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Barriers to outdoor physical activity and unmet physical activity need in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266937
Source
Prev Med. 2014 Oct;67:106-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Johanna Eronen
Mikaela B von Bonsdorff
Timo Törmäkangas
Merja Rantakokko
Erja Portegijs
Anne Viljanen
Taina Rantanen
Source
Prev Med. 2014 Oct;67:106-11
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environment
Environment Design
Exercise
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Health status
Humans
Male
Mobility Limitation
Questionnaires
Walking
Abstract
To profile participants based on reported outdoor physical activity barriers using a data-driven approach, describe the profiles and study their association with unmet physical activity need.
Cross-sectional analyses of 848 community-dwelling men and women aged 75-90 living in Central Finland in 2012. Barriers to outdoor physical activity and unmet physical activity need were enquired with a questionnaire. The latent profiles were identified by profiling participants into latent groups using a mixture modeling technique on the multivariate set of indicators of outdoor physical activity barriers. A path model was used to study the associations of the profiles with unmet physical activity need.
Five barrier profiles were identified. Profile A was characterized with minor barriers, profile B with weather barriers, profile C with health and weather barriers, profile D with barriers concerning insecurity, health and weather; and profile E with mobility and health barriers. The participants in the profiles differed in the proportion of individual and environmental barriers. The risk for unmet physical activity need was highest among people whose severe mobility difficulties restricted their outdoor physical activity.
Outdoor physical activity barriers reflect the imbalance in person-environment fit among older people, manifested as unmet physical activity need.
PubMed ID
25045839 View in PubMed
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Individual and environmental factors underlying life space of older people - study protocol and design of a cohort study on life-space mobility in old age (LISPE).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118779
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:1018
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Taina Rantanen
Erja Portegijs
Anne Viljanen
Johanna Eronen
Milla Saajanaho
Li-Tang Tsai
Markku Kauppinen
Eeva-Maija Palonen
Sarianna Sipilä
Susanne Iwarsson
Merja Rantakokko
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center and Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, P,O,Box 35, Jyväskylä, FI-40014, Finland. taina.rantanen@jyu.fi
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:1018
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Quality of Life
Walking
Abstract
A crucial issue for the sustainability of societies is how to maintain health and functioning in older people. With increasing age, losses in vision, hearing, balance, mobility and cognitive capacity render older people particularly exposed to environmental barriers. A central building block of human functioning is walking. Walking difficulties may start to develop in midlife and become increasingly prevalent with age. Life-space mobility reflects actual mobility performance by taking into account the balance between older adults internal physiologic capacity and the external challenges they encounter in daily life. The aim of the Life-Space Mobility in Old Age (LISPE) project is to examine how home and neighborhood characteristics influence people's health, functioning, disability, quality of life and life-space mobility in the context of aging. In addition, examine whether a person's health and function influence life-space mobility.
This paper describes the study protocol of the LISPE project, which is a 2-year prospective cohort study of community-dwelling older people aged 75 to 90 (n?=?848). The data consists of a baseline survey including face-to-face interviews, objective observation of the home environment and a physical performance test in the participant's home. All the baseline participants will be interviewed over the phone one and two years after baseline to collect data on life-space mobility, disability and participation restriction. Additional home interviews and environmental evaluations will be conducted for those who relocate during the study period. Data on mortality and health service use will be collected from national registers. In a substudy on walking activity and life space, 358 participants kept a 7-day diary and, in addition, 176 participants also wore an accelerometer.
Our study, which includes extensive data collection with a large sample, provides a unique opportunity to study topics of importance for aging societies. A novel approach is employed which enables us to study the interactions of environmental features and individual characteristics underlying the life-space of older people. Potentially, the results of this study will contribute to improvements in strategies to postpone or prevent progression to disability and loss of independence.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23170987 View in PubMed
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Perceived environmental barriers to outdoor mobility and changes in sense of autonomy in participation outdoors among older people: a prospective two-year cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290462
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2017 Aug; 21(8):805-809
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Merja Rantakokko
Erja Portegijs
Anne Viljanen
Susanne Iwarsson
Markku Kauppinen
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
a Gerontology Research Center and Department of Health Sciences , University of Jyväskylä , Jyväskylä , Finland.
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2017 Aug; 21(8):805-809
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Community Participation - statistics & numerical data
Environment
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mobility Limitation
Personal Autonomy
Abstract
The aim was to study whether perceived environmental barriers to outdoor mobility affect changes in sense of autonomy in participation outdoors among community-dwelling older people over a two-year period.
Community-dwelling people aged 75-90 years (n = 848) in central Finland were interviewed on two occasions, face-to-face at baseline and over the telephone two years later. Perceived environmental barriers to outdoor mobility were assessed using a 15-item structured questionnaire, and the sum scores categorized into tertiles (0, 1 and 2 or more barriers). Autonomy in participation outdoors was assessed with the 'Impact on Participation and Autonomy' (IPA) questionnaire using the autonomy outdoors subscale (score range 0-20, higher scores indicating more restricted autonomy).
Scores for autonomy in participation outdoors were available for 848 participants at baseline (mean 6.2, SD = 3.8) and for 748 participants at the two-year follow-up (mean 6.7, SD = 3.9). At baseline, those reporting multiple environmental barriers had the most restricted autonomy, while those reporting no environmental barriers had the least restricted autonomy (p
PubMed ID
26979293 View in PubMed
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Perceived environmental barriers to outdoor mobility and feelings of loneliness among community-dwelling older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259883
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2014 Dec;69(12):1562-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Merja Rantakokko
Susanne Iwarsson
Satu Vahaluoto
Erja Portegijs
Anne Viljanen
Taina Rantanen
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2014 Dec;69(12):1562-8
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environment
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Mobility Limitation
Motor Activity - physiology
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Abstract
We examined the association between perceived environmental barriers to outdoor mobility and loneliness among community-dwelling older people. In addition, we studied whether walking difficulties and autonomy in participation outdoors affected this association.
Cross-sectional analyses of face-to-face home interview data with 848 people aged 75-90 years (mean age: 80.1 years; 62% women) gathered within the "Life-Space Mobility in Old Age" (LISPE) project. Self-reports of loneliness, environmental barriers to outdoor mobility, and difficulties in walking 2 km were obtained with structured questionnaires. Autonomy in participation outdoors was assessed with the "Impact on Participation and Autonomy" questionnaire.
Altogether, 28% of participants reported experiencing loneliness sometimes or often. These participants also reported more difficulties in walking 2 km, restricted autonomy in participation outdoors, and more environmental barriers to outdoor mobility than people not experiencing loneliness. Snowy and icy winter conditions (odds ratio: 1.59 [95% confidence interval: 1.15-2.20]), long distances to services (odds ratio: 1.57 [1.00-2.46]), and hills in the nearby environment (odds ratio: 1.49 [1.05-2.12]) significantly increased the odds for loneliness, even after adjustments for walking difficulties, autonomy in participation outdoors, perceived financial situation, living alone, and health. Path modeling revealed that environmental barriers increased loneliness either through direct association or indirectly through restricted autonomy in participation outdoors.
Prospective studies should investigate whether removing environmental barriers to outdoor mobility improves autonomy in participation outdoors and alleviates loneliness among older people.
PubMed ID
24864307 View in PubMed
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Promoting mobility after hip fracture (ProMo): study protocol and selected baseline results of a year-long randomized controlled trial among community-dwelling older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129064
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2011;12:277
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Sarianna Sipilä
Anu Salpakoski
Johanna Edgren
Ari Heinonen
Markku A Kauppinen
Marja Arkela-Kautiainen
Sanna E Sihvonen
Maija Pesola
Taina Rantanen
Mauri Kallinen
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Centre, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. sarianna.sipila@jyu.fi
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2011;12:277
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Biomechanical Phenomena
Disability Evaluation
Female
Finland
Hip Fractures - diagnosis - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Hip Joint - physiopathology
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Physical Therapy Modalities
Program Evaluation
Range of Motion, Articular
Recovery of Function
Research Design
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To cope at their homes, community-dwelling older people surviving a hip fracture need a sufficient amount of functional ability and mobility. There is a lack of evidence on the best practices supporting recovery after hip fracture. The purpose of this article is to describe the design, intervention and demographic baseline results of a study investigating the effects of a rehabilitation program aiming to restore mobility and functional capacity among community-dwelling participants after hip fracture.
Population-based sample of over 60-year-old community-dwelling men and women operated for hip fracture (n = 81, mean age 79 years, 78% were women) participated in this study and were randomly allocated into control (Standard Care) and ProMo intervention groups on average 10 weeks post fracture and 6 weeks after discharged to home. Standard Care included written home exercise program with 5-7 exercises for lower limbs. Of all participants, 12 got a referral to physiotherapy. After discharged to home, only 50% adhered to Standard Care. None of the participants were followed-up for Standard Care or mobility recovery. ProMo-intervention included Standard Care and a year-long program including evaluation/modification of environmental hazards, guidance for safe walking, pain management, progressive home exercise program and physical activity counseling. Measurements included a comprehensive battery of laboratory tests and self-report on mobility limitation, disability, physical functional capacity and health as well as assessments for the key prerequisites for mobility, disability and functional capacity. All assessments were performed blinded at the research laboratory. No significant differences were observed between intervention and control groups in any of the demographic variables.
Ten weeks post hip fracture only half of the participants were compliant to Standard Care. No follow-up for Standard Care or mobility recovery occurred. There is a need for rehabilitation and follow-up for mobility recovery after hip fracture. However, the effectiveness of the ProMo program can only be assessed at the end of the study.
Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN53680197.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22145912 View in PubMed
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