Engineering.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297792
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 Jan 29; 16(3):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Jan-29-2019
Author
Richard J Gelting
Steven C Chapra
Paul E Nevin
David E Harvey
David M Gute
Author Affiliation
Division of Global Health Protection, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA. rug7@cdc.gov.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 Jan 29; 16(3):
Date
Jan-29-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Abstract
Public health has always been, and remains, an interdisciplinary field, and engineering was closely aligned with public health for many years. Indeed, the branch of engineering that has been known at various times as sanitary engineering, public health engineering, or environmental engineering was integral to the emergence of public health as a distinct discipline. However, in the United States (U.S.) during the 20th century, the academic preparation and practice of this branch of engineering became largely separated from public health. Various factors contributed to this separation, including an evolution in leadership roles within public health; increasing specialization within public health; and the emerging environmental movement, which led to the creation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), with its emphasis on the natural environment. In this paper, we consider these factors in turn. We also present a case study example of public health engineering in current practice in the U.S. that has had large-scale positive health impacts through improving water and sanitation services in Native American and Alaska Native communities. We also consider briefly how to educate engineers to work in public health in the modern world, and the benefits and challenges associated with that process. We close by discussing the global implications of public health engineering and the need to re-integrate engineering into public health practice and strengthen the connection between the two fields.
PubMed ID
30700061 View in PubMed
Less detail

"Back to the Future": Time for a Renaissance of Public Health Engineering.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300910
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 01 29; 16(3):
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Review
Date
01-29-2019
Author
Richard J Gelting
Steven C Chapra
Paul E Nevin
David E Harvey
David M Gute
Author Affiliation
Division of Global Health Protection, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA. rug7@cdc.gov.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 01 29; 16(3):
Date
01-29-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Engineering - history - statistics & numerical data
History, 20th Century
Humans
Indians, North American
Public Health - history - statistics & numerical data
Sanitary Engineering - history - methods
Sanitation - history
United States
Water Supply - history
Abstract
Public health has always been, and remains, an interdisciplinary field, and engineering was closely aligned with public health for many years. Indeed, the branch of engineering that has been known at various times as sanitary engineering, public health engineering, or environmental engineering was integral to the emergence of public health as a distinct discipline. However, in the United States (U.S.) during the 20th century, the academic preparation and practice of this branch of engineering became largely separated from public health. Various factors contributed to this separation, including an evolution in leadership roles within public health; increasing specialization within public health; and the emerging environmental movement, which led to the creation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), with its emphasis on the natural environment. In this paper, we consider these factors in turn. We also present a case study example of public health engineering in current practice in the U.S. that has had large-scale positive health impacts through improving water and sanitation services in Native American and Alaska Native communities. We also consider briefly how to educate engineers to work in public health in the modern world, and the benefits and challenges associated with that process. We close by discussing the global implications of public health engineering and the need to re-integrate engineering into public health practice and strengthen the connection between the two fields.
PubMed ID
30700061 View in PubMed
Less detail

Genetic and Environmental Contributions to Cardiovascular Risk: Lessons From North Karelia and FINRISK.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289320
Source
Glob Heart. 2016 06; 11(2):229-33
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2016
Author
Veikko Salomaa
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: veikko.salomaa@thl.fi.
Source
Glob Heart. 2016 06; 11(2):229-33
Date
06-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genome-Wide Association Study - methods
Humans
Morbidity - trends
Risk factors
Abstract
Systematic collection of DNA samples started in FINRISK during the 1992 survey and has continued in all surveys since then. At the moment, FINRISK has DNA, careful phenotyping at baseline, and prospective follow-up for incident disease for about 34,000 participants. These data have been used for genome-wide association studies by contributing to numerous large international consortia, mainly focused on cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors. In parallel, genomic data from FINRISK have been used for cardiovascular risk estimation, and our constantly improving knowledge of cardiovascular disease risk variants generates promising prospects in this field. The isolated nature of the Finnish population and recent bottlenecks in our population history, particularly in eastern Finland, provide certain advantages for sequencing studies. The power to detect low-frequency variants is stronger in isolated populations, like those in eastern Finland, than in more admixed populations. Together with country-wide and reliable electronic health records, this provides a resource that is currently widely utilized in whole exome and whole genome sequencing studies.
PubMed ID
27242092 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Holistic Effects of Climate Change on the Culture, Well-Being, and Health of the Saami, the Only Indigenous People in the European Union.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295558
Source
Curr Environ Health Rep. 2018 Oct 22; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Oct-22-2018
Author
Jouni J K Jaakkola
Suvi Juntunen
Klemetti Näkkäläjärvi
Author Affiliation
Center for Environmental and Respiratory Health Research, University of Oulu, P. O. Box 5000, FI-90014, Oulu, Finland. jouni.jaakkola@oulu.fi.
Source
Curr Environ Health Rep. 2018 Oct 22; :
Date
Oct-22-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Abstract
(1) To develop a framework for understanding the holistic effects of climate change on the Saami people; (2) to summarize the scientific evidence about the primary, secondary, and tertiary effects of climate change on Saami culture and Sápmi region; and (3) to identify gaps in the knowledge of the effects of climate change on health and well-being of the Saami.
The Saami health is on average similar, or slightly better compared to the health of other populations in the same area. Warming climate has already influenced Saami reindeer culture. Mental health and suicide risk partly linked to changing physical and social environments are major concerns. The lifestyle, diet, and morbidity of the Saami are changing to resemble the majority populations posing threats for the health of the Saami and making them more vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change. Climate change is a threat for the cultural way of life of Saami. Possibilities for Saami to adapt to climate change are limited.
PubMed ID
30350264 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Holistic Effects of Climate Change on the Culture, Well-Being, and Health of the Saami, the Only Indigenous People in the European Union.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300928
Source
Curr Environ Health Rep. 2018 12; 5(4):401-417
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Date
12-2018
Author
Jouni J K Jaakkola
Suvi Juntunen
Klemetti Näkkäläjärvi
Author Affiliation
Center for Environmental and Respiratory Health Research, University of Oulu, P. O. Box 5000, FI-90014, Oulu, Finland. jouni.jaakkola@oulu.fi.
Source
Curr Environ Health Rep. 2018 12; 5(4):401-417
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Climate change
Cultural Characteristics
European Union
Health status
Humans
Mental health
Population Groups
Seasons
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
(1) To develop a framework for understanding the holistic effects of climate change on the Saami people; (2) to summarize the scientific evidence about the primary, secondary, and tertiary effects of climate change on Saami culture and Sápmi region; and (3) to identify gaps in the knowledge of the effects of climate change on health and well-being of the Saami.
The Saami health is on average similar, or slightly better compared to the health of other populations in the same area. Warming climate has already influenced Saami reindeer culture. Mental health and suicide risk partly linked to changing physical and social environments are major concerns. The lifestyle, diet, and morbidity of the Saami are changing to resemble the majority populations posing threats for the health of the Saami and making them more vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change. Climate change is a threat for the cultural way of life of Saami. Possibilities for Saami to adapt to climate change are limited.
PubMed ID
30350264 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mental health and urbanization: a Russian perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299506
Source
Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2018 05; 31(3):272-275
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
05-2018
Author
Petr Victorovich Morozov
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Faculty for Advanced Medical Studies, N.I.Pirogov Russian National Medical Research University, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2018 05; 31(3):272-275
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Humans
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Population Dynamics - trends
Russia - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Urbanization - trends
Abstract
Despite being a pressing problem, the influence of urbanization on mental health is still underestimated in Russia. Although few studies on the topic in recent years were available, viewpoints of the expert community in Russia will be presented. Intensive urbanization impacts on the living conditions of the majority of the country's population being associated with mass migration of the population, a change in the structure of employment, the restructuring of family relations, and the need to adapt to unaccustomed living conditions.
Modern urbanization can adversely affect mental health due to stressful factors related to overpopulation, environmental contamination, poverty, violence, and lack of social support.
The main factors that directly affect mental health in Russia are consequences of urbanization such as:The society and the Government are taking a number of measures to prevent the consequences of urbanization (restrictions in the consumption of alcohol and tobacco, mass green plantations, a ban on noise in the evening, closure of landfills, etc.).
PubMed ID
29528899 View in PubMed
Less detail

Promoting Physical Activity Among Native American Youth: a Systematic Review of the Methodology and Current Evidence of Physical Activity Interventions and Community-wide Initiatives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291360
Source
J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2016 Dec; 3(4):608-624
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Sheila Fleischhacker
Erica Roberts
Ricky Camplain
Kelly R Evenson
Joel Gittelsohn
Author Affiliation
Office of Nutrition Research, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Two Democracy Plaza, Room 635, 6707 Democracy Boulevard MSC 5461, Bethesda, MD, 20892-5461, USA. sheila.fleischhacker@nih.gov.
Source
J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2016 Dec; 3(4):608-624
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Child
Child Behavior
Community-Based Participatory Research
Exercise
Humans
Indians, North American
Minority Groups
Abstract
Promoting physical activity using environmental, policy, and systems approaches could potentially address persistent health disparities faced by American Indian and Alaska Native children and adolescents. To address research gaps and help inform tribally led community changes that promote physical activity, this review examined the methodology and current evidence of physical activity interventions and community-wide initiatives among Native youth. A keyword-guided search was conducted in multiple databases to identify peer-reviewed research articles that reported on physical activity among Native youth. Ultimately, 20 unique interventions (described in 76 articles) and 13 unique community-wide initiatives (described in 16 articles) met the study criteria. Four interventions noted positive changes in knowledge and attitude relating to physical activity but none of the interventions examined reported statistically significant improvements on weight-related outcomes. Only six interventions reported implementing environmental, policy, and system approaches relating to promoting physical activity and generally only shared anecdotal information about the approaches tried. Using community-based participatory research or tribally driven research models strengthened the tribal-research partnerships and improved the cultural and contextual sensitivity of the intervention or community-wide initiative. Few interventions or community-wide initiatives examined multi-level, multi-sector interventions to promote physical activity among Native youth, families, and communities. More research is needed to measure and monitor physical activity within this understudied, high risk group. Future research could also focus on the unique authority and opportunity of tribal leaders and other key stakeholders to use environmental, policy, and systems approaches to raise a healthier generation of Native youth.
Notes
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S62-9 PMID 14636810
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Jul;110(7):1049-57 PMID 20630162
Cites: Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1998 Feb;37(2):123-9 PMID 9492121
Cites: Obes Rev. 2011 May;12(5):e151-8 PMID 20977600
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2003 Sep;93(9):1517-8 PMID 12948972
Cites: Health Educ Res. 1998 Jun;13(2):251-65 PMID 10181023
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2012 Nov 22;9:137 PMID 23173781
Cites: J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):337-42 PMID 22400466
Cites: Med Anthropol. 2001;20(1):25-64 PMID 11820766
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Apr;69(4 Suppl):782S-787S PMID 10195603
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2007 Oct;4(4):A109 PMID 17875253
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2012;9:E50 PMID 22300870
Cites: J Prim Prev. 2012 Aug;33(4):161-74 PMID 23001689
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2012 Sep;43(3 Suppl 2):S123-9 PMID 22898161
Cites: J Prim Prev. 2014 Jun;35(3):135-49 PMID 24549525
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1993 Oct 29;699:167-80 PMID 8267307
Cites: J Public Health Manag Pract. 2010 Sep-Oct;16(5):420-5 PMID 20689391
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Apr;69(4 Suppl):803S-809S PMID 10195606
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S80-90 PMID 14636812
Cites: Health Behav Policy Rev. 2014 Jan;1(1):82-95 PMID 27213163
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Apr;69(4 Suppl):796S-802S PMID 10195605
Cites: Obes Res. 2004 Dec;12(12):1974-80 PMID 15687399
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2012;9:E56 PMID 22338596
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009 Apr;163(4):344-8 PMID 19349563
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Aug;82(2):393-8 PMID 16087984
Cites: Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2009 Jul-Aug;31(4):306-15 PMID 19555789
Cites: J Public Health Manag Pract. 2010 Sep-Oct;16(5):394-400 PMID 20689387
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Apr;69(4 Suppl):764S-766S PMID 10195600
Cites: Obes Res. 2005 Jan;13(1):146-52 PMID 15761174
Cites: Prev Med. 2014 Oct;67 Suppl 1:S51-7 PMID 24513172
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2011 Sep;8(5):A105 PMID 21843408
Cites: Prev Sci. 2015 Feb;16(2):291-300 PMID 24615546
Cites: MMWR Recomm Rep. 2009 Jul 24;58(RR-7):1-26 PMID 19629029
Cites: J Community Health. 2010 Dec;35(6):667-75 PMID 20508978
Cites: Women Health. 2002;36(2):59-74 PMID 12487141
Cites: Fam Community Health. 2010 Jul-Sep;33(3):238-47 PMID 20531104
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S91-6 PMID 14636813
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2006 Jan;3(1):A19 PMID 16356372
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Nov;78(5):1030-8 PMID 14594792
Cites: J Community Health. 2012 Oct;37(5):1081-90 PMID 22323099
Cites: Int Q Community Health Educ. 2013;34(4):391-414 PMID 25228486
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S70-9 PMID 14636811
Cites: Ethn Dis. 2002 Summer;12(3):398-402 PMID 12148712
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2002 Apr;102(4):555-8 PMID 11985417
Cites: Obes Res. 1999 Jan;7(1):34-42 PMID 10023728
Cites: Am J Health Educ. 2010 Jan 1;41(4):244-249 PMID 23745177
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:S255-7 PMID 24754654
Cites: J Sch Health. 1988 Mar;58(3):104-7 PMID 3352232
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2006 Sep;96(9):1623-8 PMID 16873759
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1993 Oct 29;699:265-6 PMID 8267321
Cites: Prev Sci. 2002 Sep;3(3):235-40 PMID 12387557
Cites: J Sch Health. 2013 Mar;83(3):223-9 PMID 23343323
Cites: Diabet Med. 1998 Jan;15(1):66-72 PMID 9472866
Cites: Diabetes Educ. 2010 Nov-Dec;36(6):924-35 PMID 20944056
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2014 Sep 25;11:E166 PMID 25254984
Cites: Matern Child Health J. 2008 Jul;12 Suppl 1:68-75 PMID 18322787
Cites: J Prev Interv Community. 2011;39(1):65-76 PMID 21271433
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Aug;78(2):308-12 PMID 12885714
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2004 May;104(5):746-52 PMID 15127059
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Apr;69(4 Suppl):816S-824S PMID 10195608
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2014 Sep 18;11:E160 PMID 25232747
Cites: Obes Res. 2003 May;11(5):606-11 PMID 12740449
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2007;14(1):24-43 PMID 17602411
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Apr;69(4 Suppl):760S-763S PMID 10195599
Cites: Diabetes Educ. 2013 Jan-Feb;39(1):109-18 PMID 23150531
Cites: Health Psychol. 2000 Jul;19(4):354-64 PMID 10907654
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S46-54 PMID 14636808
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Apr;69(4 Suppl):767S-772S PMID 10195601
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2006 Jul;3(3):A103 PMID 16776864
Cites: J Community Health. 2001 Dec;26(6):423-45 PMID 11759094
Cites: J Acad Nutr Diet. 2013 Aug;113(8):1076-83 PMID 23885704
Cites: Prev Sci. 2015 Jan;16(1):11-20 PMID 23963625
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Apr;69(4 Suppl):788S-795S PMID 10195604
Cites: J Prim Prev. 2012 Aug;33(4):175-85 PMID 22956296
Cites: Fam Community Health. 2011 Jul-Sep;34(3):202-10 PMID 21633212
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2000 Apr;18(3):235-41 PMID 10722990
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2014 Apr 17;11:E59 PMID 24742392
Cites: Obes Res. 2001 Jun;9(6):356-63 PMID 11399782
Cites: J Pediatr. 2013 Jun;162(6):1270-5 PMID 23332462
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2008 Jun;34(6 Suppl):S194-209 PMID 18471600
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Apr;69(4 Suppl):810S-815S PMID 10195607
Cites: Health Educ Res. 2012 Aug;27(4):645-55 PMID 21994709
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2002 Feb;102(2):253-6 PMID 11846122
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Feb;16(2):311-7 PMID 18239638
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2006 Jul;31(1):36-46 PMID 16777541
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S55-61 PMID 14636809
Cites: J Public Health Manag Pract. 2010 Sep-Oct;16(5):404-10 PMID 20689389
Cites: WMJ. 2005 Jul;104(5):44-7 PMID 16138515
Cites: Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1998 Feb;37(2):131-41 PMID 9492122
Cites: J Prim Prev. 2012 Aug;33(4):197-207 PMID 22965622
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S97-106 PMID 14636814
Cites: Am J Hum Biol. 2012 May-Jun;24(3):302-13 PMID 22378356
Cites: J Sci Med Sport. 2014 May;17 (3):276-82 PMID 23693030
Cites: Pimatisiwin. 2009 Jun 1;7(1):1 PMID 20150951
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Mar;36(3):309-19 PMID 12634022
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2011 Sep;111(9):1375-9 PMID 21872701
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S24-34 PMID 14636806
Cites: J Public Health Manag Pract. 2010 Sep-Oct;16(5):401-3 PMID 20689388
Cites: Public Health Nurs. 2010 Mar-Apr;27(2):104-14 PMID 20433664
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S35-45 PMID 14636807
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2011 Jan-Feb;43(1):55-62 PMID 21216367
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2003 Dec;32(3-4):207-16 PMID 14703257
Cites: Matern Child Health J. 2012 Dec;16(9):1879-86 PMID 22527771
Cites: Am J Health Promot. 2009 Jul-Aug;23(6):S8-32 PMID 19601485
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011 Dec 23;11:951 PMID 22192795
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S13-23 PMID 14636805
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2000 Nov;10(8 Suppl):S41-48 PMID 11189092
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S1-2 PMID 14636803
Cites: Diabetes Educ. 1998 Jul-Aug;24(4):441-3, 446-50 PMID 9830948
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2012 Jul;102(7):1346-52 PMID 22594740
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2013 Jan;16(1):146-55 PMID 22376987
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Apr;69(4 Suppl):773S-781S PMID 10195602
Cites: Am Psychol. 2008 Jan;63(1):14-31 PMID 18193978
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2011;18(2):41-63 PMID 22302281
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2008 Jan;34(1):9-15 PMID 18083445
Cites: J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jul;17(3):224-9 PMID 16757660
Cites: Child Adolesc Social Work J. 2010 Jun 1;27(3):231-244 PMID 20582152
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S107-12 PMID 14636815
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Nov;20(11):2241-9 PMID 22513491
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2000 Feb;100(2):205-11 PMID 10670393
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2009 Apr;10(2 Suppl):109S-117S PMID 19454757
Cites: Obes Rev. 2013 Jul;14(7):593-603 PMID 23577646
PubMed ID
27294756 View in PubMed
Less detail

Recent trends in the prevalence of chronic kidney disease: not the same old song.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291328
Source
Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens. 2017 05; 26(3):187-196
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
05-2017
Author
Raymond K Hsu
Neil R Powe
Author Affiliation
aDivision of Nephrology bDepartment of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco cPriscilla Chan and Mark Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, California, USA.
Source
Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens. 2017 05; 26(3):187-196
Date
05-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Central America - epidemiology
China - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Diabetic Nephropathies - epidemiology - ethnology
England - epidemiology
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - epidemiology
Republic of Korea - epidemiology
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
We aim to review recent updates on the epidemiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD).
Recent analyses from the National Health and Nutritional Examination survey describe the temporal trend in CKD prevalence in US adults. The overall prevalence of estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60?ml/min/1.73?m increased from 4.8% in 1988-1994 to 6.9% in 2003-2004, but has since stabilized at 6.4-6.9% up to 2011-2012. Prevalence of CKD stages 1-4 has also stabilized at ~14% of adults since 2003-2004. The prevalence of diabetic kidney disease - defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60?ml/min/1.73?m and/or microalbuminuria among adults with diabetes - has similarly plateaued since the early to mid-2000s at ~26-27%. There is continued rise in CKD and diabetic kidney disease prevalence among blacks and Mexican-Americans, however, in the last decade. Worldwide, a similar pattern of stable prevalence of CKD since the early 2000s is seen in England, Norway, and Korea. Despite these optimistic findings, there are several emerging at-risk populations. Rapid increases in diabetes and hypertension in China may signal an impending growth in CKD. In parts of Central America, there is emergence of very high CKD prevalence among agricultural workers - suspected to be due to occupational and environmental exposures.
Collective efforts to undermine risk factors, such as better control of hypertension and diabetes, have likely helped to abate the growth in CKD in several developed countries within the last decade. More worldwide high-quality and geographically granular data collection on CKD would help to monitor the epidemiology of CKD and potentially assist in identifying impactful interventions.
PubMed ID
28319485 View in PubMed
Less detail

Responding to Climate and Environmental Change Impacts on Human Health via Integrated Surveillance in the Circumpolar North: A Systematic Realist Review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296291
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 Nov 30; 15(12):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Nov-30-2018
Author
Alexandra Sawatzky
Ashlee Cunsolo
Andria Jones-Bitton
Jacqueline Middleton
Sherilee L Harper
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road E, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada. asawatzk@uoguelph.ca.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 Nov 30; 15(12):
Date
Nov-30-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Abstract
Environments are shifting rapidly in the Circumpolar Arctic and Subarctic regions as a result of climate change and other external stressors, and this has a substantial impact on the health of northern populations. Thus, there is a need for integrated surveillance systems designed to monitor the impacts of climate change on human health outcomes as part of broader adaptation strategies in these regions. This review aimed to identify, describe, and synthesize literature on integrated surveillance systems in Circumpolar Arctic and Subarctic regions, that are used for research or practice. Following a systematic realist review approach, relevant articles were identified using search strings developed for MEDLINE® and Web of Science™ databases, and screened by two independent reviewers. Articles that met the inclusion criteria were retained for descriptive quantitative analysis, as well as thematic qualitative analysis, using a realist lens. Of the 3431 articles retrieved in the database searches, 85 met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Thematic analysis identified components of integrated surveillance systems that were categorized into three main groups: structural, processual, and relational components. These components were linked to surveillance attributes and activities that supported the operations and management of integrated surveillance. This review advances understandings of the distinct contributions of integrated surveillance systems and data to discerning the nature of changes in climate and environmental conditions that affect population health outcomes and determinants in the Circumpolar North. Findings from this review can be used to inform the planning, design, and evaluation of integrated surveillance systems that support evidence-based public health research and practice in the context of increasing climate change and the need for adaptation.
PubMed ID
30513697 View in PubMed
Less detail

Review of built and natural environment stressors impacting American-Indian/Alaska-Native children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294869
Source
Rev Environ Health. 2018 Sep 06; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Sep-06-2018
Author
Nirmalla Barros
Nicolle S Tulve
Daniel T Heggem
Ken Bailey
Author Affiliation
ORISE, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA, Fax: +919-541-0905.
Source
Rev Environ Health. 2018 Sep 06; :
Date
Sep-06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Abstract
Children's exposures to chemical and non-chemical stressors from their everyday environment affects their overall health and well-being. American-Indian/Alaska-Native (AI/AN) children may have a disproportionate burden of stressors from their built and natural environments when compared to children from other races/ethnicities. Our objectives were to identify chemical and non-chemical stressors from AI/AN children's built and natural environments and evaluate their linkages with health and well-being outcomes from the peer reviewed literature. Library databases (e.g. PubMed) were searched to identify studies focused on these stressors. References were excluded if they: did not discuss AI/AN children or they were not the primary cohort; discussed tribes outside the United States (U.S.); were reviews or intervention studies; or did not discuss stressors from the built/natural environments. Out of 2539 references, 35 remained. Sample populations were predominantly (70%) in New York (NY) and Alaska (AK); 14 studies reported on the same cohort. Studies with matching stressors and outcomes were few, ruling out a quantitative review. Respiratory and developmental outcomes were the main outcomes evaluated. Primary non-chemical stressors were residential proximity to polluted landscapes, lack of indoor plumbing, and indoor use of wood for heating or cooking. The main chemical stressors were volatile organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter (PM2.5), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), p,p'-DDE, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), lead, and mercury. Our qualitative review was suggestive of a potential increase in respiratory illness from indoor wood use or no plumbing, which can be used as a guide to promote healthy environments for AI/AN children. We identified limited studies (
PubMed ID
30205649 View in PubMed
Less detail

Review of built and natural environment stressors impacting American-Indian/Alaska-Native children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296833
Source
Rev Environ Health. 2018 Dec 19; 33(4):349-381
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Dec-19-2018
Author
Nirmalla Barros
Nicolle S Tulve
Daniel T Heggem
Ken Bailey
Author Affiliation
ORISE, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA, Fax: +919-541-0905.
Source
Rev Environ Health. 2018 Dec 19; 33(4):349-381
Date
Dec-19-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska - ethnology
Alaska Natives
Built Environment
Child
Child, Preschool
Environment
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
New York - ethnology
United States - ethnology
Abstract
Children's exposures to chemical and non-chemical stressors from their everyday environment affects their overall health and well-being. American-Indian/Alaska-Native (AI/AN) children may have a disproportionate burden of stressors from their built and natural environments when compared to children from other races/ethnicities. Our objectives were to identify chemical and non-chemical stressors from AI/AN children's built and natural environments and evaluate their linkages with health and well-being outcomes from the peer reviewed literature. Library databases (e.g. PubMed) were searched to identify studies focused on these stressors. References were excluded if they: did not discuss AI/AN children or they were not the primary cohort; discussed tribes outside the United States (U.S.); were reviews or intervention studies; or did not discuss stressors from the built/natural environments. Out of 2539 references, 35 remained. Sample populations were predominantly (70%) in New York (NY) and Alaska (AK); 14 studies reported on the same cohort. Studies with matching stressors and outcomes were few, ruling out a quantitative review. Respiratory and developmental outcomes were the main outcomes evaluated. Primary non-chemical stressors were residential proximity to polluted landscapes, lack of indoor plumbing, and indoor use of wood for heating or cooking. The main chemical stressors were volatile organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter (PM2.5), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), p,p'-DDE, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), lead, and mercury. Our qualitative review was suggestive of a potential increase in respiratory illness from indoor wood use or no plumbing, which can be used as a guide to promote healthy environments for AI/AN children. We identified limited studies (
Notes
CommentIn: Rev Environ Health. 2018 Dec 19;33(4):319 PMID 30530910
PubMed ID
30205649 View in PubMed
Less detail

A review of global environmental mercury processes in response to human and natural perturbations: Changes of emissions, climate, and land use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295713
Source
Ambio. 2018 Mar; 47(2):116-140
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Daniel Obrist
Jane L Kirk
Lei Zhang
Elsie M Sunderland
Martin Jiskra
Noelle E Selin
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, One University Ave, Lowell, MA, 01854, USA. daniel_obrist@uml.edu.
Source
Ambio. 2018 Mar; 47(2):116-140
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Arctic Regions
China
Climate change
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - chemistry - toxicity
Europe
Humans
India
Indian Ocean
Mercury - analysis - chemistry - toxicity
Abstract
We review recent progress in our understanding of the global cycling of mercury (Hg), including best estimates of Hg concentrations and pool sizes in major environmental compartments and exchange processes within and between these reservoirs. Recent advances include the availability of new global datasets covering areas of the world where environmental Hg data were previously lacking; integration of these data into global and regional models is continually improving estimates of global Hg cycling. New analytical techniques, such as Hg stable isotope characterization, provide novel constraints of sources and transformation processes. The major global Hg reservoirs that are, and continue to be, affected by anthropogenic activities include the atmosphere (4.4-5.3 Gt), terrestrial environments (particularly soils: 250-1000 Gg), and aquatic ecosystems (e.g., oceans: 270-450 Gg). Declines in anthropogenic Hg emissions between 1990 and 2010 have led to declines in atmospheric Hg0 concentrations and HgII wet deposition in Europe and the US (- 1.5 to - 2.2% per year). Smaller atmospheric Hg0 declines (- 0.2% per year) have been reported in high northern latitudes, but not in the southern hemisphere, while increasing atmospheric Hg loads are still reported in East Asia. New observations and updated models now suggest high concentrations of oxidized HgII in the tropical and subtropical free troposphere where deep convection can scavenge these HgII reservoirs. As a result, up to 50% of total global wet HgII deposition has been predicted to occur to tropical oceans. Ocean Hg0 evasion is a large source of present-day atmospheric Hg (approximately 2900 Mg/year; range 1900-4200 Mg/year). Enhanced seawater Hg0 levels suggest enhanced Hg0 ocean evasion in the intertropical convergence zone, which may be linked to high HgII deposition. Estimates of gaseous Hg0 emissions to the atmosphere over land, long considered a critical Hg source, have been revised downward, and most terrestrial environments now are considered net sinks of atmospheric Hg due to substantial Hg uptake by plants. Litterfall deposition by plants is now estimated at 1020-1230 Mg/year globally. Stable isotope analysis and direct flux measurements provide evidence that in many ecosystems Hg0 deposition via plant inputs dominates, accounting for 57-94% of Hg in soils. Of global aquatic Hg releases, around 50% are estimated to occur in China and India, where Hg drains into the West Pacific and North Indian Oceans. A first inventory of global freshwater Hg suggests that inland freshwater Hg releases may be dominated by artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM; approximately 880 Mg/year), industrial and wastewater releases (220 Mg/year), and terrestrial mobilization (170-300 Mg/year). For pelagic ocean regions, the dominant source of Hg is atmospheric deposition; an exception is the Arctic Ocean, where riverine and coastal erosion is likely the dominant source. Ocean water Hg concentrations in the North Atlantic appear to have declined during the last several decades but have increased since the mid-1980s in the Pacific due to enhanced atmospheric deposition from the Asian continent. Finally, we provide examples of ongoing and anticipated changes in Hg cycling due to emission, climate, and land use changes. It is anticipated that future emissions changes will be strongly dependent on ASGM, as well as energy use scenarios and technology requirements implemented under the Minamata Convention. We predict that land use and climate change impacts on Hg cycling will be large and inherently linked to changes in ecosystem function and global atmospheric and ocean circulations. Our ability to predict multiple and simultaneous changes in future Hg global cycling and human exposure is rapidly developing but requires further enhancement.
Notes
Cites: Environ Microbiol Rep. 2014 Oct;6(5):441-7 PMID 25646534
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Jul 1;43(13):4802-9 PMID 19673268
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Sep 22;112(38):11789-94 PMID 26351688
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Jun 5;46(11):5921-30 PMID 22519552
Cites: Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Feb;24(5):5001-5011 PMID 28000068
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2013 Aug 6;47(15):8105-13 PMID 23834017
Cites: Science. 2013 Sep 27;341(6153):1457-8 PMID 24072910
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2013 Mar 15;448:163-75 PMID 23062970
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2007 Jul 15;41(14):4851-60 PMID 17711193
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Feb 1;45(3):964-70 PMID 21210676
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Mar 1;44(5):1630-7 PMID 20104887
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2009 Sep 22;106(38):16114-9 PMID 19805267
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2006 Aug 15;367(1):222-33 PMID 16406491
Cites: Science. 2013 Mar 15;339(6125):1332-5 PMID 23393089
Cites: Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci. 2016 Nov 28;374(2081): PMID 29035262
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2016 Dec 6;50(23 ):12864-12873 PMID 27934281
Cites: Chem Rev. 2007 Feb;107(2):641-62 PMID 17300143
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2013 Oct 15;47(20):11810-20 PMID 24024607
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2000 Oct 2;259(1-3):61-71 PMID 11032136
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Jan 6;49(1):432-41 PMID 25485926
Cites: Nat Microbiol. 2016 Aug 01;1(10 ):16127 PMID 27670112
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2015 Dec 15;538:896-904 PMID 26363145
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Jun 6;51(11):5899-5906 PMID 28440654
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Mar 1;44(5):1698-704 PMID 20121085
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2014 Oct;80(20):6517-26 PMID 25107983
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2016 Oct 15;568:1157-70 PMID 27102272
Cites: Nature. 2017 Jul 12;547(7662):201-204 PMID 28703199
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2012 Feb;161:261-71 PMID 21745704
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Jul 15;44(14):5371-6 PMID 20553021
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 May 1;46(9):4933-40 PMID 22500567
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Mar 7;51(5):2846-2853 PMID 28191932
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Aug 7;46(15):7963-70 PMID 22747193
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Feb 18;48(4):2242-52 PMID 24428735
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2013 Oct;79(20):6325-30 PMID 23934484
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Oct 7;48(19):11437-44 PMID 25192054
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2016 Oct 15;568:546-56 PMID 26803218
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Feb 7;51(3):1186-1194 PMID 28013537
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2016 Oct 15;568:578-86 PMID 26897612
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Aug 4;49(15):8977-85 PMID 26132925
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2004 Mar 15;38(6):1772-6 PMID 15074688
Cites: Environ Toxicol Chem. 2014 Jan;33(1):208-15 PMID 24302165
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2016 Sep 6;50(17 ):9232-41 PMID 27501307
Cites: Science. 2006 Aug 18;313(5789):940-3 PMID 16825536
Cites: Water Res. 2015 Sep 1;80:245-55 PMID 26005785
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2013 Mar 19;47(6):2441-56 PMID 23384298
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Aug 19;48(16):9514-22 PMID 25066365
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Apr 7;49(7):4036-47 PMID 25750991
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2013 Feb 15;445-446:126-35 PMID 23333508
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2016 Oct 15;568:522-35 PMID 26775833
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2014 Jul 15;487:299-312 PMID 24793327
Cites: Nature. 2014 Aug 7;512(7512):65-8 PMID 25100482
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Nov 15;44(22):8574-80 PMID 20973542
Cites: Sci Adv. 2015 Oct 09;1(9):e1500675 PMID 26601305
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2007 Dec 1;41(23):8092-8 PMID 18186342
Cites: Sci Rep. 2015 May 20;5:10318 PMID 25993348
Cites: Environ Toxicol Chem. 2014 Jun;33(6):1202-10 PMID 24038450
Cites: Ecotoxicology. 2015 Mar;24(2):453-67 PMID 25492585
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Oct 16;104(42):16586-91 PMID 17901207
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2016 Oct 15;568:727-38 PMID 27130329
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2013 Nov;182:127-34 PMID 23911621
Cites: Chemosphere. 2017 Jul;178:42-50 PMID 28319740
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2012 Feb;161:284-90 PMID 21715069
Cites: Atmos Chem Phys. 2008 Dec 22;8(24):null PMID 24348525
Cites: Environ Toxicol Chem. 2009 Apr;28(4):881-93 PMID 19391686
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Dec 15;45(24):10485-91 PMID 22070723
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 May 5;49(9):5326-35 PMID 25851589
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Aug 15;43(16):6235-41 PMID 19746719
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 Sep 15;10(9):e0138333 PMID 26371471
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2002 Dec 1;36(23):5034-40 PMID 12523417
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Jul 7;49(13):7743-53 PMID 26030209
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2009 Feb;157(2):592-600 PMID 18922608
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2009 Oct 15;407(21):5578-88 PMID 19646736
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Mar 18;48(6):3153-61 PMID 24524696
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2000 Oct 9;260(1-3):213-23 PMID 11032129
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2013 May 1;452-453:196-207 PMID 23506852
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2005 Jan 15;39(2):557-68 PMID 15707056
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Jul 1;48(13):7204-6 PMID 24940613
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Jun 16;49(12):7188-96 PMID 25946594
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2013 Jun 4;47(11):5746-54 PMID 23634978
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2015 Mar 15;509-510:16-27 PMID 25604938
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Jun 1;44(11):4191-7 PMID 20443581
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Aug 21;46(16):8748-55 PMID 22839429
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Sep 10;12(9):11254-68 PMID 26378551
Cites: Mar Chem. 2015 Dec 20;177(Pt 5):753-762 PMID 26644635
Cites: Chemosphere. 2000 Jun;40(12):1335-51 PMID 10789973
Cites: Water Air Soil Pollut. 2010 Oct;212(1-4):369-385 PMID 20936165
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Jun 6;51(11):5969-5977 PMID 28448134
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2016 Sep 16;82(19):6068-78 PMID 27422835
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Jun 17;48(12):6533-43 PMID 24819278
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2016 Sep 6;50(17 ):9262-9 PMID 27485289
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Oct 16;46(20):10957-64 PMID 23033864
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2016 Nov 1;50(21):11559-11568 PMID 27690400
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2016 Oct 18;50(20):10943-10950 PMID 27649379
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2013 Jul 16;47(14):7757-65 PMID 23758558
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 May 5;49(9):5363-70 PMID 25822871
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2010 Oct;158(10):3347-53 PMID 20716469
Cites: Ambio. 2007 Feb;36(1):19-32 PMID 17408188
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2012 Mar 1;419:136-43 PMID 22281042
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2006 Aug 1;366(2-3):851-63 PMID 16181661
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Oct 7;48(19):11312-9 PMID 25171182
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Feb;115(2):235-42 PMID 17384771
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Jun 2;49(11):6712-21 PMID 25923446
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Jan 3;46(1):382-90 PMID 22103560
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2014 Oct 1;494-495:337-50 PMID 25068706
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Jan 17;51(2):801-809 PMID 27951639
Cites: Ecotoxicology. 2005 Mar;14(1-2):85-99 PMID 15931960
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2016 Mar 1;50(5):2405-12 PMID 26849121
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2012 Jan 1;414:22-42 PMID 22104383
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2011 Jan 1;409(3):548-63 PMID 21094516
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2015 Nov 1;532:220-9 PMID 26071963
Cites: Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2017 Oct 18;19(10 ):1235-1248 PMID 28825440
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Apr 15;43(8):2983-8 PMID 19475981
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2016 Jan 19;50(2):507-24 PMID 26599393
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2016 Aug 16;50(16):8548-57 PMID 27418119
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2011 May 1;45(9):3974-81 PMID 21473582
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Feb 01;14 (2): PMID 28157152
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Jan 17;51(2):863-869 PMID 27960251
Cites: J Environ Qual. 2003 Mar-Apr;32(2):393-405 PMID 12708661
Cites: Sci Adv. 2017 Jan 27;3(1):e1601239 PMID 28138547
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2013 May 7;47(9):4181-8 PMID 23597056
Cites: Phys Chem Chem Phys. 2017 Jan 18;19(3):1826-1838 PMID 28000816
Cites: J Mar Biol Assoc U.K.. 2016 Feb;96(1):43-59 PMID 26834292
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Sep 2;48(17):10242-50 PMID 25127072
Cites: Anal Bioanal Chem. 2007 May;388(2):353-9 PMID 17375289
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2016 Oct 15;568:651-65 PMID 26936663
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2016 Jan 19;113(3):526-31 PMID 26729866
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2008 Oct 1;404(1):129-38 PMID 18640702
Cites: Sci Rep. 2013 Nov 25;3:3322 PMID 24270081
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2012 Dec;171:109-17 PMID 22892573
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Mar 3;49(5):3185-94 PMID 25655106
Cites: Science. 2007 Oct 19;318(5849):417-20 PMID 17872409
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Oct 15;44(20):7764-70 PMID 20853890
Cites: Nat Commun. 2014 Aug 20;5:4624 PMID 25140406
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Mar 18;48(6):3162-8 PMID 24524759
PubMed ID
29388126 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sanitary-Epidemiological Status of Siberian Population (Medico-Demographical and Epidemiological Characteristics).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290010
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2016; 71(6):472-81
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Author
S I Kolesnikov
E D Savilov
M F Savchenkov
Ya A Leshchenko
I V Malov
E V Anganova
V A Astaf'ev
S N Shugaeva
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2016; 71(6):472-81
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Demography
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Public Health - methods - statistics & numerical data
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
Review on the problem of sanitary-epidemiological welfare of the population in the Siberian Federal District (SFD) was conducted based on literature data and authors own research in the period of 2002-2014. Authors provided broad information on the health and demographic and epidemiological characteristics of SFD population. SFD in comparison with other regions of the Russian Federation overcomes one of the most adverse situations including mortality rates from external causes. SFD population’s infectious and somatic morbidity rates were analyzed. Analysis demonstrated that the situation relating to priority epidemiologically and socially important infections (HIV-infection, parenteral viral hepatitis, tuberculosis etc.) on the territory of the SFD remains tense. Authors provided information on the increase in the level of the actual for Siberian regions natural-foci tick-borne infections. Detailed analysis for the environment anthropogenic pollution impact for the epidemic, infectious and vaccine induced processes. Authors suggest that anthropogenic (biological) environmental pollution is one of the most important factors influencing the epidemiological welfare of the Siberian population. A new strategic direction in epidemiological research associated with the problem of comorbid diseases is planned.
PubMed ID
29298018 View in PubMed
Less detail

State of knowledge on current exposure, fate and potential health effects of contaminants in polar bears from the circumpolar Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299432
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 May 10; 664:1063-1083
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
May-10-2019
Author
Heli Routti
Todd C Atwood
Thea Bechshoft
Andrei Boltunov
Tomasz M Ciesielski
Jean-Pierre Desforges
Rune Dietz
Geir W Gabrielsen
Bjørn M Jenssen
Robert J Letcher
Melissa A McKinney
Adam D Morris
Frank F Rigét
Christian Sonne
Bjarne Styrishave
Sabrina Tartu
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Polar Institute, Fram Centre, NO-9296 Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: heli.routti@npolar.no.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 May 10; 664:1063-1083
Date
May-10-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Ursidae - physiology
Abstract
The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) is among the Arctic species exposed to the highest concentrations of long-range transported bioaccumulative contaminants, such as halogenated organic compounds and mercury. Contaminant exposure is considered to be one of the largest threats to polar bears after the loss of their Arctic sea ice habitat due to climate change. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive summary of current exposure, fate, and potential health effects of contaminants in polar bears from the circumpolar Arctic required by the Circumpolar Action Plan for polar bear conservation. Overall results suggest that legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs) including polychlorinated biphenyls, chlordanes and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), followed by other perfluoroalkyl compounds (e.g. carboxylic acids, PFCAs) and brominated flame retardants, are still the main compounds in polar bears. Concentrations of several legacy POPs that have been banned for decades in most parts of the world have generally declined in polar bears. Current spatial trends of contaminants vary widely between compounds and recent studies suggest increased concentrations of both POPs and PFCAs in certain subpopulations. Correlative field studies, supported by in vitro studies, suggest that contaminant exposure disrupts circulating levels of thyroid hormones and lipid metabolism, and alters neurochemistry in polar bears. Additionally, field and in vitro studies and risk assessments indicate the potential for adverse impacts to polar bear immune functions from exposure to certain contaminants.
PubMed ID
30901781 View in PubMed
Less detail

A State-of-the-Science Review of Mercury Biomarkers in Human Populations Worldwide between 2000 and 2018.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299311
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2018 10; 126(10):106001
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Date
10-2018
Author
Niladri Basu
Milena Horvat
David C Evers
Irina Zastenskaya
Pál Weihe
Joanna Tempowski
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2018 10; 126(10):106001
Date
10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Biomarkers - analysis - blood - urine
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Environmental pollution
Food Contamination
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Mercury - analysis - blood - urine
Mining
Seafood - analysis
Abstract
The Minamata Convention on Mercury provided a mandate for action against global mercury pollution. However, our knowledge of mercury exposures is limited because there are many regions and subpopulations with little or no data.
We aimed to increase worldwide understanding of human exposures to mercury by collecting, collating, and analyzing mercury concentrations in biomarker samples reported in the published scientific literature.
A systematic search of the peer-reviewed scientific literature was performed using three databases. A priori search strategy, eligibility criteria, and data extraction steps were used to identify relevant studies.
We collected 424,858 mercury biomarker measurements from 335,991 individuals represented in 312 articles from 75 countries. General background populations with insignificant exposures have blood, hair, and urine mercury levels that generally fall under [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text], respectively. We identified four populations of concern: a) Arctic populations who consume fish and marine mammals; b) tropical riverine communities (especially Amazonian) who consume fish and in some cases may be exposed to mining; c) coastal and/or small-island communities who substantially depend on seafood; and d) individuals who either work or reside among artisanal and small-scale gold mining sites.
This review suggests that all populations worldwide are exposed to some amount of mercury and that there is great variability in exposures within and across countries and regions. There remain many geographic regions and subpopulations with limited data, thus hindering evidence-based decision making. This type of information is critical in helping understand exposures, particularly in light of certain stipulations in the Minamata Convention on Mercury. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP3904.
PubMed ID
30407086 View in PubMed
Less detail

The superior effect of nature based solutions in land management for enhancing ecosystem services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291575
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Jan 01; 610-611:997-1009
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Jan-01-2018
Author
Saskia Keesstra
Joao Nunes
Agata Novara
David Finger
David Avelar
Zahra Kalantari
Artemi Cerdà
Author Affiliation
Soil Physics and Land Management Group, Wageningen University, Droevendaalsesteeg 4, 6708PB Wageningen, The Netherlands; Civil, Surveying and Environmental Engineering, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan 2308, Australia. Electronic address: saskia.keesstra@wur.nl.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Jan 01; 610-611:997-1009
Date
Jan-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods
Ecosystem
Environmental monitoring
Ethiopia
Hydrology
Iceland
Slovenia
Spain
Sweden
Wetlands
Abstract
The rehabilitation and restoration of land is a key strategy to recover services -goods and resources- ecosystems offer to the humankind. This paper reviews key examples to understand the superior effect of nature based solutions to enhance the sustainability of catchment systems by promoting desirable soil and landscape functions. The use of concepts such as connectivity and the theory of system thinking framework allowed to review coastal and river management as a guide to evaluate other strategies to achieve sustainability. In land management NBSs are not mainstream management. Through a set of case studies: organic farming in Spain; rewilding in Slovenia; land restoration in Iceland, sediment trapping in Ethiopia and wetland construction in Sweden, we show the potential of Nature based solutions (NBSs) as a cost-effective long term solution for hydrological risks and land degradation. NBSs can be divided into two main groups of strategies: soil solutions and landscape solutions. Soil solutions aim to enhance the soil health and soil functions through which local eco-system services will be maintained or restored. Landscape solutions mainly focus on the concept of connectivity. Making the landscape less connected, facilitating less rainfall to be transformed into runoff and therefore reducing flood risk, increasing soil moisture and reducing droughts and soil erosion we can achieve the sustainability. The enhanced eco-system services directly feed into the realization of the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations.
PubMed ID
28838037 View in PubMed
Less detail

Temporal trends of contaminants in Arctic human populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294648
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Oct; 25(29):28834-28850
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Khaled Abass
Anastasia Emelyanova
Arja Rautio
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FI-90014, Oulu, Finland. khaled.megahed@oulu.fi.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Oct; 25(29):28834-28850
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Abstract
The first Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) report was published in 1998 and followed by three assessment reports of human health (AMAP 2003, 2009 and 2015). The focus area of the AMAP reports was to monitor levels of environmental contaminants in the Arctic and to assess the health effects connected with detected levels in Arctic countries. This review gives an overview of temporal trends of contaminants and their health effects in humans of the Arctic based on data published by AMAP, as well as Russian scientific literature. Several time series of 31 contaminants in humans of the Arctic from different cohorts are reported. The lengths of time series and periods covered differ from each other. International restrictions have decreased the levels of most persistent organic pollutants in humans and food webs. Percentage changes for contaminants in human biological matrices (blood samples from children, mothers and males and breast milk samples) for the period of sampling showed declining trends in most of the monitored Arctic locations, with the exception of oxychlordane, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromodiphenyl ether (PBDE153) and perfluorinated compounds (PFCs).
Notes
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Aug 21;46(16):9071-9 PMID 22770559
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012 Jul 10;71:18594 PMID 22789518
Cites: Arctic Med Res. 1988;47 Suppl 1:659-65 PMID 3078512
Cites: Mutat Res. 2012 May 1;733(1-2):69-77 PMID 21945723
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2005 Apr 15;342(1-3):5-86 PMID 15866268
Cites: PLoS One. 2010 May 20;5(5):e10746 PMID 20505766
Cites: Mutat Res. 2010 Jul 19;700(1-2):39-43 PMID 20451658
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2010 Jul 1;408(15):2874-84 PMID 19686961
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 2000 Apr;47(2):132-7 PMID 10822803
Cites: Reprod Toxicol. 2012 Dec;34(4):498-503 PMID 22841741
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2012 Aug;27(8):2532-40 PMID 22647447
Cites: Environ Health. 2013 Jul 02;12(1):54 PMID 23816203
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2013 Nov-Dec;121(11-12):1292-8 PMID 24007675
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Mar;108(3):205-11 PMID 10706525
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Jun;117(6):1014-20 PMID 19590699
Cites: Lancet Oncol. 2013 Apr;14(4):287-8 PMID 23499544
Cites: Diabetologia. 2007 Sep;50(9):1841-1851 PMID 17624515
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Jan;99(1):5-13 PMID 24153349
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Sep;117(9):1380-6 PMID 19750101
Cites: Environ Int. 2014 Aug;69:58-66 PMID 24815340
Cites: PLoS Med. 2006 Aug;3(8):e311 PMID 16942395
Cites: Environ Health. 2008 Jul 15;7:38 PMID 18627625
Cites: Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2012 May 22;355(2):240-8 PMID 21939731
Cites: J Environ Monit. 2012 Nov;14(11):2854-69 PMID 23014859
Cites: Environ Toxicol. 2015 Feb;30(2):168-76 PMID 23913582
Cites: Toxicol Lett. 2016 Nov 2;261:41-48 PMID 27575567
Cites: Chemosphere. 2009 Mar;74(11):1413-9 PMID 19108870
Cites: Environ Res. 2008 Nov;108(3):387-92 PMID 18814871
Cites: Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Aug;25(23):22499-22528 PMID 29956262
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2013 Jul;121(7):774-83 PMID 23651634
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2007 Jan 1;372(2-3):486-96 PMID 17157358
Cites: Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol. 2014 Jul;115(1):118-28 PMID 24797035
Cites: Chemosphere. 2015 Jun;129:239-45 PMID 25455676
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2014 Feb;29(2):359-67 PMID 24163265
Cites: JAMA. 2012 Jan 25;307(4):391-7 PMID 22274686
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2000 Jun 1;254(2-3):93-234 PMID 10885446
Cites: Cortex. 2016 Jan;74:358-69 PMID 26109549
Cites: Rev Environ Health. 2008 Jan-Mar;23(1):59-74 PMID 18557598
Cites: J Pediatr. 2004 Feb;144(2):177-83 PMID 14760257
Cites: Crit Rev Toxicol. 2005 Jan;35(1):61-88 PMID 15742903
Cites: Environ Health. 2011 Oct 06;10:88 PMID 21978366
Cites: Chem Res Toxicol. 2010 Feb 15;23(2):432-42 PMID 20092276
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Aug;114(8):1301-5 PMID 16882544
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 May 29;72:null PMID 23730628
Cites: Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2006 May-Jun;28(3):363-75 PMID 16647838
Cites: Met Ions Life Sci. 2013;11:491-507 PMID 23430782
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Dec 13;75:33805 PMID 27974137
Cites: Arch Toxicol. 2009 Sep;83(9):851-61 PMID 19468714
Cites: Environ Health. 2008 Jun 06;7:29 PMID 18538022
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Jun 17;72:21113 PMID 23785672
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1362 PMID 20572746
Cites: J Pediatr. 2004 Feb;144(2):169-76 PMID 14760255
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Oct;118(10):1434-8 PMID 20562056
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Apr 1;155(7):629-35 PMID 11914190
Cites: Environ Int. 2014 Jun;67:43-53 PMID 24657493
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Sep;111(12):1519-23 PMID 12948893
Cites: Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2014 Apr-May;217(4-5):473-82 PMID 24138783
Cites: Environ Res. 2010 May;110(4):388-95 PMID 20378105
Cites: Reprod Toxicol. 2012 Jul;33(4):577-83 PMID 22449571
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2018;11(1):1480084 PMID 29943674
Cites: Chemosphere. 2013 Apr;91(2):131-8 PMID 23260246
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2012 Dec 06;9(12):4486-97 PMID 23222182
Cites: Environ Int. 2010 May;36(4):398-401 PMID 20299099
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Oct;112(14):1359-65 PMID 15471725
Cites: Neurotoxicology. 2010 Aug;31(4):373-84 PMID 20403381
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2015 Sep 15;527-528:150-8 PMID 25965033
PubMed ID
30145756 View in PubMed
Less detail

Temporal trends of contaminants in Arctic human populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297477
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Oct; 25(29):28834-28850
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Khaled Abass
Anastasia Emelyanova
Arja Rautio
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FI-90014, Oulu, Finland. khaled.megahed@oulu.fi.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Oct; 25(29):28834-28850
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Child
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood
Female
Food chain
Health status
Humans
Male
Milk, human - chemistry
Organic Chemicals - analysis - blood
Risk assessment
Russia
Spatio-Temporal Analysis
Abstract
The first Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) report was published in 1998 and followed by three assessment reports of human health (AMAP 2003, 2009 and 2015). The focus area of the AMAP reports was to monitor levels of environmental contaminants in the Arctic and to assess the health effects connected with detected levels in Arctic countries. This review gives an overview of temporal trends of contaminants and their health effects in humans of the Arctic based on data published by AMAP, as well as Russian scientific literature. Several time series of 31 contaminants in humans of the Arctic from different cohorts are reported. The lengths of time series and periods covered differ from each other. International restrictions have decreased the levels of most persistent organic pollutants in humans and food webs. Percentage changes for contaminants in human biological matrices (blood samples from children, mothers and males and breast milk samples) for the period of sampling showed declining trends in most of the monitored Arctic locations, with the exception of oxychlordane, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromodiphenyl ether (PBDE153) and perfluorinated compounds (PFCs).
PubMed ID
30145756 View in PubMed
Less detail

Wastewater treatment and public health in Nunavut: a microbial risk assessment framework for the Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297768
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32860-32872
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Kiley Daley
Rob Jamieson
Daniel Rainham
Lisbeth Truelstrup Hansen
Author Affiliation
Centre for Water Resources Studies, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. kiley.daley@dal.ca.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32860-32872
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Bays
Drinking Water - microbiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Gastrointestinal Diseases - etiology
Humans
Inuits
Nunavut
Public Health
Risk Assessment - methods
Sanitation
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - microbiology
Waterborne Diseases - etiology
Wetlands
Abstract
Wastewater management in Canadian Arctic communities is influenced by several geographical factors including climate, remoteness, population size, and local food-harvesting practices. Most communities use trucked collection services and basic treatment systems, which are capable of only low-level pathogen removal. These systems are typically reliant solely on natural environmental processes for treatment and make use of existing lagoons, wetlands, and bays. They are operated in a manner such that partially treated wastewater still containing potentially hazardous microorganisms is released into the terrestrial and aquatic environment at random times. Northern communities rely heavily on their local surroundings as a source of food, drinking water, and recreation, thus creating the possibility of human exposure to wastewater effluent. Human exposure to microbial hazards present in municipal wastewater can lead to acute gastrointestinal illness or more severe disease. Although estimating the actual disease burdens associated with wastewater exposures in Arctic communities is challenging, waterborne- and sanitation-related illness is believed to be comparatively higher than in other parts of Canada. This review offers a conceptual framework and evaluation of current knowledge to enable the first microbial risk assessment of exposure scenarios associated with food-harvesting and recreational activities in Arctic communities, where simplified wastewater systems are being operated.
PubMed ID
28224339 View in PubMed
Less detail

21 records – page 1 of 2.