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Acute infections and environmental exposure to organochlorines in Inuit infants from Nunavik.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4455
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Oct;112(14):1359-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Frédéric Dallaire
Eric Dewailly
Gina Muckle
Carole Vézina
Sandra W Jacobson
Joseph L Jacobson
Pierre Ayotte
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, and Public Health Research Unit, CHUQ-Laval University Medical Center, 945 Wolfe Street, Sainte-Foy, Québec G1V 5B3, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Oct;112(14):1359-65
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Cohort Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - analysis - poisoning
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - poisoning
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Insecticides - analysis - poisoning
Inuits
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology - etiology
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - poisoning
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The Inuit population of Nunavik (Canada) is exposed to immunotoxic organochlorines (OCs) mainly through the consumption of fish and marine mammal fat. We investigated the effect of perinatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) on the incidence of acute infections in Inuit infants. We reviewed the medical charts of a cohort of 199 Inuit infants during the first 12 months of life and evaluated the incidence rates of upper and lower respiratory tract infections (URTI and LRTIs, respectively), otitis media, and gastrointestinal (GI) infections. Maternal plasma during delivery and infant plasma at 7 months of age were sampled and assayed for PCBs and DDE. Compared to rates for infants in the first quartile of exposure to PCBs (least exposed), adjusted rate ratios for infants in higher quartiles ranged between 1.09 and 1.32 for URTIs, 0.99 and 1.39 for otitis, 1.52 and 1.89 for GI infections, and 1.16 and 1.68 for LRTIs during the first 6 months of follow-up. For all infections combined, the rate ratios ranged from 1.17 to 1.27. The effect size was similar for DDE exposure but was lower for the full 12-month follow-up. Globally, most rate ratios were > 1.0, but few were statistically significant (p
PubMed ID
15471725 View in PubMed
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Altered fine motor function at school age in Inuit children exposed to PCBs, methylmercury, and lead.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275653
Source
Environ Int. 2016 Aug 26;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-2016
who participated in this study. We thank R. Sun, L. Roy, J. Varin, B. Tuttle, A. Pov, J. Gagnon, and N. Dodge for their valuable contributions to data collection and database management. This study was supported by grants from National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Institute of Environmental
  1 document  
Author
Olivier Boucher
Gina Muckle
Pierre Ayotte
Eric Dewailly
Sandra W Jacobson
Joseph L Jacobson
Source
Environ Int. 2016 Aug 26;
Date
Aug-26-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
371758
Abstract
Motor deficits have frequently been reported in methylmercury (MeHg) poisoning in adults. However, whether exposure to neurotoxic contaminants from environmental sources early in life is associated with neuromotor impairments has received relatively little attention. This study examines the relation of developmental exposure to MeHg, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and lead to motor function in school-age Inuit children exposed through their traditional diet.
In a prospective study in Nunavik, children (mean age=11.3years) were assessed on a battery of fine motor tasks, namely the Stanford-Binet Copying subtest (N=262), the Santa Ana Form Board, and the Finger Tapping Test (N=215). The relation of mercury (Hg; as an index of MeHg exposure), PCB congener 153 (PCB153), and lead concentrations in cord and current blood samples to task performance was examined using linear regression analyses.
After adjustment for potential confounders and control for the other contaminants, higher current PCB concentrations were associated with poorer Santa Ana Form Board and Finger Tapping performance. Results were virtually identical when PCB153 was replaced by other PCB congeners. Higher current Hg levels were independently associated with poorer Finger Tapping performance.
This is the first prospective longitudinal study in children to provide evidence of neuromotor impairments associated with postnatal exposure to seafood contaminants from environmental sources. Fine motor speed appears particularly sensitive to the effects of postnatal PCB exposure, which is unusually high in this population. Results with postnatal MeHg are concordant with previous cross-sectional studies with children and adults.
PubMed ID
27575364 View in PubMed
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Analysis of hydroxylated metabolites of PCBs (OH-PCBs) and other chlorinated phenolic compounds in whole blood from Canadian inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6761
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Jul;108(7):611-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
C D Sandau
P. Ayotte
E. Dewailly
J. Duffe
R J Norstrom
Author Affiliation
Centre for Analytical and Environmental Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Jul;108(7):611-6
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Environmental Exposure
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Humans
Hydroxylation
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In this study, we identified the main hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (OH-PCBs) and other chlorinated phenolic compounds and we determined their relative concentrations in whole blood from 13 male and 17 female Inuit from northern Quebec, Canada, and from a pooled whole blood sample from southern Quebec. We also determined concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Total OH-PCB concentrations were variable among the Inuit samples, ranging over 2 orders of magnitude (0.117-11.6 ng/g whole blood wet weight). These concentrations were equal to and up to 70 times those found for the southern Quebec pooled whole blood sample. Geometric mean concentrations of total OH-PCBs were 1.73 and 1.01 ng/g whole blood for Inuit men and women, respectively, and 0.161 ng/g whole blood for the southern population pool. There are limited data available for comparison, but the levels of OH-PCBs in Inuit are higher than those previously reported in the literature for other populations. There was a significant correlation (p
PubMed ID
10903613 View in PubMed
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An environmentally-relevant mixture of organochlorines and its vehicle control, dimethylsulfoxide, induce ultrastructural alterations in porcine oocytes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75392
Source
Mol Reprod Dev. 2006 Jan;73(1):83-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Céline Campagna
Janice L Bailey
Marc-André Sirard
Pierre Ayotte
Poul Maddox-Hyttel
Author Affiliation
Centre de Recherche en Biologie de la Reproduction, Département des Sciences animales, Université Laval, Québec, Canada.
Source
Mol Reprod Dev. 2006 Jan;73(1):83-91
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Organochlorine chemicals accumulate in the environment, particularly in the Arctic, and constitute potential developmental hazards to wildlife and human health. Although some of their harmful effects are recognized, their mechanisms of action within the target cells need to be better understood. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that an environmentally-relevant organochlorine mixture alters oocyte ultrastructure in the porcine model. Immature cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs), partially cultured (18 hr) COCs without treatment or exposed to the organochlorine mixture or its vehicle (0.1% dimethysulfoxide; DMSO) during culture were processed for light and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). The organochlorines induced major ultrastructural changes in the COCs: decreased density of the lipid droplets, increased smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) volume and increased interactions among SER, mitochondria, lipid droplets and vesicles. We suggest that these ultrastructural changes facilitate energy formation necessary to produce metabolizing enzymes. Other ultrastructural changes may reflect some degree of organochlorine toxicity: fewer gap junctions and decreased electron density of the cortical granules. Unexpectedly, the DMSO control treatment also induced similar ultrastructural changes, but to a lesser degree than the organochlorine mixture. This study is the first to demonstrate the effect of environmental contaminants on mammalian oocyte ultrastructure.
PubMed ID
16206133 View in PubMed
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An examination of traditional foods and cigarette smoking as cadmium sources among the nine First Nations of Eeyou Istchee, Northern Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104372
Source
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2014 May 28;16(6):1422-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-28-2014
Author
Nadia A Charania
Leonard J S Tsuji
Ian D Martin
Eric N Liberda
Suzanne Coté
Pierre Ayotte
Eric Dewailly
Evert Nieboer
Author Affiliation
Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada.
Source
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2014 May 28;16(6):1422-33
Date
May-28-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cadmium - blood
Child
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Food Contamination - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Cadmium (Cd), a nonessential toxic metal present in the environment, accumulates in the organs of herbivorous mammals which typically are consumed by Aboriginal populations. The relative contribution of this potential exposure source to concentrations of blood Cd was investigated in 1429 participants (age >7 years) residing in the nine Cree First Nations communities of Eeyou Istchee, northern Quebec, Canada. Analysis of variance identified significant Cd concentration differences between communities, sex, and age groups, although these were complicated by significant 2-way interactions. The percentage of participants with Cd concentrations within the adopted health-based guideline categories of 'acceptable', 'concern' and 'action' pertaining to kidney damage was 56.2%, 38.3%, and 5.5%, respectively. Partial correlations (controlling for age as a continuous variable) did not show a significant association between consumption of traditional foods and Cd concentrations (r = 0.014, df = 105, p = 0.883). A significant and positive partial correlation (r = 0.390, df = 105, p
PubMed ID
24781002 View in PubMed
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Assessment of pre- and postnatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls: lessons from the Inuit Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4473
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jul;111(9):1253-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Pierre Ayotte
Gina Muckle
Joseph L Jacobson
Sandra W Jacobson
Eric Dewailly
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University and Public Health Research Unit, CHUQ-Laval University Medical Centre, Québec, Québec, Canada. pierre.ayotte@inspq.qc.ca
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jul;111(9):1253-8
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Biological Markers - analysis
Breast Feeding
Chromatography, Gas
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Forecasting
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Milk, human - chemistry
Models, Theoretical
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - blood
Pregnancy
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are food-chain contaminants that have been shown to induce adverse developmental effects in humans. In the course of an epidemiologic study established to investigate neurodevelopmental deficits induced by environmental PCB exposure in the Inuit population of northern Québec (Nunavik, Canada), we compared three biomarkers of prenatal exposure and models to predict PCB plasma concentration at 6 months postpartum. Concentrations of 14 PCB congeners were measured by high-resolution gas chromatography with electron capture detection in lipids extracted from maternal plasma, cord plasma, breast milk (collected at approximately 1 month postpartum), and 6-month-old infant plasma samples. Similar congener profiles were observed in all biologic samples, and PCB-153, the most abundant and persistent PCB congener, was strongly correlated with other frequently detected PCB congeners in all biologic media. When expressed on a lipid basis, maternal plasma, cord plasma, and milk concentrations of this congener were strongly intercorrelated, indicating that PCB concentration in any of these biologic media is a good indicator of prenatal exposure to PCBs. A multivariate model that included maternal PCB-153 plasma lipid concentration, breast-feeding duration, and the sum of two skin-fold thicknesses (an index of infant body fat mass) explained 72% of PCB-153 plasma concentration variance at 6 months postpartum (p
PubMed ID
12842782 View in PubMed
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Associations between plasma persistent organic pollutant levels and blood pressure in Inuit adults from Nunavik.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108571
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Sep;59:282-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
: Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) Organochlorine (OC) pesticides Blood pressure Inuit Nunavik Background: Recent evidence suggests that exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) increases the risk of hypertension in environmentally exposed populations. High POP
  1 document  
Author
Beatriz Valera
Pierre Ayotte
Paul Poirier
Eric Dewailly
Author Affiliation
Axe santé publique et pratiques optimales en santé, Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, Canada. beatriz.valera@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Sep;59:282-9
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
631157
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Arctic Regions
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Diet
Dioxins - blood
Environmental Exposure
Environmental pollutants - blood
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - blood
Female
Fishes
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Hypertension - chemically induced - epidemiology
Inuits
Lindane - blood
Male
Mercury - blood
Middle Aged
Pesticides - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Quebec - epidemiology
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Recent evidence suggests that exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) increases the risk of hypertension in environmentally exposed populations. High POP levels have been detected in Arctic populations and the exposure is related to high consumption of fish and marine mammals, which represent the traditional diet of these populations.
We examined the associations between polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine (OC) pesticides and hypertension among Inuit from Nunavik (Quebec, Canada).
A complete set of data was obtained for 315 Inuit=18years who participated in the "Santé Québec" health survey that was conducted in the 14 villages of Nunavik in 1992. Fourteen polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 8 OC pesticides or their metabolites were measured in plasma samples using gas chromatography with electron capture detection. Blood pressure (BP) was measured using a standardized protocol and information regarding anti-hypertensive medication was obtained through questionnaires. The associations between log-transformed POPs and hypertension (systolic BP=140mmHg, diastolic BP=90mmHg or anti-hypertensive medication) were analyzed using multiple logistic regressions.
Total PCBs as well as the sum of non-dioxin-like PCBs were significantly associated with higher risk of hypertension. Furthermore, the risk of hypertension increased with higher plasma concentrations of congeners 101, 105, 138 and 187. Models adjusted for BP risk factors became significant after including n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and further adjustment for lead and mercury did not change the results. Regarding OC pesticides, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) was associated with increased risk of hypertension while inverse associations were observed with p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT), ß-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) and oxychlordane.
Some PCB congeners were associated with higher risk of hypertension in this highly exposed population. Most associations became significant after including n-3 PUFAs in the models. However, the analyses of OC pesticides revealed divergent results, which need to be confirmed in further cohort and experimental studies.
PubMed ID
23872387 View in PubMed
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Associations between prenatal cigarette smoke exposure and externalized behaviors at school age among Inuit children exposed to environmental contaminants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258359
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2013 Sep-Oct;39:84-90
Publication Type
Article
; child behavior; environmental contaminants; externalizing behaviors; attention problems; Teacher Report Form 1. Introduction Smoking is a major public health issue among Canadian aboriginal communities (Elton- Marshall et al., 2011), with a higher prevalence relative to non-aboriginal Canadian and U.S
  1 document  
Author
Caroline Desrosiers
Olivier Boucher
Nadine Forget-Dubois
Eric Dewailly
Pierre Ayotte
Sandra W Jacobson
Joseph L Jacobson
Gina Muckle
Author Affiliation
Université Laval, Québec City, Québec, Canada; Centre de recherche du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec City, Québec, Canada.
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2013 Sep-Oct;39:84-90
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
63846
Keywords
Attention - drug effects
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - chemically induced - epidemiology - psychology
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - chemically induced - psychology
Child
Drug Interactions
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Lead Poisoning, Nervous System, Childhood - blood - psychology
Male
Mercury Poisoning, Nervous System - blood - psychology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - psychology
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
Smoking during pregnancy is common among Inuit women from the Canadian Arctic. Yet prenatal cigarette smoke exposure (PCSE) is seen as a major risk factor for childhood behavior problems. Recent data also suggest that co-exposure to neurotoxic environmental contaminants can exacerbate the effects of PCSE on behavior. This study examined the association between PCSE and behavior at school age in a sample of Inuit children from Nunavik, Qu?bec, where co-exposure to environmental contaminants is also an important issue. Interactions with lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg), two contaminants associated with behavioral problems, were also explored.
Participants were 271 children (mean age=11.3years) involved in a prospective birth-cohort study. PCSE was assessed through maternal recall. Assessment of child behavior was obtained from the child's classroom teacher on the Teacher Report Form (TRF) and the Disruptive Behavior Disorders Rating Scale (DBD). Exposure to contaminants was assessed from umbilical cord and child blood samples. Other confounders were documented by maternal interview.
After control for contaminants and confounders, PCSE was associated with increased externalizing behaviors and attention problems on the TRF and higher prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) assessed on the DBD. No interactions were found with contaminants.
This study extends the existing empirical evidence linking PCSE to behavioral problems in school-aged children by reporting these effects in a population where tobacco use is normative rather than marginal. Co-exposure to Pb and Hg do not appear to exacerbate tobacco effects, suggesting that these substances act independently.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23916943 View in PubMed
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Cancer risk associated with household exposure to chloroform.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190667
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2002 Apr 12;65(7):489-502
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-2002
Author
Benoît Lévesque
Pierre Ayotte
Robert Tardif
Liliane Ferron
Suzanne Gingras
Emmanuelle Schlouch
Guy Gingras
Patrick Levallois
Eric Dewailly
Author Affiliation
Unité de recherche en santé publique, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Beauport, Canada. benoit.levesque@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2002 Apr 12;65(7):489-502
Date
Apr-12-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Baths - adverse effects
Chloroform - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - chemically induced
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Skin Absorption
Volatilization
Water Pollutants, Chemical - adverse effects - analysis
Water supply
Abstract
Chloroform (CHCl3) the trihalomethane most prevalent in drinking water, is a proven animal carcinogen and a suspected human carcinogen. Consequently, standards have been issued by health authorities to limit its concentration in drinking water. These limits are based solely on ingestion, without taking into account inhalation and skin contact. Exposure to CHCl3 was assessed for 18 men (age: mean 38 years; range 23-51) following a 10-min shower in their respective residences located in the Quebec City region (Canada). CHCl3 concentration was measured in alveolar air samples collected before, immediately after, and 15 min and 30 min following the shower. Indoor air and water concentrations were determined concomitantly. Mean CHCl3 concentrations in the air of the shower stall and in water were respectively 147 microg/m3 (SD = 56.2 microg/m3) and 20.1 microg/L (SD = 9.0 microg/L). Water concentrations were comparable to those documented in a large proportion of distribution networks in Canada. The mean increase in alveolar air CHCl3 concentration (deltaCHCIALV) at the end of the shower was 33 microg/m3 (SD = 14.7 microg/m3). A multiple-regression analysis revealed that deltaCHCl3ALV values were only associated with chloroform concentration in air of the shower stall. DeltaCHCl3ALV were described using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. This model was then used to estimate concentrations of CHCl3 metabolites bound to liver and kidney macromolecules following a shower, and also according to exposure scenarios that integrate drinking-water ingestion and air inhalation. The concentration predicted in the liver following a worst-case exposure scenario was 0.41 microg CHCl3 equivalents/kg of tissue, some 6,000 times lower than the lowest concentration that did not increase the incidence of hepatic tumors in laboratory animals. Data indicate that for this range of exposure the safety margin appears therefore considerable with respect to the potential carcinogenic effect of household exposure to CHCl3.
PubMed ID
11939707 View in PubMed
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Carbon monoxide in indoor ice skating rinks: evaluation of absorption by adult hockey players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229175
Source
Am J Public Health. 1990 May;80(5):594-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1990
Author
B. Lévesque
E. Dewailly
R. Lavoie
D. Prud'Homme
S. Allaire
Author Affiliation
Département de santé communautaire, Centre hospitalier de l'Université Laval, Quebec City, Canada.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1990 May;80(5):594-8
Date
May-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption
Adult
Age Factors
Air Pollutants - analysis
Carbon Monoxide - analysis - metabolism
Carboxyhemoglobin - analysis
Hockey
Humans
Least-Squares Analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Reference Values
Regression Analysis
Smoking
Abstract
We evaluated alveolar carbon monoxide (CO) levels of 122 male, adult hockey players active in recreational leagues of the Quebec City region (Canada), before and after 10 weekly 90-minute games in 10 different rinks. We also determined exposure by quantifying the average CO level in the rink during the games. Other variables documented included age, pulmonary function, aerobic capacity, and smoking status. Environmental concentrations varied from 1.6 to 131.5 parts per million (ppm). We examined the absorption/exposure relationship using a simple linear regression model. In low CO exposure levels, physical exercise lowered the alveolar CO concentration. However, we noted that for each 10 ppm of CO in the ambient air, the players had adsorbed enough CO to raise their carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels by 1 percent. This relationship was true both for smokers and non-smokers. We suggest that an average environmental concentration of 20 ppm of CO for the duration of a hockey game (90 minutes) should be reference limit not to be exceeded in indoor skating rinks.
Notes
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Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1972 Nov;77(5):669-764117097
PubMed ID
2327538 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cohort profile: the maternal-infant research on environmental chemicals research platform.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113014
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2013 Jul;27(4):415-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Tye E Arbuckle
William D Fraser
Mandy Fisher
Karelyn Davis
Chun Lei Liang
Nicole Lupien
Stéphanie Bastien
Maria P Velez
Peter von Dadelszen
Denise G Hemmings
Jingwei Wang
Michael Helewa
Shayne Taback
Mathew Sermer
Warren Foster
Greg Ross
Paul Fredette
Graeme Smith
Mark Walker
Roberta Shear
Linda Dodds
Adrienne S Ettinger
Jean-Philippe Weber
Monique D'Amour
Melissa Legrand
Premkumari Kumarathasan
Renaud Vincent
Zhong-Cheng Luo
Robert W Platt
Grant Mitchell
Nick Hidiroglou
Kevin Cockell
Maya Villeneuve
Dorothea F K Rawn
Robert Dabeka
Xu-Liang Cao
Adam Becalski
Nimal Ratnayake
Genevieve Bondy
Xiaolei Jin
Zhongwen Wang
Sheryl Tittlemier
Pierre Julien
Denise Avard
Hope Weiler
Alain Leblanc
Gina Muckle
Michel Boivin
Ginette Dionne
Pierre Ayotte
Bruce Lanphear
Jean R Séguin
Dave Saint-Amour
Eric Dewailly
Patricia Monnier
Gideon Koren
Emmanuel Ouellet
Author Affiliation
Population Studies Division, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa. tye.arbuckle@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2013 Jul;27(4):415-25
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Biological Markers
Canada
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Welfare
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) Study was established to obtain Canadian biomonitoring data for pregnant women and their infants, and to examine potential adverse health effects of prenatal exposure to priority environmental chemicals on pregnancy and infant health.
Women were recruited during the first trimester from 10 sites across Canada and were followed through delivery. Questionnaires were administered during pregnancy and post-delivery to collect information on demographics, occupation, life style, medical history, environmental exposures and diet. Information on the pregnancy and the infant was abstracted from medical charts. Maternal blood, urine, hair and breast milk, as well as cord blood and infant meconium, were collected and analysed for an extensive list of environmental biomarkers and nutrients. Additional biospecimens were stored in the study's Biobank. The MIREC Research Platform encompasses the main cohort study, the Biobank and follow-up studies.
Of the 8716 women approached at early prenatal clinics, 5108 were eligible and 2001 agreed to participate (39%). MIREC participants tended to smoke less (5.9% vs. 10.5%), be older (mean 32.2 vs. 29.4 years) and have a higher education (62.3% vs. 35.1% with a university degree) than women giving birth in Canada.
The MIREC Study, while smaller in number of participants than several of the international cohort studies, has one of the most comprehensive datasets on prenatal exposure to multiple environmental chemicals. The biomonitoring data and biological specimen bank will make this research platform a significant resource for examining potential adverse health effects of prenatal exposure to environmental chemicals.
PubMed ID
23772943 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of polychlorinated biphenyl levels across studies of human neurodevelopment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49183
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jan;111(1):65-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Matthew P Longnecker
Mary S Wolff
Beth C Gladen
John W Brock
Philippe Grandjean
Joseph L Jacobson
Susan A Korrick
Walter J Rogan
Nynke Weisglas-Kuperus
Irva Hertz-Picciotto
Pierre Ayotte
Paul Stewart
Gerhard Winneke
M Judith Charles
Sandra W Jacobson
Eric Dewailly
E Rudy Boersma
Larisa M Altshul
Birger Heinzow
James J Pagano
Allan A Jensen
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA. longnecker@niehs.nih.gov
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jan;111(1):65-70
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromatography, Gas - methods
Comparative Study
Environmental pollutants - blood
Europe
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Milk, Human - chemistry - drug effects
Nervous System - drug effects - embryology
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Pregnancy
Quebec
Sensitivity and specificity
United States
Abstract
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent pollutants that are ubiquitous in the food chain, and detectable amounts are in the blood of almost every person in most populations that have been examined. Extensive evidence from animal studies shows that PCBs are neurotoxins, even at low doses. Interpretation of human data regarding low-level, early-life PCB exposure and subsequent neurodevelopment is problematic because levels of exposure were not similarly quantified across studies. We expressed the exposure levels from 10 studies of PCB and neurodevelopment in a uniform manner using a combination of data from original investigators, laboratory reanalyses, calculations based on published data, and expert opinion. The mainstay of our comparison was the median level of PCB 153 in maternal pregnancy serum. The median concentration of PCB 153 in the 10 studies ranged from 30 to 450 ng/g serum lipid, and the median of the 10 medians was 110 ng/g. We found that (a)) the distribution of PCB 153 exposure in most studies overlapped substantially, (b)) exposure levels in the Faroe Islands study were about 3-4-fold higher than in most other studies, and (c)) the exposure levels in the two recent U.S. studies were about one-third of those in the four earlier U.S. studies or recent Dutch, German, and northern Qu?bec studies. Our results will facilitate a direct comparison of the findings on PCBs and neurodevelopment when they are published for all 10 studies.
PubMed ID
12515680 View in PubMed
Less detail

Consumption of tomato products is associated with lower blood mercury levels in Inuit preschool children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119193
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2013 Jan;51:404-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Doris Gagné
Julie Lauzière
Rosanne Blanchet
Carole Vézina
Emilie Vaissière
Pierre Ayotte
Huguette Turgeon O'Brien
Author Affiliation
Groupe d'études en nutrition publique, Département des sciences des aliments et de nutrition, Université Laval, Québec (Québec), Canada.
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2013 Jan;51:404-10
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Child, Preschool
Diet
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Infant
Inuits
Lycopersicon esculentum
Male
Mercury - blood
Regression Analysis
Seafood
Seals, Earless
Abstract
Some evidence suggests that various diet components and nutrients, including vegetables, fruit and food-derived antioxidants, could mitigate contaminant exposure and/or adverse health effects of contaminants. To examine the effect of the consumption of tomato products on blood mercury levels in Inuit preschool children, 155 Inuit children (25.0±9.1months) were recruited from 2006-2008 in Nunavik childcare centers (northern Québec, Canada). Food frequency questionnaires were completed at home and at the childcare center, and total blood mercury concentration was measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Multivariate regression analysis was performed after multiple imputation. The median blood concentration of mercury was 9.5nmol/L. Age, duration of breastfeeding, annual consumption frequency of seal meat, and monthly consumption frequency of tomato products were significant predictors of blood mercury levels, whereas annual consumption frequencies of beluga muktuk, walrus, Arctic char, and caribou meat were not. Each time a participant consumed tomato products during the month before the interview was associated with a 4.6% lower blood mercury level (p=0.0005). All other significant predictors in the model were positively associated with blood mercury levels. Further studies should explore interactions between consumption of healthy store-bought foods available in Arctic regions and contaminant exposure.
PubMed ID
23127601 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cord blood lymphocyte functions in newborns from a remote maritime population exposed to organochlorines and methylmercury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191730
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2002 Jan 25;65(2):165-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-25-2002
Author
Marthe Belles-Isles
Pierre Ayotte
Eric Dewailly
Jean-Philippe Weber
Raynald Roy
Author Affiliation
Unité de recherche en rhumatologie-immunologie, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec-CHUL, Ste-Foy, Canada.
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2002 Jan 25;65(2):165-82
Date
Jan-25-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Environmental Exposure
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry - immunology
Food Contamination
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Killer Cells, Natural - immunology
Lead - blood
Lymphocyte Count
Male
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Mercury - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Pregnancy
Quebec
Abstract
The consumption of fish and sea mammals can be an important source of exposure to organochlorine compounds (OCs) and heavy metals in populations relying on seafood for subsistence. Exposure to these substances, especially during the prenatal period, has been shown to induce immunotoxic effects in mammals. Immunological status was assessed in 48 newborns from a remote maritime population living on the Lower and Mid North Shore of the St. Lawrence River (subsistence fishing group) and 60 newborns from the coastal urban center of Sept-Iles (reference group). Women were recruited upon arrival at Sept-Iles regional hospital to give birth. Cord blood samples were collected for organochlorine and heavy metal analyses and to isolate lymphocytes for immunological assays (proportions and functional responses of the main cellular subsets T, B, and NK (natural killer) cells. Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury were respectively three- and twofold higher, significantly greater, in the subsistence fishing group than in the reference group. Compared to the reference group, the subsistence fishing group showed significant decreases in the proportion of the naive helper T-cell subset CD4+CD45RA, T-cell proliferation following an in vitro mitogenic stimulation, and plasma immunoglobulin M (IgM) level, while plasma IgC level was increased. NK cytolytic activities were similar in both groups. The proportion of CD4+CD45RA cells was inversely correlated to mercury and PCBs, while T-cell clonal expansion was negatively associated with PCBs and p,p'-DDE. Mercury was inversely correlated to plasma IgM. Data show that subtle functional alterations of the developing human immune system may result from in utero exposure to OCs and mercury. Epidemiological studies are needed to determine the relevance of these alterations in predicting detrimental health effects in the developing child.
PubMed ID
11820504 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cytochrome P450 CYP1A1 enzyme activity and DNA adducts in placenta of women environmentally exposed to organochlorines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3494
Source
Environ Res. 1999 May;80(4):369-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
J. Lagueux
D. Pereg
P. Ayotte
E. Dewailly
G G Poirier
Author Affiliation
Health and Environment Unit, CHUQ, CHUL Research Center and Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Ste-Foy, Québec, G1V 4G2, Canada.
Source
Environ Res. 1999 May;80(4):369-82
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Biological Markers - analysis
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 - metabolism
DNA - genetics - metabolism
DNA Adducts - analysis
Environmental Exposure
Enzyme Induction - drug effects
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated
Infant, Newborn
Insecticides - adverse effects - blood
Inuits
Placenta - drug effects - metabolism
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - analysis
Pregnancy - blood
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Abstract
Organochlorine compounds bioaccumulate in fishing and hunting products included in the daily diet of many coastal populations. Prenatal and perinatal exposure to large doses of PCBs and PCDFs was shown to be deleterious on fetal and neonatal development, but information is scarce regarding possible effects of chronic low-dose exposure. This study investigates biomarkers of early effects in newborns from women exposed to organochlorines through the consumption of species from marine food chains, in two remote coastal regions of the province of Quebec (Canada). A CYP1A1-dependent enzyme activity (EROD) and DNA adducts were measured in placenta samples obtained from 30 women living on the Lower-North-Shore of the St. Lawrence River and 22 Inuit women from Nunavik (Arctic Quebec). These biomarkers were also assessed in 30 women from a Quebec urban center (Sept-Iles) as a reference group. Prenatal organochlorine exposure was determined by measuring these compounds in umbilical cord plasma. The amount of bulky polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-related DNA adducts was significantly greater in the Lower-North-Shore group than in the reference group. Placental EROD activity and the amount of less bulky (OC-related) DNA adducts were significantly higher in the Nunavik group than in the reference group. For both biomarkers, smoking was found to be an important confounding factor. Organochlorine exposure was significantly associated with EROD activity and DNA adduct levels when stratifying for smoking. This study confirms that CYP1A1 enzyme induction and DNA adducts in placental tissue constitute useful biomarkers of early effects induced by environmental exposure to organochlorines.
PubMed ID
10330311 View in PubMed
Less detail

Determinants of plasma concentrations of perfluorooctanesulfonate and brominated organic compounds in Nunavik Inuit adults (Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149165
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Jul 1;43(13):5130-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2009
Author
Renée Dallaire
Pierre Ayotte
Daria Pereg
Serge Déry
Pierre Dumas
Eric Langlois
Eric Dewailly
Author Affiliation
Public Health Research Unit, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec-CHUL, Québec, Québec, Canada.
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Jul 1;43(13):5130-6
Date
Jul-1-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alkanesulfonic Acids - blood
Animals
Bromine Compounds - blood
Canada
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Fishes
Fluorocarbons - blood
Halogenation
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and brominated organic compounds (BOCs) have been found in biota and humans worldwide with levels of BOCs being the highest in North America. PFOS and BOC exposure of remote populations that consume species of a marine food web for their subsistence has seldom been investigated. In 2004, we determined the concentrations of these contaminants in 883 Nunavik Inuit adults from the Canadian Arctic and investigated the demographic and dietary factors associated with them. Demographic and dietary information were collected by questionnaires. Multiple linear regressions were conducted to investigate predictors of exposure to those contaminants. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener 153 concentrations are presented for comparative purposes. PFOS and PCB 153 were detected in all samples, with plasma concentrations several times higher than BOCs. The consumption of fish and marine mammals appears to be an important contributor to PFOS exposure among Nunavik Inuit. While PBDE 153 also appears as a persistent PBDE congener, exposure to PBDE 47 seems to be more recent in this population. Adoption of a westernized lifestyle seems to be related to an increased exposure to PBDE 47, but specific sources remain to be elucidated. In conclusion, we found that the remote geographical location and traditional lifestyle of the Nunavik Inuit population do not protect them against exposure to emerging POPs, particularly PFOS.
PubMed ID
19673318 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dioxin-like compounds and bone quality in Cree women of Eastern James Bay (Canada): a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260305
Source
Environ Health. 2013;12(1):54
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Alexandra-Cristina Paunescu
Eric Dewailly
Sylvie Dodin
Evert Nieboer
Pierre Ayotte
Source
Environ Health. 2013;12(1):54
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Bone and Bones - drug effects - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dioxins - blood
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
Female
Humans
Metals, Heavy - blood
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - toxicity
Quebec
Abstract
Aboriginal populations living in Canada's northern regions are exposed to a number of persistent organic pollutants through their traditional diet which includes substantial amounts of predator fish species. Exposure to dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) can cause a variety of toxic effects including adverse effects on bone tissue. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the relationship between plasma concentrations of DLCs and bone quality parameters in Cree women of Eastern James Bay (Canada).
Two hundred and forty-nine Cree women from seven communities in Eastern James Bay (Canada), aged 35 to 74 years old, participated in the study. In order to determine the total DLC concentration in plasma samples of participants, we measured the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated transcriptional activity elicited by plasma sample extracts using a luciferase reporter gene assay. Plasma concentrations of mono-ortho-substituted dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (DL-PCBs) 105, 118 and 156 were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bone quality parameters (speed of sound, m/s; broadband ultrasound attenuation, dB/MHz; stiffness index, %) were assessed by quantitative ultrasound at the right calcaneus with the Achilles InSight system. Several factors known to be associated with osteoporosis were documented by questionnaire. Multiple linear regression models were constructed for the three ultrasound parameters.
DL-PCBs 105 and 118 concentrations, but not the global DLC concentration, were inversely associated with the stiffness index, even after adjusting for several confounding factors. The stiffness index (log) decreased by -0.22% (p=0.0414) and -0.04% (p=0.0483) with an increase of one µg/L in plasma concentrations of DL-PCB 105 and DL-PCB 118, respectively. Other factors, including age, height, smoking status, menopausal status and the percentage of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in erythrocyte membranes were negatively associated with one of the ultrasound parameters, while the percentage of omega-3 PUFAs in these membranes and levels of physical activity and education were positively associated with them.
Our results show that an increase in plasma concentrations of DL-PCBs 105 and 118 was negatively associated with stiffness index, a measure of bone quality/strength, in women of this population. In addition to environmental contaminants, future studies should also consider PUFA intake as a factor influencing bone quality.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23816203 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dioxin-like compounds are not associated with bone strength measured by ultrasonography in Inuit women from Nunavik (Canada): results of a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113413
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Alexandra-Cristina Paunescu
Pierre Ayotte
Eric Dewailly
Sylvie Dodin
Author Affiliation
Axe santé publique et pratiques optimales en santé, Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, Québec, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Bone Diseases - chemically induced
Bone and Bones - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Calcaneus - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Dioxins - adverse effects - blood
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Humans
Inuits
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated biphenyls - adverse effects - blood
Abstract
Bone strength in Inuit people appears lower than that of non-Aboriginals. Inuit are exposed to persistent organic pollutants including dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) through their traditional diet that comprises predatory fish and marine mammal fat. Results from experimental and population studies suggest that some DLCs can alter bone metabolism and increase bone fragility.
This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted to examine the relationship between the stiffness index (SI) and plasma concentrations of total DLCs or specific dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (DL-PCBs) in Inuit women of Nunavik (Northern Quebec, Canada).
SI was determined by ultrasonography at the right calcaneus of 194 Inuit women aged 35-72 years who participated to Qanuippitaa? How Are We? Nunavik Inuit Health Survey in 2004. Plasma total DLC levels were quantified by measuring the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated transcriptional activity elicited by plasma sample extracts in a cell-based reporter gene assay. Plasma concentrations of DL-PCBs nos. 105, 118, 156, 157, 167 and 189 were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We used multiple linear regression analyses to investigate relations between total DLCs or specific DL-PCBs and SI, taking into consideration several potential confounders.
Neither total plasma DLCs nor specific DL-PCBs were associated with SI after adjustment for several confounders and covariates.
Our results do not support a relation between exposure to DLCs and bone strength measured by ultrasonography in Inuit women of Nunavik.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23730628 View in PubMed
Less detail

Domain-specific effects of prenatal exposure to PCBs, mercury, and lead on infant cognition: results from the Environmental Contaminants and Child Development Study in Nunavik.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257993
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2014 Mar;122(3):310-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
310 volume 122 | number 3 | March 2014 • Environmental Health Perspectives Research | Children’s Health All EHP content is accessible to individuals with disabilities. A fully accessible (Section 508–compliant) HTML version of this article is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1206323
  1 document  
Author
Olivier Boucher
Gina Muckle
Joseph L Jacobson
R Colin Carter
Melissa Kaplan-Estrin
Pierre Ayotte
Éric Dewailly
Sandra W Jacobson
Author Affiliation
Centre de Recherche du Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec, Québec City, Québec, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2014 Mar;122(3):310-6
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
260025
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Development - drug effects
Cognition - drug effects
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
Female
Humans
Infant
Inuits
Lead - blood - toxicity
Male
Methylmercury Compounds - blood - toxicity
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - toxicity
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), methylmercury (MeHg), and lead (Pb) are environmental contaminants known for their adverse effects on cognitive development.
In this study we examined the effects of prenatal exposure to PCBs, MeHg, and Pb on cognitive development in a sample of Inuit infants from Arctic Qu?bec.
Mothers were recruited at local prenatal clinics. PCBs, mercury (Hg), Pb, and two seafood nutrients-docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and selenium (Se)-were measured in umbilical cord blood. Infants (n = 94) were assessed at 6.5 and 11 months of age on the Fagan Test of Infant Intelligence (FTII), A-not-B test, and Bayley Scales of Infant Development-2nd Edition (BSID-II).
Multiple regression analyses revealed that higher prenatal PCB exposure was associated with decreased FTII novelty preference, indicating impaired visual recognition memory. Prenatal Hg was associated with poorer performance on A-not-B, which depends on working memory and is believed to be a precursor of executive function. Prenatal Pb was related to longer FTII fixation durations, indicating slower speed of information processing.
PCBs, MeHg, and Pb each showed specific and distinct patterns of adverse associations with the outcomes measured during infancy. By contrast, none of these exposures was associated with performance on the BSID-II, a global developmental measure. The more focused, narrow band measures of cognitive function that appeared to be sensitive to these exposures also provide early indications of long-term impairment in specific domains that would otherwise not likely be evident until school age.
Boucher O, Muckle G, Jacobson JL, Carter RC, Kaplan-Estrin M, Ayotte P, Dewailly ?, Jacobson SW. 2014. Domain-specific effects of prenatal exposure to PCBs, mercury, and lead on infant cognition: results from the Environmental Contaminants and Child Development Study in Nunavik. Environ Health Perspect 122:310-316; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1206323.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24441767 View in PubMed
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Effect of dietary calcium intake on lead exposure in Inuit children attending childcare centres in Nunavik.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260878
Source
Int J Environ Health Res. 2014;24(5):482-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Huguette Turgeon O'Brien
Doris Gagné
Emilie Vaissière
Rosanne Blanchet
Julie Lauzière
Carole Vézina
Pierre Ayotte
Source
Int J Environ Health Res. 2014;24(5):482-95
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Calcium, Dietary - analysis
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Energy intake
Environmental Exposure
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Humans
Infant
Inuits
Lead - blood
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Quebec
Abstract
High blood lead levels (BLLs) can be found in Inuit from Nunavik. At the same time, various nutrients such as calcium could lower lead absorption and toxicity. We examined the effect of dietary calcium intakes on BLLs in 245 preschool Inuit children attending childcare centres in Nunavik. Calcium intake was assessed with one 24-h dietary recall and BLLs were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in whole blood samples. Multiple imputation was performed to deal with missing data. Median blood lead concentration was 0.08 µmol/L. A high proportion of children did not meet the Estimated Average Requirement for vitamin D intake (73 %) and, to a lower extent, for calcium (20 %). Calcium intake was negatively associated with BLLs (p = 0.0001) while child's age and energy intake were positively associated with BLLs (p = 0.015 and p = 0.024, respectively). Consuming traditional foods rich in calcium as well as milk and alternatives may protect against lead exposure.
PubMed ID
24382151 View in PubMed
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