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Determinants of plasma PCB, brominated flame retardants, and organochlorine pesticides in pregnant women and 3 year old children in The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273849
Source
Environ Res. 2016 Apr;146:136-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Ida Henriette Caspersen
Helen Engelstad Kvalem
Margaretha Haugen
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Jan Alexander
Cathrine Thomsen
May Frøshaug
Nanna Margrethe Bruun Bremnes
Sharon Lynn Broadwell
Berit Granum
Manolis Kogevinas
Helle Katrine Knutsen
Source
Environ Res. 2016 Apr;146:136-44
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Demography
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Flame Retardants - metabolism
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Brominated - blood
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Life Style
Norway
Pesticides - blood
Polybrominated Biphenyls - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Pregnancy
Abstract
Exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) during prenatal and postnatal life has been extensively studied in relation to adverse health effects in children.
The aim was to identify determinants of the concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), brominated flame retardants (polybrominated diphenyl ethers, PBDEs; polybrominated biphenyl, PBB), and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in blood samples from pregnant women and children in The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).
Blood samples were collected from two independent subsamples within MoBa; a group of women (n=96) enrolled in mid-pregnancy during the years 2002-2008 and a group of 3 year old children (n=99) participating during 2010-2011. PCB congeners (74, 99, 138, 153, 180, 170, 194, 209, 105, 114, 118, 156, 157, 167, and 189), brominated flame retardants (PBDE-28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154, and PBB-153), as well as the OCPs hexachlorobenzene (HCB), oxychlordane, 4,4'dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), and 4,4'dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) were measured in both pregnant women and children.
Age, low parity, and low pre-pregnant BMI were the most important determinants of increased plasma concentrations of POPs in pregnant women. In 3 year old children, prolonged breastfeeding duration was a major determinant of increased POP concentrations. Estimated dietary exposure to PCBs during pregnancy was positively associated with plasma concentrations in 3 year old children, but not in pregnant women. Plasma concentrations were approximately 40% higher in children compared to pregnant women.
Several factors associated with exposure and toxicokinetics, i.e. accumulation, excretion and transfer via breastmilk of POPs were the main predictors of POP levels in pregnant women and children. Diet, which is the main exposure source for these compounds in the general population, was found to predict PCB levels only among children. For the PBDEs, for which non-dietary sources are more important, toxicokinetic factors appeared to have less predictive impact.
PubMed ID
26749444 View in PubMed
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Patterns and dietary determinants of essential and toxic elements in blood measured in mid-pregnancy: The Norwegian Environmental Biobank.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301318
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Jun 25; 671:299-308
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-25-2019
Author
Ida Henriette Caspersen
Cathrine Thomsen
Line Småstuen Haug
Helle K Knutsen
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Eleni Papadopoulou
Iris Erlund
Thomas Lundh
Jan Alexander
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Author Affiliation
Division of Infection Control and Environmental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: ida.henriette.caspersen@fhi.no.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Jun 25; 671:299-308
Date
Jun-25-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Specimen Banks
Blood Chemical Analysis
Cohort Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Humans
Iron - deficiency
Life Style
Norway
Pregnancy
Socioeconomic Factors
Trace Elements - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Inadequate stores or intakes of essential minerals in pregnancy, or too high exposure to both toxic and essential elements, can have adverse effects on mother and child. The main aims of this study were to 1) describe the concentrations and patterns of essential and toxic elements measured in maternal whole blood during pregnancy; 2) identify dietary, lifestyle and sociodemographic determinants of element status; and 3) explore the impact of iron deficiency on blood element concentrations.
This study is based on blood samples collected from 2982 women in gestational week 18 in The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort study (MoBa) which were analyzed as part of the Norwegian Environmental Biobank. We derived blood element patterns by exploratory factor analysis, and associations between blood element patterns and diet were explored using sparse partial least squares (sPLS) regression.
Blood concentrations were determined for the essential elements (in the order of most abundant) Zn?>?Cu?>?Se?>?Mn?>?Mo?>?Co, and the toxic metals Pb?>?As?>?Hg?>?Cd?>?Tl. The concentrations were in ranges that were similar to or sometimes more favorable than in other pregnant and non-pregnant European women. We identified two blood element patterns; one including Zn, Se and Mn and another including Hg and As. For the Zn-Se-Mn pattern, use of multimineral supplements was the most important dietary determinant, while a high score in the Hg-As pattern was mainly determined by seafood consumption. Concentrations of Mn, Cd and Co were significantly higher in women with iron deficiency (plasma ferritin?
PubMed ID
30928759 View in PubMed
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Unmet physical activity need in old age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144173
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2010 Apr;58(4):707-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Merja Rantakokko
Susanne Iwarsson
Mirja Hirvensalo
Raija Leinonen
Eino Heikkinen
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Finnish Centre for Interdisciplinary Gerontology, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. merja.rantakokko@jyu.fi
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2010 Apr;58(4):707-12
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged - psychology
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - psychology
Exercise - psychology
Exercise Test
Fear
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration
Humans
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Mobility Limitation
Multivariate Analysis
Musculoskeletal Diseases - psychology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Walking
Abstract
To examine which individual and environmental factors correlate with unmet physical activity need in old age and predict development of unmet physical activity need (the feeling that one's level of physical activity is inadequate and thus distinct from the recommended amount of physical activity) over a 2-year follow-up.
Observational prospective cohort study and cross-sectional analyses.
Community and research center.
A total of 643 community-living ambulatory people aged 75 to 81 took part in face-to-face interviews and examinations at baseline and 314 at the 2-year follow-up.
Unmet physical activity need and its potential individual and environmental correlates were assessed at baseline. Development of unmet physical activity need was assessed over the 2-year follow-up period.
At baseline, all participants were able to walk at least 500 m outdoors, but 14% perceived unmet physical activity need. Unmet physical activity need was more prevalent in those with musculoskeletal diseases, depressive symptoms, and mobility limitations. Hills in the nearby environment, lack of resting places, and dangerous crossroads correlated with unmet physical activity need at baseline; the association was especially strong in those with walking difficulties. Significant baseline predictors for incident unmet physical activity need (15%) included fear of moving outdoors, hills in the nearby environment, and noisy traffic.
Unmet physical activity need is common in ambulatory community-living older people who have health and mobility problems and report negative environmental features in their neighborhood. Solutions to overcome barriers to physical activity need to be developed to promote equal opportunities for physical activity participation.
PubMed ID
20398151 View in PubMed
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