Skip header and navigation

Refine By

693 records – page 1 of 35.

The state of the residential fire fatality problem in Sweden: Epidemiology, risk factors, and event typologies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290062
Source
J Safety Res. 2017 Sep; 62:89-100
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Anders Jonsson
Carl Bonander
Finn Nilson
Fredrik Huss
Author Affiliation
Division of Risk Management, Department of Environmental and Life Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Centre for Public Safety, Karlstad University, Sweden. Electronic address: anders.jonsson@kau.se.
Source
J Safety Res. 2017 Sep; 62:89-100
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Burns - mortality
Child
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Female
Fires - statistics & numerical data
Housing
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Public Health Surveillance
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Residential fires represent the largest category of fatal fires in Sweden. The purpose of this study was to describe the epidemiology of fatal residential fires in Sweden and to identify clusters of events.
Data was collected from a database that combines information on fatal fires with data from forensic examinations and the Swedish Cause of Death-register. Mortality rates were calculated for different strata using population statistics and rescue service turnout reports. Cluster analysis was performed using multiple correspondence analysis with agglomerative hierarchical clustering.
Male sex, old age, smoking, and alcohol were identified as risk factors, and the most common primary injury diagnosis was exposure to toxic gases. Compared to non-fatal fires, fatal residential fires more often originated in the bedroom, were more often caused by smoking, and were more likely to occur at night. Six clusters were identified. The first two clusters were both smoking-related, but were separated into (1) fatalities that often involved elderly people, usually female, whose clothes were ignited (17% of the sample), (2) middle-aged (45-64years old), (often) intoxicated men, where the fire usually originated in furniture (30%). Other clusters that were identified in the analysis were related to (3) fires caused by technical fault, started in electrical installations in single houses (13%), (4) cooking appliances left on (8%), (5) events with unknown cause, room and object of origin (25%), and (6) deliberately set fires (7%).
Fatal residential fires were unevenly distributed in the Swedish population. To further reduce the incidence of fire mortality, specialized prevention efforts that focus on the different needs of each cluster are required.
Cooperation between various societal functions, e.g. rescue services, elderly care, psychiatric clinics and other social services, with an application of both human and technological interventions, should reduce residential fire mortality in Sweden.
PubMed ID
28882281 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol use disorder and divorce: evidence for a genetic correlation in a population-based Swedish sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290102
Source
Addiction. 2017 Apr; 112(4):586-593
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Jessica E Salvatore
Sara Larsson Lönn
Jan Sundquist
Paul Lichtenstein
Kristina Sundquist
Kenneth S Kendler
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.
Source
Addiction. 2017 Apr; 112(4):586-593
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Keywords
Aged
Alcoholism - epidemiology - genetics
Divorce - statistics & numerical data
Environment
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Siblings
Sweden - epidemiology
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Abstract
We tested the association between alcohol use disorder (AUD) and divorce; estimated the genetic and environmental influences on divorce; estimated how much genetic and environmental influences accounted for covariance between AUD and divorce; and estimated latent genetic and environmental correlations between AUD and divorce. We tested sex differences in these effects.
We identified twin and sibling pairs with AUD and divorce information in Swedish national registers. We described the association between AUD and divorce using tetrachorics and used twin and sibling models to estimate genetic and environmental influences on divorce, on the covariance between AUD and divorce and the latent genetic and environmental correlations between AUD and divorce.
Sweden.
A total of 670?836 individuals (53% male) born 1940-1965.
Life-time measures of AUD and divorce.
AUD and divorce were related strongly (males: rtet  = +0.44, 95% CI = 0.43, 0.45; females rtet  = +0.37, 95% CI = 0.36, 0.38). Genetic factors accounted for a modest proportion of the variance in divorce (males: 21.3%, 95% CI = 7.6, 28.5; females: 31.0%, 95% CI = 18.8, 37.1). Genetic factors accounted for most of the covariance between AUD and divorce (males: 52.0%, 95% CI = 48.8, 67.9; females: 53.74%, 95% CI = 17.6, 54.5), followed by non-shared environmental factors (males: 45.0%, 95% CI = 37.5, 54.9; females: 41.6%, 95% CI = 40.3, 60.2). Shared environmental factors accounted for a negligible proportion of the covariance (males: 3.0%, 95% CI = -3.0, 13.5; females: 4.75%, 95% CI = 0.0, 6.6). The AUD-divorce genetic correlations were high (males: rA = +0.76, 95% CI = 0.53, 0.90; females +0.52, 95% CI = 0.24, 0.67). The non-shared environmental correlations were modest (males: rE = +0.32, 95% CI = 0.31, 0.40; females: +0.27, 95% CI = 0.27, 0.36).
Divorce and alcohol use disorder are correlated strongly in the Swedish population, and the heritability of divorce is consistent with previous studies. Covariation between AUD and divorce results from overlapping genetic and non-shared environmental factors. Latent genetic and non-shared environmental correlations for alcohol use disorder and divorce are high and moderate.
Notes
Cites: Psychol Med. 2015 Aug;45(11):2353-64 PMID 25782712
Cites: J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2015 Sep;76(5):773-80 PMID 26402358
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1991 Mar;81(3):305-18 PMID 1994739
Cites: Psychol Addict Behav. 2008 Mar;22(1):25-35 PMID 18298228
Cites: Psychol Med. 2015 Apr;45(5):1061-72 PMID 25171596
Cites: J Pers Soc Psychol. 1996 Aug;71(2):288-99 PMID 8765483
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 2015 Jun;83(3):617-29 PMID 25664643
Cites: J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2014 May;75(3):520-9 PMID 24766764
Cites: Psychometrika. 2011 Apr 1;76(2):306-317 PMID 23258944
Cites: Behav Genet. 2006 Mar;36(2):201-15 PMID 16645902
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 2002 Feb;111(1):124-33 PMID 11871377
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1998 Aug;155(8):1092-6 PMID 9699699
Cites: J Clin Psychol. 2012 May;68(5):514-25 PMID 22504611
Cites: Psychol Addict Behav. 2004 Dec;18(4):340-9 PMID 15631606
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2008 Sep;32(9):1615-22 PMID 18616689
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1999 Jan;23(1):101-7 PMID 10029209
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2003 Sep;60(9):929-37 PMID 12963675
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2000 Jan;126(1):78-108 PMID 10668351
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 2005 Nov;114(4):570-86 PMID 16351381
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2006 Jun 28;83(2):137-46 PMID 16364565
Cites: JAMA Psychiatry. 2015 Aug;72(8):757-66 PMID 26039070
Cites: Twin Res Hum Genet. 2006 Aug;9(4):481-9 PMID 16899154
Cites: Addiction. 1999 Oct;94(10 ):1477-87 PMID 10790900
Cites: Br J Addict. 1991 Oct;86(10):1269-81 PMID 1836409
Cites: J Intern Med. 2002 Sep;252(3):184-205 PMID 12270000
Cites: Behav Genet. 2002 May;32(3):221-7 PMID 12141783
Cites: Pers Individ Dif. 2010 Oct 1;49(5):473-478 PMID 20729979
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2005 Dec;61(11):2304-16 PMID 16139939
Cites: Am J Med Genet. 2000 Oct 9;96(5):684-95 PMID 11054778
Cites: JAMA Psychiatry. 2015 Mar;72(3):211-8 PMID 25565339
Cites: Psychol Addict Behav. 2014 Sep;28(3):780-9 PMID 24128287
Cites: Addiction. 2016 Aug;111(8):1323-5 PMID 26929107
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 1999 Sep;60(5):647-52 PMID 10487734
Cites: J Pers Soc Psychol. 1993 Jul;65(1):56-68 PMID 8355143
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2011 Apr;35(4):632-42 PMID 21244438
Cites: Scand J Soc Med. 1992 Sep;20(3):134-42 PMID 1485149
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 2002 Aug;111(3):411-24 PMID 12150417
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2001 Jul;158(7):1091-8 PMID 11431231
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 2011 Feb;120(1):210-22 PMID 21133510
PubMed ID
27981669 View in PubMed
Less detail

Outdoor pedestrian fall-related injuries among Swedish senior citizens--injuries and preventive strategies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290169
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Jun; 29(2):225-33
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Lina Gyllencreutz
Johanna Björnstig
Ewa Rolfsman
Britt-Inger Saveman
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Jun; 29(2):225-33
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Accidental Falls - economics - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Hospitalization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pedestrians
Safety
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Walking
Wounds and Injuries - economics - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
Senior citizens get around, to a large extent, as pedestrians, and safe walking is desirable for senior citizens allowing them to stay mobile, independent and healthy in old age. Senior citizens are over-represented in injury statistics, and fall-related injuries are common. The aim of this study was to investigate fall-related injuries including healthcare costs among senior citizen pedestrians injured when walking in public outdoor environments and to describe their self-reported causes and suggested preventive strategies. The data were based on a combination of information from injury data and a questionnaire. Three hundred senior citizens attended one emergency department after sustaining injuries from pedestrian falls; 60% suffered nonminor injuries, mostly fractures. One-fifth of the pedestrians were hospitalised for an average of 8 days with an indirect hospital cost of 6.2 million EUR (55 million SEK). Environmental factors such as ice were the most commonly described cause of the injury incident. Forty per cent of the respondents indicated that the municipality was responsible for the cause of the injury incident. Fewer respondents mentioned their own responsibility as a preventive strategy. Thirty per cent described a combination of improvements such as better road maintenance, changes in human behaviour and use of safety products as preventive strategies. It is of great importance to highlight general safety, products and preventive strategies to minimise injury risks, so that pedestrians can safely realise the known health benefits of walking and thereby limit healthcare costs.
PubMed ID
24913321 View in PubMed
Less detail

Increased Cancer Incidence in the Local Population Around Metal-Contaminated Glassworks Sites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290247
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2017 May; 59(5):e84-e90
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Fredrik Nyqvist
Ingela Helmfrid
Anna Augustsson
Gun Wingren
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden (Nyqvist, Helmfrid, Dr Wingren); and Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linneaus University, Kalmar, Sweden (Dr Augustsson).
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2017 May; 59(5):e84-e90
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Digestive System Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology - mortality
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Glass
Humans
Incidence
Male
Manufacturing and Industrial Facilities
Metals, Heavy - toxicity
Prostatic Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Registries
Respiratory Tract Diseases - mortality
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - mortality
Sex Factors
Soil - chemistry
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine mortality causes and cancer incidence in a population cohort that have resided in close proximity to highly metal-contaminated sources, characterized by contamination of, in particular, arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb).
Data from Swedish registers were used to calculate standardized mortality and cancer incidence ratios. An attempt to relate cancer incidence to metal contamination levels was made.
Significantly elevated cancer incidences were observed for overall malignant cancers in both genders, cancer in the digestive system, including colon, rectum, and pancreas, and cancers in prostate among men. Dose-response relationships between Cd and Pb levels in soil and cancer risks were found.
Cancer observations made, together with previous studies of metal uptake in local vegetables, may imply that exposure to local residents have occurred primarily via oral intake of locally produced foodstuffs.
PubMed ID
28437293 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2017 09; 32(9):765-773
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2017
Author
Hannah Louise Brooke
Mats Talbäck
Jesper Hörnblad
Lars Age Johansson
Jonas Filip Ludvigsson
Henrik Druid
Maria Feychting
Rickard Ljung
Author Affiliation
Unit of Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, PO Box 210, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden. hannah.brooke@ki.se.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2017 09; 32(9):765-773
Date
09-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - mortality
Age Distribution
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death - trends
Death Certificates
Female
Humans
Male
Mortality - trends
Neoplasms - mortality
Registries - standards - statistics & numerical data
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Sweden has a long tradition of recording cause of death data. The Swedish cause of death register is a high quality virtually complete register of all deaths in Sweden since 1952. Although originally created for official statistics, it is a highly important data source for medical research since it can be linked to many other national registers, which contain data on social and health factors in the Swedish population. For the appropriate use of this register, it is fundamental to understand its origins and composition. In this paper we describe the origins and composition of the Swedish cause of death register, set out the key strengths and weaknesses of the register, and present the main causes of death across age groups and over time in Sweden. This paper provides a guide and reference to individuals and organisations interested in data from the Swedish cause of death register.
Notes
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2009;24(11):669-75 PMID 19728117
Cites: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2003 Jan 1;32(1):62-9 PMID 12514415
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Jun 4;289(21):2849-56 PMID 12783916
Cites: J Forensic Sci. 1996 Sep;41(5):830-6 PMID 15637819
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2009 Nov;62(11):1202-9 PMID 19364635
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2012 Dec;40(9 Suppl):6-22 PMID 23238399
Cites: Eur J Cancer Prev. 2004 Feb;13(1):77-81 PMID 15075792
Cites: Clin Epidemiol. 2015 Nov 23;7:491-508 PMID 26648756
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2006 Feb;59(2):125-31 PMID 16426947
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):26-9 PMID 21775346
Cites: Scand J Soc Med. 1994 Jun;22(2):145-58 PMID 8091157
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2013 Dec;41(8):883-9 PMID 23982462
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1997 Apr;50(4):367-75 PMID 9179094
Cites: Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2008;42(4):352-7 PMID 18609293
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2009;24(11):659-67 PMID 19504049
PubMed ID
28983736 View in PubMed
Less detail

Occupational exposure to diesel motor exhaust and risk of lung cancer by histological subtype: a population-based case-control study in Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290387
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2017 08; 32(8):711-719
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2017
Author
Anna Ilar
Nils Plato
Marie Lewné
Göran Pershagen
Per Gustavsson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Anna.Ilar@ki.se.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2017 08; 32(8):711-719
Date
08-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Carcinoma, Large Cell - chemically induced - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - chemically induced - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Vehicle Emissions
Abstract
We investigated occupational exposure to diesel motor exhaust (DME) and the risk of lung cancer by histological subtype among men, using elemental carbon (EC) as a marker of DME exposure. 993 cases and 2359 controls frequency-matched on age and year of study inclusion were analyzed by unconditional logistic regression in this Swedish case-control study. Work and smoking histories were collected by a questionnaire and telephone interviews. DME was assessed by a job-exposure matrix. We adjusted for age, year of study inclusion, smoking, occupational exposure to asbestos and combustion products (other than motor exhaust), residential exposure to radon and exposure to air pollution from road traffic. The OR for lung cancer for ever vs. never exposure to DME was 1.15 (95% CI 0.94-1.41). The risk was higher for squamous and large cell, anaplastic or mixed cell carcinoma than for alveolar cell cancer, adenocarcinoma and small cell carcinoma. The OR in the highest quartile of exposure duration (=34 years) vs. never exposed was 1.66 (95% CI 1.08-2.56; p for trend over all quartiles: 0.027) for lung cancer overall, 1.73 (95% CI 1.00-3.00; p: 0.040) for squamous cell carcinoma and 2.89 (95% CI 1.37-6.11; p: 0.005) for the group of undifferentiated, large cell, anaplastic and mixed cell carcinomas. We found no convincing association between exposure intensity and lung cancer risk. Long-term DME exposure was associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, particularly to squamous cell carcinoma and the group of undifferentiated, large cell, anaplastic or mixed carcinomas.
Notes
Cites: Lancet Oncol. 2012 Jul;13(7):663-4 PMID 22946126
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Jun;109(6):633-9 PMID 11445519
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2001 May;12(4):365-74 PMID 11456233
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2014 Jul;29(7):517-25 PMID 24981789
Cites: Carcinogenesis. 2005 Oct;26(10):1821-8 PMID 15917305
Cites: Epidemiology. 2000 Sep;11(5):487-95 PMID 10955399
Cites: Environ Res. 2000 Nov;84(3):255-64 PMID 11097799
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2014 Feb;122(2):172-7 PMID 24273233
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1994 Jan 20;330(3):159-64 PMID 8264737
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2012 Nov;69(11):787-92 PMID 22843434
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Jun 1;155(11):1016-22 PMID 12034580
Cites: Cancer. 2000 Dec 15;89(12):2613-21 PMID 11135223
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2012 Sep 1;131(5):1210-9 PMID 22052329
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Jul 1;152(1):32-40 PMID 10901327
Cites: Environ Res. 2011 Jul;111(5):727-35 PMID 21536265
Cites: Analyst. 1996 Sep;121(9):1183-90 PMID 8831275
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2013 Aug 27;10(9):3886-907 PMID 23985773
Cites: Ann Occup Hyg. 2007 Nov;51(8):693-701 PMID 17921238
Cites: Lung Cancer. 2001 Feb-Mar;31(2-3):139-48 PMID 11165392
Cites: IARC Monogr Eval Carcinog Risks Hum. 2014;105:9-699 PMID 26442290
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2002 Oct;75 Suppl:S122-32 PMID 12397423
Cites: J Environ Monit. 2004 Oct;6(10):799-806 PMID 15480493
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Jan 1;165(1):53-62 PMID 17062632
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1996 Mar;53(3):157-9 PMID 8704855
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1978 May;35(2):109-16 PMID 656334
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2011 Apr 1;183(7):941-8 PMID 21037020
Cites: Mutat Res. 2004 Aug 8;562(1-2):119-31 PMID 15279835
PubMed ID
28585123 View in PubMed
Less detail

Post-colonoscopy colorectal cancers in Sweden: room for quality improvement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290722
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2017 Jul; 29(7):855-860
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Anna Forsberg
Ulf Hammar
Anders Ekbom
Rolf Hultcrantz
Author Affiliation
aDepartment of Medicine Solna bDepartment of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine cDepartment of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Huddinge Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2017 Jul; 29(7):855-860
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Colonoscopy - adverse effects - standards
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Diagnostic Errors
Female
Humans
Male
Margins of Excision
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasm, Residual
Odds Ratio
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Quality Improvement - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Post-colonoscopy colorectal cancer (PCCRC), a cancer occurring within a short interval of a colonoscopy, might be partly explained as missed or incompletely resected lesions. Associated risk factors are age, sex, comorbidity, cancer location, and colonoscopy volume. There is a gap in the knowledge of prevalence of PCCRC and the impact of different risk factors in Sweden.
This is a retrospective population-based observational cohort study of the colonoscopies performed on adults during the years 2001-2010 that were identified from Swedish health registers. The rate of PCCRC (diagnosed 6-36 months after the first colonoscopy) was defined as the number of PCCRCs divided by the number of colorectal cancers (CRC) in the interval of 0-36 months. Univariate and multivariate Poisson regression analyses examined associations with PCCRC.
There were 289?729 colonoscopies performed on 249?079 individuals included in the study. There were 16?319 individuals with a colorectal cancer diagnosis 0-36 months after a colonoscopy. Of these, 1286 (7.9%) were PCCRCs. In the multivariate analysis, young age (18-30 years) and former polyp diagnosis had the highest risks [relative risk (RR)=3.3; 95% confidence interval: 2.1-5.2 and RR=3.1; 95% confidence interval: 2.7-3.6]. The impact of other risk factors, such as female sex, comorbidity, right sided colorectal cancer location, and time period, was consistent with the finding in other studies.
The prevalence of PCCRC in Sweden seems to be relatively high, indicating that there is room for improvement in colonoscopy quality. The high RR of PCCRC in the youngest age group, even though there were only a few cases, has not been described in other studies.
PubMed ID
28410353 View in PubMed
Less detail

Pain Sensitivity and its Relation to Spreading on the Body, Intensity, Frequency, and Duration of Pain: A Cross-Sectional Population-based Study (SwePain).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290759
Source
Clin J Pain. 2017 Jul; 33(7):579-587
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Britt Larsson
Björn Gerdle
Jonas Björk
Anna Grimby-Ekman
Author Affiliation
*Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping ‡Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg †Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Clin J Pain. 2017 Jul; 33(7):579-587
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Chronic Pain - classification - epidemiology - psychology
Community Health Planning
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Pain Threshold - psychology
Prospective Studies
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Translating
Abstract
Individuals with chronic pain often report increased pain sensitivity compared with pain-free individuals; hence, it is crucial to determine whether and how different pain characteristics influence or interact with pain sensitivity. An alternative to experimental pain sensitivity testing is the self-reported pain sensitivity questionnaire (PSQ), which captures pain sensitivity in various body areas.This study compares PSQ in individuals with and without pain and clarifies how pain sensitivity relates to spreading of pain on the body, and to intensity, frequency, duration of pain and to age and sex.
A total of 5905 individuals with pain and 572 individuals without pain from the general population in southeastern Sweden completed and returned a postal questionnaire.
The mean PSQ score was 3.9 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.88-3.98) in individuals with pain and 3.5 (95% CI, 3.38-3.64) in pain-free individuals. Hence, PSQ was the highest among individuals with pain, with a difference of 0.4 (95% CI, 0.30-0.56). There was a considerable variation in the PSQ values (mean=3.5; SD=1.54) among pain-free individuals. Pain sensitivity was positively related to spreading, intensity, and frequency of pain, with a correlation coefficient of 0.3. PSQ was higher in widespread pain, 4.5 (95% CI, 4.27-4.69) in women and 4.3 (95% CI, 3.94-4.71) in men, than in local pain, 3.7 (95% CI, 3.61-3.91) in women and 3.8 (95% CI, 3.66-3.95) in men. The score for women with regional pain was between local and widespread pain at 4.0 (95% CI, 3.95-4.11) and that for men with regional pain was 3.8 (95% CI, 3.69-3.87), which is equal to that of local pain.
The positive association between pain sensitivity and spreading of pain on the body provides some evidence that the extent of spreading may be related to the degree of pain sensitivity. Before clinical use of PSQ, psychometric development and further research are needed.
PubMed ID
27648588 View in PubMed
Less detail

Population-based study shows that teenage girls with asthma had impaired health-related quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290881
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2017 Jul; 106(7):1128-1135
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Linnea Hedman
Caroline Stridsman
Martin Andersson
Helena Backman
Sven-Arne Jansson
Eva Rönmark
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, The OLIN Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2017 Jul; 106(7):1128-1135
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control - psychology
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study examined the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of teenagers with and without asthma, including the impact of their sex, allergic conditions, smoking, living conditions and physical activity.
The Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden (OLIN) studies recruited a cohort of schoolchildren in 2006. The parents of all children aged seven to eight years in three municipalities were invited to complete a questionnaire and 2585 (96%) participated. The cohort was followed up at the ages of 11-12 years and 14-15 years with high participation rates. At 14-15 years, the HRQoL questionnaire KIDSCREEN-10 and Asthma Control Test were added.
Girls with current asthma at 14-15 years had a lower mean HRQoL score than girls without asthma (46.4 versus 49.3, p
PubMed ID
28345180 View in PubMed
Less detail

Some risk factors for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20864
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 1999;12(2):135-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
B. Persson
M. Fredrikson
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 1999;12(2):135-42
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) has been subject to several epidemiological studies and various occupational and non-occupational exposures have been identified as determinants. The present study is a pooled analysis of two earlier methodologically similar case-referent studies encompassing 199 cases of NHL and 479 referents, all alive. Exposure information, mainly on occupational agents, was obtained by mailed questionnaires to the subjects. Exposure to white spirits, thinner, and aviation gasoline as well as work as a painter was connected with increased odds ratios, whereas no increased risk was noted for benzene. Farming was associated with a decreased odds ratio and exposure to phenoxy herbicides, wood preservatives, and work as a lumberjack showed increased odds ratios. Moreover, exposure to plastic and rubber chemicals and also contact with some kinds of pets appeared with increased odds ratios. Office employment and housework showed decreased odds ratios. This study indicates the importance of investigating exposures not occurring very frequently in the general population. Solvents were studied as a group of compounds but were also separated into various specific compounds. The present findings suggest that the carcinogenic property of solvents is not only related to the aromatic ones or to the occurrence of benzene contamination, but also to other types of compounds.
PubMed ID
10465904 View in PubMed
Less detail

Modification of cancer risk in offspring by parental cancer (Sweden).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21060
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1999 Apr;10(2):125-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
K. Hemminki
P. Vaittinen
P. Kyyrönen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, CNT Novum, Huddinge, Sweden.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1999 Apr;10(2):125-9
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Family Health
Female
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Genetic Diseases, Inborn - genetics
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - genetics
Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology - genetics
Organ Specificity - genetics
Parents
Poisson Distribution
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Familial cancer risks were studied in offspring whose parents had a similar (concordant) or a different (discordant) cancer in order to assess the modification of cancer risks from one generation to another. METHODS: We used the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to calculate familial rate ratios (FRRs) to the offspring when their parents had concordant and discordant cancers. Cancer sites were included if there was at least one pair of parents with the same cancer. In situ cancers were included in a separate analysis in order to increase the numbers of cases. RESULTS: The risk of colon, all bowel, lung and breast cancer and melanoma increased 1.1-1.2 times when one parent and 1.3-1.6 times when two parents had any discordant cancer, suggesting involvement of environmental and hereditary effects shared by many forms of cancer. When both parents had colon cancer or melanoma, the respective risks in the offspring were 3.0 and 9.3 but only based on single triplets. For all bowel cancer the risk was 3.4, approximately multiplicative from the familial one parent-offspring risk. For concordant lung and breast cancer triplets the risk in offspring was 11.8 and 29.4, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Even discordant cancer in parents increased cancer risk in offspring. This may be due to environmental and hereditary causes, and deserves consideration in epidemiological studies. The high risks in families where both parents had the same cancer suggest interactions of hereditary and environmental factors.
PubMed ID
10231161 View in PubMed
Less detail

Familial cancer risks in offspring from discordant parental cancers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21168
Source
Int J Cancer. 1999 Mar 31;81(1):12-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-31-1999
Author
P. Vaittinen
K. Hemminki
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1999 Mar 31;81(1):12-9
Date
Mar-31-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Family Health
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Organ Specificity - genetics
Parents
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Analysis of familial cancer risks between discordant sites provides etiologic understanding on genetic and environmental risks factors of site-specific cancers. We used the Swedish nation-wide Family-Cancer Database to analyze familial risks in discordant cancers of offspring and parents. Familial risk ratios (FRRs) were calculated for cancer in offspring aged 15 to 53 years at 22 sites, discordant from parental sites. We confirmed many reported associations. Consistent novel findings associated parental-offspring sites of pancreas-breast, breast-testis and uterus-nervous system. For these, the FRRs were modest, 1.2 to 1.5 in the whole Database, but the FRRs increased in those whose parents were diagnosed before age 50. Pancreas and liver cancers showed FRRs of 2.5 to 3.3 in offspring of women and of 1.3 in offspring of men. One or both of these cancers was/were associated with cancers of stomach, colon, breast, uterus, ovary and prostate. Melanoma was associated with pancreas, breast, skin and nervous-system cancers and with leukemias. Myeloma showed a concordant FRR of about 4.0 and was associated with prostate cancer and non-thyroid endocrine-gland cancers. Mutations in known cancer-related genes may explain some of these findings, but new susceptibility genes are yet to be found. For melanoma, pancreatic and liver cancer, environmental factors are important etiologic factors and may contribute to the familial effects observed.
PubMed ID
10077145 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mortality and cancer incidence in Swedish battery workers exposed to cadmium and nickel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21275
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1998 Nov;55(11):755-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
L. Järup
T. Bellander
C. Hogstedt
G. Spång
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health, Stockholm County Council, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1998 Nov;55(11):755-9
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cadmium Compounds - poisoning
Carcinogens
Chemical Industry
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Mortality
Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Nickel - adverse effects
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To follow up cancer incidence and mortality in a group of Swedish battery workers exposed to nickel hydroxide and cadmium oxide. METHODS: 869 workers, employed at least one year between the years 1940 and 1980 were followed up until 1992. Vital status and causes of death were obtained from the Swedish cause of death registry. Cancer morbidity was retrieved from the Swedish cancer registry. Regional reference rates were used to compute the expected numbers of deaths and cancers. RESULTS: Up to 31 December, 1992, a total of 315 deaths (292 in men and 23 in women) had occurred in the cohort. For men, the overall standardised mortality ratio (SMR) was 106 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 93.7 to 118) and for women 83.8 (95% CI 53.1 to 126). The SMRs for total cancer mortality were 125 (95% CI 98.2 to 157) for men and 69.5 (95% CI 25.5 to 151) for women. The SMR for lung cancer in men was 176 (95% CI 101 to 287). No lung cancers were found among female workers. Up to 31 December, 1991, a total of 118 cancers had occurred in the cohort. A significantly increased standardised incidence ratio (SIR) was found for cancer of the nose and nasal sinuses in men, three cases v 0.36 expected, yielding an SIR of 832 (95% CI 172 to 2430). Applying a 10 year latency period in cohort members exposed to > or = 1000 micrograms cadmium/m3, the SIR was 1107 (95% CI 134 to 4000). Similarly, for cohort members exposed to 2000 micrograms nickel/m3, the SIR was 1080 (95% CI 131 to 3900). CONCLUSION: There was an increased overall risk for lung cancer, but no exposure-response relation between cumulative exposure to cadmium or nickel and risk of lung cancer. There was a highly significant increased risk of cancer of the nose and nasal sinuses, which may be caused by exposure to nickel or cadmium or a combination of both exposures.
PubMed ID
9924452 View in PubMed
Less detail

Daily air pollution levels and acute asthma in southern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15702
Source
Eur Respir J. 1998 Oct;12(4):900-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
B. Forsberg
N. Stjernberg
R. Linné
B. Segerstedt
S. Wall
Author Affiliation
Dept of Environmental Health, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1998 Oct;12(4):900-5
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - chemically induced - diagnosis - epidemiology
Environmental monitoring
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Linear Models
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects - analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the association between daily air pollution levels and the occurrence of acute respiratory signs and symptoms among people with asthma or asthma-like problems. Thirty eight subjects in the southern Swedish city of Landskrona kept a daily diary for 10 weeks. The daily prevalence of symptoms, supplementary bronchodilator use and peak flow deviations were compared with measurements of environmental nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide, temperature and humidity in the city. The occurrence of severe asthma, both during the day and during the evening, was significantly positively associated with the concurrent 24 h average concentration of NO2, which never exceeded 72 microg x m(-3). A correlation of borderline significance was found between the use of on-demand medication and the NO2 level. However, peak flow deviations were not associated with air pollution or weather conditions, which may be explained by the beneficial effect of bronchodilators used by 28 of the subjects. The results of this study confirm those of some earlier studies and suggest that aggravation of asthma is related to daily variations in air quality, as indicated by relatively low ambient concentrations of nitrogen dioxide. These results also indicate that it may be appropriate to examine severe asthma symptoms separately.
PubMed ID
9817166 View in PubMed
Less detail

A randomized controlled trial of the effect of pertussis vaccines on atopic disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15715
Source
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1998 Aug;152(8):734-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
L. Nilsson
N I Kjellman
B. Björkstén
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Environment, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1998 Aug;152(8):734-8
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child, Preschool
Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine - administration & dosage
Double-Blind Method
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology - etiology
Incidence
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Pertussis Vaccine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Skin Tests
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Whooping Cough - prevention & control
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Pertussis vaccination in infancy has been suggested to increase the risk for development of asthma and allergy. OBJECTIVE: To assess sensitization rates and development of atopic diseases in a prospective randomized controlled trial of pertussis vaccine. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 669 children were randomized to 1 of 4 vaccine groups (2-component acellular pertussis, 5-component acellular pertussis, whole-cell pertussis vaccines, and placebo [diphtheria and tetanus toxoids]). Diphtheria and tetanus toxoids were also given to the children in the pertussis vaccine groups. The children were evaluated by means of questionnaires at age 2 months, 7 months, and 2 1/2 years; skin prick tests at age 7 months and 2 1/2 years; and blinded clinical investigation at age 2 1/2 years. The families were contacted at regular intervals to assess possible adverse effects after the vaccinations and symptoms of whooping cough. RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of atopic diseases was 30% and incidence rates were similar in the 4 groups after adjusting for family history. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and home dampness did not confound these results. The frequency of adverse effects did not differ appreciably between atopic and nonatopic children, with the exception that a nodule at the vaccination site was more frequent after whole-cell pertussis vaccination in the nonatopic children. Among 47 children with proven pertussis, atopic disease appeared in 19 (40%). Of these 47 children, 9 (19%) developed asthma, as compared with 58 (9%) noninfected children (P=.03). CONCLUSIONS: We found no support for a drastic increase in allergic manifestations after pertussis vaccination. There was a positive association between whooping cough and asthma by 2 1/2 years of age. There seems to be little reason to withhold pertussis vaccination from infants, irrespective of family history of allergy.
PubMed ID
9701130 View in PubMed
Less detail

Asthma among secondary schoolchildren in relation to the school environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15766
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 1997 Nov;27(11):1270-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
G. Smedje
D. Norbäck
C. Edling
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 1997 Nov;27(11):1270-8
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Comparative Study
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schools
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Poor indoor air quality has been suggested to be related to the increase in the prevalence of asthma that has occurred in the western world, especially among children and young persons. Apart from the home, school is the most important indoor environment for children. OBJECTIVES: The aims were to study the prevalence of current asthma among secondary pupils and its relationship to the school environment, but also to personal factors and domestic exposures. METHODS: Data on asthmatic symptoms, other health aspects, and domestic exposures were gathered using a questionnaire which was sent to 762 pupils in the seventh form (13-14 years old) in 11 randomly chosen schools in the county of Uppsala in Sweden. Pupils answering 'yes' to having had asthma diagnosed by a physician, and having had recent asthma attacks, or who used asthma medication were defined as having current asthma. Data on exposures at school were gathered by measurements in 28 classrooms. The relationship between asthma and exposures was analysed by multiple logistic regression. RESULTS: The questionnaire was completed by 627 (82%). Current asthma was found among 40 pupils (6.4%). Current asthma was more common in those who had an atopic disposition, or food allergy, or who had attended a day care centre for several years. Controlling for these factors, current asthma was related to several factors in the school environment. There were more pupils with current asthma in schools that were larger, had more open shelves, lower room temperature, higher relative air humidity, higher concentrations of formaldehyde or other volatile organic compounds, viable moulds or bacteria or more cat allergen in the settled dust. CONCLUSIONS: Although the pupils attended school for a minor part of their time, our study indicates that the quality of the school environment is of importance and may affect asthmatic symptoms.
PubMed ID
9420130 View in PubMed
Less detail

Frequency of patients with acute asthma in relation to ozone, nitrogen dioxide, other pollutants of ambient air and meteorological observations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15820
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1997;69(5):317-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
A. Holmén
J. Blomqvist
H. Frindberg
Y. Johnelius
N E Eriksson
K A Henricson
P. Herrström
B. Högstedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1997;69(5):317-22
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Air - analysis
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - chemically induced - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects - analysis
Ozone - adverse effects - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Weather
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study the association of the daily frequency of registration of patients with acute asthma at the emergency department of a central hospital in the south-west of Sweden with levels of air pollution and meteorological observations. METHODS: A retrospective longitudinal study was made of asthma patients taken from a hospital registry. This information was correlated with measurements of ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide, toluene, temperature and relative humidity. Patients were from the catchment area of the Central Hospital of Halmstad containing around 120,000 inhabitants. A total of 4127 visits of patients with acute asthma to the emergency department at the Central Hospital of Halmstad were registered during a period of 1247 days from January 1990 to May 1993. The differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique was used to monitor levels of air pollutants over a distance of 1000 m in the central part of the town of Halmstad. Data on temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, wind speed and wind direction for the time period were supplied by the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI). RESULTS: There were many statistically significant correlations between the levels of air pollutants and the meteorological measurements and a strong negative correlation between ozone and nitrogen dioxide. There was a statistically significant effect on asthma visits in children of low temperature and high nitrogen dioxide levels, and on asthma visits in adults of high temperature and high levels of ozone. CONCLUSIONS: There was a different reaction pattern in children and adults with asthma regarding temperature and ozone/nitrogen dioxide. The strong correlations between temperature and air pollution and between the levels of ozone and nitrogen dioxide made the true relation between asthma, air pollution and temperature hard to evaluate statistically.
PubMed ID
9192215 View in PubMed
Less detail

Symptoms related to asthma and chronic bronchitis in three areas of Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15938
Source
Eur Respir J. 1994 Dec;7(12):2146-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
E. Björnsson
P. Plaschke
E. Norrman
C. Janson
B. Lundbäck
A. Rosenhall
N. Lindholm
L. Rosenhall
E. Berglund
G. Boman
Author Affiliation
Dept of Lung Medicine, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala University, Sweden.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1994 Dec;7(12):2146-53
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution
Asthma - epidemiology
Bronchitis - epidemiology
Climate
Cough - epidemiology
European Union
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Sounds
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Does the prevalence of respiratory symptoms differ between regions? As a part of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey, we present data from an international questionnaire on asthma symptoms occurring during a 12 month period, smoking and symptoms of chronic bronchitis. The questionnaire was mailed to 10,800 persons aged 20-44 yrs living in three regions of Sweden (Västerbotten, Uppsala and Göteborg) with different environmental characteristics. The total response rate was 86%. Wheezing was reported by 20.5%, and the combination of wheezing without a cold and wheezing with breathlessness by 7.4%. The use of asthma medication was reported by 5.3%. Long-term cough and/or morning cough together with problems with phlegm was reported by 12.8%; the prevalence being highest in the most polluted area (Göteborg). When using multivariate analysis, no significant difference in asthma-related symptoms was found between the centres. Women reported cough more frequently, but otherwise gender did not influence symptom prevalence. Our results indicate that bronchitis symptoms occur more frequently in Göteborg, the most polluted of the Swedish centres, but that the prevalence rates of asthma-related symptoms do not differ between these three regions.
PubMed ID
7713195 View in PubMed
Less detail

Atopic sensitization and respiratory symptoms among Polish and Swedish school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15948
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 1994 Sep;24(9):826-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
L. Bråbäck
A. Breborowicz
S. Dreborg
A. Knutsson
H. Pieklik
B. Björkstén
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Sundsvall Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 1994 Sep;24(9):826-35
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Child
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology
Industry
Male
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Poland - epidemiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
School Health Services
Skin Tests
Social Conditions
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Allergic sensitization and symptoms from the airways in relation to air pollution were compared in 10-12-year-old school children (n = 1113) from urban Konin in central Poland and both urban and rural parts of Sundsvall in northern Sweden. The measurements included parental questionnaires, skin-prick tests and serial peak flow measurements during 2 weeks with simultaneous monitoring of outdoor air pollutants. The skin-prick test technique was validated by IgE antibody determinations. The levels of common industrial pollutants, SO2 and smoke particles were much higher in Konin than in urban Sundsvall and the levels of NO2 were similar. Various respiratory symptoms were more often reported among school children in Konin (except for wheezing and diagnosed asthma). Multiple logistic regression analyses yielded the following increased odds ratios for children in Konin as compared with the reference group (rural Sundsvall): chest tightness and breathlessness 3.48 (95% confidence interval 2.08-5.82), exercise-induced coughing attacks 3.69 (95% confidence interval 1.68-8.10), recurrent episodes of common cold 2.79 (95% confidence interval 1.53-5.09) and prolonged cough 4.89 (95% confidence interval 2.59-9.23). In contrast, as compared with rural Sundsvall, the adjusted odds ratio for a positive skin-prick test was decreased in Konin, but increased in urban Sundsvall, 0.58 (95% confidence interval 0.37-0.91) and 1.67 (95% confidence interval 1.15-2.42) respectively. The study confirms that living in urban, as compared with rural areas, is associated with an increased prevalence of respiratory symptoms and sensitization to allergens. These differences could be explained by air pollution. Respiratory symptoms were more common in a similar urban group of Polish children who were exposed to even higher levels of air pollution. These children, however, had a much lower prevalence of sensitization to allergens, as compared with the Swedish children. This indicates that differences in lifestyle and standard of living between western Europe and a former socialist country influences the prevalence of atopy.
PubMed ID
7812884 View in PubMed
Less detail

693 records – page 1 of 35.