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Active aging - resilience and external support as modifiers of the disablement outcome: AGNES cohort study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299192
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 05 02; 18(1):565
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-02-2018
Author
Taina Rantanen
Milla Saajanaho
Laura Karavirta
Sini Siltanen
Merja Rantakokko
Anne Viljanen
Timo Rantalainen
Katja Pynnönen
Anu Karvonen
Inna Lisko
Lotta Palmberg
Johanna Eronen
Eeva-Maija Palonen
Timo Hinrichs
Markku Kauppinen
Katja Kokko
Erja Portegijs
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, Univerisity of Jyvaskyla, P.O. Box 35 (viv 149), 40014, Jyväskylä, Finland. taina.rantanen@jyu.fi.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 05 02; 18(1):565
Date
05-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Cohort Studies
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Exercise
Female
Finland
Health Behavior
Health Literacy
Humans
Male
Resilience, Psychological
Social Support
Abstract
Population aging increases the need for knowledge on positive aspects of aging, and contributions of older people to their own wellbeing and that of others. We defined active aging as an individual's striving for elements of wellbeing with activities as per their goals, abilities and opportunities. This study examines associations of health, health behaviors, health literacy and functional abilities, environmental and social support with active aging and wellbeing. We will develop and validate assessment methods for physical activity and physical resilience suitable for research on older people, and examine their associations with active aging and wellbeing. We will examine cohort effects on functional phenotypes underlying active aging and disability.
For this population-based study, we plan to recruit 1000 participants aged 75, 80 or 85 years living in central Finland, by drawing personal details from the population register. Participants are interviewed on active aging, wellbeing, disability, environmental and social support, mobility, health behavior and health literacy. Physical activity and heart rate are monitored for 7 days with wearable sensors. Functional tests include hearing, vision, muscle strength, reaction time, exercise tolerance, mobility, and cognitive performance. Clinical examination by a nurse and physician includes an electrocardiogram, tests of blood pressure, orthostatic regulation, arterial stiffness, and lung function, as well as a review of chronic and acute conditions and prescribed medications. C-reactive protein, small blood count, cholesterol and vitamin D are analyzed from blood samples. Associations of factors potentially underlying active aging and wellbeing will be studied using multivariate methods. Cohort effects will be studied by comparing test results of physical and cognitive functioning with results of a cohort examined in 1989-90.
The current study will renew research on positive gerontology through the novel approach to active aging and by suggesting new biomarkers of resilience and active aging. Therefore, high interdisciplinary impact is expected. This cross-sectional study will not provide knowledge on temporal order of events or causality, but an innovative cross-sectional dataset provides opportunities for emergence of novel creative hypotheses and theories.
PubMed ID
29716566 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and respiratory health among children with asthmatic or cough symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207815
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1997 Aug;156(2 Pt 1):546-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
K L Timonen
J. Pekkanen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Environmental Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1997 Aug;156(2 Pt 1):546-52
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Asthma - diagnosis - etiology
Child
Cough - diagnosis - etiology
Finland
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Questionnaires
Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology
Seasons
Suburban Population - statistics & numerical data
Temperature
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
During the winter of 1994, the association between daily changes in air pollution and in the respiratory health of children 7 to 12 yr of age were studied in Kuopio, Finland. Seventy-four children with asthmatic symptoms and 95 children with cough only, living either in urban or suburban areas, were followed for 3 mo. During the study period, the mean daily concentration of particulate air pollution (PM10) was 18 micrograms/m3 in the urban area and 13 micrograms/m3 in the suburban area. Lagged concentrations of PM10, black smoke, and NO2 were significantly associated with declines in morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) among asthmatic children. The regression coefficient (x10) for a 2-d lag of PM10 was -0.911 (SE, 0.386) in the urban and -1.05 (0.596), in the suburban area. Among children with cough only, PM10, black smoke, and NO2 were not significantly associated with PEF. In the urban area, there was a significant association between SO2 and morning and evening PEF and incidence of upper respiratory symptoms among children who cough only. No other associations between air pollution and evening PEF or respiratory symptoms were observed. This study suggests that particulate air pollution is associated with respiratory health, especially among children with asthmatic symptoms.
PubMed ID
9279238 View in PubMed
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[An international epidemiologic comparison of allergies].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190657
Source
Duodecim. 1999;115(17):1817-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999

Arsenic concentrations in well water and risk of bladder and kidney cancer in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201045
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1999 Sep;107(9):705-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
P. Kurttio
E. Pukkala
H. Kahelin
A. Auvinen
J. Pekkanen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Unit of Environmental Epidemiology, Kuopio, Finland. paivi.kurttio@ktl.fi
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1999 Sep;107(9):705-10
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arsenic - analysis
Arsenic Poisoning - complications
Female
Finland
Fresh Water - analysis
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - chemically induced
Male
Risk
Smoking - adverse effects
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - chemically induced
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
We assessed the levels of arsenic in drilled wells in Finland and studied the association of arsenic exposure with the risk of bladder and kidney cancers. The study persons were selected from a register-based cohort of all Finns who had lived at an address outside the municipal drinking-water system during 1967-1980 (n = 144,627). The final study population consisted of 61 bladder cancer cases and 49 kidney cancer cases diagnosed between 1981 and 1995, as well as an age- and sex-balanced random sample of 275 subjects (reference cohort). Water samples were obtained from the wells used by the study population at least during 1967-1980. The total arsenic concentrations in the wells of the reference cohort were low (median = 0.1 microg/L; maximum = 64 microg/L), and 1% exceeded 10 microg/L. Arsenic exposure was estimated as arsenic concentration in the well, daily dose, and cumulative dose of arsenic. None of the exposure indicators was statistically significantly associated with the risk of kidney cancer. Bladder cancer tended to be associated with arsenic concentration and daily dose during the third to ninth years prior to the cancer diagnosis; the risk ratios for arsenic concentration categories 0.1-0.5 and [Greater/equal to] 0.5 microg/L relative to the category with
Notes
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PubMed ID
10464069 View in PubMed
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Associations between ambient, personal, and indoor exposure to fine particulate matter constituents in Dutch and Finnish panels of cardiovascular patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171886
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Dec;62(12):868-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
N A H Janssen
T. Lanki
G. Hoek
M. Vallius
J J de Hartog
R. Van Grieken
J. Pekkanen
B. Brunekreef
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental and Occupational Health, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, The Netherlands. nicole.janssen@rivm.nl
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Dec;62(12):868-77
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Cardiovascular diseases
Cities
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - analysis
Male
Netherlands - epidemiology
Particle Size
Regression Analysis
Sulfur - adverse effects
Vehicle Emissions - analysis
Abstract
To assess the relation between ambient, indoor, and personal levels of PM2.5 and its elemental composition for elderly subjects with cardiovascular disease.
In the framework of a European Union funded study, panel studies were conducted in Amsterdam, the Netherlands and Helsinki, Finland. Outdoor PM2.5 concentrations were measured at a fixed site. Each subject's indoor and personal PM2.5 exposure was measured biweekly for six months, during the 24 hour period preceding intensive health measurements. The absorbance of PM2.5 filters was measured as a marker for diesel exhaust. The elemental content of more than 50% of the personal and indoor samples and all corresponding outdoor samples was measured using energy dispersive x ray fluorescence.
For Amsterdam and Helsinki respectively, a total of 225 and 238 personal, and 220 and 233 indoor measurements, were analysed from 36 and 46 subjects. For most elements, personal and indoor concentrations were lower than and highly correlated with outdoor concentrations. The highest correlations (median r>0.9) were found for sulfur and particle absorbance, which both represent fine mode particles from outdoor origin. Low correlations were observed for elements that represent the coarser part of the PM2.5 particles (Ca, Cu, Si, Cl).
The findings of this study provide support for using fixed site measurements as a measure of exposure to particulate matter in time series studies linking the day to day variation in particulate matter to the day to day variation in health endpoints, especially for components of particulate matter that are generally associated with fine particles and have few indoor sources. The high correlation for absorbance of PM2.5 documents that this applies to particulate matter from combustion sources, such as diesel vehicles, as well.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16299096 View in PubMed
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Barriers to outdoor physical activity and unmet physical activity need in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266937
Source
Prev Med. 2014 Oct;67:106-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Johanna Eronen
Mikaela B von Bonsdorff
Timo Törmäkangas
Merja Rantakokko
Erja Portegijs
Anne Viljanen
Taina Rantanen
Source
Prev Med. 2014 Oct;67:106-11
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environment
Environment Design
Exercise
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Health status
Humans
Male
Mobility Limitation
Questionnaires
Walking
Abstract
To profile participants based on reported outdoor physical activity barriers using a data-driven approach, describe the profiles and study their association with unmet physical activity need.
Cross-sectional analyses of 848 community-dwelling men and women aged 75-90 living in Central Finland in 2012. Barriers to outdoor physical activity and unmet physical activity need were enquired with a questionnaire. The latent profiles were identified by profiling participants into latent groups using a mixture modeling technique on the multivariate set of indicators of outdoor physical activity barriers. A path model was used to study the associations of the profiles with unmet physical activity need.
Five barrier profiles were identified. Profile A was characterized with minor barriers, profile B with weather barriers, profile C with health and weather barriers, profile D with barriers concerning insecurity, health and weather; and profile E with mobility and health barriers. The participants in the profiles differed in the proportion of individual and environmental barriers. The risk for unmet physical activity need was highest among people whose severe mobility difficulties restricted their outdoor physical activity.
Outdoor physical activity barriers reflect the imbalance in person-environment fit among older people, manifested as unmet physical activity need.
PubMed ID
25045839 View in PubMed
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Birth-related factors and doctor-diagnosed wheezing and allergic sensitization in early childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145682
Source
Allergy. 2010 Sep;65(9):1116-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
L. Keski-Nisula
A. Karvonen
P I Pfefferle
H. Renz
G. Büchele
J. Pekkanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Kuopio, Finland. leea.keski-nisula@kuh.fi
Source
Allergy. 2010 Sep;65(9):1116-25
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Allergens - adverse effects - immunology
Cesarean Section
Cohort Studies
Delivery, Obstetric - methods
Female
Fetal Membranes, Premature Rupture - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Food Hypersensitivity - diagnosis
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - diagnostic use
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Respiratory Sounds - diagnosis
Risk factors
Abstract
To investigate the associations between clinical obstetric factors during birth and doctor-diagnosed wheezing and allergic sensitization during early childhood.
We followed 410 Finnish women from late pregnancy until 18 months age of their children. All children were delivered at term. Doctor-diagnosed wheezing among children was established by questionnaires, while specific immunoglobulin E antibodies to inhalant and food allergens were measured in 388 children at 1 year of age. Data on maternal obstetric variables were recorded at the time of delivery.
Children of mothers with longer duration of ruptured fetal membranes before birth had significantly higher risk of doctor-diagnosed wheezing during early childhood compared to those children with shorter period of ruptured fetal membranes (III vs I quartile; aOR 6.65, 95% CI 1.99-22.18; P
PubMed ID
20121761 View in PubMed
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Body fat and mobility are explained by common genetic and environmental influences in older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157662
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jul;16(7):1616-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Alfredo Ortega-Alonso
Sarianna Sipilä
Urho M Kujala
Jaakko Kaprio
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. alfredo.ortega@sport.jyu.fi
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jul;16(7):1616-21
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adiposity - genetics
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - genetics
Electric Impedance
Environment
Female
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Locomotion - genetics
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Models, Genetic
Obesity - genetics - physiopathology
Physical Endurance - genetics
Risk factors
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Walking
Abstract
In older adults, mobility limitations often coexist with overweight or obesity, suggesting that similar factors may underlie both traits. This study examined the extent to which genetic and environmental influences explain the association between adiposity and mobility in older women. Body fat percentage (bioimpedance test), walking speed over 10 m, and distance walked in a 6-min test were evaluated in 92 monozygotic (MZ) and 104 dizygotic (DZ) pairs of twin sisters reared together, aged 63-76 years. Genetic and environmental influences on each trait were estimated using age-adjusted multivariate genetic modeling. The analyses showed that the means (and s.d.) for body fat percentage, walking speed, and walking endurance were 33.2+/-7.3%, 1.7+/-0.3 m/s and 529.7+/-75.4 m, respectively. The phenotypic correlation between adiposity and walking speed was -0.32 and between adiposity and endurance it was -0.33. Genetic influences explained 80% of the association between adiposity and speed, and 65% of adiposity and walking endurance. Cross-trait genetic influences accounted for 12% of the variability in adiposity, 56% in walking speed, and 34% in endurance. Trait-specific genetic influences were also detected for adiposity (54%) and walking endurance (13%), but not speed. In conclusion, among community-living older women, an inverse association was found between adiposity and mobility that was mostly due to the effect of shared genes. This result suggests that the identification of genetic variants for body fat metabolism may also provide understanding of the development of mobility limitations in older women.
PubMed ID
18421266 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence around an oil refinery as an example of a small area study based on map coordinates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213876
Source
Environ Res. 1995 Nov;71(2):128-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
J. Pekkanen
E. Pukkala
M. Vahteristo
T. Vartiainen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Environmental Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Environ Res. 1995 Nov;71(2):128-34
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure
Finland
Geography
Humans
Industrial Oils
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Selection Bias
Abstract
The aim of the study was to create a rapid method for estimating cancer risk in areas defined by exact map coordinates and to test it using as an example incidence of leukemia near an oil refinery. The method can be used to investigate possible local excesses of cancer of suspected environmental origin in Finland. Map coordinates with an accuracy of 10 m for the place of residence of each Finn were obtained from national registers. Based on this data set, numbers of inhabitants and expected number of cancer cases by sex and age in squares of 500 x 500 m were calculated for all of Finland. Observed number of cancer cases in each square were obtained based on record linkage of the map coordinates with the Finnish Cancer Registry. The ratio of observed and expected number of cancer cases was modeled using Poisson regression. The example analysis included all 23 leukemia and 531 any cancer cases registered in an area around an oil refinery in 1983-1986. There was no significant association between distance from the oil refinery and risk of leukemia or any cancer. The method proved fast and efficient in comparing areal differences in cancer incidence in Finland. In cases of environmental concern, geographical analyses of existing registers is a rapid method to perform first analyses when evaluating the need for further studies.
PubMed ID
8977621 View in PubMed
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Changes in serum cholesterol level and mortality: a 30-year follow-up. The Finnish cohorts of the seven countries study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218999
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1994 Jan 15;139(2):155-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1994
Author
J. Pekkanen
A. Nissinen
E. Vartiainen
J T Salonen
S. Punsar
M J Karvonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1994 Jan 15;139(2):155-65
Date
Jan-15-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cholesterol - blood
Cohort Studies
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Abstract
The association of past changes in serum cholesterol level with cause-specific mortality between 1974 and 1989 was examined in a cohort of 784 Finnish men aged 55-74 years who were free of symptomatic coronary heart disease in 1974. Changes in serum cholesterol level were computed based on measurements made in 1959, 1964, 1969, and 1974. Of the 405 deaths, 202 were due to cardiovascular diseases and 107 due to cancer. Men with a decline in serum cholesterol level between 1959 and 1974 also experienced greater than average declines in body mass index and tended to be more often current smokers in 1974. Among 339 men aged 65-74 years in 1974, men in the lowest tertile of serum cholesterol change, i.e., with greatest declines, had increased cardiovascular (hazard ratio, 1.58; 95% confidence interval 1.00-2.50) and all-cause (hazard ratio, 1.46; 95% confidence interval 1.06-2.02) mortality compared with men in the middle tertile of change, i.e., with least change, in multivariate analysis. Among 445 men aged 55-64 years in 1974, there was a significant U-shaped association between change in serum cholesterol level and coronary and all-cause mortality risk. The authors suggest that both the decline in serum cholesterol level and the associated high mortality may be caused by a third factor, such as increased prevalence of chronic diseases or other changes associated with aging. This would help to explain why several studies have not found an association of serum cholesterol with coronary risk among the elderly.
PubMed ID
8296782 View in PubMed
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Childhood asthma in four regions in Scandinavia: risk factors and avoidance effects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15791
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Jun;26(3):610-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
B. Forsberg
J. Pekkanen
J. Clench-Aas
M B Mårtensson
N. Stjernberg
A. Bartonova
K L Timonen
S. Skerfving
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Jun;26(3):610-9
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Air Pollution, Indoor - statistics & numerical data
Asthma - epidemiology
Child
Confidence Intervals
Cough - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Family Health
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The high and increasing prevalence of childhood asthma is a major public health issue. Various risk factors have been proposed in local studies with different designs. METHODS: We have made a questionnaire study of the prevalence of childhood asthma, potential risk factors and their relations in four regions in Scandinavia (Umeå and Malmö in Sweden, Kuopio in eastern Finland and Oslo, Norway). One urban and one less urbanized area were selected in each region, and a study group of 15962 children aged 6-12 years was recruited. RESULTS: The prevalence of symptoms suggestive of asthma varied considerably between different areas (dry cough 8-19%, asthma attacks 4-8%, physician-diagnosed asthma 4-9%), as did the potential risk factors. Urban residency was generally not a risk factor. However, dry cough was common in the most traffic polluted area. Exposure to some of the risk factors. such as smoking indoors and moisture stains or moulds at home during the first 2 years of life, resulted in an increased risk. However, current exposure was associated with odds ratios less than one. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings were probably due to a combination of early impact and later avoidance of these risk factors. The effects of some risk factors were found to differ significantly between regions. No overall pattern between air pollution and asthma was seen, but air pollution differed less than expected between the areas.
PubMed ID
9222787 View in PubMed
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Children's homes--determinants of moisture damage and asthma in Finnish residences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169352
Source
Indoor Air. 2006 Jun;16(3):248-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
U. Haverinen-Shaughnessy
J. Pekkanen
A. Hyvärinen
A. Nevalainen
T. Putus
M. Korppi
D. Moschandreas
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Environmental Health, Kuopio, Finland. haverinen@fulbrightweb.org
Source
Indoor Air. 2006 Jun;16(3):248-55
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Asthma - etiology - pathology
Child
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Family Health
Finland
Housing
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Ventilation
Water
Abstract
Certain housing characteristics increase the risk for moisture damage, which has been associated with increased risk for asthma in children. Modeling moisture damage as a function of these characteristics could therefore provide a simple tool to estimate building-related risk for asthma. This study aimed to find out specific associations between asthma case-control status of children and moisture damage and housing characteristics. The data consisted of information on 121 asthmatic children and predominately two age-, gender- and place of residence-matched control children for every case, and information on moisture damage and housing characteristics in the homes of the children. In a previous study, we found a statistically significant association between moisture damage observations in main living areas and asthma in children. Using logistic regression, five models were formulated to predict moisture damage status of the homes and moisture damage status of living areas. The models were able to classify the damage status correctly in 65.0-87.7% of the homes (kappa values 0.10-0.47) as functions of housing characteristics. None of the models qualified as a significant determinant of the case-control status of the children.
It can be hypothesized that building-related risk for asthma could be roughly estimated using models predicting moisture damage status of buildings as a function of easily obtainable housing characteristics. The results of this study indicated that, with a moderate certainty, it is possible to model moisture damage status of buildings using housing characteristics. However, the models developed did not associate with asthma in children. In conclusion, it was not possible to estimate the risk for asthma by studying housing characteristics only, but detailed information on moisture damage (e.g. location of damage) was crucial for such estimation.
PubMed ID
16683943 View in PubMed
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Comparison of two-level and three-level classifications of moisture-damaged dwellings in relation to health effects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193503
Source
Indoor Air. 2001 Sep;11(3):192-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
U. Haverinen
T. Husman
M. Vahteristo
O. Koskinen
D. Moschandreas
A. Nevalainen
J. Pekkanen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology and Unit of Environmental Epidemiology, POB 95, FIN-70701 Kuopio, Finland. ulla.haverinen@ktl.fi
Source
Indoor Air. 2001 Sep;11(3):192-9
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Finland
Humans
Humidity - adverse effects
Male
Public Health
Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology
Risk assessment
Time Factors
Abstract
A total of 630 randomly selected dwellings were surveyed for visible signs of moisture damage by civil engineers, and questionnaire responses were collected from the occupants (a total of 1,017 adults) to analyse the association between moisture damage and occupant health. A three-level grading system was developed, which took into account the number of damage sites in buildings and estimated the severity of the damage. In the present study, this grading system was tested as an improved model of moisture damage-related exposure in comparison to a conventional two-category system: based on independent, technical criteria it also allowed dose-response to be estimated. The questionnaire probed 28 individual health symptoms, based on earlier reported associations with building moisture and mould-related exposure. Criteria in evaluating the goodness of the selected exposure model were (1) dose-responsiveness and (2) higher risk compared to a two-level classification. Dose-responsiveness was observed with the three-level classification in 7, higher risk in 10, and both criteria in 5 out of 28 health symptoms. Two-level classification had higher risk in 4 health symptoms. Dose-dependent risk increases for respiratory infections and lower respiratory symptoms, and recurrent irritative and skin symptoms were observed with the three-level classification using symptom score variables. Although the results did not unambiguously support the three-level model, they underline the importance of developing more accurate exposure models in assessing the severity of moisture damage.
PubMed ID
11521504 View in PubMed
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Coronary risk factor levels: differences between educational groups in 1972-87 in eastern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215401
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1995 Apr;49(2):144-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
J. Pekkanen
A. Uutela
T. Valkonen
E. Vartiainen
J. Tuomilehto
P. Puska
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1995 Apr;49(2):144-9
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Blood pressure
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - blood - mortality - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Smoking - mortality
Abstract
To compare differences in coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factor levels between educational groups in the 1970s and 1980s in eastern Finland.
Independent, cross sectional population surveys were undertaken in 1972, 1977, 1982, and 1987 of randomly selected men and women aged 30-59 living in two provinces in eastern Finland. Altogether 20,096 subjects participated. The lowest observed level of participation in either sex or province in any year was 77%. Serum cholesterol values and blood pressure measurements, body mass index, smoking, and the level of education were determined in each survey using comparable methodology.
More poorly educated men and women had higher levels of all risk factors at the end of the study period (1987). There was no change between 1972 and 1987 in differences between educational groups in mean serum cholesterol values and the diastolic blood pressure level in either sex, and in smoking in men. In women, the proportion of smokers was highest in the better educated in the 1970s but lowest in this group in the 1980s (interaction between year of examination and educational level p
Notes
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PubMed ID
7798041 View in PubMed
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Dietary factors determining diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance. A 20-year follow-up of the Finnish and Dutch cohorts of the Seven Countries Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214653
Source
Diabetes Care. 1995 Aug;18(8):1104-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
E J Feskens
S M Virtanen
L. Räsänen
J. Tuomilehto
J. Stengård
J. Pekkanen
A. Nissinen
D. Kromhout
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Diseases and Environmental Epidemiology, National Institute of Public Health and Environmental Protection, Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
Source
Diabetes Care. 1995 Aug;18(8):1104-12
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - epidemiology
Diet
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Glucose Intolerance - blood - epidemiology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Predictive value of tests
Reference Values
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To investigate the role of diet as a predictor of glucose intolerance and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM).
At the 30-year follow-up survey of the Dutch and Finnish cohorts of the Seven Countries Study, in 1989/1990, men were examined according to a standardized protocol including a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test. Information on habitual food consumption was obtained using the cross-check dietary history method. Those 338 men in whom information on habitual diet was also available 20 years earlier were included in this study. Subjects known as having diabetes in 1989/1990 were excluded from the analyses.
Adjusting for age and cohort, the intake of total, saturated, and monounsaturated fatty acids and dietary cholesterol 20 years before diagnosis was higher in men with newly diagnosed diabetes in the survey than in men with normal or impaired glucose tolerance. After adjustment for cohort, age, past body mass index, and past energy intake, the past intake of total fat was positively associated with 2-h postload glucose level (P
PubMed ID
7587845 View in PubMed
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Do Associations Between Perceived Environmental and Individual Characteristics and Walking Limitations Depend on Lower Extremity Performance Level?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291084
Source
J Aging Health. 2017 Jun; 29(4):640-656
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Ritva Sakari
Merja Rantakokko
Erja Portegijs
Susanne Iwarsson
Sarianna Sipilä
Anne Viljanen
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
1 University of Jyvaskyla, Finland.
Source
J Aging Health. 2017 Jun; 29(4):640-656
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Environment
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Independent living
Interviews as Topic
Lower Extremity - physiopathology
Male
Mobility Limitation
Perception
Physical Fitness - physiology
Sweden
Task Performance and Analysis
Walking - physiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyze whether the associations between perceived environmental and individual characteristics and perceived walking limitations in older people differ between those with intact and those with poorer lower extremity performance.
Persons aged 75 to 90 ( N = 834) participated in interviews and performance tests in their homes. Standard questionnaires were used to obtain walking difficulties; environmental barriers to and, facilitators of, mobility; and perceived individual hindrances to outdoor mobility. Lower extremity performance was tested using Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB).
Among those with poorer lower extremity performance, the likelihood for advanced walking limitations was, in particular, related to perceived poor safety in the environment, and among those with intact performance to perceived social issues, such as lack of company, as well as to long distances.
The environmental correlates of walking limitations seem to depend on the level of lower extremity performance.
PubMed ID
27056910 View in PubMed
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Does the predictive value of baseline coronary risk factors change over a 30-year follow-up?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222201
Source
Cardiology. 1993;82(2-3):181-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
J. Pekkanen
M. Tervahauta
A. Nissinen
M J Karvonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Cardiology. 1993;82(2-3):181-90
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Cause of Death
Cholesterol - blood
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - adverse effects
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Abstract
The association of baseline serum total cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, smoking and body mass index with coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality was analyzed among 1,619 men aged 40-59 at baseline. Analyses were made separately for the first, second and third decade of follow-up. Serum cholesterol and smoking more than 9 cigarettes daily were strong predictors of risk of CHD death (n = 450) occurring early and late during the 30-year follow-up. After 20 years of follow-up, systolic blood pressure was no longer associated with CHD risk. In contrast, highest tertile of body mass index (over 24.7 kg/m2) was only then associated with increased CHD risk. The correlations between the baseline and the 30-year risk factor values were 0.42 for serum cholesterol (n = 444), 0.28 for systolic blood pressure (n = 444) and 0.57 for body mass index (n = 429). Our results showed large differences in the long-term predictive power of the classical coronary risk factors. The reasons for these differences are discussed.
PubMed ID
8324779 View in PubMed
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Effects of ultrafine and fine particles in urban air on peak expiratory flow among children with asthmatic symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209915
Source
Environ Res. 1997;74(1):24-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
J. Pekkanen
K L Timonen
J. Ruuskanen
A. Reponen
A. Mirme
Author Affiliation
Unit of Environmental Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio, Finland. Juha.Pekkanen@ktl.fi
Source
Environ Res. 1997;74(1):24-33
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - chemistry - poisoning
Asthma - physiopathology
Child
Finland
Humans
Particle Size
Respiratory Function Tests
Vehicle Emissions
Abstract
It has been suggested that ultrafine particles in urban air may cause the health effects associated with thoracic particles (PM10). We therefore compared the effects of daily variations in particles of different sizes on peak expiratory flow (PEF) during a 57-day follow-up of 39 asthmatic children aged 7-12 years. The main source of particulate air pollution in the area was traffic. In addition to the measurements of PM10 and black smoke (BS) concentrations, an electric aerosol spectrometer was used to measure particle number concentrations in six size classes ranging from 0.01 to 10.0 microns. Daily variations in BS and particle number concentrations in size ranges between 0.032 and 0.32 micron and between 1.0 and 10.0 microns were highly intercorrelated (correlation coefficients about 0.9). Correlations with PM10 were somewhat lower (below 0.7). All these pollutants tended also to be associated with declines in morning PEF. However, the only statistically significant associations were observed with PM10 and BS. Different time lags of PM10 were also most consistently associated with declines in PEF. Therefore, in the present study on asthmatic children, the concentration of ultrafine particles was no more strongly associated with variations in PEF than PM10 or BS, as has earlier been suggested.
PubMed ID
9339211 View in PubMed
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Environmental barriers, person-environment fit and mortality among community-dwelling very old people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265500
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:783
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Merja Rantakokko
Timo Törmäkangas
Taina Rantanen
Maria Haak
Susanne Iwarsson
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:783
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Architectural Accessibility
Environment
Female
Frail Elderly
Housing for the Elderly
Humans
Male
Mobility Limitation
Mortality - trends
Proportional Hazards Models
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Environmental barriers are associated with disability-related outcomes in older people but little is known of the effect of environmental barriers on mortality. The aim of this study was to examine whether objectively measured barriers in the outdoor, entrance and indoor environments are associated with mortality among community-dwelling 80- to 89-year-old single-living people.
This longitudinal study is based on a sample of 397 people who were single-living in ordinary housing in Sweden. Participants were interviewed during 2002-2003, and 393 were followed up for mortality until May 15, 2012.Environmental barriers and functional limitations were assessed with the Housing Enabler instrument, which is intended for objective assessments of Person-Environment (P-E) fit problems in housing and the immediate outdoor environment. Mortality data were gathered from the public national register. Cox regression models were used for the analyses.
A total of 264 (67%) participants died during follow-up. Functional limitations increased mortality risk. Among the specific environmental barriers that generate the most P-E fit problems, lack of handrails in stairs at entrances was associated with the highest mortality risk (adjusted RR 1.55, 95% CI 1.14-2.10), whereas the total number of environmental barriers at entrances and outdoors was not associated with mortality. A higher number of environmental barriers indoors showed a slight protective effect against mortality even after adjustment for functional limitations (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.96-1.00).
Specific environmental problems may increase mortality risk among very-old single-living people. However, the association may be confounded by individuals' health status which is difficult to fully control for. Further studies are called for.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23981906 View in PubMed
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Exposure to microbial agents in house dust and wheezing, atopic dermatitis and atopic sensitization in early childhood: a birth cohort study in rural areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122533
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2012 Aug;42(8):1246-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
A M Karvonen
A. Hyvärinen
U. Gehring
M. Korppi
G. Doekes
J. Riedler
C. Braun-Fahrländer
S. Bitter
S. Schmid
L. Keski-Nisula
M. Roponen
V. Kaulek
J-C Dalphin
P I Pfefferle
H. Renz
G. Büchele
E. von Mutius
J. Pekkanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Kuopio, Finland. anne.karvonen@thl.fi
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2012 Aug;42(8):1246-56
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agriculture
Allergens - analysis - immunology
Asthma - epidemiology - immunology
Austria - epidemiology
Biological Markers - analysis
Cohort Studies
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology - immunology
Dust - analysis - immunology
Endotoxins - analysis - immunology
Environmental Exposure
Female
Finland - epidemiology
France - epidemiology
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - blood - immunology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Polysaccharides - analysis - immunology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Respiratory Sounds - immunology
Rural Population
Switzerland - epidemiology
Abstract
Early-life exposure to environmental microbial agents may be associated with development of wheezing and allergic diseases.
To assess the association of microbial exposure in rural homes with the risk of asthma, wheezing, atopic dermatitis and sensitization.
Birth cohorts of rural children (n = 1133), half from farmer families, were followed up from birth to 2 years of age by questionnaires in five European centres. Endotoxin and extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) of Penicillium and Aspergillus spp. were determined from living room floor and mother's mattress dust samples collected at 2 months of age. Specific IgE against 19 allergens was measured at 1 year of age. Discrete-time hazard models, generalized estimations equations (GEE) and logistic regression were used for statistical analyses.
The incidence of asthma was inversely associated with the amount of dust (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.73, 95% CI 0.58-0.93) and the loads (units/m(2)) of EPS (aOR 0.75, 95% CI 0.55-1.04) and endotoxin (aOR 0.79, 95% CI 0.60-1.05) in the mother's mattress. Similar associations were seen with wheezing and with living room floor dust. The microbial markers were highly correlated and their effects could not be clearly separated. The inverse associations were seen especially among non-farmers. The risk of sensitization to inhalant allergens increased with increasing endotoxin exposure from mattress dust. No associations were observed with concentrations (units/g) or with atopic dermatitis.
The amount and microbial content of house dust were inversely associated with asthma and wheezing, but due to high correlations between microbial agents and amount of dust, it was not possible to disentangle their individual effects. New ways to better measure and represent exposure to environmental microbes, including indexes of biodiversity, are needed especially among farmers.
PubMed ID
22805472 View in PubMed
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