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Arsenic concentrations in well water and risk of bladder and kidney cancer in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201045
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1999 Sep;107(9):705-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
P. Kurttio
E. Pukkala
H. Kahelin
A. Auvinen
J. Pekkanen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Unit of Environmental Epidemiology, Kuopio, Finland. paivi.kurttio@ktl.fi
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1999 Sep;107(9):705-10
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arsenic - analysis
Arsenic Poisoning - complications
Female
Finland
Fresh Water - analysis
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - chemically induced
Male
Risk
Smoking - adverse effects
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - chemically induced
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
We assessed the levels of arsenic in drilled wells in Finland and studied the association of arsenic exposure with the risk of bladder and kidney cancers. The study persons were selected from a register-based cohort of all Finns who had lived at an address outside the municipal drinking-water system during 1967-1980 (n = 144,627). The final study population consisted of 61 bladder cancer cases and 49 kidney cancer cases diagnosed between 1981 and 1995, as well as an age- and sex-balanced random sample of 275 subjects (reference cohort). Water samples were obtained from the wells used by the study population at least during 1967-1980. The total arsenic concentrations in the wells of the reference cohort were low (median = 0.1 microg/L; maximum = 64 microg/L), and 1% exceeded 10 microg/L. Arsenic exposure was estimated as arsenic concentration in the well, daily dose, and cumulative dose of arsenic. None of the exposure indicators was statistically significantly associated with the risk of kidney cancer. Bladder cancer tended to be associated with arsenic concentration and daily dose during the third to ninth years prior to the cancer diagnosis; the risk ratios for arsenic concentration categories 0.1-0.5 and [Greater/equal to] 0.5 microg/L relative to the category with
Notes
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PubMed ID
10464069 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer and occupational exposures in women in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201844
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1999 Jul;36(1):48-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
E. Weiderpass
E. Pukkala
T. Kauppinen
P. Mutanen
H. Paakkulainen
K. Vasama-Neuvonen
P. Boffetta
T. Partanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Elisabete.Weiderpass@MEP.KI.SE
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1999 Jul;36(1):48-53
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Confidence Intervals
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Occupations - classification - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Postmenopause
Premenopause
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Women's health
Abstract
The etiology of breast cancer is not fully understood. Environmental and occupational exposures may contribute to breast cancer risk.
We linked 324 job titles from the 1970 census of 892,591 Finnish women with incidence of breast cancer (23,638 cases) during 1971-1995. We converted job titles to 31 chemical and two ergonomic agents through a measurement-based, period-specific, national job-exposure matrix. Poisson regression models were fit to the data, with adjustment for birth cohort, follow-up period, socioeconomic status, mean number of children, mean age at first delivery, and turnover rate.
For premenopausal breast cancer, medium/high level of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation was associated with a standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of 1.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7-2.5; trend P = 0.03). For postmenopausal breast cancer, we found on SIR of 1.2 (1.1-1.3) for low level and 1.4 (1.1-1.8) for medium/high level of ionizing radiation (trend P = 0.001); and an SIR 1.3 (1.1-1.7) for medium/high levels of both asbestos and man-made vitreous fibers. Aromatic hydrocarbon solvents showed a significant trend for a modest excess of postmenopausal breast cancer.
Our study indicates that occupational exposure to ionizing radiation may be associated with an increased risk of female breast cancer. High-quality studies on environmental and occupational etiology of breast cancer are needed for further elucidation of risk factors.
PubMed ID
10361586 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence around an oil refinery as an example of a small area study based on map coordinates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213876
Source
Environ Res. 1995 Nov;71(2):128-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
J. Pekkanen
E. Pukkala
M. Vahteristo
T. Vartiainen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Environmental Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Environ Res. 1995 Nov;71(2):128-34
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure
Finland
Geography
Humans
Industrial Oils
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Selection Bias
Abstract
The aim of the study was to create a rapid method for estimating cancer risk in areas defined by exact map coordinates and to test it using as an example incidence of leukemia near an oil refinery. The method can be used to investigate possible local excesses of cancer of suspected environmental origin in Finland. Map coordinates with an accuracy of 10 m for the place of residence of each Finn were obtained from national registers. Based on this data set, numbers of inhabitants and expected number of cancer cases by sex and age in squares of 500 x 500 m were calculated for all of Finland. Observed number of cancer cases in each square were obtained based on record linkage of the map coordinates with the Finnish Cancer Registry. The ratio of observed and expected number of cancer cases was modeled using Poisson regression. The example analysis included all 23 leukemia and 531 any cancer cases registered in an area around an oil refinery in 1983-1986. There was no significant association between distance from the oil refinery and risk of leukemia or any cancer. The method proved fast and efficient in comparing areal differences in cancer incidence in Finland. In cases of environmental concern, geographical analyses of existing registers is a rapid method to perform first analyses when evaluating the need for further studies.
PubMed ID
8977621 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence following chlorophenol exposure in a community in southern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223846
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1992 May-Jun;47(3):167-75
Publication Type
Article
Author
P. Lampi
T. Hakulinen
T. Luostarinen
E. Pukkala
L. Teppo
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute-Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1992 May-Jun;47(3):167-75
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Chlorophenols
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Finland - epidemiology
Fishes
Humans
Incidence
Industry
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - chemically induced - epidemiology
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Sarcoma - chemically induced - epidemiology
Soft Tissue Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Water Pollution, Chemical - adverse effects
Water Supply - standards
Wood
Abstract
Chlorophenols have contaminated the drinking water system and the local lake in the village of Järvelä in southern Finland. Local geology, ground water streams, and chemical analyses incriminated a local sawmill as the only plausible source of exposure. Cancer incidence in the municipality of Kärkölä (half of the population lives in Järvelä), compared with the rest of the local health-care district and with the greater cancer control region, indicated an excess of soft-tissue sarcomas and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. A case-control study, which focused on cancers of the colon, bladder and soft tissues, lymphomas, and leukemia, demonstrated a significantly elevated risk ratio for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas among persons who consumed fish from the local lake, which was contaminated with chlorophenols. Probable exposure to chlorophenol-contaminated drinking water played a role in the increased incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and possibly was a factor in the development of soft-tissue sarcoma.
PubMed ID
1596099 View in PubMed
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Cancer risk among health care personnel in Finland, 1971-1980.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228605
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1990 Aug;16(4):252-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1990
Author
R. Sankila
S. Karjalainen
E. Läärä
E. Pukkala
L. Teppo
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Helsinki.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1990 Aug;16(4):252-7
Date
Aug-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Environmental Exposure
Female
Finland
Health Occupations
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Nurses
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Physicians
Risk factors
Abstract
Standardized incidence ratios were calculated for the assessment of cancer risk among Finnish health care personnel in 1971-1980. The overall relative cancer risk among the men was low when compared with that of all economically active men, mainly due to the low relative risk of lung cancer. The cancer risk of female health care personnel was increased when compared with that of all economically active women. The relative risk of breast cancer among registered nurses was high, being twice that of practical nurses, who had an average risk. In contrast, the risk of lymphomas, leukemia, and primary liver carcinoma was low among registered nurses and high among practical nurses. Although specific occupational exposures could not be assessed, the results did not imply any alarming major hazards related to health care work itself.
PubMed ID
2389132 View in PubMed
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A comparison of some simple methods to identify geographical areas with excess incidence of a rare disease such as childhood leukaemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201580
Source
Stat Med. 1999 Jun 30;18(12):1501-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-1999
Author
N R Wray
F E Alexander
C R Muirhead
E. Pukkala
I. Schmidtmann
C. Stiller
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, EH8 9AG, U.K.
Source
Stat Med. 1999 Jun 30;18(12):1501-16
Date
Jun-30-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bayes Theorem
Child
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Computer simulation
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Poisson Distribution
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma - epidemiology
ROC Curve
Abstract
Six statistics are compared in a simulation study for their ability to identify geographical areas with a known excess incidence of a rare disease. The statistics are the standardized incidence ratio, the empirical Bayes method of Clayton and Kaldor, Poisson probability, a statistic based on the 'Breslow T' test (BT) and two statistics based on the 'Potthoff-Whittinghill' test (PW) for extra-Poisson variance. Two alternative processes of clustering are simulated in which high-risk locations could be caused by environmental sources or could be sites of microepidemics of an infectious agent contributing to a rare disease such as childhood leukaemia. The simulation processes use two parameters (proportion of cases found in clusters and mean cluster size) which are varied to embrace a variety of situations. Real and artificial data sets of small area populations are considered. The most extreme of the artificial sets has all areas of equal population size. The other data sets use the small census areas (municipalities) in Finland since these have extremely heterogeneous population size distribution. Subset selection allows examination of this variability. Receiver operator curve methodology is used to compare the efficacy of the statistics in identifying the cluster areas; statistics are compared for the proportion of true high-risk areas identified in the top 1 per cent and 10 per cent of ranked areas. One of the PW statistics performed consistently well under all circumstances, although the results for the BT statistic were marginally better when only the top 1 per cent of ranked areas was considered. The standardized incidence ratio performed consistently worst.
PubMed ID
10398288 View in PubMed
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Drinking water chlorination and cancer-a historical cohort study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22167
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1997 Mar;8(2):192-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
M. Koivusalo
E. Pukkala
T. Vartiainen
J J Jaakkola
T. Hakulinen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1997 Mar;8(2):192-200
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Chlorine - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Drinking
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Mutagens - adverse effects - analysis - chemistry
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Water - chemistry
Water Purification - methods
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
Chlorination of water rich in organic material is known to produce a complex mixture of organochlorine compounds, including mutagenic and carcinogenic substances. A historical cohort study of 621,431 persons living in 56 towns in Finland was conducted in order to assess the relation between historical exposure to drinking water mutagenicity and cancer. Exposure to quantity of mutagenicity was calculated on the basis of historical information of raw water quality and water treatment practices using an empirical equation relating mutagenicity and raw water pH, KMnO4 value and chlorine dose. Cancer cases were derived from the population-based Finnish Cancer Registry and follow-up time in the study started in 1970. Age, gender, time period, social class, and urban residence were taken into account in Poisson regression analysis of the observed numbers of cases using expected numbers of cases standardized for age and gender as a basis. Excess risks were calculated using a continuous variable for mutagenicity for 3,000 net rev/l exposure representing an average exposure in a town using chlorinated surface water. After adjustment for confounding, a statistically significant excess risk was observed for women in cancers of the bladder (relative risk [RR] = 1.48, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-2.18), rectum (RR = 1.38, CI = 1.03-1.85), esophagus (RR = 1.90, CI = 1.02-3.52), and breast (RR = 1.11, CI = 1.01-1.22). These results support the magnitude of excess risks for rectal and bladder cancers found in earlier epidemiologic studies on chlorination by-products and give additional information on exposure-response concerning the mutagenic compounds. Nevertheless, due to the public health importance of water chlorination, uncertainty related to the magnitude of observed risks, and the fact that excess risks were observed only for women, the results of the study should be interpreted with caution.
PubMed ID
9134243 View in PubMed
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Drinking water mutagenicity and gastrointestinal and urinary tract cancers: an ecological study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217573
Source
Am J Public Health. 1994 Aug;84(8):1223-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
M. Koivusalo
J J Jaakkola
T. Vartiainen
T. Hakulinen
S. Karjalainen
E. Pukkala
J. Tuomisto
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Helsinki.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1994 Aug;84(8):1223-8
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Chlorine - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Finland - epidemiology
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Linear Models
Mutagens - adverse effects
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Urban Population
Urologic Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between exposure to mutagenic drinking water and cancers of the gastrointestinal and urinary tract.
Past exposure to drinking water mutagenicity was assessed in 56 Finnish municipalities for the years 1955 and 1970. The cases of bladder, kidney, stomach, colon, and rectum cancers were derived from two periods (1967 to 1976 and 1977 to 1986). Age, sex, social class, urban living, and time period were taken into account in the Poisson regression analysis.
Statistically significant exposure-response association was observed between exposure and incidence of bladder, kidney, and stomach cancers. In an ordinary municipality using chlorinated surface water, this exposure would indicate a relative risk of 1.2 for bladder cancer and of 1.2 to 1.4 for kidney cancer compared with municipalities where nonmutagenic drinking water was consumed.
The acidic mutagenic compounds present in drinking water may play a role in the etiology of kidney and bladder cancers, but, because the results are based on aggregate data, they should be interpreted with caution.
Notes
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Comment In: Am J Public Health. 1994 Aug;84(8):1211-38059872
Comment In: Am J Public Health. 1995 Sep;85(9):1298-3007661248
PubMed ID
8059876 View in PubMed
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Drinking water mutagenicity and urinary tract cancers: a population-based case-control study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204251
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1998 Oct 1;148(7):704-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-1998
Author
M. Koivusalo
T. Hakulinen
T. Vartiainen
E. Pukkala
J J Jaakkola
J. Tuomisto
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Helsinki.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1998 Oct 1;148(7):704-12
Date
Oct-1-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Chlorine - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mutagenicity Tests
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Urologic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Water Supply - analysis - standards
Abstract
The detection of mutagenic and carcinogenic chlorination by-products in chlorinated drinking water has raised concern in many countries over the potential health effects of long-term exposure to these products. The relation between estimated exposure to historical drinking water mutagenicity and cancer was studied in Finland by using a population-based case-control study comprising 732 bladder cancer cases, 703 kidney cancer cases, and 914 controls. The cases were obtained from the nationwide Finnish Cancer Registry for the years 1991-1992. The controls, frequency matched by age and sex, were randomly selected from the national population registry. Information on past drinking water sources and confounding factors was acquired through a questionnaire. Historical exposure to drinking water mutagenicity was estimated by using information on past residence, past water source, and historical data on water quality and treatment. Odds ratios were calculated for an increase of 3,000 net revertants per liter (net rev/liter) in average exposure from 1950 to 1987, adjusting for age, sex, socioeconomic status, and smoking in logistic regression models. A small, statistically significant, exposure-related excess risk was found for kidney cancer for men (odds ratio = 1.49, 95 percent confidence interval (CI) 1.05-2.13) for 3,000 net rev/liter exposure level. For women, the association remained nonsignificant, with a lower odds ratio of 1.08 (95% CI 0.69-1.68). For bladder cancer, the odds ratio for both men and women was 1.22 (95% CI 0.92-1.62) for 3,000 net rev/liter exposure. However, a higher odds ratio of 2.59 (95% CI 1.13-5.94) for 3,000 net rev/liter exposure was observed for male nonsmokers.
PubMed ID
9778177 View in PubMed
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From cross-tabulations to multipurpose exposure information systems: a new job-exposure matrix.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206210
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1998 Apr;33(4):409-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
T. Kauppinen
J. Toikkanen
E. Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH), Helsinki, Finland. timo.kauppinen@occuphealth.fi
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1998 Apr;33(4):409-17
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Monitoring - instrumentation - methods
Finland
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects - analysis
Humans
Information Systems
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Previous job-exposure matrices (JEM) have usually cross-tabulated classified exposure information by chemical agent and occupational class. A new Finnish job-exposure matrix (FINJEM) was constructed for exposure assessment in large register-based studies. Unlike most other JEMs, FINJEM was designed to contain definitions, inferences, exposure data, and references. This documentation enables FINJEM to be applied also as a general exposure information system for hazard control, risk quantification and hazard surveillance. The system includes, e.g., workforce data, and it provides information on the numbers of exposed workers in Finland by agent, occupation, and level of exposure. The exposures of FINJEM cover major physical, chemical, microbiological, ergonomic, and psychosocial factors. The assessment period is 1945-1997, divided into several subperiods. Exposure is described by the prevalence of exposure and the level of exposure among the exposed, both estimated mainly on continuous scales. The user may also define the final criteria of exposure, and thereby influence the magnitude of misclassification.
PubMed ID
9513649 View in PubMed
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Genetic predisposition, environment and cancer incidence: a nationwide twin study in Finland, 1976-1995.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199964
Source
Int J Cancer. 1999 Dec 10;83(6):743-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-1999
Author
P K Verkasalo
J. Kaprio
M. Koskenvuo
E. Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. p.verkasalo@icrf.icnet.uk
Source
Int J Cancer. 1999 Dec 10;83(6):743-9
Date
Dec-10-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Cohort Studies
Environment
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Registries
Sex Factors
Smoking
Abstract
Twin studies integrate genetic and environmental (including physical environment and life-style) information by comparing monozygotic and dizygotic twins for the occurrence of disease. Our objectives were to compare cancer incidence in twins with national rates and to estimate both the probability that co-twins of affected twins may develop cancer and the importance of genetic predisposition and environment in cancer development. The nationwide record linkage of the Finnish Twin Cohort Study, the Finnish Cancer Registry and the Central Population Register allowed the follow-up of 12,941 same-sexed twin pairs for incident primary cancers from 1976 to 1995. Zygosity was determined by use of a validated questionnaire in 1975. Methods included calculation of standardized incidence ratios and concordances and fitting of structural equation models. A total of 1,613 malignant neoplasms occurred in the cohort. The overall cancer incidence among twins resembled that among the general population. Monozygotic co-twins of affected twins were at 50% higher risk than were dizygotic co-twins. Based on genetic modeling, inherited genetic factors accounted for 18% (95% confidence interval 4-32%) of the liability in inter-individual variation in the risk of overall cancer, while non-genetic factors shared by twins accounted for 7% (0-16%) and unique environmental factors for 75% (65-85%). Our results appear to exclude a contribution greater than one-third for genetic predisposition in the development of cancer in the general population, thus pointing to the earlier confirmed substantial role of environment.
PubMed ID
10597189 View in PubMed
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Incidence of leukaemia and brain tumours in Finnish workers exposed to ELF magnetic fields.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103353
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1990;62(4):289-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
J. Juutilainen
E. Läärä
E. Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1990;62(4):289-93
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brain Neoplasms - etiology
Environmental Exposure
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Leukemia - etiology
Leukemia, Myeloid - etiology
Magnetics
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Abstract
The relative incidence of leukaemia, acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and central nervous system (CNS) tumours among workers presumably exposed to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MFs) was studied. The study population consisted of all male industrial workers in Finland aged 25 to 64 years during 1971-1980 according to the Population Census in 1970. The occupations were grouped into three exposure categories according to the probability of exposure. The category of "probable" exposure included electrical occupations and the category of "possible" exposure included occupations where electric motors or welding are common. All other occupations were included to the category of "no exposure". Cancer incidence rates in different occupational groups during 1971-1980 were obtained after linking the census records with the national death certificates and the files of the Finnish Cancer Registry. The adjusted relative risks (with 95% confidence limits) in the categories of "probable" and "possible" exposure were for all leukaemia 1.9 (1.0-3.5) and 1.4 (1.1-1.8), for AML 1.5 (0.5-4.7) and 1.4 (0.9-2.1), and for CNS tumours 1.3 (0.7-2.3) and 1.3 (1.0-1.6), respectively. The results are concordant with earlier studies suggesting elevated risk among workers exposed to ELF magnetic fields.
PubMed ID
2379958 View in PubMed
Less detail

Magnetic fields of high voltage power lines and risk of cancer in Finnish adults: nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210809
Source
BMJ. 1996 Oct 26;313(7064):1047-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-1996
Author
P K Verkasalo
E. Pukkala
J. Kaprio
K V Heikkilä
M. Koskenvuo
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
BMJ. 1996 Oct 26;313(7064):1047-51
Date
Oct-26-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Electric Wiring
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hematologic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent - epidemiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Nervous System Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate the risk of cancer in association with magnetic fields in Finnish adults living close to high voltage power lines.
Nationwide cohort study.
383,700 people who lived during 1970-89 within 500 metres of overhead power lines of 110-400 kV in a magnetic field calculated to be > or = 0.01 microT. Study subjects were identified by record linkages of nationwide registers.
Numbers of observed and expected cases of cancer, standardised incidence ratios, and incidence rate ratios adjusted for sex, age, calendar year, and social class--for example, by continuous cumulative exposure per 1 microT year with 95% confidence intervals from multiplicative models for all cancers combined and 21 selected types.
Altogether 8415 cases of cancer were observed (standardised incidence ratio 0.98; 95% confidence interval 0.96 to 1.00) in adults. All incidence rate ratios for both sexes combined were non-significant and between 0.91 and 1.11. Significant excesses were observed in multiple myeloma in men (incidence rate ratio 1.22) and in colon cancer in women (1.16).
Typical residential magnetic fields generated by high voltage power lines do not seem to be related to the risk of overall cancer in adults. The previously suggested associations between extremely low frequency magnetic fields and tumours of the nervous system, lymphoma, and leukaemia in adults and breast cancer in women were not confirmed.
Notes
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1985 Mar;42(3):211-23970890
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Cites: Bioelectromagnetics. 1995;16(6):365-768789067
Comment In: BMJ. 1997 Jan 25;314(7076):305-69022517
PubMed ID
8898595 View in PubMed
Less detail

Malignant skin cancers in the Finnish Twin Cohort: a population-based study, 1976-97.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188734
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2002 Sep;147(3):509-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
T. Milán
P K Verkasalo
J. Kaprio
M. Koskenvuo
E. Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Lemminkäisenkatu 1, FIN-20520 Turku, Finland. tiimil@dlc.fi
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2002 Sep;147(3):509-12
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Registries
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
Both hereditary and environmental factors are implicated in the aetiology of cutaneous neoplasms. Studies of twins make it possible to estimate the contribution of inherited genes to the development of disease.
To assess the importance of hereditary and environmental factors (including physical environment and lifestyles) in malignant melanoma and malignant nonmelanoma of the skin.
The Finnish Twin Cohort, comprising 25 882 adult like-sexed twins with established zygosity, was linked with the Finnish Cancer Registry to identify malignant skin cancers in a prospective follow-up from 1976 to 1997. Standardized incidence ratios were computed based on national rates.
Sixty twins were diagnosed with melanoma and 49 twins with nonmelanoma during the follow-up. The risks of these cancers did not differ from the risk in the population at large. There was only one pair where both twins had a malignant skin cancer (dizygotic male twins both with squamous cell carcinoma).
The near-total lack of concordance for skin cancer in twin pairs suggests that environmental and not hereditary effects are most important in the causation of malignant skin cancers in a white population with low levels of sun exposure.
PubMed ID
12207592 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ovarian cancer and occupational exposures in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201843
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1999 Jul;36(1):83-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
K. Vasama-Neuvonen
E. Pukkala
H. Paakkulainen
P. Mutanen
E. Weiderpass
P. Boffetta
N. Shen
T. Kauppinen
H. Vainio
T. Partanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki. kvas@occuphealth.fi
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1999 Jul;36(1):83-9
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Confidence Intervals
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Occupations
Odds Ratio
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Women's health
Abstract
No single occupational or environmental agent has been established as causing ovarian cancer, existing studies often being based on ecologic or proportional mortality data in which potential confounders related to reproductive history have not been taken into account.
This study linked 324 job titles of occupationally active Finnish women (n = 892,591) at 1970 census with incidence of ovarian cancer (Finnish Cancer Registry, 5,072 cases) during 1971-1995 (over 15 million person-years). The job titles were converted into indicators of exposure to 33 agents, using a national job-exposure matrix based on measurements and surveys (FINJEM). Poisson regression analyses were performed with stratification by birth cohort, follow-up period, and socioeconomic status, and adjusted for mean number of children, mean age at first delivery, and turnover rate for each job title.
We found indications of elevated risks for aromatic hydrocarbon solvents (standardized incidence ratio 1.3 (95% CI 1.0-1.7), leather dust (1.4; 0.7-2.7), man-made vitreous fibers (1.3; 0.9-1.8), and high levels of asbestos (1.3; 0.9-1.8), and diesel (1.7; 0.7-4.1), and gasoline (1.5; 1.0-2.0) engine exhausts). Previously reported findings for hairdressers and women in the printing industry were supported in our data, but not for women in dry cleaning jobs.
Given the various drawbacks in linkage studies and job-exposure matrices, the excesses found in this study need confirmation in individual-level studies.
PubMed ID
10361591 View in PubMed
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Recent adverse trends in semen quality and testis cancer incidence among Finnish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136579
Source
Int J Androl. 2011 Aug;34(4 Pt 2):e37-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
N. Jørgensen
M. Vierula
R. Jacobsen
E. Pukkala
A. Perheentupa
H E Virtanen
N E Skakkebaek
J. Toppari
Author Affiliation
University Department of Growth and Reproduction, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. Niels.Joergensen@rh.regionh.dk
Source
Int J Androl. 2011 Aug;34(4 Pt 2):e37-48
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Finland - epidemiology
Gonadal Dysgenesis - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Semen - cytology
Sperm Count
Sperm Motility
Spermatozoa - abnormalities - pathology
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Impaired semen quality and testicular cancer may be linked through a testicular dysgenesis syndrome of foetal origin. The incidence of testis cancer has been shown to increase among Finnish men, whereas there is no recent publication describing temporal trends in semen quality. Therefore, we carried out a prospective semen quality study and a registry study of testis cancer incidence among Finnish men to explore recent trends. A total of 858 men were investigated in the semen quality study during 1998-2006. Median sperm concentrations were 67 (95% CI 57-80) million/mL, 60 (51-71) and 48 (39-60) for birth cohorts 1979-81, 1982-83 and 1987; total sperm counts 227 (189-272) million, 202 (170-240) and 165 (132-207); total number of morphologically normal spermatozoa 18 (14-23) million, 15 (12-19) and 11 (8-15). Men aged 10-59 years at the time of diagnosis with testicular cancer during 1954-2008 were included in the registry study, which confirmed the increasing incidence of testicular cancer in recent cohorts. These simultaneous and rapidly occurring adverse trends suggest that the underlying causes are environmental and, as such, preventable. Our findings necessitate not only further surveillance of male reproductive health but also research to detect and remove the underlying factors.
Notes
Cites: Hum Reprod Update. 2001 Sep-Oct;7(5):495-50011556497
Cites: Endocrinology. 2010 Jun;151(6):2868-7520392824
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2002 Feb;17(2):503-1511821304
Cites: Int J Androl. 2002 Aug;25(4):243-5212121574
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Cites: APMIS. 2001 Feb;109(2):96-10011399000
Cites: Int J Androl. 1987 Feb;10(1):19-283034791
Cites: Hum Reprod. 1990 Jul;5(5):586-922394790
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Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2005 Jul;90(7):4041-615870122
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Cites: Hum Reprod Update. 2006 May-Jun;12(3):303-2316540528
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Cites: Nat Clin Pract Urol. 2006 Oct;3(10):532-4317031378
Cites: Int J Androl. 2010 Apr;33(2):298-30320132348
Cites: Acta Oncol. 2010 Jun;49(5):725-3620491528
Cites: Endocrinology. 2007 May;148(5):2027-3617289843
Cites: Int J Androl. 2008 Apr;31(2):93-10218315714
Cites: Cancer Res. 2009 Jun 15;69(12):5241-5019491264
Cites: Asian J Androl. 2010 Jan;12(1):95-820111088
Cites: Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2010 May 27;365(1546):1697-71220403879
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 May;19(5):1151-920447912
Comment In: Int J Androl. 2012 Aug;35(4):626; author reply 627-821875429
PubMed ID
21366607 View in PubMed
Less detail

Risk of cancer in Finnish children living close to power lines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220094
Source
BMJ. 1993 Oct 9;307(6909):895-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-9-1993
Author
P K Verkasalo
E. Pukkala
M Y Hongisto
J E Valjus
P J Järvinen
K V Heikkilä
M. Koskenvuo
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
BMJ. 1993 Oct 9;307(6909):895-9
Date
Oct-9-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Housing
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Abstract
To investigate the risk of cancer in children living close to overhead power lines with magnetic fields of > or = 0.01 microteslas (microT).
Cohort study.
The whole of Finland.
68,300 boys and 66,500 girls aged 0-19 years living during 1970-89 within 500 m of overhead power lines of 110-400 kV in magnetic fields calculated to be > or = 0.01 microT. Subjects were identified by record linkages of nationwide registers.
Numbers of observed cases in follow up for cancer and standardised incidence ratios for all cancers and particularly for nervous system tumours, leukaemia, and lymphoma.
In the whole cohort 140 cases of cancer were observed (145 expected; standardised incidence ratio 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.81 to 1.1). No statistically significant increases in all cancers and in leukaemia and lymphoma were found in children at any exposure level. A statistically significant excess of nervous system tumours was found in boys (but not in girls) who were exposed to magnetic fields of > or = 0.20 microT or cumulative exposure of > or = 0.40 microT years.
Residentia magnetic fields of transmission power lines do not constitute a major public health problem regarding childhood cancer. The small numbers do not allow further conclusions about the risk of cancer in stronger magnetic fields.
Notes
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1988 Jul;128(1):21-383164167
Cites: BMJ. 1993 Oct 9;307(6909):891-58241850
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1979 Mar;109(3):273-84453167
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1980 Mar;111(3):292-67361752
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1980 Apr;111(4):461-27377191
Cites: Bioelectromagnetics. 1986;7(2):191-2073741493
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1990;62(4):289-932379958
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1990 Dec;62(6):1008-142257204
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1991 Nov 1;134(9):923-371843457
Comment In: BMJ. 1994 Apr 30;308(6937):1162-38031373
Comment In: BMJ. 1993 Oct 9;307(6909):884-58241847
PubMed ID
8241851 View in PubMed
Less detail

Risk of nervous system cancer among workers exposed to lead.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212767
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 1996 Feb;38(2):131-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
A. Anttila
P. Heikkilä
E. Nykyri
T. Kauppinen
E. Pukkala
S. Hernberg
K. Hemminki
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 1996 Feb;38(2):131-6
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Brain Neoplasms - blood - chemically induced - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Glioma - blood - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Lead - adverse effects - pharmacokinetics
Lead Poisoning - blood - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Risk
Abstract
Experimental animal studies suggest that lead compounds may increase the risk of gliomas. To study whether occupational exposure to lead increases the risk, we followed nervous system cancer incidence among 20,741 employees biologically monitored for their blood lead (B-Pb) concentrations. We also performed a nested case-referent study, comprising 26 male cases of nervous system cancer (16 of which had gliomas). Those cases a B-Pb > or = 1.4 mumol/L had a twofold increase in the odds ratio of nervous system cancer as compared with those employees whose B-Pb had not exceeded 0.7 mumol/L. The excess was confined to gliomas (odds ratio 11, 95% confidence interval 1.0 to 630 for B-Pb > or = 1.4 mumol/L; overall P value for trend, 0.037). We obtained lifetime information on exposure and potential confounders for 58% of the cases. The odds ratio of glioma was associated with indices of lifetime exposure to lead, and potential confounders seemed not to explain the effects. The results suggest that there may be an association between occupational lead exposure and the risk of gliomas. No firm conclusions can be drawn because of the small number of cases and loss of material.
PubMed ID
8673517 View in PubMed
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Small area estimation of incidence of cancer around a known source of exposure with fine resolution data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195023
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2001 May;58(5):315-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001
Author
E. Kokki
J. Ranta
A. Penttinen
E. Pukkala
J. Pekkanen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Environmental Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, PO Box 95, FIN-70701 Kuopio, Finland. Esa.Kokki@ktl.fi
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2001 May;58(5):315-20
Date
May-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos - adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Mining
Registries
Risk factors
Small-Area Analysis
Abstract
To describe the small area system developed in Finland. To illustrate the use of the system with analyses of incidence of lung cancer around an asbestos mine. To compare the performance of different spatial statistical models when applied to sparse data.
In the small area system, cancer and population data are available by sex, age, and socioeconomic status in adjacent "pixels", squares of size 0.5 km x 0.5 km. The study area was partitioned into sub-areas based on estimated exposure. The original data at the pixel level were used in a spatial random field model. For comparison, standardised incidence ratios were estimated, and full bayesian and empirical bayesian models were fitted to aggregated data. Incidence of lung cancer around a former asbestos mine was used as an illustration.
The spatial random field model, which has been used in former small area studies, did not converge with present fine resolution data. The number of neighbouring pixels used in smoothing had to be enlarged, and informative distributions for hyperparameters were used to stabilise the unobserved random field. The ordered spatial random field model gave lower estimates than the Poisson model. When one of the three effects of area were fixed, the model gave similar estimates with a narrower interval than the Poisson model.
The use of fine resolution data and socioeconomic status as a means of controlling for confounding related to lifestyle is useful when estimating risk of cancer around point sources. However, better statistical methods are needed for spatial modelling of fine resolution data.
Notes
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1999 Nov;56(11):774-8010658564
Cites: J Public Health Med. 1999 Sep;21(3):289-9810528956
Cites: Biometrics. 1987 Sep;43(3):671-813663823
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 1992 May;3(3):255-631610972
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1993 Feb;83(2):233-98427329
Cites: BMJ. 1993 Oct 9;307(6909):895-98241851
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1994 Jun;51(6):421-58044235
Cites: Stat Methods Med Res. 1995 Jun;4(2):137-597582202
Cites: Stat Med. 1995 Nov 15-30;14(21-22):2459-728711281
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Oct 26;313(7064):1047-518898595
Cites: Environ Res. 1995 Nov;71(2):128-348977621
Cites: Environ Res. 1997 Feb;72(2):118-309177654
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1998 Feb;27(1):74-829563697
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1999 May;56(5):308-1410472304
Cites: Stat Med. 2000 Sep 15-30;19(17-18):2217-4110960849
PubMed ID
11303080 View in PubMed
Less detail

Work-related cancer in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20789
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1999;25 Suppl 2:1-116
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
A. Andersen
L. Barlow
A. Engeland
K. Kjaerheim
E. Lynge
E. Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Cancer Registry of Norway, Montebello, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1999;25 Suppl 2:1-116
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Environmental monitoring
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Abstract
This report presents 20 years' of cancer incidence data by occupational group for the Nordic populations. The study covers the 10 million people aged 25-64 years at the time of the 1970 censuses in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden, and the 1 million incident cancer cases diagnosed among these people during the subsequent 20 years. The project was undertaken as a cohort study with linkage of individual records based on the personal identification numbers used in all the Nordic countries. In the 1970 censuses, information on occupation for each economically active member of the household was provided in free text in self-administered questionnaires. The data were centrally coded and computerized in the statistical offices. Norway, Sweden, and Finland used the Nordic Classification of Occupations, while Denmark used a national coding scheme. However, all the data could be reclassified into 53 occupational groups and 1 group of economically inactive persons. Person-years at risk were accumulated from 1 January 1971 until the date of emigration, date of death or 31 December 1987 in Denmark, 1989 in Sweden, 1990 in Finland, and 1991 in Norway. The 4 countries all had nationwide registration of incident cancer cases during the entire study period. All incident cancer cases during the individual risk periods were included in the analysis. Despite minor differences between the countries, the International Classification of Diseases, 7th revision, formed the core basis for the diagnostic coding in all 4 countries. For the present study the incident cancer cases have been classified into 35 broad diagnostic groups. The observed number of cancer cases in each group of persons defined by country, gender, and occupation was compared with the expected number calculated from the age-, gender-, and period-specific person-years and the incidence rates for the national population. The result has been presented as a standardized incidence ratio (SIR), defined as the observed number of cases divided by the expected number and multiplied by 100. In the tables of this report, all the SIR values for which the upper limit of the 95% confidence interval is below 100 are printed in green and all those for which the lower limit of the confidence interval is above 100 are printed in red. For all cancers combined, the study showed a wide variation among the men, from an SIR of 79 for farmers to 159 for waiters. The occupations with the highest SIR values also included seamen and workers producing beverages and tobacco. Among the women the SIR values varied from 83 for gardeners to 129 for tobacco workers. Low SIR values were found for farmers and teachers. Outdoor workers such as fishermen and gardeners had the highest risk of lip cancer, while the lowest risk was found among indoor workers such as physicians and artistic workers. Almost all pleural cancers are associated with asbestos exposure. Accordingly, plumbers, welders, mechanics, and seamen were the occupations with the highest risk. There was also an excess risk of pleural cancer in the occupational group of technical, chemical, physical, and biological workers, including, among others, engineers and chemists potentially exposed to asbestos. The wood workers included in the present study had the highest risk of nasal cancer. Most studies of nasal cancer have shown increased risks associated with exposure to wood dust, both for those in furniture making and for those exposed exclusively to soft wood. Nickel refinery workers are also known for their high risk of nasal cancer. In the present study they were included in the occupational group of smelting workers. Lung cancer was the most frequent cancer among men in the present study. Tobacco smoking is the major risk factor for this disease, but occupational exposures also play an important role. Waiters and tobacco workers had the highest risk of lung cancer. Miners and quarry workers also had a high risk of lung cancer, which may be related to
PubMed ID
10507118 View in PubMed
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