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Active aging - resilience and external support as modifiers of the disablement outcome: AGNES cohort study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299192
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 05 02; 18(1):565
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-02-2018
Author
Taina Rantanen
Milla Saajanaho
Laura Karavirta
Sini Siltanen
Merja Rantakokko
Anne Viljanen
Timo Rantalainen
Katja Pynnönen
Anu Karvonen
Inna Lisko
Lotta Palmberg
Johanna Eronen
Eeva-Maija Palonen
Timo Hinrichs
Markku Kauppinen
Katja Kokko
Erja Portegijs
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, Univerisity of Jyvaskyla, P.O. Box 35 (viv 149), 40014, Jyväskylä, Finland. taina.rantanen@jyu.fi.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 05 02; 18(1):565
Date
05-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Cohort Studies
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Exercise
Female
Finland
Health Behavior
Health Literacy
Humans
Male
Resilience, Psychological
Social Support
Abstract
Population aging increases the need for knowledge on positive aspects of aging, and contributions of older people to their own wellbeing and that of others. We defined active aging as an individual's striving for elements of wellbeing with activities as per their goals, abilities and opportunities. This study examines associations of health, health behaviors, health literacy and functional abilities, environmental and social support with active aging and wellbeing. We will develop and validate assessment methods for physical activity and physical resilience suitable for research on older people, and examine their associations with active aging and wellbeing. We will examine cohort effects on functional phenotypes underlying active aging and disability.
For this population-based study, we plan to recruit 1000 participants aged 75, 80 or 85 years living in central Finland, by drawing personal details from the population register. Participants are interviewed on active aging, wellbeing, disability, environmental and social support, mobility, health behavior and health literacy. Physical activity and heart rate are monitored for 7 days with wearable sensors. Functional tests include hearing, vision, muscle strength, reaction time, exercise tolerance, mobility, and cognitive performance. Clinical examination by a nurse and physician includes an electrocardiogram, tests of blood pressure, orthostatic regulation, arterial stiffness, and lung function, as well as a review of chronic and acute conditions and prescribed medications. C-reactive protein, small blood count, cholesterol and vitamin D are analyzed from blood samples. Associations of factors potentially underlying active aging and wellbeing will be studied using multivariate methods. Cohort effects will be studied by comparing test results of physical and cognitive functioning with results of a cohort examined in 1989-90.
The current study will renew research on positive gerontology through the novel approach to active aging and by suggesting new biomarkers of resilience and active aging. Therefore, high interdisciplinary impact is expected. This cross-sectional study will not provide knowledge on temporal order of events or causality, but an innovative cross-sectional dataset provides opportunities for emergence of novel creative hypotheses and theories.
PubMed ID
29716566 View in PubMed
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Analysis of hydroxylated metabolites of PCBs (OH-PCBs) and other chlorinated phenolic compounds in whole blood from Canadian inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6761
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Jul;108(7):611-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
C D Sandau
P. Ayotte
E. Dewailly
J. Duffe
R J Norstrom
Author Affiliation
Centre for Analytical and Environmental Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Jul;108(7):611-6
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Environmental Exposure
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Humans
Hydroxylation
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In this study, we identified the main hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (OH-PCBs) and other chlorinated phenolic compounds and we determined their relative concentrations in whole blood from 13 male and 17 female Inuit from northern Quebec, Canada, and from a pooled whole blood sample from southern Quebec. We also determined concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Total OH-PCB concentrations were variable among the Inuit samples, ranging over 2 orders of magnitude (0.117-11.6 ng/g whole blood wet weight). These concentrations were equal to and up to 70 times those found for the southern Quebec pooled whole blood sample. Geometric mean concentrations of total OH-PCBs were 1.73 and 1.01 ng/g whole blood for Inuit men and women, respectively, and 0.161 ng/g whole blood for the southern population pool. There are limited data available for comparison, but the levels of OH-PCBs in Inuit are higher than those previously reported in the literature for other populations. There was a significant correlation (p
PubMed ID
10903613 View in PubMed
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Barriers to outdoor physical activity and unmet physical activity need in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266937
Source
Prev Med. 2014 Oct;67:106-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Johanna Eronen
Mikaela B von Bonsdorff
Timo Törmäkangas
Merja Rantakokko
Erja Portegijs
Anne Viljanen
Taina Rantanen
Source
Prev Med. 2014 Oct;67:106-11
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environment
Environment Design
Exercise
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Health status
Humans
Male
Mobility Limitation
Questionnaires
Walking
Abstract
To profile participants based on reported outdoor physical activity barriers using a data-driven approach, describe the profiles and study their association with unmet physical activity need.
Cross-sectional analyses of 848 community-dwelling men and women aged 75-90 living in Central Finland in 2012. Barriers to outdoor physical activity and unmet physical activity need were enquired with a questionnaire. The latent profiles were identified by profiling participants into latent groups using a mixture modeling technique on the multivariate set of indicators of outdoor physical activity barriers. A path model was used to study the associations of the profiles with unmet physical activity need.
Five barrier profiles were identified. Profile A was characterized with minor barriers, profile B with weather barriers, profile C with health and weather barriers, profile D with barriers concerning insecurity, health and weather; and profile E with mobility and health barriers. The participants in the profiles differed in the proportion of individual and environmental barriers. The risk for unmet physical activity need was highest among people whose severe mobility difficulties restricted their outdoor physical activity.
Outdoor physical activity barriers reflect the imbalance in person-environment fit among older people, manifested as unmet physical activity need.
PubMed ID
25045839 View in PubMed
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Body fat and mobility are explained by common genetic and environmental influences in older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157662
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jul;16(7):1616-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Alfredo Ortega-Alonso
Sarianna Sipilä
Urho M Kujala
Jaakko Kaprio
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. alfredo.ortega@sport.jyu.fi
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jul;16(7):1616-21
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adiposity - genetics
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - genetics
Electric Impedance
Environment
Female
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Locomotion - genetics
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Models, Genetic
Obesity - genetics - physiopathology
Physical Endurance - genetics
Risk factors
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Walking
Abstract
In older adults, mobility limitations often coexist with overweight or obesity, suggesting that similar factors may underlie both traits. This study examined the extent to which genetic and environmental influences explain the association between adiposity and mobility in older women. Body fat percentage (bioimpedance test), walking speed over 10 m, and distance walked in a 6-min test were evaluated in 92 monozygotic (MZ) and 104 dizygotic (DZ) pairs of twin sisters reared together, aged 63-76 years. Genetic and environmental influences on each trait were estimated using age-adjusted multivariate genetic modeling. The analyses showed that the means (and s.d.) for body fat percentage, walking speed, and walking endurance were 33.2+/-7.3%, 1.7+/-0.3 m/s and 529.7+/-75.4 m, respectively. The phenotypic correlation between adiposity and walking speed was -0.32 and between adiposity and endurance it was -0.33. Genetic influences explained 80% of the association between adiposity and speed, and 65% of adiposity and walking endurance. Cross-trait genetic influences accounted for 12% of the variability in adiposity, 56% in walking speed, and 34% in endurance. Trait-specific genetic influences were also detected for adiposity (54%) and walking endurance (13%), but not speed. In conclusion, among community-living older women, an inverse association was found between adiposity and mobility that was mostly due to the effect of shared genes. This result suggests that the identification of genetic variants for body fat metabolism may also provide understanding of the development of mobility limitations in older women.
PubMed ID
18421266 View in PubMed
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Carbon monoxide in indoor ice skating rinks: evaluation of absorption by adult hockey players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229175
Source
Am J Public Health. 1990 May;80(5):594-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1990
Author
B. Lévesque
E. Dewailly
R. Lavoie
D. Prud'Homme
S. Allaire
Author Affiliation
Département de santé communautaire, Centre hospitalier de l'Université Laval, Quebec City, Canada.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1990 May;80(5):594-8
Date
May-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption
Adult
Age Factors
Air Pollutants - analysis
Carbon Monoxide - analysis - metabolism
Carboxyhemoglobin - analysis
Hockey
Humans
Least-Squares Analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Reference Values
Regression Analysis
Smoking
Abstract
We evaluated alveolar carbon monoxide (CO) levels of 122 male, adult hockey players active in recreational leagues of the Quebec City region (Canada), before and after 10 weekly 90-minute games in 10 different rinks. We also determined exposure by quantifying the average CO level in the rink during the games. Other variables documented included age, pulmonary function, aerobic capacity, and smoking status. Environmental concentrations varied from 1.6 to 131.5 parts per million (ppm). We examined the absorption/exposure relationship using a simple linear regression model. In low CO exposure levels, physical exercise lowered the alveolar CO concentration. However, we noted that for each 10 ppm of CO in the ambient air, the players had adsorbed enough CO to raise their carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels by 1 percent. This relationship was true both for smokers and non-smokers. We suggest that an average environmental concentration of 20 ppm of CO for the duration of a hockey game (90 minutes) should be reference limit not to be exceeded in indoor skating rinks.
Notes
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PubMed ID
2327538 View in PubMed
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Cytochrome P450 CYP1A1 enzyme activity and DNA adducts in placenta of women environmentally exposed to organochlorines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3494
Source
Environ Res. 1999 May;80(4):369-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
J. Lagueux
D. Pereg
P. Ayotte
E. Dewailly
G G Poirier
Author Affiliation
Health and Environment Unit, CHUQ, CHUL Research Center and Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Ste-Foy, Québec, G1V 4G2, Canada.
Source
Environ Res. 1999 May;80(4):369-82
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Biological Markers - analysis
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 - metabolism
DNA - genetics - metabolism
DNA Adducts - analysis
Environmental Exposure
Enzyme Induction - drug effects
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated
Infant, Newborn
Insecticides - adverse effects - blood
Inuits
Placenta - drug effects - metabolism
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - analysis
Pregnancy - blood
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Abstract
Organochlorine compounds bioaccumulate in fishing and hunting products included in the daily diet of many coastal populations. Prenatal and perinatal exposure to large doses of PCBs and PCDFs was shown to be deleterious on fetal and neonatal development, but information is scarce regarding possible effects of chronic low-dose exposure. This study investigates biomarkers of early effects in newborns from women exposed to organochlorines through the consumption of species from marine food chains, in two remote coastal regions of the province of Quebec (Canada). A CYP1A1-dependent enzyme activity (EROD) and DNA adducts were measured in placenta samples obtained from 30 women living on the Lower-North-Shore of the St. Lawrence River and 22 Inuit women from Nunavik (Arctic Quebec). These biomarkers were also assessed in 30 women from a Quebec urban center (Sept-Iles) as a reference group. Prenatal organochlorine exposure was determined by measuring these compounds in umbilical cord plasma. The amount of bulky polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-related DNA adducts was significantly greater in the Lower-North-Shore group than in the reference group. Placental EROD activity and the amount of less bulky (OC-related) DNA adducts were significantly higher in the Nunavik group than in the reference group. For both biomarkers, smoking was found to be an important confounding factor. Organochlorine exposure was significantly associated with EROD activity and DNA adduct levels when stratifying for smoking. This study confirms that CYP1A1 enzyme induction and DNA adducts in placental tissue constitute useful biomarkers of early effects induced by environmental exposure to organochlorines.
PubMed ID
10330311 View in PubMed
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Do Associations Between Perceived Environmental and Individual Characteristics and Walking Limitations Depend on Lower Extremity Performance Level?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291084
Source
J Aging Health. 2017 Jun; 29(4):640-656
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Ritva Sakari
Merja Rantakokko
Erja Portegijs
Susanne Iwarsson
Sarianna Sipilä
Anne Viljanen
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
1 University of Jyvaskyla, Finland.
Source
J Aging Health. 2017 Jun; 29(4):640-656
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Environment
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Independent living
Interviews as Topic
Lower Extremity - physiopathology
Male
Mobility Limitation
Perception
Physical Fitness - physiology
Sweden
Task Performance and Analysis
Walking - physiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyze whether the associations between perceived environmental and individual characteristics and perceived walking limitations in older people differ between those with intact and those with poorer lower extremity performance.
Persons aged 75 to 90 ( N = 834) participated in interviews and performance tests in their homes. Standard questionnaires were used to obtain walking difficulties; environmental barriers to and, facilitators of, mobility; and perceived individual hindrances to outdoor mobility. Lower extremity performance was tested using Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB).
Among those with poorer lower extremity performance, the likelihood for advanced walking limitations was, in particular, related to perceived poor safety in the environment, and among those with intact performance to perceived social issues, such as lack of company, as well as to long distances.
The environmental correlates of walking limitations seem to depend on the level of lower extremity performance.
PubMed ID
27056910 View in PubMed
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Environmental barriers, person-environment fit and mortality among community-dwelling very old people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265500
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:783
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Merja Rantakokko
Timo Törmäkangas
Taina Rantanen
Maria Haak
Susanne Iwarsson
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:783
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Architectural Accessibility
Environment
Female
Frail Elderly
Housing for the Elderly
Humans
Male
Mobility Limitation
Mortality - trends
Proportional Hazards Models
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Environmental barriers are associated with disability-related outcomes in older people but little is known of the effect of environmental barriers on mortality. The aim of this study was to examine whether objectively measured barriers in the outdoor, entrance and indoor environments are associated with mortality among community-dwelling 80- to 89-year-old single-living people.
This longitudinal study is based on a sample of 397 people who were single-living in ordinary housing in Sweden. Participants were interviewed during 2002-2003, and 393 were followed up for mortality until May 15, 2012.Environmental barriers and functional limitations were assessed with the Housing Enabler instrument, which is intended for objective assessments of Person-Environment (P-E) fit problems in housing and the immediate outdoor environment. Mortality data were gathered from the public national register. Cox regression models were used for the analyses.
A total of 264 (67%) participants died during follow-up. Functional limitations increased mortality risk. Among the specific environmental barriers that generate the most P-E fit problems, lack of handrails in stairs at entrances was associated with the highest mortality risk (adjusted RR 1.55, 95% CI 1.14-2.10), whereas the total number of environmental barriers at entrances and outdoors was not associated with mortality. A higher number of environmental barriers indoors showed a slight protective effect against mortality even after adjustment for functional limitations (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.96-1.00).
Specific environmental problems may increase mortality risk among very-old single-living people. However, the association may be confounded by individuals' health status which is difficult to fully control for. Further studies are called for.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23981906 View in PubMed
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Environmental contaminants and human health in the Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99174
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2010 Aug 20;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-2010
Author
S G Donaldson
J. Van Oostdam
C. Tikhonov
M. Feeley
B. Armstrong
P. Ayotte
O. Boucher
W. Bowers
L. Chan
F. Dallaire
R. Dallaire
E. Dewailly
J. Edwards
G M Egeland
J. Fontaine
C. Furgal
T. Leech
E. Loring
G. Muckle
T. Nancarrow
D. Pereg
P. Plusquellec
M. Potyrala
O. Receveur
R G Shearer
Author Affiliation
Chemicals Surveillance Bureau, HECSB, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Ave West, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0K9; Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1S 5B6.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2010 Aug 20;
Date
Aug-20-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The third Canadian Arctic Human Health Assessment conducted under the Canadian Northern Contaminants Program (NCP), in association with the circumpolar Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), addresses concerns about possible adverse health effects in individuals exposed to environmental contaminants through a diet containing country foods. The objectives here are to: 1) provide data on changes in human contaminant concentrations and exposure among Canadian Arctic peoples; 2) identify new contaminants of concern; 3) discuss possible health effects; 4) outline risk communication about contaminants in country food; and 5) identify knowledge gaps for future contaminant research and monitoring. The nutritional and cultural benefits of country foods are substantial; however, some dietary studies suggest declines in the amount of country foods being consumed. Significant declines were found for most contaminants in maternal blood over the last 10years within all three Arctic regions studied. Inuit continue to have the highest levels of almost all persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and metals among the ethnic groups studied. A greater proportion of people in the East exceed Health Canada's guidelines for PCBs and mercury, although the proportion of mothers exceeding these guidelines has decreased since the previous assessment. Further monitoring and research are required to assess trends and health effects of emerging contaminants. Infant development studies have shown possible subtle effects of prenatal exposure to heavy metals and some POPs on immune system function and neurodevelopment. New data suggest important beneficial effects on brain development for Inuit infants from some country food nutrients. The most successful risk communication processes balance the risks and benefits of a diet of country food through input from a variety of regional experts and the community, to incorporate the many socio-cultural and economic factors to arrive at a risk management decision that will be the most beneficial in Arctic communities.
PubMed ID
20728918 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of the health risk associated with exposure to chloroform in indoor swimming pools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196697
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2000 Oct 27;61(4):225-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-27-2000
Author
B. Lévesque
P. Ayotte
R. Tardif
G. Charest-Tardif
E. Dewailly
D. Prud'Homme
G. Gingras
S. Allaire
R. Lavoie
Author Affiliation
Unité de recherche en santé publique, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec, Beauport, Canada. blevesque@cspq.qc.ca
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2000 Oct 27;61(4):225-43
Date
Oct-27-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - pharmacokinetics
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Child
Chloroform - adverse effects - pharmacokinetics
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Lung - drug effects - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - chemically induced
Quebec
Risk assessment
Skin Absorption
Swimming
Swimming Pools - standards
Abstract
The exposure of swimmers to chloroform (CHCl3) was investigated in indoor swimming pools of the Quebec City region along with the associated carcinogenic risk. Six training sessions involving 52 competition swimmers (11 to 20 yr old) were conducted in 3 different pools, while 12 adult leisure swimmers attended 5 sessions, each held in a different pool. For each session, water and ambient air CHCl3 concentrations were measured and CHCl3 levels in alveolar air samples (CHCl3 ALV) collected from swimmers prior to entering the swimming pool premises and after 15, 35, and 60 min of swimming. Mean water concentrations varied from 18 microg/L to 80 microg/L, while those in air ranged from 78 microg/m3 to 329 microg/m3. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that CHCl3 ALV values in competition swimmers were strongly correlated to ambient air and water levels, and to a lesser degree to the intensity of training. Only ambient air concentration was positively correlated to CHCl3 ALV in the leisure group. Concentrations of CHCl3 metabolites bound to hepatic and renal macromolecules, estimated using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, were 1.6 and 1.9 times higher for the competition swimmers than for the leisure swimmers, respectively. The highest hepatic concentration predicted in competition swimmers, 0.22 microg CHCl3 equivalents/kg of tissue, was at least 10,000 times lower than the smallest no observed effect level for liver tumors in animals. Data indicate that the safety margin is therefore very large, for competitive swimmers as well as for leisure swimmers.
PubMed ID
11071317 View in PubMed
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Exposure of Inuit in Greenland to organochlorines through the marine diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4827
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2001 Jan 26;62(2):69-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-26-2001
Author
P. Bjerregaard
E. Dewailly
P. Ayotte
T. Pars
L. Ferron
G. Mulvad
Author Affiliation
Section for Research in Greenland, National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. p.bjerrgaard@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2001 Jan 26;62(2):69-81
Date
Jan-26-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Greenland
Health Surveys
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated
Insecticides - adverse effects - analysis - blood
Inuits
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Pesticide Residues - adverse effects - analysis - blood
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seafood - adverse effects - analysis
Sex Distribution
Abstract
High organochlorine concentrations have been found among the Inuit in eastern Canada and in Greenland. The present study was undertaken to assess the exposure to organochlorines in relation to age, sex, and diet in a general population sample of Inuit from Greenland. Survey data and plasma concentrations of 14 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and 16 pesticides, including 5 toxaphene congeners, were recorded in a random population survey of 408 adult indigenous Greenlanders. In a two-stage design, the survey response rate was 66%, and 90% of those randomly selected for blood testing participated. This was equivalent to an overall response rate of 59%. The median plasma concentration of the sum of PCB congeners was 13.3 microg/L; the lipid-adjusted value was 2109 microg/kg. The PCB concentration was twice as high as among the Inuit of Nunavik, Canada, 25 times higher than in a control group from southern Canada, and several times higher than the values found in European studies. Concentrations were similarly elevated for all PCB congeners and pesticides. The PCB congener pattern was similar to previous observations from the eastern Canadian Arctic and Greenland. Concentrations showed statistically significant positive associations with age, marine diet, and male sex in multiple linear regression analyses. The exceptionally high plasma concentrations of several organochlorines among the Inuit of Greenland are attributed to a lifelong high intake of seafood, in particular marine mammals. Concentrations of PCB adjusted for the consumption of marine food increased until approximately 40 yr of age, which is equivalent to the birth cohorts of the early 1950s. The age pattern indicates that bioaccumulation of PCB started in the 1950s, which is a likely date for the introduction of the compounds into the Arctic environment.
PubMed ID
11209822 View in PubMed
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Exposure of remote maritime populations to coplanar PCBs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219152
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1994 Jan;102 Suppl 1:205-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1994
Author
E. Dewailly
J J Ryan
C. Laliberté
S. Bruneau
J P Weber
S. Gingras
G. Carrier
Author Affiliation
Community Health Department, CHUL, Québec, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1994 Jan;102 Suppl 1:205-9
Date
Jan-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Benzofurans - analysis - blood
Environmental Exposure
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Inuits
Male
Milk, human - chemistry
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - blood
Quebec
Seafood
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - analysis - blood
Abstract
Two remote maritime populations were evaluated for their biological exposure to organochlorines in 1989-1990. Because of their high intake of seafood, these two populations have high biological levels. One hundred nine breast milk samples from Inuit women from Arctic Québec were analyzed to determine levels of polychlorodibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) including non-ortho, mono-ortho, and di-ortho congeners. Total 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TEqs) for PCBs were 3.5 times higher in Inuit milk samples than in 96 Caucasian milk samples. Among the 185 fishermen from the Lower North Shore of the Gulf of the St. Lawrence River, we evaluated 10 highly exposed fishermen for their coplanar PCB blood levels. Total TEqs were 900 ng/kg for highly exposed individuals with 36 ng/kg for controls. In these two nonoccupationally exposed populations, coplanar PCBs make a larger contribution to the TEq than PCDDs and PCDFs. However, the mono-ortho penta CB No. 118 is the major contributor for the total toxicity.
Notes
Cites: J Pediatr. 1990 Jan;116(1):38-452104928
Cites: Crit Rev Toxicol. 1990;21(1):51-882124811
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 1992 Jul 15;122(1-2):75-1341514106
Cites: Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 1991 Oct;47(4):491-81786431
Cites: Food Addit Contam. 1991 May-Jun;8(3):351-611778271
PubMed ID
8187710 View in PubMed
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Exposure of the Inuit population of Nunavik (Arctic Quebec) to lead and mercury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3471
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2001 Jul-Aug;56(4):350-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Dewailly
P. Ayotte
S. Bruneau
G. Lebel
P. Levallois
J P Weber
Author Affiliation
Unité de Recherche en Santé Publique, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Beauport, Canada.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2001 Jul-Aug;56(4):350-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Diet - adverse effects
Diet Surveys
Ducks
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Geese
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Lead - blood
Lead Poisoning - blood - ethnology
Life Style
Male
Mercury - blood
Mercury Poisoning - blood - ethnology
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Seafood - analysis
Seals, Earless
Sex Distribution
Smoking - adverse effects - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Whales
Abstract
The authors conducted a survey during 1992 to evaluate blood levels of lead and mercury in Inuit adults of Nunavik (Arctic Quebec, Canada). Blood samples obtained from 492 participants (209 males and 283 females; mean age = 35 yr) were analyzed for lead and total mercury; mean (geometric) concentrations were 0.42 micromol/l (range = 0.04-2.28 micromol/l) and 79.6 nmol/l (range = 4-560 nmol/l), respectively. Concentrations of omega-3 fatty acid in plasma phospholipids--a biomarker of marine food consumption--were correlated with mercury (r = .56, p
PubMed ID
11572279 View in PubMed
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Fear of moving outdoors and development of outdoor walking difficulty in older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151341
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2009 Apr;57(4):634-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Merja Rantakokko
Minna Mänty
Susanne Iwarsson
Timo Törmäkangas
Raija Leinonen
Eino Heikkinen
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Finnish Centre for Interdisciplinary Gerontology, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. merja.rantakokko@sport.jyu.fi
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2009 Apr;57(4):634-40
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environment
Fear
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Logistic Models
Male
Mobility Limitation
Musculoskeletal Diseases - complications
Prospective Studies
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To study which individual characteristics and environmental factors correlate with fear of moving outdoors and whether fear of moving outdoors predicts development of mobility limitation.
Observational prospective cohort study and cross-sectional analyses.
Community and research center.
Seven hundred twenty-seven community-living people aged 75 to 81 were interviewed at baseline, of whom 314 took part in a 3.5-year follow-up.
Fear of moving outdoors and its potential individual and environmental correlates were assessed at baseline. Perceived difficulties in walking 0.5 km and 2 km were assessed twice a year over a 3.5-year period.
At baseline, 65% of the women and 29% of the men reported fear of moving outdoors. Poor socioeconomic status; musculoskeletal diseases; slow walking speed; and the presence of poor street conditions, hills in the nearby environment, and noisy traffic correlated with fear of moving outdoors. At the first 6-month follow-up, participants with fear of moving outdoors had more than four times the adjusted risk (odds ratio (OR)=4.6, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.92-11.00) of developing difficulties in walking 0.5 km and a three times greater adjusted risk (OR=3.10, 95% CI=1.49-6.46) for developing difficulty in walking 2 km compared with those without fear. The difference in the prevalence of walking difficulties remained statistically significant over the 3.5-year follow-up (P=.02 and P=.009, respectively).
Fear of moving outdoors is common in older adults and increases the risk of developing self-reported difficulties in walking 0.5 km and 2 km. Knowledge about individual and environmental factors underlying fear of moving outdoors and finding ways to alleviate fear of moving outdoors are important for community planning and prevention of disability.
PubMed ID
19392955 View in PubMed
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The genetic and environmental effects on depressive symptoms among older female twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176906
Source
Twin Res. 2004 Dec;7(6):626-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Sanna Takkinen
Asko Tolvanen
Jaakko Kaprio
Stig Berg
Markku Koskenvuo
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping, Sweden.
Source
Twin Res. 2004 Dec;7(6):626-36
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Environment
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Models, Biological
Risk factors
Twins - genetics - psychology
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics - psychology
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to examine the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to depressive symptoms among older women. The participants were 102 monozygotic and 115 dizygotic female twin pairs aged 64 to 76 years. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Center for the Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. The contribution of genetic and environmental effects was estimated for the constructed depressiveness factor and for the subscales which were depressed mood, psychomotor retardation, lack of wellbeing and interpersonal difficulties. Of the variance in depressiveness, shared environmental influences accounted for 39% and nonshared environmental influences 61%. For the subscales, 24% to 62% of the variance was explained by individual, and 13% to 23% by shared, environmental factors. Lack of wellbeing had its own moderate additive genetic effect explaining 30% of the variance. This study showed that in older women predominantly environmental factors underlay individual differences in depressiveness; however, the factors varied to some extent between dimensions measured by the subscales.
PubMed ID
15607014 View in PubMed
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Genetic and environmental influences on hearing at different frequencies separately for the better and worse hearing ear in older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160056
Source
Int J Audiol. 2007 Dec;46(12):772-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Anne Viljanen
Jaakko Kaprio
Ilmari Pyykkö
Martti Sorri
Markku Kauppinen
Markku Koskenvuo
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Centre for Interdisciplinary Gerontology, Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland. anne.viljanen@sport.jyu.fi
Source
Int J Audiol. 2007 Dec;46(12):772-9
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - physiology
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hearing Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Humans
Middle Aged
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Twins, Dizygotic
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to examine the relative contribution of genetic and environmental effects on the air-conducted hearing threshold levels at low (0.125-0.5 kHz), mid (1-2 kHz), and high (4-8 kHz) frequencies separately for the better and worse hearing ear in older women. We also examined the distribution of audiogram configurations. Data was analysed using quantitative genetic modelling. As part of the Finnish twin study on aging (FITSA), hearing was measured in 103 monozygotic and 114 dizygotic female twin pairs aged 63-76 years. Approximately every third subject had a flat type, and two-thirds a descending type of audiogram configuration. No significant difference was observed in the distribution of audiogram configurations between zygosity groups. In the better ear, additive genetic effects accounted for 64%-74% of the total variance at different frequencies. For the worse ear, environmental effects were larger. Although overall heritability is rather constant across the frequency spectrum, it is noteworthy that at low and high frequencies frequency-specific genetic and environmental effects together accounted for the majority of the total variance.
PubMed ID
18049966 View in PubMed
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Genetic influences on resting electrocardiographic variables in older women: a twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153101
Source
Ann Noninvasive Electrocardiol. 2009 Jan;14(1):57-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Sara Mutikainen
Alfredo Ortega-Alonso
Markku Alén
Jaakko Kaprio
Jouko Karjalainen
Taina Rantanen
Urho M Kujala
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland. sara.mutikainen@gmail.com
Source
Ann Noninvasive Electrocardiol. 2009 Jan;14(1):57-64
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - genetics
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Electrocardiography
Female
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Heart rate - genetics
Humans
Middle Aged
Reference Values
Rest
Twins
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
Previous studies in young and middle-aged men and women have shown that resting electrocardiographic (ECG) variables are influenced by genetic factors. However, the extent to which resting ECG variables are influenced by genetic factors in older women is unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate the relative contribution of genetic and environmental influences to individual differences in resting ECG variables among older female twins without overt cardiac diseases.
Resting ECG recordings were obtained from 186 monozygotic and 203 dizygotic twin individuals, aged 63-76 years. Quantitative genetic modeling was used to decompose the phenotypic variance in each resting ECG variable into additive genetic, dominance genetic, shared environmental, and unique environmental influences.
The results showed that individual differences in the majority of the resting ECG variables were moderately to highly explained by additive genetic influences, ranging from 32% for T axis to 72% for TV(5). The results also suggested dominance genetic influences on QRS duration, TV(1), and Sokolow-Lyon voltage (36%, 53%, and 57%, respectively). Unique environmental influences were important for each resting ECG variable, whereas shared environmental influences were detected only for QT interval and QTc.
In older women without overt cardiac diseases, genetic influences explain a moderate to high proportion of individual differences in the majority of the resting ECG variables. Genetic influences are especially strong for T-wave amplitudes, left ventricular mass, and hypertrophy indices, whereas other variables, including heart rate, intervals, and axes, are more affected by environmental influences.
PubMed ID
19149794 View in PubMed
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Genetic influences underlying self-rated health in older female twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174438
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Jun;53(6):1002-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Raija Leinonen
Jaakko Kaprio
Marja Jylhä
Asko Tolvanen
Markku Koskenvuo
Eino Heikkinen
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Center for Interdisciplinary Gerontology, Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylaä, Finland. raija.leinonen@sport.jyu.fi
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Jun;53(6):1002-7
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology
Environment
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Mental health
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Self Concept
Twins - genetics
Walking
Abstract
To examine the genetic and environmental sources of variation in self-rated health (SRH) in older female twins and to explore the roles of morbidity, functional limitation, and psychological well-being as mediators of genetic and environmental effects on SRH.
Cross-sectional analysis of twin data.
Research laboratory.
One hundred two monozygotic and 115 dizygotic female twin pairs aged 63 to 76.
SRH was categorized as good, average, or poor. Morbidity was described using a physician-assessed disease-severity scale together with information about the presence of diabetes mellitus and cancer. Maximal walking speed measured over 10 m was used to assess physical functional limitation; the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale were used to characterize psychological well-being. The contributions of genetic and environmental (defined as familial (shared by siblings) or nonshared (unique to each sibling)) effects were assessed using univariate and multivariate structural equation modeling of twin data.
SRH did not have its own specific genetic effect but shared a genetic component in common with the genetic components underlying liability to disease severity, maximal walking speed, and depressive symptoms. It accounted for 64% of the variation in SRH, with environmental effects accounting for the remaining variation.
The current results suggest that there are no specific genetic effects on SRH but rather that genetic influences on SRH are mediated through genetic influences affecting chronic diseases, functional limitation, and mood.
PubMed ID
15935024 View in PubMed
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Hearing as a predictor of falls and postural balance in older female twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152870
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2009 Feb;64(2):312-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Anne Viljanen
Jaakko Kaprio
Ilmari Pyykkö
Martti Sorri
Satu Pajala
Markku Kauppinen
Markku Koskenvuo
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Finnish Centre for Interdisciplinary Gerontology, Finland. anne.viljanen@sport.jyu.fi
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2009 Feb;64(2):312-7
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aging - genetics - physiology
Audiometry
Confidence Intervals
Female
Finland
Hearing - genetics
Hearing Loss - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Postural Balance - physiology
Predictive value of tests
Risk assessment
Sampling Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Twins
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to examine, first, whether hearing acuity predicts falls and whether the potential association is explained by postural balance and, second, to examine whether shared genetic or environmental effects underlie these associations.
Hearing was measured using a clinical audiometer as a part of the Finnish Twin Study on Aging in 103 monozygotic and 114 dizygotic female twin pairs aged 63-76 years. Postural balance was indicated as a center of pressure (COP) movement in semi-tandem stance, and participants filled in a fall-calendar daily for an average of 345 days after the baseline.
Mean hearing acuity (better ear hearing threshold level at 0.5-4 kHz) was 21 dB (standard deviation [SD] 12). Means of the COP velocity moment for the best to the poorest hearing quartiles increased linearly from 40.7 mm(2)/s (SD 24.4) to 52.8 mm(2)/s (SD 32.0) (p value for the trend = .003). Altogether 199 participants reported 437 falls. Age-adjusted incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for falls, with the best hearing quartile as a reference, were 1.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.4-3.8) in the second, 4.1 (95% CI = 1.1-15.6) in the third, and 3.4 (95% CI = 1.0-11.4) in the poorest hearing quartiles. Adjustment for COP velocity moment decreased IRRs markedly. Twin analyses showed that the association between hearing acuity and postural balance was not explained by genetic factors in common for these traits.
People with poor hearing acuity have a higher risk for falls, which is partially explained by their poorer postural control. Auditory information about environment may be important for safe mobility.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19182227 View in PubMed
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