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Active aging - resilience and external support as modifiers of the disablement outcome: AGNES cohort study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299192
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 05 02; 18(1):565
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-02-2018
Author
Taina Rantanen
Milla Saajanaho
Laura Karavirta
Sini Siltanen
Merja Rantakokko
Anne Viljanen
Timo Rantalainen
Katja Pynnönen
Anu Karvonen
Inna Lisko
Lotta Palmberg
Johanna Eronen
Eeva-Maija Palonen
Timo Hinrichs
Markku Kauppinen
Katja Kokko
Erja Portegijs
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, Univerisity of Jyvaskyla, P.O. Box 35 (viv 149), 40014, Jyväskylä, Finland. taina.rantanen@jyu.fi.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 05 02; 18(1):565
Date
05-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Cohort Studies
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Exercise
Female
Finland
Health Behavior
Health Literacy
Humans
Male
Resilience, Psychological
Social Support
Abstract
Population aging increases the need for knowledge on positive aspects of aging, and contributions of older people to their own wellbeing and that of others. We defined active aging as an individual's striving for elements of wellbeing with activities as per their goals, abilities and opportunities. This study examines associations of health, health behaviors, health literacy and functional abilities, environmental and social support with active aging and wellbeing. We will develop and validate assessment methods for physical activity and physical resilience suitable for research on older people, and examine their associations with active aging and wellbeing. We will examine cohort effects on functional phenotypes underlying active aging and disability.
For this population-based study, we plan to recruit 1000 participants aged 75, 80 or 85 years living in central Finland, by drawing personal details from the population register. Participants are interviewed on active aging, wellbeing, disability, environmental and social support, mobility, health behavior and health literacy. Physical activity and heart rate are monitored for 7 days with wearable sensors. Functional tests include hearing, vision, muscle strength, reaction time, exercise tolerance, mobility, and cognitive performance. Clinical examination by a nurse and physician includes an electrocardiogram, tests of blood pressure, orthostatic regulation, arterial stiffness, and lung function, as well as a review of chronic and acute conditions and prescribed medications. C-reactive protein, small blood count, cholesterol and vitamin D are analyzed from blood samples. Associations of factors potentially underlying active aging and wellbeing will be studied using multivariate methods. Cohort effects will be studied by comparing test results of physical and cognitive functioning with results of a cohort examined in 1989-90.
The current study will renew research on positive gerontology through the novel approach to active aging and by suggesting new biomarkers of resilience and active aging. Therefore, high interdisciplinary impact is expected. This cross-sectional study will not provide knowledge on temporal order of events or causality, but an innovative cross-sectional dataset provides opportunities for emergence of novel creative hypotheses and theories.
PubMed ID
29716566 View in PubMed
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[Actual problem of methodology and development of evidence-based health risk assessment associated with chemical exposure].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290154
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(8):711-6
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
S M Novikov
M V Fokin
T N Unguryanu
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(8):711-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Environmental Exposure - prevention & control - standards
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - standards
Evidence-Based Practice
Hazardous Substances - analysis - standards
Humans
Hygiene - standards
Public Health - methods
Risk Assessment - methods - standards
Russia
Abstract
Paramount problems of the development of the assessment of population health risks associated with the chemical exposure in Russia are considered on the ground of critical analysis of reports devoted to methodological issues of the risk assessment and guidelines published since 2010. Causes of the lack in progress of risk assessment are discussed. The information of executed research revealed the significant retardation number of Russian publications devoted to the evidence-based health risk assessment compare to worldwide trend. The analysis of publications according to evidence-based health risk assessment in Russia in 1998 - 2012 demonstrated methodical problems to be leading to the underestimation of the real risk to population’s health. There are demonstrated directions in the renewal of methodology and practice of hygienic standardization on the basis of the risk assessment. The comparative analysis of values of uncertainty factors (modifying factors, conversion factors) used for extrapolation and accepted in different countries and organizations was made. The system of extrapolation coefficients of DNEL (Derive No-Effect Level) is presented. The leading principles of modern toxicology and risk assessment based on strict scientific proofs are showed. Criteria of evidence-based toxicology and risk assessment are presented.Among actual problems which demand their decision there are considered: the assessment of combined action in regulatory toxicology; expansion of spheres of the application of health risk assessment methodology; the improvement ofpreparation and certification of experts in the field of health risk assessment; need of check of dispersion models and their replacement by more modern models; the improvement of exposure assessment with taking into account the international requirements; the assessment of regional exposure factors; expansion of atmospheric air monitoring in all the large cities of Russia.
PubMed ID
29430892 View in PubMed
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[A methodological scheme for examination of the urban population, by making multilevel assessments of exposure to ambient air pollutants].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159936
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 Sep-Oct;(5):65-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
L V Khripach
T D Kniazeva
N S Skvortsova
I M Korsunskaia
V M Rozental'
I E Zykova
Iu A Revazova
S M Novikov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 Sep-Oct;(5):65-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Biological Markers - analysis
Child
Environmental Illness - diagnosis - epidemiology - metabolism
Humans
Pilot Projects
Risk Assessment - methods
Russia - epidemiology
Urban health
Urban Population
Abstract
A novel methodological design comprising multilevel assessments of exposures of examinees to controlled ambient air pollution according to the data of route stations was developed to examine the population of large towns. The design was tested in 4 surveys of Moscow residents (apparently healthy and outpatients with a number of chronic diseases). The findings indicate the fundamental possibility of altering the traditional differential design of biomedical surveys of the population, by introducing more evidence-based regression analyses and dividing the contributions of individual chemicals to the observed changes in health indices.
PubMed ID
18062018 View in PubMed
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[Approaches to assessing the health risk under exposure to chemicals with account of age peculiarities].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118040
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 Sep-Oct;(5):98-101
Publication Type
Article
Author
T N Ungurianu
S M Novikov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 Sep-Oct;(5):98-101
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Illness - epidemiology - etiology
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Morbidity - trends
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To study the factors of exposure and to assess health risk in different age groups under exposure to chemical contaminants in drinking water in Novodvinsk.
Local exposure factors were studied by questionnaire in 1628 men in three age groups: 1-6 years, 7-17 years, 18 years and older. In the risk model three ways of exposure: inhalation, oral, and skin have been included. To assess the noncarcinogenic risk cumulative risk indices (CRI) were calculated, to evaluate a carcinogenic risk--the total carcinogenic risk (TCR), taking into account the correction for the age-specific cancer-causing potential was calculated.
Quantity of water used for drinking for 1 kg of body weight in children of 1-6 years was 109 ml/kg-day, 7-17 years--55 ml/kg-day, and adults--34 ml/kg-day. At concentrations of contaminants of drinking water at 90th and 98th percentile the risk to the blood system exceeds the allowable level only for children in the group of 1-6 years (CRI = 1,8 and 3,7, respectively), taking into account age-specific for the total population TCR amounted to 4.3 x 10(-5) and 9.3 x 10(-5) correspondingly.
PubMed ID
23243736 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of a risk from aviation noise exposure to the population's health].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146283
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 Sep-Oct;(5):29-31
Publication Type
Article
Author
M V Fokin
S M Novikov
M S Bespalov
A Iu Reteium
E Iu Oseledets
L V Prokopenko
Iu P Pal'tsev
T M Uspenskaia
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 Sep-Oct;(5):29-31
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Environmental Illness - epidemiology - prevention & control
Guidelines as Topic
Health status
Humans
Hygiene - standards
Incidence
Noise, Transportation - adverse effects
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The paper gives an algorithm, a procedure for calculation of aircraft noise, and its spread modeling. The performed investigations have provided guidelines that will become the first Russian official guiding document for assessing a risk from aviation noise to human health.
PubMed ID
20050061 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of human health damage as a priority of human ecology and a tool for justifying managerial decisions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166700
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 Sep-Oct;(5):10-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu A Rakhmanin
S M Novikov
G I Rumiantsev
S I Ivanov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 Sep-Oct;(5):10-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Health - methods
Health status
Humans
Risk factors
Russia
Abstract
The paper analyzes of the currently available guidelines for assessing damages (in kind and value terms) caused by environmental factors to the population's health. The contributions of various diseases, the quality of the environment, bad habits, and other internal and external factors to the mortality structure in Russia are compared. The authors show it important to study the comparative role of the quality of life and its style, environmental pollution, the population's subjective perception of risks in the formation of health damages.
PubMed ID
17087199 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of Moscow population health risk from exposure to ambient air suspended matter].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145593
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 Nov-Dec;(6):41-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
S M Novikov
A V Ivanenko
I F Volkova
A P Kornienko
N S Skvortsova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 Nov-Dec;(6):41-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Environmental health
Humans
Hygiene - standards
Moscow
Particulate Matter - adverse effects
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Abstract
Ambient air pollution by suspended matter is an environmental factor that has the greatest influence on the health status of the majority of the Russian Federation's population. There is extensive epidemiological and clinical evidence suggesting that ambient air pollution by suspended matter and its fine-dispersed fractions PM10 and PM2.5 in particular, poses a serious threat to human health. The existing Russian single and average daily maximum permissible concentrations of suspended matter are not a high risk from this type of ambient air pollution and fail to assess human health damage in full measure. To reduce the concentrations of suspended matter and their action on man is currently the worldwide priority task whose performance will save much money. There is a need to change an air pollution monitoring system (continuous monitoring of fine suspended matter of PM10 and PM2.5), as well as to substantiate and introduce Russian hygienic standards for fine suspended matter (PM10 and PM2.5).
PubMed ID
20135864 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of the effect of environmental chemicals on the working population in mono-cities].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263384
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Sep-Oct;(5):74-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
S M Novikov
T N Unguryanu
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Sep-Oct;(5):74-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Industry
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Paper
Risk assessment
Russia
Urban Health - standards
Workplace - standards
Abstract
There was made the characterization of the health risk for workers' of pulp and paper industry, under the simultaneous effects of chemicals in the residential and working area. The main adverse effect of chemicals that pollute the air and work environment is related with the impact on the respiratory system. Under the successive exposure (ambient air--air in the workplace) in the adult population working at the Arkhangelsk Pulp and Paper Mill, the risk of occurrence of respiratory diseases (HI = 18.5) and individual carcinogenic risk (CR = 9.7 x 10(-3)) have been rated as high and constitute 86-99% of the total risk.
PubMed ID
25831935 View in PubMed
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Barriers to outdoor physical activity and unmet physical activity need in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266937
Source
Prev Med. 2014 Oct;67:106-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Johanna Eronen
Mikaela B von Bonsdorff
Timo Törmäkangas
Merja Rantakokko
Erja Portegijs
Anne Viljanen
Taina Rantanen
Source
Prev Med. 2014 Oct;67:106-11
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environment
Environment Design
Exercise
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Health status
Humans
Male
Mobility Limitation
Questionnaires
Walking
Abstract
To profile participants based on reported outdoor physical activity barriers using a data-driven approach, describe the profiles and study their association with unmet physical activity need.
Cross-sectional analyses of 848 community-dwelling men and women aged 75-90 living in Central Finland in 2012. Barriers to outdoor physical activity and unmet physical activity need were enquired with a questionnaire. The latent profiles were identified by profiling participants into latent groups using a mixture modeling technique on the multivariate set of indicators of outdoor physical activity barriers. A path model was used to study the associations of the profiles with unmet physical activity need.
Five barrier profiles were identified. Profile A was characterized with minor barriers, profile B with weather barriers, profile C with health and weather barriers, profile D with barriers concerning insecurity, health and weather; and profile E with mobility and health barriers. The participants in the profiles differed in the proportion of individual and environmental barriers. The risk for unmet physical activity need was highest among people whose severe mobility difficulties restricted their outdoor physical activity.
Outdoor physical activity barriers reflect the imbalance in person-environment fit among older people, manifested as unmet physical activity need.
PubMed ID
25045839 View in PubMed
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Body fat and mobility are explained by common genetic and environmental influences in older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157662
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jul;16(7):1616-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Alfredo Ortega-Alonso
Sarianna Sipilä
Urho M Kujala
Jaakko Kaprio
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. alfredo.ortega@sport.jyu.fi
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jul;16(7):1616-21
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adiposity - genetics
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - genetics
Electric Impedance
Environment
Female
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Locomotion - genetics
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Models, Genetic
Obesity - genetics - physiopathology
Physical Endurance - genetics
Risk factors
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Walking
Abstract
In older adults, mobility limitations often coexist with overweight or obesity, suggesting that similar factors may underlie both traits. This study examined the extent to which genetic and environmental influences explain the association between adiposity and mobility in older women. Body fat percentage (bioimpedance test), walking speed over 10 m, and distance walked in a 6-min test were evaluated in 92 monozygotic (MZ) and 104 dizygotic (DZ) pairs of twin sisters reared together, aged 63-76 years. Genetic and environmental influences on each trait were estimated using age-adjusted multivariate genetic modeling. The analyses showed that the means (and s.d.) for body fat percentage, walking speed, and walking endurance were 33.2+/-7.3%, 1.7+/-0.3 m/s and 529.7+/-75.4 m, respectively. The phenotypic correlation between adiposity and walking speed was -0.32 and between adiposity and endurance it was -0.33. Genetic influences explained 80% of the association between adiposity and speed, and 65% of adiposity and walking endurance. Cross-trait genetic influences accounted for 12% of the variability in adiposity, 56% in walking speed, and 34% in endurance. Trait-specific genetic influences were also detected for adiposity (54%) and walking endurance (13%), but not speed. In conclusion, among community-living older women, an inverse association was found between adiposity and mobility that was mostly due to the effect of shared genes. This result suggests that the identification of genetic variants for body fat metabolism may also provide understanding of the development of mobility limitations in older women.
PubMed ID
18421266 View in PubMed
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[Characteristics of quantitative values of regional factors of exposure in the studied areas].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115864
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 Nov-Dec;(6):30-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu A Rakhmanin
T A Shashina
T N Ungurianu
S M Novikov
N S Skvortsova
A V Matsiuk
T B Legostaeva
N A Antipanova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 Nov-Dec;(6):30-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Health - standards
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Infant
Questionnaires
Research Design
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Russia
Young Adult
Abstract
In the paper the results of a comparative evaluation of the Russian and the standard, recommended by US EPA, factors of population exposure in seven areas of different federal districts of Russia are presented. Concerning the adult population differences reach 3.5 times, for children (1-6 years) - 4.2 times. An example of the effect of regional differences and standard factors on levels of exposure and risk is considered. Promising areas for further research on regional factors to improve the accuracy and reliability of the forecast assessments of the risks to public health have been identified.
PubMed ID
23457989 View in PubMed
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[COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF THE MULTIMEDIA CANCER HEALTH RISKS CAUSED BY CONTAMINATION OF THE KRASNOIARSK KRAI REGIONS' ENVIRONMENT].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265728
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Mar-Apr;94(2):88-92
Publication Type
Article
Author
S M Novikov
T A Shashina
N S Dodina
V A Kislitsin
L M Vorobieva
D V Goriaev
I V Tikhonova
S V Kurkatov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Mar-Apr;94(2):88-92
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - analysis
Carcinogens, Environmental - analysis
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Humans
Incidence
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
Krasnoyarsk Krai is a region with developed mining and processing industries, notoriously known industries, as sources of carcinogenic emission. For 55 administrative units of the Krai 303 large enterprises' industrial emissions were preliminary prioritized and their location was designated. Only 52% out of the carcinogens emitted into the ambient air by industries were controlled, in other environments the figures ranged from 20% (soil, food) to 48% (drinking water), 10 carcinogens were not controlled in the environment at all. Based on the results of ranking carcinogenic emission and analysis of the carcinogens monitoring in the environment in 2007-2011 31 substances were selected. A comparative analysis of multiple environmental carcinogenic risks showed that 78% of the areas, based on the receipt ofcarcinogensfrom two media, and 80% ofthe areas taking into account the receipt ofcarcinogens from three media attributed to the alarming level of risk for population, that requires continuous monitoring and routine health interventions for its mitigation. The maximal multiple environmental risk values that took into account inputs from all sources were close to the upper boundary alarming level of risk, in Divnogorsk (7,80E-04), Norilsk (7,97 E-04), Krasnoyarsk (8,84E-04) and Achinsk (9,4 E-04). The greatest inputs to total individual cancer risk from polluted ambient air were made by benzene, chromium VI, formaldehyde and nickel, from drinking water--by arsenic, aldrin and heptachlor from soil--by arsenic and lead. The ambient air input into total multiple environmental carcinogenic risk ranged from 31.5 to 99.5%, drinking water input--from 0.5 to 68.5%, soil--up to 0.1%. Areas with maximum levels of total carcinogenic risk are characterized by the highest levels of average long-term indices of cancer development. The study discussed in this article has screening nature. Further in-depth researches for carcinogenic and toxic multimedia risks are required.
PubMed ID
26155656 View in PubMed
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[Current lines of methodology for risk assessment].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162208
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 May-Jun;(3):3-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu A Rakhmanin
S M Novikov
T A Shashina
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 May-Jun;(3):3-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Illness - diagnosis - etiology
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects
Health Services Administration
Humans
Risk Assessment - methods
Russia
Abstract
The paper presents the results of some guidance studies assessing the risk, recently conducted at the A. N. Sysin Research Institute of Human Ecology and Environmental Health, such as validation of toxicological and hygienic criteria for risk assessment upon short- and long-term human exposures to deleterious substances; development and introduction of methods for assessing health risk and damage, by applying computer technologies; elaboration of guidelines for establishing the cause-and-effect relationship of changes in health indices to those in the environment; characterization of damage caused by ambient air pollution in Russian cities and towns; possibilities of using the guidance for assessing the risk to improve sociohygienic monitoring. It also gives the results of testing scientific developments in the assessment of a multienvironmental risk in the areas exposed to emission from aluminum works (Khakasia) and chemical and petrochemical enterprises (Samara Region) and in the determination of contribution of emission from the Moscow fuel-and-energy complex to risks and damages to human health, caused by ambient air pollution. The urgent issues of further development of modern trends in risk guidance studies are determined.
PubMed ID
17663052 View in PubMed
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[Current problems in the assessment of health risks and damages from the influence of environmental factors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160024
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 Sep-Oct;(5):18-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
S M Novikov
Iu A Rakhmanin
N S Skvortsova
T A Shashina
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 Sep-Oct;(5):18-20
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Health - organization & administration
Environmental Illness - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Morbidity
Risk Assessment - organization & administration
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
In the past decade, a great number of risk assessment projects have been implemented; experience in using the risk-assessing methodology in sociohygienic monitoring, in the hygienic evaluation of a possible impact of new or rebuilt plants on human health, and in the estimation of natural and cost damages from the influence of environmental factors has been gained. Along with the legal aspects of using the risk-assessing methodology, there is a diversity of urgent and unsolved problems: a discrepancy between the hygienic standards and the risk-assessing criteria established in our country, recommended by international organizations, or used in the leading countries of the world; evaluation of exposures; availability of data on exposures in both individual regions and Russia as whole; development of methods for the assessment of damages and for the comparative assessment of risks, including such indices and their value terms as lost life years and life years with consideration of the severity of abnormalities.
PubMed ID
18050698 View in PubMed
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Determinants of plasma PCB, brominated flame retardants, and organochlorine pesticides in pregnant women and 3 year old children in The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273849
Source
Environ Res. 2016 Apr;146:136-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Ida Henriette Caspersen
Helen Engelstad Kvalem
Margaretha Haugen
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Jan Alexander
Cathrine Thomsen
May Frøshaug
Nanna Margrethe Bruun Bremnes
Sharon Lynn Broadwell
Berit Granum
Manolis Kogevinas
Helle Katrine Knutsen
Source
Environ Res. 2016 Apr;146:136-44
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Demography
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Flame Retardants - metabolism
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Brominated - blood
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Life Style
Norway
Pesticides - blood
Polybrominated Biphenyls - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Pregnancy
Abstract
Exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) during prenatal and postnatal life has been extensively studied in relation to adverse health effects in children.
The aim was to identify determinants of the concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), brominated flame retardants (polybrominated diphenyl ethers, PBDEs; polybrominated biphenyl, PBB), and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in blood samples from pregnant women and children in The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).
Blood samples were collected from two independent subsamples within MoBa; a group of women (n=96) enrolled in mid-pregnancy during the years 2002-2008 and a group of 3 year old children (n=99) participating during 2010-2011. PCB congeners (74, 99, 138, 153, 180, 170, 194, 209, 105, 114, 118, 156, 157, 167, and 189), brominated flame retardants (PBDE-28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154, and PBB-153), as well as the OCPs hexachlorobenzene (HCB), oxychlordane, 4,4'dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), and 4,4'dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) were measured in both pregnant women and children.
Age, low parity, and low pre-pregnant BMI were the most important determinants of increased plasma concentrations of POPs in pregnant women. In 3 year old children, prolonged breastfeeding duration was a major determinant of increased POP concentrations. Estimated dietary exposure to PCBs during pregnancy was positively associated with plasma concentrations in 3 year old children, but not in pregnant women. Plasma concentrations were approximately 40% higher in children compared to pregnant women.
Several factors associated with exposure and toxicokinetics, i.e. accumulation, excretion and transfer via breastmilk of POPs were the main predictors of POP levels in pregnant women and children. Diet, which is the main exposure source for these compounds in the general population, was found to predict PCB levels only among children. For the PBDEs, for which non-dietary sources are more important, toxicokinetic factors appeared to have less predictive impact.
PubMed ID
26749444 View in PubMed
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Dietary acrylamide intake during pregnancy and fetal growth-results from the Norwegian mother and child cohort study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118477
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2013 Mar;121(3):374-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Talita Duarte-Salles
Hans von Stedingk
Berit Granum
Kristine B Gützkow
Per Rydberg
Margareta Törnqvist
Michelle A Mendez
Gunnar Brunborg
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Jan Alexander
Margaretha Haugen
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2013 Mar;121(3):374-9
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Cohort Studies
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Female
Fetal Development - drug effects
Hemoglobins - chemistry
Humans
Norway
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Abstract
Acrylamide has shown developmental and reproductive toxicity in animals, as well as neurotoxic effects in humans with occupational exposures. Because it is widespread in food and can pass through the human placenta, concerns have been raised about potential developmental effects of dietary exposures in humans.
We assessed associations of prenatal exposure to dietary acrylamide with small for gestational age (SGA) and birth weight.
This study included 50,651 women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Acrylamide exposure assessment was based on intake estimates obtained from a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), which were compared with hemoglobin (Hb) adduct measurements reflecting acrylamide exposure in a subset of samples (n = 79). Data on infant birth weight and gestational age were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Multivariable regression was used to estimate associations between prenatal acrylamide and birth outcomes.
Acrylamide intake during pregnancy was negatively associated with fetal growth. When women in the highest quartile of acrylamide intake were compared with women in the lowest quartile, the multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (OR) for SGA was 1.11 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.21) and the coefficient for birth weight was -25.7 g (95% CI: -35.9, -15.4). Results were similar after excluding mothers who smoked during pregnancy. Maternal acrylamide- and glycidamide-Hb adduct levels were correlated with estimated dietary acrylamide intakes (Spearman correlations = 0.24; 95% CI: 0.02, 0.44; and 0.48; 95% CI: 0.29, 0.63, respectively).
Lowering dietary acrylamide intake during pregnancy may improve fetal growth.
Notes
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PubMed ID
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