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Fish liver and seagull eggs, vitamin D-rich foods with a shadow: results from the Norwegian Fish and Game Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127159
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2012 Mar;56(3):388-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Bryndis E Birgisdottir
Anne L Brantsaeter
Helen E Kvalem
Helle K Knutsen
Margaretha Haugen
Jan Alexander
Ragna B Hetland
Lage Aksnes
Helle M Meltzer
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. bryndis.eva.birgisdottir@fhi.no
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2012 Mar;56(3):388-98
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Charadriiformes
Databases, Factual
Diet
Dioxins - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Eggs
Female
Fish Oils - administration & dosage
Fishes
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Liver - chemistry
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Questionnaires
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analysis
Vitamins - administration & dosage - analysis
Abstract
Fish liver, fish liver oil, oily fish and seagull eggs have been major sources of vitamin D for the coastal population of Norway. They also provide dioxin and polychlorinated dioxin-like compounds (dl-compounds), which may interfere with vitamin D homeostasis. We investigated whether serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) might be compromised by concomitant intake of dl-compounds.
We studied 182 adults participating in the Norwegian Fish and Game Study. Participants who consumed fish liver and/or seagull eggs had higher dl-compound intake and blood concentrations than non-consumers (p
PubMed ID
22319024 View in PubMed
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Maternal cell phone use in early pregnancy and child's language, communication and motor skills at 3 and 5 years: the Norwegian mother and child cohort study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290064
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 09 05; 17(1):685
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-05-2017
Author
Eleni Papadopoulou
Margaretha Haugen
Synnve Schjølberg
Per Magnus
Gunnar Brunborg
Martine Vrijheid
Jan Alexander
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Exposures and Epidemiology, Division of Infection Control and Environmental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404, 0403, Oslo, Norway.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 09 05; 17(1):685
Date
09-05-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cell Phone Use - statistics & numerical data
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Communication
Female
Humans
Language Development
Male
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Motor Skills
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Cell phone use during pregnancy is a public health concern. We investigated the association between maternal cell phone use in pregnancy and child's language, communication and motor skills at 3 and 5 years.
This prospective study includes 45,389 mother-child pairs, participants of the MoBa, recruited at mid-pregnancy from 1999 to 2008. Maternal frequency of cell phone use in early pregnancy and child language, communication and motor skills at 3 and 5 years, were assessed by questionnaires. Logistic regression was used to estimate the associations.
No cell phone use in early pregnancy was reported by 9.8% of women, while 39%, 46.9% and 4.3% of the women were categorized as low, medium and high cell phone users. Children of cell phone user mothers had 17% (OR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.77, 0.89) lower adjusted risk of having low sentence complexity at 3 years, compared to children of non-users. The risk was 13%, 22% and 29% lower by low, medium and high maternal cell phone use. Additionally, children of cell phone users had lower risk of low motor skills score at 3 years, compared to children of non-users, but this association was not found at 5 years. We found no association between maternal cell phone use and low communication skills.
We reported a decreased risk of low language and motor skills at three years in relation to prenatal cell phone use, which might be explained by enhanced maternal-child interaction among cell phone users. No evidence of adverse neurodevelopmental effects of prenatal cell phone use was reported.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28870201 View in PubMed
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Maternal dietary intake of dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls and birth size in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107028
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Oct;60:209-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Eleni Papadopoulou
Ida H Caspersen
Helen E Kvalem
Helle K Knutsen
Talita Duarte-Salles
Jan Alexander
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Manolis Kogevinas
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain; Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: eleni.papadopoulou@fhi.no.
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Oct;60:209-16
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Dioxins - analysis
Eating
Female
Fetal Development
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Seafood - analysis
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
Maternal diet not only provides essential nutrients to the developing fetus but is also a source of prenatal exposure to environmental contaminants. We investigated the association between dietary intake of dioxins and PCBs during pregnancy and birth size. The study included 50,651 women from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Dietary information was collected by FFQs and intake estimates were calculated by combining food consumption and food concentration of dioxins, dioxin-like PCBs and non-dioxin-like PCBs. We used multivariable regression models to estimate the association between dietary intake of dioxins and PCBs and fetal growth. The contribution of fish and seafood intake during pregnancy was 41% for dietary dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs and 49% for dietary non-dioxin-like PCBs. Further stratified analysis by quartiles of seafood intake during pregnancy was conducted. We found an inverse dose-response association between dietary intake of dioxins and PCBs and fetal growth after adjustment for confounders. Newborns of mothers in the upper quartile of dioxin and dioxin-like PCBs intake had 62g lower birth weight (95% CI: -73, -50), 0.26cm shorter birth length (95% CI: -0.31, -0.20) and 0.10cm shorter head circumference (95% CI: -0.14, -0.06) than newborns of mothers in the lowest quartile of intake. Similar negative associations for intake of dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs were found after excluding women with intakes above the tolerable weekly intake (TWI=14pg TEQ/kg bw/week). The negative association of dietary dioxins and PCBs with fetal growth was weaker as seafood intake was increasing. No association was found between dietary dioxin and PCB intake and the risk for small-for-gestational age neonate. In conclusion, dietary intakes of dioxins and PCBs during pregnancy were negatively associated with fetal growth, even at intakes below the TWI.
PubMed ID
24071022 View in PubMed
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Organic Food Consumption during Pregnancy and Hypospadias and Cryptorchidism at Birth: The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278568
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2016 Mar;124(3):357-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Hanne Torjusen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Eleni Papadopoulou
Jane A Hoppin
Jan Alexander
Geir Lieblein
Gun Roos
Jon Magne Holten
Jackie Swartz
Margaretha Haugen
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2016 Mar;124(3):357-64
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Cryptorchidism - epidemiology
Diet
Female
Food, Organic
Humans
Hypospadias - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
The etiologies of the male urogenital anomalies hypospadias and cryptorchidism remain unclear. It has been suggested that maternal diet and environmental contaminants may affect the risk of these anomalies via placental or hormonal disturbances.
We examined associations between organic food consumption during pregnancy and prevalence of hypospadias and cryptorchidism at birth.
Our study includes 35,107 women participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) who delivered a singleton male infant. Information about use of six groups of organically produced food (vegetables, fruit, bread/cereal, milk/dairy products, eggs, and meat) during pregnancy was collected by a food frequency questionnaire. Women who indicated that they sometimes, often, or mostly consumed organic foods in at least one of the six food groups were classified as organic food consumers in analyses. Hypospadias and cryptorchidism diagnoses were retrieved from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using multiple logistic regression.
Seventy-four male newborns were diagnosed with hypospadias (0.2%), and 151 with cryptorchidism (0.4%). Women who consumed any organic food during pregnancy were less likely to give birth to a boy with hypospadias (OR = 0.42; 95% CI: 0.25, 0.70, based on 21 exposed cases) than women who reported they never or seldom consumed organic food. Associations with specific organic foods were strongest for vegetable (OR = 0.36; 95% CI: 0.15, 0.85; 10 exposed cases) and milk/dairy (OR = 0.43; 95% CI: 0.17, 1.07; 7 exposed cases) consumption. No substantial association was observed for consumption of organic food and cryptorchidism.
Consumption of organically produced foods during pregnancy was associated with a lower prevalence of hypospadias in our study population. These findings were based on small numbers of cases and require replication in other study populations.
Notes
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Comment In: Environ Health Perspect. 2016 Mar;124(3):A5526930698
PubMed ID
26307850 View in PubMed
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Role of dietary patterns for dioxin and PCB exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147852
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2009 Nov;53(11):1438-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Helen E Kvalem
Helle K Knutsen
Cathrine Thomsen
Margaretha Haugen
Hein Stigum
Anne Lise Brantsaeter
May Frøshaug
Nina Lohmann
Olaf Päpke
Georg Becher
Jan Alexander
Helle M Meltzer
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. helen.engelstad@fhi.no
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2009 Nov;53(11):1438-51
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Benzofurans - administration & dosage - blood
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - administration & dosage - blood
Polymers - administration & dosage
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
Dietary patterns were related to intake and blood concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDFs), dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) and selected non-dioxin-like-PCBs (ndl-PCBs). Intake calculations were based on an extensive food frequency questionnaire and a congener-specific database on concentrations in Norwegian foods. The study (2003) applied a two-step inclusion strategy recruiting representative (n=73) and high consumers (n=111) of seafood and game. Estimated median intakes of sum PCDD/PCDFs and dl-PCBs of the representative and high consumers were 0.78 and 1.25 pg toxic equivalents (TEQ)/kg bw/day, respectively. Estimated median intakes of ndl-PCBs (sum chlorinated biphenyl (CB)-28, 52, 101, 138, 153, 180) were 4.26 and 6.40 ng/kg bw/day. The median blood concentrations of PCDD/PCDFs/dl-PCBs were 28.7 and 35.1 pg TEQ/g lipid, and ndl-PCBs (sum of CB-101, 138, 153 and 180) 252 and 299 ng/g lipid. The Spearman correlations between dietary intake and serum concentration were r=0.34 (p=0.017) for dl-compounds and r=0.37 (p
PubMed ID
19842105 View in PubMed
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