Skip header and navigation

Refine By

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Effect of dietary factors in pregnancy on risk of pregnancy complications: results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134772
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Dec;94(6 Suppl):1970S-1974S
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Roy M Nilsen
Per Magnus
Jan Alexander
Margareta Haugen
Author Affiliation
Divisions of Environmental Medicine and Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. helle.margrete.meltzer@fhi.no
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Dec;94(6 Suppl):1970S-1974S
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Diet, Mediterranean
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Food Habits
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Status
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Premature Birth - metabolism
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
There has been a thrilling development , as well as profound changes, in our understanding of the effect of fetal nutrition on the development and health of the child. The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) is an ongoing nationwide population-based pregnancy cohort study that between 1999 and 2008 recruited 90,723 women with 106,981 pregnancies and 108,487 children. The objective of MoBa is to test specific etiologic hypotheses by estimating the association between exposures and diseases with a special focus on disorders that may originate in early life. An important aspect in this regard is maternal diet and nutritional status during pregnancy. Nutritional factors have long been considered to be important determinants of maternal and fetal health, and dietary information is currently being collected in a number of pregnancy cohorts in Europe and the United States. Thus far, pregnancy complications studied in MoBa are preterm birth, preeclampsia, and fetal growth; and the aim of this article is to report results of recently published studies of dietary factors in relation to these outcomes. Numerous studies are planned using MoBa data, and the aim is to add to the knowledge of the interplay between dietary factors, nonnutrients, and toxic dietary substances and epigenetic modulation on fetal development and health later in life.
Notes
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2007 Sep;92(9):3517-2217535985
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2001 Aug;185(2):451-811518908
Cites: Matern Child Nutr. 2008 Jan;4(1):14-2718171404
Cites: Matern Child Nutr. 2008 Jan;4(1):28-4318171405
Cites: Environ Health. 2007;6:3317958907
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(3):319-2418307072
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 2009 Mar;94(3):180-419052032
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009 Mar;63(3):347-5418059417
Cites: J Nutr. 2009 Jun;139(6):1162-819369368
Cites: Epidemiology. 2009 Sep;20(5):720-619451820
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Dec 15;170(12):1486-9319880541
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jan;13(1):54-6219490733
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2000 Jun;79(6):435-910857866
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2001 Apr;4(2B):611-2411683554
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Apr;111(4):637-4112676628
Cites: J Nutr. 2003 May;133(5 Suppl 2):1684S-1692S12730485
Cites: J Soc Gynecol Investig. 2004 Jul;11(5):263-7115219879
Cites: Nutr Rev. 1994 Mar;52(3):84-948015751
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1995 Jun;61(6 Suppl):1402S-1406S7754995
Cites: Reprod Fertil Dev. 2005;17(3):341-815745642
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Oct;193(4):1292-30116202717
Cites: JAMA. 2006 Oct 18;296(15):1885-9917047219
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2006 Oct;35(5):1146-5016926217
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2006;21(10):749-5817111251
Cites: Ann Nutr Metab. 2007;51(2):146-5417536192
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2007 Aug;10(8):838-4717493318
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2007 Sep;17(9):663-817521921
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Sep 15;166(6):687-9617631607
Cites: J Nutr. 2010 Mar;140(3):572-920089778
Cites: Environ Int. 2007 Nov;33(8):1057-6217643489
PubMed ID
21543541 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exploration of biomarkers for total fish intake in pregnant Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98999
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jan;13(1):54-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Anne Lise Brantsaeter
Margaretha Haugen
Yngvar Thomassen
Dag G Ellingsen
Trond A Ydersbond
Tor-Arne Hagve
Jan Alexander
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Department of Food Safety and Nutrition, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, NO-04030 Oslo, Norway. anne.lise.brantsaeter@fhi.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jan;13(1):54-62
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arsenic - administration & dosage - blood
Biological Markers - blood - urine
Cohort Studies
Diet Records
Erythrocytes - chemistry
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage - analysis
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Iodine - administration & dosage - urine
Mercury - administration & dosage - blood
Norway
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Seafood - analysis
Selenium - administration & dosage - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Few biomarkers for dietary intake of various food groups have been established. The aim of the present study was to explore whether selenium (Se), iodine, mercury (Hg) or arsenic may serve as a biomarker for total fish and seafood intake in addition to the traditionally used n-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA. DESIGN: Intake of fish and seafood estimated by an FFQ was compared with intake assessed by a 4 d weighed food diary and with biomarkers in blood and urine. SETTING: Validation study in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). SUBJECTS: One hundred and nineteen women. RESULTS: Total fish/seafood intake (median 39 g/d) calculated with the MoBa FFQ was comparable to intake calculated by the food diary (median 30 g/d, rS = 0.37, P
Notes
RefSource: Public Health Nutr. 2009 Dec;12(12):2536-7
PubMed ID
19490733 View in PubMed
Less detail

Role of dietary patterns for dioxin and PCB exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147852
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2009 Nov;53(11):1438-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Helen E Kvalem
Helle K Knutsen
Cathrine Thomsen
Margaretha Haugen
Hein Stigum
Anne Lise Brantsaeter
May Frøshaug
Nina Lohmann
Olaf Päpke
Georg Becher
Jan Alexander
Helle M Meltzer
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. helen.engelstad@fhi.no
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2009 Nov;53(11):1438-51
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Benzofurans - administration & dosage - blood
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - administration & dosage - blood
Polymers - administration & dosage
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
Dietary patterns were related to intake and blood concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDFs), dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) and selected non-dioxin-like-PCBs (ndl-PCBs). Intake calculations were based on an extensive food frequency questionnaire and a congener-specific database on concentrations in Norwegian foods. The study (2003) applied a two-step inclusion strategy recruiting representative (n=73) and high consumers (n=111) of seafood and game. Estimated median intakes of sum PCDD/PCDFs and dl-PCBs of the representative and high consumers were 0.78 and 1.25 pg toxic equivalents (TEQ)/kg bw/day, respectively. Estimated median intakes of ndl-PCBs (sum chlorinated biphenyl (CB)-28, 52, 101, 138, 153, 180) were 4.26 and 6.40 ng/kg bw/day. The median blood concentrations of PCDD/PCDFs/dl-PCBs were 28.7 and 35.1 pg TEQ/g lipid, and ndl-PCBs (sum of CB-101, 138, 153 and 180) 252 and 299 ng/g lipid. The Spearman correlations between dietary intake and serum concentration were r=0.34 (p=0.017) for dl-compounds and r=0.37 (p
PubMed ID
19842105 View in PubMed
Less detail