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Hearing as a predictor of falls and postural balance in older female twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152870
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2009 Feb;64(2):312-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Anne Viljanen
Jaakko Kaprio
Ilmari Pyykkö
Martti Sorri
Satu Pajala
Markku Kauppinen
Markku Koskenvuo
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Finnish Centre for Interdisciplinary Gerontology, Finland. anne.viljanen@sport.jyu.fi
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2009 Feb;64(2):312-7
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aging - genetics - physiology
Audiometry
Confidence Intervals
Female
Finland
Hearing - genetics
Hearing Loss - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Postural Balance - physiology
Predictive value of tests
Risk assessment
Sampling Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Twins
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to examine, first, whether hearing acuity predicts falls and whether the potential association is explained by postural balance and, second, to examine whether shared genetic or environmental effects underlie these associations.
Hearing was measured using a clinical audiometer as a part of the Finnish Twin Study on Aging in 103 monozygotic and 114 dizygotic female twin pairs aged 63-76 years. Postural balance was indicated as a center of pressure (COP) movement in semi-tandem stance, and participants filled in a fall-calendar daily for an average of 345 days after the baseline.
Mean hearing acuity (better ear hearing threshold level at 0.5-4 kHz) was 21 dB (standard deviation [SD] 12). Means of the COP velocity moment for the best to the poorest hearing quartiles increased linearly from 40.7 mm(2)/s (SD 24.4) to 52.8 mm(2)/s (SD 32.0) (p value for the trend = .003). Altogether 199 participants reported 437 falls. Age-adjusted incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for falls, with the best hearing quartile as a reference, were 1.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.4-3.8) in the second, 4.1 (95% CI = 1.1-15.6) in the third, and 3.4 (95% CI = 1.0-11.4) in the poorest hearing quartiles. Adjustment for COP velocity moment decreased IRRs markedly. Twin analyses showed that the association between hearing acuity and postural balance was not explained by genetic factors in common for these traits.
People with poor hearing acuity have a higher risk for falls, which is partially explained by their poorer postural control. Auditory information about environment may be important for safe mobility.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19182227 View in PubMed
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Maternal cell phone use in early pregnancy and child's language, communication and motor skills at 3 and 5 years: the Norwegian mother and child cohort study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290064
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 09 05; 17(1):685
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-05-2017
Author
Eleni Papadopoulou
Margaretha Haugen
Synnve Schjølberg
Per Magnus
Gunnar Brunborg
Martine Vrijheid
Jan Alexander
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Exposures and Epidemiology, Division of Infection Control and Environmental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404, 0403, Oslo, Norway.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 09 05; 17(1):685
Date
09-05-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cell Phone Use - statistics & numerical data
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Communication
Female
Humans
Language Development
Male
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Motor Skills
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Cell phone use during pregnancy is a public health concern. We investigated the association between maternal cell phone use in pregnancy and child's language, communication and motor skills at 3 and 5 years.
This prospective study includes 45,389 mother-child pairs, participants of the MoBa, recruited at mid-pregnancy from 1999 to 2008. Maternal frequency of cell phone use in early pregnancy and child language, communication and motor skills at 3 and 5 years, were assessed by questionnaires. Logistic regression was used to estimate the associations.
No cell phone use in early pregnancy was reported by 9.8% of women, while 39%, 46.9% and 4.3% of the women were categorized as low, medium and high cell phone users. Children of cell phone user mothers had 17% (OR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.77, 0.89) lower adjusted risk of having low sentence complexity at 3 years, compared to children of non-users. The risk was 13%, 22% and 29% lower by low, medium and high maternal cell phone use. Additionally, children of cell phone users had lower risk of low motor skills score at 3 years, compared to children of non-users, but this association was not found at 5 years. We found no association between maternal cell phone use and low communication skills.
We reported a decreased risk of low language and motor skills at three years in relation to prenatal cell phone use, which might be explained by enhanced maternal-child interaction among cell phone users. No evidence of adverse neurodevelopmental effects of prenatal cell phone use was reported.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28870201 View in PubMed
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Vitamin D supplementation and reduced risk of preeclampsia in nulliparous women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150897
Source
Epidemiology. 2009 Sep;20(5):720-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Margaretha Haugen
Anne Lise Brantsaeter
Lill Trogstad
Jan Alexander
Christine Roth
Per Magnus
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. margaretha.haugen@fhi.no
Source
Epidemiology. 2009 Sep;20(5):720-6
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Vitamins - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Young Adult
Abstract
A recent study showed that nulliparous women who develop preeclampsia had low concentrations of vitamin D in serum sampled in midpregnancy. The aim of the present study was to estimate the association between intake of vitamin D during pregnancy and the risk of preeclampsia in 23,423 nulliparous pregnant women taking part in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.
Participating women answered questionnaires at gestational week 15 (general health questionnaire), at week 22 (food frequency questionnaire), and at week 30 (general health questionnaire). Pregnancy outcomes were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry. Nutrient intake was calculated from foods and dietary supplements. We estimated relative risks as odds ratios, and controlled for confounding with multiple logistic regression.
The odds ratio of preeclampsia for women with a total vitamin D intake of 15-20 microg/d compared with less than 5 microg/d was 0.76 (95% confidence interval = 0.60-0.95). Considering only the intake of vitamin D from supplements, we found a 27% reduction in risk of preeclampsia (OR = 0.73 [0.58-0.92]) for women taking 10-15 microg/d as compared with no supplements. No association was found between intake of vitamin D from the diet alone and the occurrence of preeclampsia.
These findings are consistent with other reports of a protective effect of vitamin D on preeclampsia development. However, because vitamin D intake is highly correlated with the intake of long chain n-3 fatty acids in the Norwegian diet, further research is needed to disentangle the separate effects of these nutrients.
PubMed ID
19451820 View in PubMed
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