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Barriers to outdoor physical activity and unmet physical activity need in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266937
Source
Prev Med. 2014 Oct;67:106-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Johanna Eronen
Mikaela B von Bonsdorff
Timo Törmäkangas
Merja Rantakokko
Erja Portegijs
Anne Viljanen
Taina Rantanen
Source
Prev Med. 2014 Oct;67:106-11
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environment
Environment Design
Exercise
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Health status
Humans
Male
Mobility Limitation
Questionnaires
Walking
Abstract
To profile participants based on reported outdoor physical activity barriers using a data-driven approach, describe the profiles and study their association with unmet physical activity need.
Cross-sectional analyses of 848 community-dwelling men and women aged 75-90 living in Central Finland in 2012. Barriers to outdoor physical activity and unmet physical activity need were enquired with a questionnaire. The latent profiles were identified by profiling participants into latent groups using a mixture modeling technique on the multivariate set of indicators of outdoor physical activity barriers. A path model was used to study the associations of the profiles with unmet physical activity need.
Five barrier profiles were identified. Profile A was characterized with minor barriers, profile B with weather barriers, profile C with health and weather barriers, profile D with barriers concerning insecurity, health and weather; and profile E with mobility and health barriers. The participants in the profiles differed in the proportion of individual and environmental barriers. The risk for unmet physical activity need was highest among people whose severe mobility difficulties restricted their outdoor physical activity.
Outdoor physical activity barriers reflect the imbalance in person-environment fit among older people, manifested as unmet physical activity need.
PubMed ID
25045839 View in PubMed
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Genetic influences underlying self-rated health in older female twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174438
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Jun;53(6):1002-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Raija Leinonen
Jaakko Kaprio
Marja Jylhä
Asko Tolvanen
Markku Koskenvuo
Eino Heikkinen
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Center for Interdisciplinary Gerontology, Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylaä, Finland. raija.leinonen@sport.jyu.fi
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Jun;53(6):1002-7
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology
Environment
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Mental health
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Self Concept
Twins - genetics
Walking
Abstract
To examine the genetic and environmental sources of variation in self-rated health (SRH) in older female twins and to explore the roles of morbidity, functional limitation, and psychological well-being as mediators of genetic and environmental effects on SRH.
Cross-sectional analysis of twin data.
Research laboratory.
One hundred two monozygotic and 115 dizygotic female twin pairs aged 63 to 76.
SRH was categorized as good, average, or poor. Morbidity was described using a physician-assessed disease-severity scale together with information about the presence of diabetes mellitus and cancer. Maximal walking speed measured over 10 m was used to assess physical functional limitation; the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale were used to characterize psychological well-being. The contributions of genetic and environmental (defined as familial (shared by siblings) or nonshared (unique to each sibling)) effects were assessed using univariate and multivariate structural equation modeling of twin data.
SRH did not have its own specific genetic effect but shared a genetic component in common with the genetic components underlying liability to disease severity, maximal walking speed, and depressive symptoms. It accounted for 64% of the variation in SRH, with environmental effects accounting for the remaining variation.
The current results suggest that there are no specific genetic effects on SRH but rather that genetic influences on SRH are mediated through genetic influences affecting chronic diseases, functional limitation, and mood.
PubMed ID
15935024 View in PubMed
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