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Associations of ambient air pollution with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease hospitalization and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116489
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2013 Apr 1;187(7):721-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2013
Author
Wen Qi Gan
J Mark FitzGerald
Chris Carlsten
Mohsen Sadatsafavi
Michael Brauer
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Health, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, Great Neck, NY 11021, USA. wgan@nshs.edu
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2013 Apr 1;187(7):721-7
Date
Apr-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Particulate Matter - adverse effects
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - mortality
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Vehicle Emissions - toxicity
Abstract
Ambient air pollution has been suggested as a risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, there is a lack of longitudinal studies to support this assertion.
To investigate the associations of long-term exposure to elevated traffic-related air pollution and woodsmoke pollution with the risk of COPD hospitalization and mortality.
This population-based cohort study included a 5-year exposure period and a 4-year follow-up period. All residents aged 45-85 years who resided in Metropolitan Vancouver, Canada, during the exposure period and did not have known COPD at baseline were included in this study (n = 467,994). Residential exposures to traffic-related air pollutants (black carbon, particulate matter
PubMed ID
23392442 View in PubMed
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Intercity transferability of land use regression models for estimating ambient concentrations of nitrogen dioxide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157833
Source
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2009 Jan;19(1):107-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Karla Poplawski
Timothy Gould
Eleanor Setton
Ryan Allen
Jason Su
Timothy Larson
Sarah Henderson
Michael Brauer
Perry Hystad
Christy Lightowlers
Peter Keller
Marty Cohen
Carlos Silva
Mike Buzzelli
Author Affiliation
Spatial Sciences Research Laboratory, Department of Geography, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. poplawski@alumni.uvic.ca
Source
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2009 Jan;19(1):107-17
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Canada - epidemiology
Cities - epidemiology
Environmental Monitoring - methods - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiological Monitoring
Geography
Humans
Models, Biological
Models, Statistical
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Regression Analysis
United States - epidemiology
Urban health
Abstract
Land use regression (LUR) is a method for predicting the spatial distribution of traffic-related air pollution. To facilitate risk and exposure assessment, and the design of future monitoring networks and sampling campaigns, we sought to determine the extent to which LUR can be used to predict spatial patterns in air pollution in the absence of dedicated measurements. We evaluate the transferability of one LUR model to two other geographically comparable areas with similar climates and pollution types. The source model, developed in 2003 to estimate ambient nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) concentrations in Vancouver (BC, Canada) was applied to Victoria (BC, Canada) and Seattle (WA, USA). Model estimates were compared with measurements made with Ogawa passive samplers in both cities. As part of this study, 42 locations were sampled in Victoria for a 2-week period in June 2006. Data obtained for Seattle were collected for a different project at 26 locations in March 2005. We used simple linear regression to evaluate the fit of the source model under three scenarios: (1) using the same variables and coefficients as the source model; (2) using the same variables as the source model, but calculating new coefficients for local calibration; and (3) developing site-specific equations with new variables and coefficients. In Scenario 1, we found that the source model had a better fit in Victoria (R(2)=0.51) than in Seattle (R(2)=0.33). Scenario 2 produced improved R(2)-values in both cities (Victoria=0.58, Seattle=0.65), with further improvement achieved under Scenario 3 (Victoria=0.61, Seattle=0.72). Although it is possible to transfer LUR models between geographically similar cities, success may depend on the between-city consistency of the input data. Modest field sampling campaigns for location-specific model calibration can help to produce transfer models that are equally as predictive as their sources.
PubMed ID
18398445 View in PubMed
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Long-term residential exposure to air pollution and lung cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113862
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Sep;24(5):762-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Perry Hystad
Paul A Demers
Kenneth C Johnson
Richard M Carpiano
Michael Brauer
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. phystad@gmail.com
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Sep;24(5):762-72
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects
Ozone - adverse effects
Particulate Matter - adverse effects
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Spatio-Temporal Analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
There is accumulating evidence that air pollution causes lung cancer. Still, questions remain about exposure misclassification, the components of air pollution responsible, and the histological subtypes of lung cancer that might be produced.
We investigated lung cancer incidence in relation to long-term exposure to three ambient air pollutants and proximity to major roads, using a Canadian population-based case-control study. We compared 2,390 incident, histologically confirmed lung cancer cases with 3,507 population controls in eight Canadian provinces from 1994 to 1997. We developed spatiotemporal models for the whole country to estimate annual residential exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3) over a 20-year exposure period. We carried out a subanalysis in urban centers, using exposures derived from fixed-site air pollution monitors, and also examined traffic proximity measures. Hierarchical logistic regression models incorporated a comprehensive set of individual and geographic covariates.
The increase in lung cancer incidence (expressed as fully adjusted odds ratios [ORs]) was 1.29 (95% confidence interval = 0.95-1.76) with a ten-unit increase in PM2.5 (µg/m), 1.11 (1.00-1.24) with a ten-unit increase in NO2 (ppb), and 1.09 (0.85-1.39) with a ten-unit increase in O3 (ppb). The urban monitor-based subanalyses generally supported the national results, with larger associations for NO2 (OR = 1.34; 1.07-1.69) per 10 ppb increase. No dose-response trends were observed, and no clear relationships were found for specific histological cancer subtypes. There was the suggestion of increased risk among those living within 100 m of highways, but not among those living near major roads.
Lung cancer incidence in this Canadian study was increased most strongly with NO2 and PM2.5 exposure. Further investigation is needed into possible effects of O3 on development of lung cancer.
Notes
Comment In: Epidemiology. 2014 Jan;25(1):15924296934
Comment In: Epidemiology. 2014 Jan;25(1):159-6024296935
PubMed ID
23676262 View in PubMed
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Neighbourhood socioeconomic status and individual lung cancer risk: evaluating long-term exposure measures and mediating mechanisms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106487
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Nov;97:95-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Perry Hystad
Richard M Carpiano
Paul A Demers
Kenneth C Johnson
Michael Brauer
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, 2206 East Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z3. Electronic address: phystad@gmail.com.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Nov;97:95-103
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - psychology
Social Class
Time Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Neighbourhood socioeconomic status (SES) has been associated with numerous chronic diseases, yet little information exists on its association with lung cancer incidence. This outcome presents two key empirical challenges: a long latency period that requires study participants' residential histories and long-term neighbourhood characteristics; and adequate data on many risk factors to test hypothesized mediating pathways between neighbourhood SES and lung cancer incidence. Analysing data on urban participants of a large Canadian population-based lung cancer case-control study, we investigate three issues pertaining to these challenges. First, we examine whether there is an association between long-term neighbourhood SES, derived from 20 years of residential histories and five national censuses, and lung cancer incidence. Second, we determine how this long-term neighbourhood SES association changes when using neighbourhood SES measures based on different latency periods or at time of study entry. Third, we estimate the extent to which long-term neighbourhood SES is mediated by a range of individual-level smoking behaviours, other health behaviours, and environmental and occupational exposures. Results of hierarchical logistic regression models indicate significantly higher odds of lung cancer cases residing in the most compared to the least deprived quintile of the long-term neighbourhood SES index (OR: 1.46; 95% CI: 1.13-1.89) after adjustment for individual SES. This association remained significant (OR: 1.38; 1.01-1.88) after adjusting for smoking behaviour and other known and suspected lung cancer risk factors. Important differences were observed between long-term and study entry neighbourhood SES measures, with the latter attenuating effect estimates by over 50 percent. Smoking behaviour was the strongest partial mediating pathway of the long-term neighbourhood SES effect. This research is the first to examine the effects of long-term neighbourhood SES on lung cancer risk and more research is needed to further identify specific, modifiable pathways by which neighbourhood context may influence lung cancer risk.
PubMed ID
24161094 View in PubMed
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Risk of nonaccidental and cardiovascular mortality in relation to long-term exposure to low concentrations of fine particulate matter: a Canadian national-level cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127225
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 May;120(5):708-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Dan L Crouse
Paul A Peters
Aaron van Donkelaar
Mark S Goldberg
Paul J Villeneuve
Orly Brion
Saeeda Khan
Dominic Odwa Atari
Michael Jerrett
C Arden Pope
Michael Brauer
Jeffrey R Brook
Randall V Martin
David Stieb
Richard T Burnett
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. daniel.crouse@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 May;120(5):708-14
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Particle Size
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Few cohort studies have evaluated the risk of mortality associated with long-term exposure to fine particulate matter [= 2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter (PM(2.5))]. This is the first national-level cohort study to investigate these risks in Canada.
We investigated the association between long-term exposure to ambient PM(2.5) and cardiovascular mortality in nonimmigrant Canadian adults.
We assigned estimates of exposure to ambient PM(2.5) derived from satellite observations to a cohort of 2.1 million Canadian adults who in 1991 were among the 20% of the population mandated to provide detailed census data. We identified deaths occurring between 1991 and 2001 through record linkage. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for available individual-level and contextual covariates using both standard Cox proportional survival models and nested, spatial random-effects survival models.
Using standard Cox models, we calculated HRs of 1.15 (95% CI: 1.13, 1.16) from nonaccidental causes and 1.31 (95% CI: 1.27, 1.35) from ischemic heart disease for each 10-µg/m(3) increase in concentrations of PM(2.5). Using spatial random-effects models controlling for the same variables, we calculated HRs of 1.10 (95% CI: 1.05, 1.15) and 1.30 (95% CI: 1.18, 1.43), respectively. We found similar associations between nonaccidental mortality and PM2.5 based on satellite-derived estimates and ground-based measurements in a subanalysis of subjects in 11 cities.
In this large national cohort of nonimmigrant Canadians, mortality was associated with long-term exposure to PM(2.5). Associations were observed with exposures to PM(2.5) at concentrations that were predominantly lower (mean, 8.7 µg/m(3); interquartile range, 6.2 µg/m(3)) than those reported previously.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22313724 View in PubMed
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Spatiotemporal air pollution exposure assessment for a Canadian population-based lung cancer case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125484
Source
Environ Health. 2012;11:22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Perry Hystad
Paul A Demers
Kenneth C Johnson
Jeff Brook
Aaron van Donkelaar
Lok Lamsal
Randall Martin
Michael Brauer
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, 2206 East Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada. phystad@gmail.com
Source
Environ Health. 2012;11:22
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Demography
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Models, Theoretical
Nitric Oxide - adverse effects - analysis
Particulate Matter - adverse effects - analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Spacecraft
Time Factors
Abstract
Few epidemiological studies of air pollution have used residential histories to develop long-term retrospective exposure estimates for multiple ambient air pollutants and vehicle and industrial emissions. We present such an exposure assessment for a Canadian population-based lung cancer case-control study of 8353 individuals using self-reported residential histories from 1975 to 1994. We also examine the implications of disregarding and/or improperly accounting for residential mobility in long-term exposure assessments.
National spatial surfaces of ambient air pollution were compiled from recent satellite-based estimates (for PM2.5 and NO2) and a chemical transport model (for O3). The surfaces were adjusted with historical annual air pollution monitoring data, using either spatiotemporal interpolation or linear regression. Model evaluation was conducted using an independent ten percent subset of monitoring data per year. Proximity to major roads, incorporating a temporal weighting factor based on Canadian mobile-source emission estimates, was used to estimate exposure to vehicle emissions. A comprehensive inventory of geocoded industries was used to estimate proximity to major and minor industrial emissions.
Calibration of the national PM2.5 surface using annual spatiotemporal interpolation predicted historical PM2.5 measurement data best (R2 = 0.51), while linear regression incorporating the national surfaces, a time-trend and population density best predicted historical concentrations of NO2 (R2 = 0.38) and O3 (R2 = 0.56). Applying the models to study participants residential histories between 1975 and 1994 resulted in mean PM2.5, NO2 and O3 exposures of 11.3 µg/m3 (SD = 2.6), 17.7 ppb (4.1), and 26.4 ppb (3.4) respectively. On average, individuals lived within 300 m of a highway for 2.9 years (15% of exposure-years) and within 3 km of a major industrial emitter for 6.4 years (32% of exposure-years). Approximately 50% of individuals were classified into a different PM2.5, NO2 and O3 exposure quintile when using study entry postal codes and spatial pollution surfaces, in comparison to exposures derived from residential histories and spatiotemporal air pollution models. Recall bias was also present for self-reported residential histories prior to 1975, with cases recalling older residences more often than controls.
We demonstrate a flexible exposure assessment approach for estimating historical air pollution concentrations over large geographical areas and time-periods. In addition, we highlight the importance of including residential histories in long-term exposure assessments. For submission to: Environmental Health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22475580 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.