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60 records – page 1 of 3.

Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Aug 20;111(19):2404-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-1991
Author
H. Reiso
N. Homb
J. Båtnes
N. Holm
T D Christiansen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Aug 20;111(19):2404-6
Date
Aug-20-1991
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Abstract
All accidents treated by the Primary Health Services in Vågå Municipality in 1988, were registered. There were altogether 498 accidents (124 accidents per 1,000 inhabitants per year). 418 injured persons were treated by the local health service, 80 were referred to hospital. The major mechanism of injury was falling (38%). The accidents occurred most frequently at home (38%), at the sports-ground/outdoors (23%) or at work (17%). 11 injuries were very serious, none were lethal. 44 occurred during skiing. Our work to prevent accidents will give priority to: the mother and child clinic; environmental health; skiing accidents.
PubMed ID
1926074 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Jan 20;122(2):198-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-2002
Author
Teresa Løvold Berents
Bjørgulf Claussen
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for arbeids- og trygdemedisin Institutt for allmenn- og samfunnsmedisin Postboks 1130 Blindern 0317 Oslo. tvlovold@hotmail.com
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Jan 20;122(2):198-201
Date
Jan-20-2002
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental health
Health status
Humans
Morbidity
Mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Feb 28;122(6):65111998725
PubMed ID
11873580 View in PubMed
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[Air pollution, asthma and allergy--the importance of different types of particles]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15327
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Aug 10;122(18):1777-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-2002
Author
Heidi Ormstad
Martinus Løvik
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for miljøimmunologi, Divisjon for miljømedisin, Nasjonalt folkehelseinstitutt, Postboks 4404 Nydalen 0403 Oslo. heidi.ormstad@folkehelsa.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Aug 10;122(18):1777-82
Date
Aug-10-2002
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Allergens - adverse effects
Asthma - chemically induced - etiology
Dust - adverse effects
English Abstract
Heating - adverse effects
Humans
Motor Vehicles
Particle Size
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - chemically induced - etiology
Rubber - adverse effects
Vehicle Emissions - adverse effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Particulate air pollution has been much discussed in Norway during the last few years. Coarse particles from asphalt are likely to have quite different properties than the far smaller particles from diesel exhaust. MATERIALS AND METHODS: On the basis of data from the literature and our own research, we discuss the health problem of different types of particles with a focus on allergy and respiratory symptoms. RESULTS: Diesel exhaust particles have well-documented adverse effects in relation to allergic airway disease. They increase symptoms load in already allergic individuals and also seem to contribute to the increased prevalence of allergy. PM10 is today measured on the basis of weight, not on number. Diesel exhaust particles are much smaller than road surface particles; hence PM10 measurements reflect road surface dust pollution more than exhaust particles. INTERPRETATION: Focus should now be given to diesel exhaust particles in order to reduce the adverse health effects of particulate air pollution in Norwegian cities.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Aug 10;122(18):176612362683
PubMed ID
12362688 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol education among junior high school students. Results from a WHO educational program]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11772
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jan 20;113(2):202-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-1993
Author
K I Klepp
R B Waahlberg
C L Perry
D R Jacobs
K. Andersson
M. Grant
Author Affiliation
Nasjonalforeningens HEMIL-senter, Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jan 20;113(2):202-5
Date
Jan-20-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Alcoholism - prevention & control
English Abstract
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Norway
School Health Services
Students - psychology
World Health Organization
Abstract
A school-based social influences approach to alcohol education was tested among Norwegian 8th grade lower secondary school students. The goal of the programme was to delay onset and minimize involvement in use of alcohol among the participants. 15 schools were randomly assigned to peer-led education, teacher-led education or a control condition. The programme focused on the social and environmental influences to drink alcohol, and skills to resist those influences. It consisted of five lessons over two months. Baseline and post-test data measured alcohol-use, knowledge, attitudes, skills, friends' drinking, and intentions to drink alcohol in the future. Data were collected immediately prior to and following the educational programme. The data indicate that peer-led education appears to be efficacious in reducing alcohol use and intention to use alcohol. There was no intervention effect of the peer-led programme for knowledge, attitudes or skills. There was no intervention effect for the teacher-led education.
PubMed ID
8430402 View in PubMed
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Source
Sykepleien. 1980 Feb 5;67(3):13-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-5-1980
Author
E. Nørholm
Source
Sykepleien. 1980 Feb 5;67(3):13-4
Date
Feb-5-1980
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Environmental health
Occupational Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
PubMed ID
6899507 View in PubMed
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[Application of tobacco smoking regulations in restaurants in Tromsö 1998]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67436
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Feb 10;121(4):410-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-2001
Author
A. Emaus
M L Løchen
R. Høifødt
Author Affiliation
Institutt for samfunnsmedisin Universitetet i Tromsø 9037 Tromsø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Feb 10;121(4):410-2
Date
Feb-10-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Occupational health - legislation & jurisprudence
Questionnaires
Restaurants - legislation & jurisprudence
Smoking - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Under the Norwegian Environmental Tobacco Smoke Act, a minimum of 50% of tables in restaurants have to be in smoke-free areas. The Ministry of Health and Social Affairs has defined "smoke-free restaurants" as a priority objective in its anti-tobacco strategy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We have investigated smoking policies in restaurants in the City of Tromsø in Northern Norway, as reported by restaurateurs in 1998. Representatives of all the 85 restaurants, bars and pubs in the city were interviewed and their smoking policies and habits reported. This study was part of the local health authority's evaluation of the degree of compliance with the legislation. RESULTS: In 71% of establishments, at least 50% of tables were smoke-free; in 88%, smoking areas were in compliance with the legislation. 86% of restaurateurs reported a positive or neutral attitude to the legislation, 80% thought that their guests were of the same opinion. 47% smoked every day; however, there was no association between smoking habits and smoking policies. INTERPRETATION: Though the prevalence of smoking was high among restaurateurs, this did not affect their attitudes towards the Environmental Tobacco Smoke Act or their policies on smoking.
PubMed ID
11255852 View in PubMed
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[Are electromagnetic fields created by electric means hazardous to health?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202864
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Feb 10;119(4):490
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1999

[Cancer in Pasvik. II. Pollution from Nikel--no relationship after all?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24384
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Aug 10;112(18):2384-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-1992
Author
H G Sunde
J. Alexander
Author Affiliation
Kommunehelsetjenesten i Sør-Varanger Bjørnevatn.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Aug 10;112(18):2384-6
Date
Aug-10-1992
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Metallurgy
Metals - adverse effects
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Russia
Soil Pollutants - adverse effects
Water Pollutants, Chemical - adverse effects
Abstract
Previous medical investigations have indicated a connection between heavy metal pollution from the metallurgical industry in the Russian town of Nikel on the Kola peninsula and an observed increase of incidence of cancer among the Norwegian population living near the Russian border. This report contains the latest measurements of heavy metals in the local environment and discusses exposure levels in relation to possible health effects. It is concluded that exposure to heavy metals via food, water and air is considered so low as to be unlikely to cause any increase in incidence of cancer. Thus, the previously held hypothesis of a connection between heavy metal pollution from Nikel and cancer in Pasvik is not confirmed.
PubMed ID
1412244 View in PubMed
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[Carbon dioxide poisoning--an industrial accident]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75323
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1973 Aug 10;93(21):1520-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-1973

Center for International Climate and Environmental Research: Oslo (CICERO)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288438
Publication Type
Database
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Center for International Climate and Environmental Research: Oslo (CICERO)
Language
English
Norwegian
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Database
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Arctic Environmental Health
Ocean, Atmosphere, & Weather
Climate change
Climate
Research
International Cooperation
Public Policy
Abstract
Conducts research and provide reports, information and expert advice about issues related to global climate change and international climate policy with the aim of acquiring knowledge that can help mitigate the climate problem and enhance international climate cooperation.
Online Resources
Less detail

Centre for Ice, Climate & Ecosystems (ICE)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288442
Publication Type
Database
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Polar Institute
Language
English
Norwegian
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Database
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Arctic Environmental Health
Sea ice
Climate
Ecosystem
Environment
Research
Norway
Abstract
ICE was officially opened in March 2009 by Norway's Ministry of the Environment. The research focus of ICE is ice, climate, and ecosystems.
Online Resources
Less detail
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Arctic University of Norway
Language
English
Norwegian
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Governments and Organizations
Norway
Research Personnel
Inuits
Research
Environmental Health
Abstract
Actively creates an environment in which Inuit communities and researchers can cooperatively identify critical environmental health issues and conduct the appropriate training and innovative research needed to address them.
Online Resources
Less detail

[Changes in reporting on passive smoking by parents of small children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17986
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Jan 8;124(1):16-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-8-2004
Author
Karl Erik Lund
Asgeir R Helgason
Marianne Andersen
Author Affiliation
Statens institutt for rusmiddelforskning, Postboks 565 Sentrum, 0105 Oslo. kel@sirus.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Jan 8;124(1):16-9
Date
Jan-8-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Parents - psychology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The Norwegian Cancer Society has led a comprehensive information campaign since 1995 with the aim of reducing young children's ETS (environmental tobacco smoke) exposure in their homes. The aims of the present study were to assess changes in parents' reporting of child exposure to ETS, attitudes towards ETS, and awareness regarding the potential hazards of passive smoking to children. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A questionnaire along with a stamped, addressed envelope was sent to a stratified random sample of 1000 households in Norway with three-year-old children at the time of the investigation (May 1995 and August 2001). RESULTS: According to parents, the prevalence of households in which children were exposed to ETS fell from 32% in 1995 to 18% in 2001. In both surveys, the probability of children being exposed was positively correlated with the number of parents smoking and inversely correlated with length of education, negative attitudes towards ETS and strength of health-risk awareness. INTERPRETATION: The observed changes must be viewed in the light of the media focus on passive smoking during this period, a nationwide information campaign and as an artifact caused by more underreporting of a behaviour that is being internalised as in breach of a norm.
PubMed ID
14716385 View in PubMed
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[Chief medical officers and preventive health care]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49315
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jan 30;113(3):351-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-1993
Author
E. Boonstra
J G Maeland
Author Affiliation
Nasjonalforeningens HEMIL-senter, Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jan 30;113(3):351-5
Date
Jan-30-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services - manpower
Decision Making
English Abstract
Health Promotion - manpower
Norway
Physician's Role
Policy Making
Preventive Medicine - manpower
Public Health Administration - manpower
Abstract
A survey conducted among all Norwegian Chief Municipal Medical Officers, provided information about their formal role and involvement in health promotion work. Of the total respondents, 71% regularly attended meetings of the Municipal Board of Health and 32% attended meetings of the Building Council; 80% had authority to forward proposals to the Board of Health on matters of environmental health. On average, the Chief Municipal Medical Officers spent one-fifth of their working time on community health promotion activities. 80% of the respondents would have liked to spend more time on these activities. These officials should have a stronger formal position in the field of health promotion, and they themselves should give higher priority to health promotion work.
PubMed ID
8441985 View in PubMed
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[Children exposed to "earth rays" are not more frequently ill than other children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33041
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Oct 30;119(26):3896-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1999
Author
B H Grandaunet
A. Baerheim
S. Bondevik
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for allmennmedisin, Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Oct 30;119(26):3896-8
Date
Oct-30-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Background Radiation
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Double-Blind Method
Earth (Planet)
English Abstract
Environmental Exposure
Health status
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Infant
Norway - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology
Stomach Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
From time to time newspapers bring reports on "earth rays" and their alleged damaging effects on health. There is, however, no objective evidence which suggests the existence of earth rays. In spite of this, dowsers claim that earth rays are a main cause of disease, also in children. In this study we wanted to evaluate, using a double-blind design, the alleged effects of earth rays on young children. A total of 44 children in four nursery schools in the Bergen area were recruited. Two dowsers and one interviewer visited the homes of all the children. The dowsers evaluated the presence of earth rays over the child's bed while the parents were interviewed in an independent procedure about the child's medical history over the past 12 months. Whether or not earth rays where found over the child's bed, there where no differences in the reported health of the child with regard to upper and lower respiratory tract infections, stomach aches, allergies or sleeping habits. Parents' report on restlessness and hyperactivity were also the same. The study failed to find any health effects, adverse or not, of earth rays.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Dec 10;119(30):4611-210827512
PubMed ID
10592748 View in PubMed
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[Comments on the legislation for workers' protection and working environment]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49444
Source
Sykepleien. 1977 Sep 5;64(14):811-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-5-1977
Author
K H Henriksen
Source
Sykepleien. 1977 Sep 5;64(14):811-6
Date
Sep-5-1977
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Environmental health
Humans
Legislation, Medical
Norway
Occupational Medicine
Safety
PubMed ID
242364 View in PubMed
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[District more with work environment activities]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49289
Source
J Sykepleien. 1994 Apr 5;82(6):16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-5-1994
Author
K A Aase
Source
J Sykepleien. 1994 Apr 5;82(6):16
Date
Apr-5-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental health
Humans
Norway
Occupational Health
Societies, Nursing
PubMed ID
7946744 View in PubMed
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[Environmental health--a formalized problem field or an arena for the interested?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49262
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Aug 20;116(19):2334-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-1996
Author
A. Røiseland
Author Affiliation
Nordlandsforskning, Bodø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Aug 20;116(19):2334-6
Date
Aug-20-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Planning
English Abstract
Environmental health
Humans
Local Government
Norway
Abstract
The article focus on the division of labour in Norwegian municipalities' work on environmental health problems. The analysis shows that this work follows a relatively formalised pattern. To a high degree, formal positions explain who participate and how. The analysis also shows that actors outside the local health authorities also participate to some extent.
PubMed ID
8804211 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Environmental health and industrial pollution in the 1890s]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49194
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Dec 10;121(30):3561-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-2001
Author
A. Storesund
F. Rønning
Author Affiliation
Institutt for allmenn- og samfunnsmedisin Universitetet i Oslo Postboks 1130 Blindern 0318 Oslo. asbjorn.storesund@hit.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Dec 10;121(30):3561-5
Date
Dec-10-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chemical Industry - history
English Abstract
Environmental Health - history
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - history
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects - history - prevention & control
History, 19th Century
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Mining - history
Norway
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Pollution from industry assumed new dimensions when large-scale industry and mining were established in Norway towards the end of the nineteenth century. The present article discusses how the local health administration responded to the first extensive industrial pollution of air and water. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Two chemical factories producing wood pulp and one abandoned nickel mine are studied by means of information from court records and municipal archives. RESULTS: New forms of large quantity pollutants and their great spreading capacity were not anticipated in the Health Act of 1860. The legislation at the time had ambiguous points which made it difficult to apply in cases of industrial pollution. One major problem was reliable documentation of adverse health effects. INTERPRETATION: Neither central nor local medical authorities had adequate competence to exert the professional influence required. In spite of this, local health commissions acted with considerable authority in the early 1890s. Within a few years, however, the health aspects were down-played because of the strong economic and political interests behind the new industries. The principal difficulties emerging in the 1890s with industrial pollution eventually lasted for nearly one hundred years.
PubMed ID
11808018 View in PubMed
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60 records – page 1 of 3.