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Maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy and childhood growth and overweight: results from a large Norwegian prospective observational cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296615
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 04 23; 8(3):e018895
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-23-2018
Author
Eleni Papadopoulou
Jérémie Botton
Anne-Lise Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Jan Alexander
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Jonas Bacelis
Anders Elfvin
Bo Jacobsson
Verena Sengpiel
Author Affiliation
Division of Infection Control and Environmental Health, Department of Environmental Exposure and Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 04 23; 8(3):e018895
Date
04-23-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Caffeine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Child
Child Development - drug effects
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diet Records
Eating
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Norway
Overweight - chemically induced - etiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - etiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Weight Gain
Abstract
To study the association between maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy and the child's weight gain and overweight risk up to 8 years.
Prospective nationwide pregnancy cohort.
The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.
A total of 50?943 mothers recruited from 2002 to 2008 and their children, after singleton pregnancies, with information about average caffeine intake assessed at mid-pregnancy.
Child's body size information at 11 age points from 6 weeks to 8 years. We defined excess growth in infancy as a WHO weight gain z-score of >0.67 from birth to age 1?year, and overweight according to the International Obesity Task Force. We used a growth model to assess individual growth trajectories.
Compared with pregnant women with low caffeine intake (200?mg/day had consistently higher weight. Very high caffeine exposures were associated with higher weight gain velocity from infancy to age 8 years.
Any caffeine consumption during pregnancy is associated with a higher risk of excess infant growth and of childhood overweight, mainly at preschool ages. Maternal caffeine intake may modify the overall weight growth trajectory of the child from birth to 8 years. This study adds supporting evidence for the current advice to reduce caffeine intake during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
29685923 View in PubMed
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Maternal dietary intake of dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls and birth size in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107028
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Oct;60:209-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Eleni Papadopoulou
Ida H Caspersen
Helen E Kvalem
Helle K Knutsen
Talita Duarte-Salles
Jan Alexander
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Manolis Kogevinas
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain; Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: eleni.papadopoulou@fhi.no.
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Oct;60:209-16
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Dioxins - analysis
Eating
Female
Fetal Development
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Seafood - analysis
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
Maternal diet not only provides essential nutrients to the developing fetus but is also a source of prenatal exposure to environmental contaminants. We investigated the association between dietary intake of dioxins and PCBs during pregnancy and birth size. The study included 50,651 women from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Dietary information was collected by FFQs and intake estimates were calculated by combining food consumption and food concentration of dioxins, dioxin-like PCBs and non-dioxin-like PCBs. We used multivariable regression models to estimate the association between dietary intake of dioxins and PCBs and fetal growth. The contribution of fish and seafood intake during pregnancy was 41% for dietary dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs and 49% for dietary non-dioxin-like PCBs. Further stratified analysis by quartiles of seafood intake during pregnancy was conducted. We found an inverse dose-response association between dietary intake of dioxins and PCBs and fetal growth after adjustment for confounders. Newborns of mothers in the upper quartile of dioxin and dioxin-like PCBs intake had 62g lower birth weight (95% CI: -73, -50), 0.26cm shorter birth length (95% CI: -0.31, -0.20) and 0.10cm shorter head circumference (95% CI: -0.14, -0.06) than newborns of mothers in the lowest quartile of intake. Similar negative associations for intake of dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs were found after excluding women with intakes above the tolerable weekly intake (TWI=14pg TEQ/kg bw/week). The negative association of dietary dioxins and PCBs with fetal growth was weaker as seafood intake was increasing. No association was found between dietary dioxin and PCB intake and the risk for small-for-gestational age neonate. In conclusion, dietary intakes of dioxins and PCBs during pregnancy were negatively associated with fetal growth, even at intakes below the TWI.
PubMed ID
24071022 View in PubMed
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Maternal diet, prenatal exposure to dioxin-like compounds and birth outcomes in a European prospective mother-child study (NewGeneris).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266778
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2014 Jun 15;484:121-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2014
Author
Eleni Papadopoulou
Manolis Kogevinas
Maria Botsivali
Marie Pedersen
Harrie Besselink
Michelle A Mendez
Sarah Fleming
Laura J Hardie
Lisbeth E Knudsen
John Wright
Silvia Agramunt
Jordi Sunyer
Berit Granum
Kristine B Gutzkow
Gunnar Brunborg
Jan Alexander
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Katerina Sarri
Leda Chatzi
Domenico F Merlo
Jos C Kleinjans
Margaretha Haugen
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2014 Jun 15;484:121-8
Date
Jun-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dioxins - blood
Environmental Policy
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Gestational Age
Great Britain - epidemiology
Greece - epidemiology
Health Policy
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Mothers
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Spain - epidemiology
Abstract
Maternal diet can result in exposure to environmental contaminants including dioxins which may influence foetal growth. We investigated the association between maternal diet and birth outcomes by defining a dioxin-rich diet. We used validated food frequency questionnaires to assess the diet of pregnant women from Greece, Spain, United Kingdom, Denmark and Norway and estimated plasma dioxin-like activity by the Dioxin-Responsive Chemically Activated LUciferase eXpression (DR-CALUX®) bioassay in 604 maternal blood samples collected at delivery. We applied reduced rank regression to identify a dioxin-rich dietary pattern based on dioxin-like activity (DR-CALUX®) levels in maternal plasma, and calculated a dioxin-diet score as an estimate of adherence to this dietary pattern. In the five country population, dioxin-diet score was characterised by high consumption of red and white meat, lean and fatty fish, low-fat dairy and low consumption of salty snacks and high-fat cheese, during pregnancy. The upper tertile of the dioxin-diet score was associated with a change in birth weight of -121g (95% confidence intervals: -232, -10g) compared to the lower tertile after adjustment for confounders. A small non-significant reduction in gestational age was also observed (-1.4days, 95% CI: -3.8, 1.0days). Our results suggest that maternal diet might contribute to the exposure of the foetus to dioxins and dioxin-like compounds and may be related to reduced birth weight. More studies are needed to develop updated dietary guidelines for women of reproductive age, aiming to the reduction of dietary exposure to persistent organic pollutants as dioxins and dioxin-like compounds.
PubMed ID
24691212 View in PubMed
Less detail

Organic Food Consumption during Pregnancy and Hypospadias and Cryptorchidism at Birth: The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278568
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2016 Mar;124(3):357-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Hanne Torjusen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Eleni Papadopoulou
Jane A Hoppin
Jan Alexander
Geir Lieblein
Gun Roos
Jon Magne Holten
Jackie Swartz
Margaretha Haugen
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2016 Mar;124(3):357-64
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Cryptorchidism - epidemiology
Diet
Female
Food, Organic
Humans
Hypospadias - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
The etiologies of the male urogenital anomalies hypospadias and cryptorchidism remain unclear. It has been suggested that maternal diet and environmental contaminants may affect the risk of these anomalies via placental or hormonal disturbances.
We examined associations between organic food consumption during pregnancy and prevalence of hypospadias and cryptorchidism at birth.
Our study includes 35,107 women participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) who delivered a singleton male infant. Information about use of six groups of organically produced food (vegetables, fruit, bread/cereal, milk/dairy products, eggs, and meat) during pregnancy was collected by a food frequency questionnaire. Women who indicated that they sometimes, often, or mostly consumed organic foods in at least one of the six food groups were classified as organic food consumers in analyses. Hypospadias and cryptorchidism diagnoses were retrieved from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using multiple logistic regression.
Seventy-four male newborns were diagnosed with hypospadias (0.2%), and 151 with cryptorchidism (0.4%). Women who consumed any organic food during pregnancy were less likely to give birth to a boy with hypospadias (OR = 0.42; 95% CI: 0.25, 0.70, based on 21 exposed cases) than women who reported they never or seldom consumed organic food. Associations with specific organic foods were strongest for vegetable (OR = 0.36; 95% CI: 0.15, 0.85; 10 exposed cases) and milk/dairy (OR = 0.43; 95% CI: 0.17, 1.07; 7 exposed cases) consumption. No substantial association was observed for consumption of organic food and cryptorchidism.
Consumption of organically produced foods during pregnancy was associated with a lower prevalence of hypospadias in our study population. These findings were based on small numbers of cases and require replication in other study populations.
Notes
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Comment In: Environ Health Perspect. 2016 Mar;124(3):A5526930698
PubMed ID
26307850 View in PubMed
Less detail