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Active aging - resilience and external support as modifiers of the disablement outcome: AGNES cohort study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299192
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 05 02; 18(1):565
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-02-2018
Author
Taina Rantanen
Milla Saajanaho
Laura Karavirta
Sini Siltanen
Merja Rantakokko
Anne Viljanen
Timo Rantalainen
Katja Pynnönen
Anu Karvonen
Inna Lisko
Lotta Palmberg
Johanna Eronen
Eeva-Maija Palonen
Timo Hinrichs
Markku Kauppinen
Katja Kokko
Erja Portegijs
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, Univerisity of Jyvaskyla, P.O. Box 35 (viv 149), 40014, Jyväskylä, Finland. taina.rantanen@jyu.fi.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 05 02; 18(1):565
Date
05-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Cohort Studies
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Exercise
Female
Finland
Health Behavior
Health Literacy
Humans
Male
Resilience, Psychological
Social Support
Abstract
Population aging increases the need for knowledge on positive aspects of aging, and contributions of older people to their own wellbeing and that of others. We defined active aging as an individual's striving for elements of wellbeing with activities as per their goals, abilities and opportunities. This study examines associations of health, health behaviors, health literacy and functional abilities, environmental and social support with active aging and wellbeing. We will develop and validate assessment methods for physical activity and physical resilience suitable for research on older people, and examine their associations with active aging and wellbeing. We will examine cohort effects on functional phenotypes underlying active aging and disability.
For this population-based study, we plan to recruit 1000 participants aged 75, 80 or 85 years living in central Finland, by drawing personal details from the population register. Participants are interviewed on active aging, wellbeing, disability, environmental and social support, mobility, health behavior and health literacy. Physical activity and heart rate are monitored for 7 days with wearable sensors. Functional tests include hearing, vision, muscle strength, reaction time, exercise tolerance, mobility, and cognitive performance. Clinical examination by a nurse and physician includes an electrocardiogram, tests of blood pressure, orthostatic regulation, arterial stiffness, and lung function, as well as a review of chronic and acute conditions and prescribed medications. C-reactive protein, small blood count, cholesterol and vitamin D are analyzed from blood samples. Associations of factors potentially underlying active aging and wellbeing will be studied using multivariate methods. Cohort effects will be studied by comparing test results of physical and cognitive functioning with results of a cohort examined in 1989-90.
The current study will renew research on positive gerontology through the novel approach to active aging and by suggesting new biomarkers of resilience and active aging. Therefore, high interdisciplinary impact is expected. This cross-sectional study will not provide knowledge on temporal order of events or causality, but an innovative cross-sectional dataset provides opportunities for emergence of novel creative hypotheses and theories.
PubMed ID
29716566 View in PubMed
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Air pollution from traffic and cancer incidence: a Danish cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132837
Source
Environ Health. 2011;10:67
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Zorana J Andersen
Martin Hvidberg
Steen S Jensen
Matthias Ketzel
Mette Sørensen
Johnni Hansen
Steffen Loft
Kim Overvad
Anne Tjønneland
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Environ Health. 2011;10:67
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - chemically induced - classification - epidemiology
Nitrogen Oxides - analysis - toxicity
Residence Characteristics
Vehicle Emissions - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Vehicle engine exhaust includes ultrafine particles with a large surface area and containing absorbed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, transition metals and other substances. Ultrafine particles and soluble chemicals can be transported from the airways to other organs, such as the liver, kidneys, and brain. Our aim was to investigate whether air pollution from traffic is associated with risk for other cancers than lung cancer.
We followed up 54,304 participants in the Danish Diet Cancer and Health cohort for 20 selected cancers in the Danish Cancer Registry, from enrolment in 1993-1997 until 2006, and traced their residential addresses from 1971 onwards in the Central Population Registry. We used modeled concentration of nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) and amount of traffic at the residence as indicators of traffic-related air pollution and used Cox models to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) after adjustment for potential confounders.
NO(x) at the residence was significantly associated with risks for cervical cancer (IRR, 2.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01;5.93, per 100 µg/m(3) NO(x)) and brain cancer (IRR, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.25;4.19, per 100 µg/m(3) NO(x)).
This hypothesis-generating study indicates that traffic-related air pollution might increase the risks for cervical and brain cancer, which should be tested in future studies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21771295 View in PubMed
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Apparent temperature and acute myocardial infarction hospital admissions in Copenhagen, Denmark: a case-crossover study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125657
Source
Environ Health. 2012;11:19
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Janine Wichmann
Matthias Ketzel
Thomas Ellermann
Steffen Loft
Author Affiliation
Section of Environmental Health, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. jawic@sund.ku.dk
Source
Environ Health. 2012;11:19
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Seasons
Socioeconomic Factors
Temperature
Young Adult
Abstract
The influence of temperature on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has not been investigated as extensively as the effects of broader outcomes of morbidity and mortality. Sixteen studies reported inconsistent results and two considered confounding by air pollution. We addressed some of the methodological limitations of the previous studies in this study.
This is the first study of the association between the daily 3-hour maximum apparent temperature (Tapp(max)) and AMI hospital admissions in Copenhagen. The study period covered 1 January 1999-31 December 2006, stratified in warm (April-September) and cold (October-March) periods. A case-crossover epidemiology study design was applied. Models were adjusted for public holidays and influenza, confounding by PM10, NO2 and CO was investigated, the lag and non-linear effects of Tapp(max) was examined, effect modification by age, sex and SES was explored, and the results of the case-crossover models were compared to those of the generalised additive Poisson time-series and generalised estimating equation models.
14,456 AMI hospital admissions (12,995 people) occurred during the study period. For an inter-quartile range (6 or 7°C) increase in the 5-day cumulative average of Tapp(max), a 4% (95% CI:-2%; 10%) and 9% (95% CI: 3%; 14%) decrease in the AMI admission rate was observed in the warm and cold periods, respectively. The 19-65 year old group, men and highest SES group seemed to be more susceptible in the cold period.
An increase in Tapp(max) is associated with a decrease in AMI admissions during the colder months.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22463704 View in PubMed
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Apparent temperature and cause-specific emergency hospital admissions in greater copenhagen, denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101267
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(7):e22904
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Janine Wichmann
Zorana Andersen
Matthias Ketzel
Thomas Ellermann
Steffen Loft
Author Affiliation
Section of Environmental Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(7):e22904
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
One of the key climate change factors, temperature, has potentially grave implications for human health. We report the first attempt to investigate the association between the daily 3-hour maximum apparent temperature (Tapp(max)) and respiratory (RD), cardiovascular (CVD), and cerebrovascular (CBD) emergency hospital admissions in Copenhagen, controlling for air pollution. The study period covered 1 January 2002-31 December 2006, stratified in warm and cold periods. A case-crossover design was applied. Susceptibility (effect modification) by age, sex, and socio-economic status was investigated. For an IQR (8°C) increase in the 5-day cumulative average of Tapp(max), a 7% (95% CI: 1%, 13%) increase in the RD admission rate was observed in the warm period whereas an inverse association was found with CVD (-8%, 95% CI: -13%, -4%), and none with CBD. There was no association between the 5-day cumulative average of Tapp(max) during the cold period and any of the cause-specific admissions, except in some susceptible groups: a negative association for RD in the oldest age group and a positive association for CVD in men and the second highest SES group. In conclusion, an increase in Tapp(max) is associated with a slight increase in RD and decrease in CVD admissions during the warmer months.
PubMed ID
21829550 View in PubMed
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Apparent temperature and cause-specific mortality in Copenhagen, Denmark: a case-crossover analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130287
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2011 Sep;8(9):3712-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Janine Wichmann
Zorana Jovanovic Andersen
Matthias Ketzel
Thomas Ellermann
Steffen Loft
Author Affiliation
Section of Environmental Health, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5A, Copenhagen DK-1014, Denmark. jawic@sund.ku.dk
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2011 Sep;8(9):3712-27
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - analysis
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Humidity
Male
Middle Aged
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Particulate Matter - analysis
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Respiratory Tract Diseases - mortality
Temperature
Young Adult
Abstract
Temperature, a key climate change indicator, is expected to increase substantially in the Northern Hemisphere, with potentially grave implications for human health. This study is the first to investigate the association between the daily 3-hour maximum apparent temperature (Tapp(max)), and respiratory, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular mortality in Copenhagen (1999-2006) using a case-crossover design. Susceptibility was investigated for age, sex, socio-economic status and place of death. For an inter-quartile range (7 °C) increase in Tapp(max), an inverse association was found with cardiovascular mortality (-7% 95% CI -13%; -1%) and none with respiratory and cerebrovascular mortality. In the cold period all associations were inverse, although insignificant.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22016711 View in PubMed
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Association between 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine excretion and risk of lung cancer in a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129988
Source
Free Radic Biol Med. 2012 Jan 1;52(1):167-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2012
Author
Steffen Loft
Peter Svoboda
Kazuaki Kawai
Hiroshi Kasai
Mette Sørensen
Anne Tjønneland
Ulla Vogel
Peter Møller
Kim Overvad
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Section of Environmental Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. stl@sund.ku.dk
Source
Free Radic Biol Med. 2012 Jan 1;52(1):167-72
Date
Jan-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - enzymology - epidemiology - genetics - urine
Case-Control Studies
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
DNA Glycosylases - genetics - metabolism
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Genotype
Guanine - analogs & derivatives - urine
Homozygote
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - enzymology - epidemiology - genetics - urine
Male
Middle Aged
Oxidative Stress
Polymorphism, Genetic
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology - urine
Abstract
Oxidative damage to guanine (8-oxoGua) is one of the most abundant lesions induced by oxidative stress and documented mutagenic. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1) removes 8-oxoGua from DNA by excision. The urinary excretion of 8-oxoGua is a biomarker of exposure, reflecting the rate of damage in the steady state. The aim of this study was to investigate urinary 8-oxoGua as a risk factor for lung cancer. In a nested case-cohort design we examined associations between urinary excretion of 8-oxoGua and risk of lung cancer as well as potential interaction with the OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism in a population-based cohort of 25,717 men and 27,972 women aged 50-64 years with 3-7 years follow-up. We included 260 cases with lung cancer and a subcohort of 263 individuals matched on sex, age, and smoking duration for comparison. Urine collected at entry was analysed for 8-oxoGua by HPLC with electrochemical detection. There was no significant effect of smoking or OGG1 genotype on the excretion of 8-oxoGua. Overall the incidence rate ratio (IRR) (95% confidence interval) of lung cancer was 1.06 (0.97-1.15) per doubling of 8-oxoGua excretion. The association between lung cancer risk and 8-oxoGua excretion was significant among men [IRR: 1.17 (1.03-1.31)], never-smokers [IRR: 9.94 (1.04-94.7)], and former smokers [IRR: 1.19 (1.07-1.33)]. There was no significant interaction with the OGG1 genotype, although the IRR was 1.14 (0.98-1.34) among subjects homozygous for Cys326. The association between urinary 8-oxoGua excretion and lung cancer risk among former and never-smokers suggests that oxidative stress with damage to DNA is important in this group.
PubMed ID
22044660 View in PubMed
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Barriers to outdoor physical activity and unmet physical activity need in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266937
Source
Prev Med. 2014 Oct;67:106-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Johanna Eronen
Mikaela B von Bonsdorff
Timo Törmäkangas
Merja Rantakokko
Erja Portegijs
Anne Viljanen
Taina Rantanen
Source
Prev Med. 2014 Oct;67:106-11
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environment
Environment Design
Exercise
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Health status
Humans
Male
Mobility Limitation
Questionnaires
Walking
Abstract
To profile participants based on reported outdoor physical activity barriers using a data-driven approach, describe the profiles and study their association with unmet physical activity need.
Cross-sectional analyses of 848 community-dwelling men and women aged 75-90 living in Central Finland in 2012. Barriers to outdoor physical activity and unmet physical activity need were enquired with a questionnaire. The latent profiles were identified by profiling participants into latent groups using a mixture modeling technique on the multivariate set of indicators of outdoor physical activity barriers. A path model was used to study the associations of the profiles with unmet physical activity need.
Five barrier profiles were identified. Profile A was characterized with minor barriers, profile B with weather barriers, profile C with health and weather barriers, profile D with barriers concerning insecurity, health and weather; and profile E with mobility and health barriers. The participants in the profiles differed in the proportion of individual and environmental barriers. The risk for unmet physical activity need was highest among people whose severe mobility difficulties restricted their outdoor physical activity.
Outdoor physical activity barriers reflect the imbalance in person-environment fit among older people, manifested as unmet physical activity need.
PubMed ID
25045839 View in PubMed
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Body fat and mobility are explained by common genetic and environmental influences in older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157662
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jul;16(7):1616-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Alfredo Ortega-Alonso
Sarianna Sipilä
Urho M Kujala
Jaakko Kaprio
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. alfredo.ortega@sport.jyu.fi
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jul;16(7):1616-21
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adiposity - genetics
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - genetics
Electric Impedance
Environment
Female
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Locomotion - genetics
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Models, Genetic
Obesity - genetics - physiopathology
Physical Endurance - genetics
Risk factors
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Walking
Abstract
In older adults, mobility limitations often coexist with overweight or obesity, suggesting that similar factors may underlie both traits. This study examined the extent to which genetic and environmental influences explain the association between adiposity and mobility in older women. Body fat percentage (bioimpedance test), walking speed over 10 m, and distance walked in a 6-min test were evaluated in 92 monozygotic (MZ) and 104 dizygotic (DZ) pairs of twin sisters reared together, aged 63-76 years. Genetic and environmental influences on each trait were estimated using age-adjusted multivariate genetic modeling. The analyses showed that the means (and s.d.) for body fat percentage, walking speed, and walking endurance were 33.2+/-7.3%, 1.7+/-0.3 m/s and 529.7+/-75.4 m, respectively. The phenotypic correlation between adiposity and walking speed was -0.32 and between adiposity and endurance it was -0.33. Genetic influences explained 80% of the association between adiposity and speed, and 65% of adiposity and walking endurance. Cross-trait genetic influences accounted for 12% of the variability in adiposity, 56% in walking speed, and 34% in endurance. Trait-specific genetic influences were also detected for adiposity (54%) and walking endurance (13%), but not speed. In conclusion, among community-living older women, an inverse association was found between adiposity and mobility that was mostly due to the effect of shared genes. This result suggests that the identification of genetic variants for body fat metabolism may also provide understanding of the development of mobility limitations in older women.
PubMed ID
18421266 View in PubMed
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Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140509
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2011 Feb 15;183(4):455-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2011
Author
Zorana J Andersen
Martin Hvidberg
Steen S Jensen
Matthias Ketzel
Steffen Loft
Mette Sørensen
Anne Tjønneland
Kim Overvad
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. zorana@cancer.dk
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2011 Feb 15;183(4):455-61
Date
Feb-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants
Air Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Asthma - epidemiology
Causality
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Nitrogen Dioxide
Nitrogen Oxides
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology
Risk factors
Vehicle Emissions
Abstract
Short-term exposure to air pollution has been associated with exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), whereas the role of long-term exposures on the development of COPD is not yet fully understood.
We assessed the effect of exposure to traffic-related air pollution over 35 years on the incidence of COPD in a prospective cohort study.
We followed 57,053 participants in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort in the Hospital Discharge Register for their first hospital admission for COPD between 1993 and 2006. We estimated the annual mean levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) at all residential addresses of the cohort participants since 1971 to an event or 2006 and used indicators of traffic near the residential address at recruitment. We assessed the association between exposure to air pollution and COPD incidence by Cox regression analyses for the full cohort, and for participants with and without comorbid conditions, including asthma, diabetes, or cardiovascular disease.
A first hospital admission for COPD was recorded for 1,786 (3.4%) of 52,799 eligible subjects between recruitment (1993-1997) and 2006. COPD incidence was associated with the 35-year mean NO2 level (hazard ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.14, per interquartile range of 5.8 µg/m³), with stronger associations in subjects with diabetes (1.29; 1.05-1.50) and asthma (1.19; 1.03-1.38).
Long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution may contribute to the development of COPD with possibly enhanced susceptibility in people with diabetes and asthma.
PubMed ID
20870755 View in PubMed
Less detail

Do Associations Between Perceived Environmental and Individual Characteristics and Walking Limitations Depend on Lower Extremity Performance Level?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291084
Source
J Aging Health. 2017 Jun; 29(4):640-656
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Ritva Sakari
Merja Rantakokko
Erja Portegijs
Susanne Iwarsson
Sarianna Sipilä
Anne Viljanen
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
1 University of Jyvaskyla, Finland.
Source
J Aging Health. 2017 Jun; 29(4):640-656
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Environment
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Independent living
Interviews as Topic
Lower Extremity - physiopathology
Male
Mobility Limitation
Perception
Physical Fitness - physiology
Sweden
Task Performance and Analysis
Walking - physiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyze whether the associations between perceived environmental and individual characteristics and perceived walking limitations in older people differ between those with intact and those with poorer lower extremity performance.
Persons aged 75 to 90 ( N = 834) participated in interviews and performance tests in their homes. Standard questionnaires were used to obtain walking difficulties; environmental barriers to and, facilitators of, mobility; and perceived individual hindrances to outdoor mobility. Lower extremity performance was tested using Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB).
Among those with poorer lower extremity performance, the likelihood for advanced walking limitations was, in particular, related to perceived poor safety in the environment, and among those with intact performance to perceived social issues, such as lack of company, as well as to long distances.
The environmental correlates of walking limitations seem to depend on the level of lower extremity performance.
PubMed ID
27056910 View in PubMed
Less detail

Environmental barriers, person-environment fit and mortality among community-dwelling very old people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265500
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:783
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Merja Rantakokko
Timo Törmäkangas
Taina Rantanen
Maria Haak
Susanne Iwarsson
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:783
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Architectural Accessibility
Environment
Female
Frail Elderly
Housing for the Elderly
Humans
Male
Mobility Limitation
Mortality - trends
Proportional Hazards Models
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Environmental barriers are associated with disability-related outcomes in older people but little is known of the effect of environmental barriers on mortality. The aim of this study was to examine whether objectively measured barriers in the outdoor, entrance and indoor environments are associated with mortality among community-dwelling 80- to 89-year-old single-living people.
This longitudinal study is based on a sample of 397 people who were single-living in ordinary housing in Sweden. Participants were interviewed during 2002-2003, and 393 were followed up for mortality until May 15, 2012.Environmental barriers and functional limitations were assessed with the Housing Enabler instrument, which is intended for objective assessments of Person-Environment (P-E) fit problems in housing and the immediate outdoor environment. Mortality data were gathered from the public national register. Cox regression models were used for the analyses.
A total of 264 (67%) participants died during follow-up. Functional limitations increased mortality risk. Among the specific environmental barriers that generate the most P-E fit problems, lack of handrails in stairs at entrances was associated with the highest mortality risk (adjusted RR 1.55, 95% CI 1.14-2.10), whereas the total number of environmental barriers at entrances and outdoors was not associated with mortality. A higher number of environmental barriers indoors showed a slight protective effect against mortality even after adjustment for functional limitations (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.96-1.00).
Specific environmental problems may increase mortality risk among very-old single-living people. However, the association may be confounded by individuals' health status which is difficult to fully control for. Further studies are called for.
Notes
Cites: Am Heart J. 2011 May;161(5):950-521570528
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Cites: Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2012 Jan-Feb;54(1):55-6021420181
PubMed ID
23981906 View in PubMed
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Exposure to ultrafine particles, intracellular production of reactive oxygen species in leukocytes and altered levels of endothelial progenitor cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282319
Source
Toxicology. 2016 Jun 01;359-360:11-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-01-2016
Author
Kim Jantzen
Peter Møller
Dorina Gabriela Karottki
Yulia Olsen
Gabriel Bekö
Geo Clausen
Lars-Georg Hersoug
Steffen Loft
Source
Toxicology. 2016 Jun 01;359-360:11-8
Date
Jun-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Cell Count
Denmark
Endothelial Progenitor Cells - cytology - drug effects - metabolism
Environmental monitoring
Female
Housing
Humans
Leukocytes - drug effects - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Particle Size
Particulate Matter - toxicity
Reactive Oxygen Species - metabolism
Abstract
Exposure to particles in the fine and ultrafine size range has been linked to induction of low-grade systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and development of cardiovascular diseases. Declining levels of endothelial progenitor cells within systemic circulation have likewise been linked to progression of cardiovascular diseases. The objective was to determine if exposure to fine and ultrafine particles from indoor and outdoor sources, assessed by personal and residential indoor monitoring, is associated with altered levels of endothelial progenitor cells, and whether such effects are related to leukocyte-mediated oxidative stress. The study utilized a cross sectional design performed in 58 study participants from a larger cohort. Levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells, defined as either late (CD34(+)KDR(+) cells) or early (CD34(+)CD133(+)KDR(+) cells) subsets were measured using polychromatic flow cytometry. We additionally measured production of reactive oxygen species in leukocyte subsets (lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes) by flow cytometry using intracellular 2',7'-dichlorofluoroscein. The measurements encompassed both basal levels of reactive oxygen species production and capacity for reactive oxygen species production for each leukocyte subset. We found that the late endothelial progenitor subset was negatively associated with levels of ultrafine particles measured within the participant residences and with reactive oxygen species production capacity in lymphocytes. Additionally, the early endothelial progenitor cell levels were positively associated with a personalised measure of ultrafine particle exposure and negatively associated with both basal and capacity for reactive oxygen species production in lymphocytes and granulocytes, respectively. Our results indicate that exposure to fine and ultrafine particles derived from indoor sources may have adverse effects on human vascular health.
PubMed ID
27311922 View in PubMed
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Fear of moving outdoors and development of outdoor walking difficulty in older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151341
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2009 Apr;57(4):634-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Merja Rantakokko
Minna Mänty
Susanne Iwarsson
Timo Törmäkangas
Raija Leinonen
Eino Heikkinen
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Finnish Centre for Interdisciplinary Gerontology, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. merja.rantakokko@sport.jyu.fi
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2009 Apr;57(4):634-40
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environment
Fear
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Logistic Models
Male
Mobility Limitation
Musculoskeletal Diseases - complications
Prospective Studies
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To study which individual characteristics and environmental factors correlate with fear of moving outdoors and whether fear of moving outdoors predicts development of mobility limitation.
Observational prospective cohort study and cross-sectional analyses.
Community and research center.
Seven hundred twenty-seven community-living people aged 75 to 81 were interviewed at baseline, of whom 314 took part in a 3.5-year follow-up.
Fear of moving outdoors and its potential individual and environmental correlates were assessed at baseline. Perceived difficulties in walking 0.5 km and 2 km were assessed twice a year over a 3.5-year period.
At baseline, 65% of the women and 29% of the men reported fear of moving outdoors. Poor socioeconomic status; musculoskeletal diseases; slow walking speed; and the presence of poor street conditions, hills in the nearby environment, and noisy traffic correlated with fear of moving outdoors. At the first 6-month follow-up, participants with fear of moving outdoors had more than four times the adjusted risk (odds ratio (OR)=4.6, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.92-11.00) of developing difficulties in walking 0.5 km and a three times greater adjusted risk (OR=3.10, 95% CI=1.49-6.46) for developing difficulty in walking 2 km compared with those without fear. The difference in the prevalence of walking difficulties remained statistically significant over the 3.5-year follow-up (P=.02 and P=.009, respectively).
Fear of moving outdoors is common in older adults and increases the risk of developing self-reported difficulties in walking 0.5 km and 2 km. Knowledge about individual and environmental factors underlying fear of moving outdoors and finding ways to alleviate fear of moving outdoors are important for community planning and prevention of disability.
PubMed ID
19392955 View in PubMed
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The genetic and environmental effects on depressive symptoms among older female twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176906
Source
Twin Res. 2004 Dec;7(6):626-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Sanna Takkinen
Asko Tolvanen
Jaakko Kaprio
Stig Berg
Markku Koskenvuo
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping, Sweden.
Source
Twin Res. 2004 Dec;7(6):626-36
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Environment
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Models, Biological
Risk factors
Twins - genetics - psychology
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics - psychology
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to examine the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to depressive symptoms among older women. The participants were 102 monozygotic and 115 dizygotic female twin pairs aged 64 to 76 years. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Center for the Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. The contribution of genetic and environmental effects was estimated for the constructed depressiveness factor and for the subscales which were depressed mood, psychomotor retardation, lack of wellbeing and interpersonal difficulties. Of the variance in depressiveness, shared environmental influences accounted for 39% and nonshared environmental influences 61%. For the subscales, 24% to 62% of the variance was explained by individual, and 13% to 23% by shared, environmental factors. Lack of wellbeing had its own moderate additive genetic effect explaining 30% of the variance. This study showed that in older women predominantly environmental factors underlay individual differences in depressiveness; however, the factors varied to some extent between dimensions measured by the subscales.
PubMed ID
15607014 View in PubMed
Less detail

Genetic and environmental influences on hearing at different frequencies separately for the better and worse hearing ear in older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160056
Source
Int J Audiol. 2007 Dec;46(12):772-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Anne Viljanen
Jaakko Kaprio
Ilmari Pyykkö
Martti Sorri
Markku Kauppinen
Markku Koskenvuo
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Centre for Interdisciplinary Gerontology, Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland. anne.viljanen@sport.jyu.fi
Source
Int J Audiol. 2007 Dec;46(12):772-9
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - physiology
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hearing Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Humans
Middle Aged
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Twins, Dizygotic
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to examine the relative contribution of genetic and environmental effects on the air-conducted hearing threshold levels at low (0.125-0.5 kHz), mid (1-2 kHz), and high (4-8 kHz) frequencies separately for the better and worse hearing ear in older women. We also examined the distribution of audiogram configurations. Data was analysed using quantitative genetic modelling. As part of the Finnish twin study on aging (FITSA), hearing was measured in 103 monozygotic and 114 dizygotic female twin pairs aged 63-76 years. Approximately every third subject had a flat type, and two-thirds a descending type of audiogram configuration. No significant difference was observed in the distribution of audiogram configurations between zygosity groups. In the better ear, additive genetic effects accounted for 64%-74% of the total variance at different frequencies. For the worse ear, environmental effects were larger. Although overall heritability is rather constant across the frequency spectrum, it is noteworthy that at low and high frequencies frequency-specific genetic and environmental effects together accounted for the majority of the total variance.
PubMed ID
18049966 View in PubMed
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Genetic influences on resting electrocardiographic variables in older women: a twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153101
Source
Ann Noninvasive Electrocardiol. 2009 Jan;14(1):57-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Sara Mutikainen
Alfredo Ortega-Alonso
Markku Alén
Jaakko Kaprio
Jouko Karjalainen
Taina Rantanen
Urho M Kujala
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland. sara.mutikainen@gmail.com
Source
Ann Noninvasive Electrocardiol. 2009 Jan;14(1):57-64
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - genetics
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Electrocardiography
Female
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Heart rate - genetics
Humans
Middle Aged
Reference Values
Rest
Twins
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
Previous studies in young and middle-aged men and women have shown that resting electrocardiographic (ECG) variables are influenced by genetic factors. However, the extent to which resting ECG variables are influenced by genetic factors in older women is unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate the relative contribution of genetic and environmental influences to individual differences in resting ECG variables among older female twins without overt cardiac diseases.
Resting ECG recordings were obtained from 186 monozygotic and 203 dizygotic twin individuals, aged 63-76 years. Quantitative genetic modeling was used to decompose the phenotypic variance in each resting ECG variable into additive genetic, dominance genetic, shared environmental, and unique environmental influences.
The results showed that individual differences in the majority of the resting ECG variables were moderately to highly explained by additive genetic influences, ranging from 32% for T axis to 72% for TV(5). The results also suggested dominance genetic influences on QRS duration, TV(1), and Sokolow-Lyon voltage (36%, 53%, and 57%, respectively). Unique environmental influences were important for each resting ECG variable, whereas shared environmental influences were detected only for QT interval and QTc.
In older women without overt cardiac diseases, genetic influences explain a moderate to high proportion of individual differences in the majority of the resting ECG variables. Genetic influences are especially strong for T-wave amplitudes, left ventricular mass, and hypertrophy indices, whereas other variables, including heart rate, intervals, and axes, are more affected by environmental influences.
PubMed ID
19149794 View in PubMed
Less detail

Genetic influences underlying self-rated health in older female twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174438
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Jun;53(6):1002-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Raija Leinonen
Jaakko Kaprio
Marja Jylhä
Asko Tolvanen
Markku Koskenvuo
Eino Heikkinen
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Center for Interdisciplinary Gerontology, Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylaä, Finland. raija.leinonen@sport.jyu.fi
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Jun;53(6):1002-7
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology
Environment
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Mental health
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Self Concept
Twins - genetics
Walking
Abstract
To examine the genetic and environmental sources of variation in self-rated health (SRH) in older female twins and to explore the roles of morbidity, functional limitation, and psychological well-being as mediators of genetic and environmental effects on SRH.
Cross-sectional analysis of twin data.
Research laboratory.
One hundred two monozygotic and 115 dizygotic female twin pairs aged 63 to 76.
SRH was categorized as good, average, or poor. Morbidity was described using a physician-assessed disease-severity scale together with information about the presence of diabetes mellitus and cancer. Maximal walking speed measured over 10 m was used to assess physical functional limitation; the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale were used to characterize psychological well-being. The contributions of genetic and environmental (defined as familial (shared by siblings) or nonshared (unique to each sibling)) effects were assessed using univariate and multivariate structural equation modeling of twin data.
SRH did not have its own specific genetic effect but shared a genetic component in common with the genetic components underlying liability to disease severity, maximal walking speed, and depressive symptoms. It accounted for 64% of the variation in SRH, with environmental effects accounting for the remaining variation.
The current results suggest that there are no specific genetic effects on SRH but rather that genetic influences on SRH are mediated through genetic influences affecting chronic diseases, functional limitation, and mood.
PubMed ID
15935024 View in PubMed
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Hearing as a predictor of falls and postural balance in older female twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152870
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2009 Feb;64(2):312-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Anne Viljanen
Jaakko Kaprio
Ilmari Pyykkö
Martti Sorri
Satu Pajala
Markku Kauppinen
Markku Koskenvuo
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Finnish Centre for Interdisciplinary Gerontology, Finland. anne.viljanen@sport.jyu.fi
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2009 Feb;64(2):312-7
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aging - genetics - physiology
Audiometry
Confidence Intervals
Female
Finland
Hearing - genetics
Hearing Loss - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Postural Balance - physiology
Predictive value of tests
Risk assessment
Sampling Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Twins
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to examine, first, whether hearing acuity predicts falls and whether the potential association is explained by postural balance and, second, to examine whether shared genetic or environmental effects underlie these associations.
Hearing was measured using a clinical audiometer as a part of the Finnish Twin Study on Aging in 103 monozygotic and 114 dizygotic female twin pairs aged 63-76 years. Postural balance was indicated as a center of pressure (COP) movement in semi-tandem stance, and participants filled in a fall-calendar daily for an average of 345 days after the baseline.
Mean hearing acuity (better ear hearing threshold level at 0.5-4 kHz) was 21 dB (standard deviation [SD] 12). Means of the COP velocity moment for the best to the poorest hearing quartiles increased linearly from 40.7 mm(2)/s (SD 24.4) to 52.8 mm(2)/s (SD 32.0) (p value for the trend = .003). Altogether 199 participants reported 437 falls. Age-adjusted incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for falls, with the best hearing quartile as a reference, were 1.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.4-3.8) in the second, 4.1 (95% CI = 1.1-15.6) in the third, and 3.4 (95% CI = 1.0-11.4) in the poorest hearing quartiles. Adjustment for COP velocity moment decreased IRRs markedly. Twin analyses showed that the association between hearing acuity and postural balance was not explained by genetic factors in common for these traits.
People with poor hearing acuity have a higher risk for falls, which is partially explained by their poorer postural control. Auditory information about environment may be important for safe mobility.
Notes
Cites: Am J Otolaryngol. 1999 Nov-Dec;20(6):371-810609481
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PubMed ID
19182227 View in PubMed
Less detail

Individual and environmental factors underlying life space of older people - study protocol and design of a cohort study on life-space mobility in old age (LISPE).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118779
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:1018
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Taina Rantanen
Erja Portegijs
Anne Viljanen
Johanna Eronen
Milla Saajanaho
Li-Tang Tsai
Markku Kauppinen
Eeva-Maija Palonen
Sarianna Sipilä
Susanne Iwarsson
Merja Rantakokko
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center and Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, P,O,Box 35, Jyväskylä, FI-40014, Finland. taina.rantanen@jyu.fi
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:1018
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Quality of Life
Walking
Abstract
A crucial issue for the sustainability of societies is how to maintain health and functioning in older people. With increasing age, losses in vision, hearing, balance, mobility and cognitive capacity render older people particularly exposed to environmental barriers. A central building block of human functioning is walking. Walking difficulties may start to develop in midlife and become increasingly prevalent with age. Life-space mobility reflects actual mobility performance by taking into account the balance between older adults internal physiologic capacity and the external challenges they encounter in daily life. The aim of the Life-Space Mobility in Old Age (LISPE) project is to examine how home and neighborhood characteristics influence people's health, functioning, disability, quality of life and life-space mobility in the context of aging. In addition, examine whether a person's health and function influence life-space mobility.
This paper describes the study protocol of the LISPE project, which is a 2-year prospective cohort study of community-dwelling older people aged 75 to 90 (n?=?848). The data consists of a baseline survey including face-to-face interviews, objective observation of the home environment and a physical performance test in the participant's home. All the baseline participants will be interviewed over the phone one and two years after baseline to collect data on life-space mobility, disability and participation restriction. Additional home interviews and environmental evaluations will be conducted for those who relocate during the study period. Data on mortality and health service use will be collected from national registers. In a substudy on walking activity and life space, 358 participants kept a 7-day diary and, in addition, 176 participants also wore an accelerometer.
Our study, which includes extensive data collection with a large sample, provides a unique opportunity to study topics of importance for aging societies. A novel approach is employed which enables us to study the interactions of environmental features and individual characteristics underlying the life-space of older people. Potentially, the results of this study will contribute to improvements in strategies to postpone or prevent progression to disability and loss of independence.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23170987 View in PubMed
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Indoor and outdoor exposure to ultrafine, fine and microbiologically derived particulate matter related to cardiovascular and respiratory effects in a panel of elderly urban citizens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272612
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Feb;12(2):1667-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Dorina Gabriela Karottki
Michal Spilak
Marie Frederiksen
Zorana Jovanovic Andersen
Anne Mette Madsen
Matthias Ketzel
Andreas Massling
Lars Gunnarsen
Peter Møller
Steffen Loft
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Feb;12(2):1667-86
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerosols - analysis - toxicity
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Microbiology
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Biomarkers - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - diagnosis - etiology
Denmark
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Particle Size
Particulate Matter - analysis - toxicity
Respiratory Tract Diseases - blood - diagnosis - etiology
Urban health
Abstract
To explore associations of exposure to ambient and indoor air particulate and bio-aerosol pollutants with cardiovascular and respiratory disease markers, we utilized seven repeated measurements from 48 elderly subjects participating in a 4-week home air filtration study. Microvascular function (MVF), lung function, blood leukocyte counts, monocyte adhesion molecule expression, C-reactive protein, Clara cell protein (CC16) and surfactant protein-D (SPD) were examined in relation to exposure preceding each measurement. Exposure assessment included 48-h urban background monitoring of PM10, PM2.5 and particle number concentration (PNC), weekly measurements of PM2.5 in living- and bedroom, 24-h measurements of indoor PNC three times, and bio-aerosol components in settled dust on a 2-week basis. Statistically significant inverse associations included: MVF with outdoor PNC; granulocyte counts with PM2.5; CD31 expression with dust fungi; SPD with dust endotoxin. Significant positive associations included: MVF with dust bacteria; monocyte expression of CD11 with PM2.5 in the bedroom and dust bacteria and endotoxin, CD31 expression with dust serine protease; serum CC16 with dust NAGase. Multiple comparisons demand cautious interpretation of results, which suggest that outdoor PNC have adverse effects on MVF, and outdoor and indoor PM2.5 and bio-aerosols are associated with markers of inflammation and lung cell integrity.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25648225 View in PubMed
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