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Associations between physical home environmental factors and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5-year-olds: the BRA-study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290267
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 May; 20(7):1173-1183
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
May-2017
Author
Anne Lene Kristiansen
Mona Bjelland
Anne Himberg-Sundet
Nanna Lien
Lene Frost Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition,Institute of Basic Medical Sciences,University of Oslo,PO Box 1046 Blindern,0316 Oslo,Norway.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 May; 20(7):1173-1183
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adult
Child, Preschool
Choice Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Food Preferences
Fruit
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Norway
Nutrition Assessment
Parent-Child Relations
Pilot Projects
Principal Component Analysis
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
First, to explore item pools developed to measure the physical home environment of pre-school children and assess the psychometric properties of these item pools; second, to explore associations between this environment and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5-year-olds.
Data were collected in three steps: (i) a parental web-based questionnaire assessing the child's vegetable intake and factors potentially influencing the child's vegetable consumption; (ii) direct observation of the children's fruit, berry and vegetable intakes at two meals in one day in the kindergarten; and (iii) a parental web-based 24 h recall.
The target group for this study was pre-school children born in 2010 and 2011, attending public or private kindergartens in the counties of Vestfold and Buskerud, Norway.
A total of 633 children participated.
Principal component analysis on the thirteen-item pool assessing availability/accessibility resulted in two factors labelled 'availability at home' and 'accessibility at home', while the eight-item pool assessing barriers resulted in two factors labelled 'serving barriers' and 'purchase barriers'. The psychometric properties of these factors were satisfactory. Linear regression of the associations between vegetable intake and the factors showed generally positive associations with 'availability at home' and 'accessibility at home' and negative associations with 'serving barriers'.
This age group has so far been understudied and there is a need for comparable studies. Our findings highlight the importance of targeting the physical home environment of pre-school children in future interventions as there are important modifiable factors that both promote and hinder vegetable consumption in this environment.
PubMed ID
27995831 View in PubMed
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Maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy and childhood growth and overweight: results from a large Norwegian prospective observational cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296615
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 04 23; 8(3):e018895
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-23-2018
Author
Eleni Papadopoulou
Jérémie Botton
Anne-Lise Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Jan Alexander
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Jonas Bacelis
Anders Elfvin
Bo Jacobsson
Verena Sengpiel
Author Affiliation
Division of Infection Control and Environmental Health, Department of Environmental Exposure and Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 04 23; 8(3):e018895
Date
04-23-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Caffeine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Child
Child Development - drug effects
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diet Records
Eating
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Norway
Overweight - chemically induced - etiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - etiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Weight Gain
Abstract
To study the association between maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy and the child's weight gain and overweight risk up to 8 years.
Prospective nationwide pregnancy cohort.
The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.
A total of 50?943 mothers recruited from 2002 to 2008 and their children, after singleton pregnancies, with information about average caffeine intake assessed at mid-pregnancy.
Child's body size information at 11 age points from 6 weeks to 8 years. We defined excess growth in infancy as a WHO weight gain z-score of >0.67 from birth to age 1?year, and overweight according to the International Obesity Task Force. We used a growth model to assess individual growth trajectories.
Compared with pregnant women with low caffeine intake (200?mg/day had consistently higher weight. Very high caffeine exposures were associated with higher weight gain velocity from infancy to age 8 years.
Any caffeine consumption during pregnancy is associated with a higher risk of excess infant growth and of childhood overweight, mainly at preschool ages. Maternal caffeine intake may modify the overall weight growth trajectory of the child from birth to 8 years. This study adds supporting evidence for the current advice to reduce caffeine intake during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
29685923 View in PubMed
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Maternal Iodine Intake and Offspring Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Results from a Large Prospective Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293042
Source
Nutrients. 2017 Nov 13; 9(11):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Nov-13-2017
Author
Marianne Hope Abel
Eivind Ystrom
Ida Henriette Caspersen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Heidi Aase
Liv Elin Torheim
Ragna Bugge Askeland
Ted Reichborn-Kjennerud
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Author Affiliation
Division of Infection Control and Environmental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, 0456 Oslo, Norway. mariannehope.abel@fhi.no.
Source
Nutrients. 2017 Nov 13; 9(11):
Date
Nov-13-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Age Factors
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Child
Child Behavior
Dietary Supplements
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Iodine - administration & dosage - deficiency
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Norway - epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Recommended dietary allowances
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
Current knowledge about the relationship between mild to moderately inadequate maternal iodine intake and/or supplemental iodine on child neurodevelopment is sparse. Using information from 77,164 mother-child pairs in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, this study explored associations between maternal iodine intake and child attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis, registered in the Norwegian Patient Registry and maternally-reported child ADHD symptoms at eight years of age. Pregnant women reported food and supplement intakes by questionnaire in gestational week 22. In total, 1725 children (2.2%) were diagnosed with ADHD. In non-users of supplemental iodine (53,360 mothers), we found no association between iodine intake from food and risk of child ADHD diagnosis (p = 0.89), while low iodine from food (
Notes
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PubMed ID
29137191 View in PubMed
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Post-colonoscopy colorectal cancers in Sweden: room for quality improvement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290722
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2017 Jul; 29(7):855-860
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Anna Forsberg
Ulf Hammar
Anders Ekbom
Rolf Hultcrantz
Author Affiliation
aDepartment of Medicine Solna bDepartment of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine cDepartment of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Huddinge Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2017 Jul; 29(7):855-860
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Colonoscopy - adverse effects - standards
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Diagnostic Errors
Female
Humans
Male
Margins of Excision
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasm, Residual
Odds Ratio
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Quality Improvement - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Post-colonoscopy colorectal cancer (PCCRC), a cancer occurring within a short interval of a colonoscopy, might be partly explained as missed or incompletely resected lesions. Associated risk factors are age, sex, comorbidity, cancer location, and colonoscopy volume. There is a gap in the knowledge of prevalence of PCCRC and the impact of different risk factors in Sweden.
This is a retrospective population-based observational cohort study of the colonoscopies performed on adults during the years 2001-2010 that were identified from Swedish health registers. The rate of PCCRC (diagnosed 6-36 months after the first colonoscopy) was defined as the number of PCCRCs divided by the number of colorectal cancers (CRC) in the interval of 0-36 months. Univariate and multivariate Poisson regression analyses examined associations with PCCRC.
There were 289?729 colonoscopies performed on 249?079 individuals included in the study. There were 16?319 individuals with a colorectal cancer diagnosis 0-36 months after a colonoscopy. Of these, 1286 (7.9%) were PCCRCs. In the multivariate analysis, young age (18-30 years) and former polyp diagnosis had the highest risks [relative risk (RR)=3.3; 95% confidence interval: 2.1-5.2 and RR=3.1; 95% confidence interval: 2.7-3.6]. The impact of other risk factors, such as female sex, comorbidity, right sided colorectal cancer location, and time period, was consistent with the finding in other studies.
The prevalence of PCCRC in Sweden seems to be relatively high, indicating that there is room for improvement in colonoscopy quality. The high RR of PCCRC in the youngest age group, even though there were only a few cases, has not been described in other studies.
PubMed ID
28410353 View in PubMed
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Prediction of alcohol use disorder using personality disorder traits: a twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294336
Source
Addiction. 2018 Jan; 113(1):15-24
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Twin Study
Date
Jan-2018
Author
Tom Rosenström
Fartein Ask Torvik
Eivind Ystrom
Nikolai Olavi Czajkowski
Nathan A Gillespie
Steven H Aggen
Robert F Krueger
Kenneth S Kendler
Ted Reichborn-Kjennerud
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Disorders, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Addiction. 2018 Jan; 113(1):15-24
Date
Jan-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Twin Study
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Antisocial Personality Disorder - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Borderline Personality Disorder - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Comorbidity
Conduct Disorder - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Female
Humans
Impulsive Behavior
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Personality
Personality Disorders - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Young Adult
Abstract
The DSM-IV personality disorders (PDs) are comorbid with alcohol use disorder (AUD) and with each other. It remains unclear which PD criteria are most likely to drive onset and recurrence of AUD and which are merely confounded with those criteria. We determine which individual PD criteria predict AUD and the degree of underlying genetic and/or environmental aetiology.
A prospective observational twin study.
Norway 1999-2011.
A total of 2528 and 2275 Norwegian adult twins in waves 1 and 2 variable-selection analyses, and 2785 in biometric analyses.
DSM-IV PDs and their 80 criteria were assessed using a structured personal interview, and AUD using the World Health Organization's Composite International Diagnostic Interview.
In a variable-selection analysis, two PD criteria were associated with AUD even after taking all the other criteria into account: criterion 8 of antisocial PD (childhood conduct disorder) and criterion 4 of borderline PD (self-damaging impulsive behaviours). Adjusting for each other, their respective odds ratios were 3.4 [confidence interval (CI) = 2.1-5.4] and 5.0 (CI = 3.3-7.7). Endorsement strength of the criteria was associated with AUD in a dose-response manner and they explained 5.5% of variation in AUD risk-more than the full diagnoses of antisocial and borderline PDs together (0.5%). The association between borderline criterion 4 and AUD 10 years later derived mainly from their overlapping genetic factors, whereas the association between antisocial criterion 8 and AUD 10 years later was due to both genetic and non-genetic factors.
Conduct disorder and self-harming impulsivity are the foremost risk traits for alcohol use disorder among the 80 personality disorder criteria of DSM-IV, predicting alcohol use disorder more effectively than personality disorder diagnoses. The twin-study analysis suggested that conduct disorder represents a joint genetic and developmental risk for alcohol use disorder and that impulsivity is a genetic risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28734091 View in PubMed
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Prevalence and management of severe asthma in primary care: an observational cohort study in Sweden (PACEHR).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295883
Source
Respir Res. 2018 01 18; 19(1):12
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-18-2018
Author
Kjell Larsson
Björn Ställberg
Karin Lisspers
Gunilla Telg
Gunnar Johansson
Marcus Thuresson
Christer Janson
Author Affiliation
Work Environment Toxicology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. kjell.larsson@ki.se.
Source
Respir Res. 2018 01 18; 19(1):12
Date
01-18-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Cohort Studies
Disease Management
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Primary Health Care - methods
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Severe and uncontrolled asthma is associated with increased risk of exacerbations and death. A substantial proportion of asthma patients have poor asthma control, and a concurrent COPD diagnosis often increases disease burden. The objective of the study was to describe the prevalence and managemant of severe asthma in a Swedish asthma popuöation.
In this observational cohort study, primary care medical records data (2006-2013) from 36 primary health care centers were linked to data from national mandatory Swedish health registries. The studied population (>18 years) had a record of drug collection for obstructive pulmonary disease (ATC code R03) during 2011-2012, and a physician diagnosed asthma (ICD-10 code J45-J46) prior to drug collection. Severe asthma was classified as collection of high dose inhaled steroid (> 800 budesonide or equivalent per day) and leukotriene receptor antagonist and/or long-acting beta-agonist. Poor asthma control was defined as either collection of =600 doses of short-acting beta-agonists, and/or =1 exacerbation(s) during the year post index date.
A total of 18,724 asthma patients (mean 49 years, 62.8% women) were included, of whom 17,934 (95.8%) had mild to moderate and 790 (4.2%) had severe asthma. Exacerbations were more prevalent in severe asthma (2.59 [2.41-2.79], Relative Risk [95% confidence interval]; p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
29347939 View in PubMed
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