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Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in maternal and fetal blood samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58376
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jul;111(9):1249-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Anita Mazdai
Nathan G Dodder
Mary Pell Abernathy
Ronald A Hites
Robert M Bigsby
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis 46202-5121,USA.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jul;111(9):1249-52
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Environmental Exposure
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Humans
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Polybrominated Biphenyls - analysis - blood
Pregnancy
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk assessment
Sweden
Thyroid Hormones - blood
United States
Abstract
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used as flame retardants in consumer goods, such as plastics, electronics, textiles, and construction material. PBDEs have been found in human milk, fat, and blood samples. Rodent studies indicate that PBDEs may be detrimental to neurodevelopment, possibly by lowering thyroid hormone concentrations in blood. In the present study, we determined concentrations of PBDEs and thyroid hormones in human fetal and maternal serum. Patients presenting in labor to Indiana University and Wishard Memorial County hospitals in Indianapolis, who were older than 18 years, were recruited to participate. Twelve paired samples of maternal and cord blood were obtained and analyzed using gas chromatographic mass spectrometry; thyroid hormone concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay. Six congeners of PBDE were measured in maternal and fetal serum samples. The concentrations of total PBDEs found in maternal sera ranged from 15 to 580 ng/g lipid, and the concentrations found in fetal samples ranged from 14 to 460 ng/g lipid. Individual fetal blood concentrations did not differ from the corresponding maternal concentrations, indicating that measurement of maternal PBDE blood levels is useful in predicting fetal exposure; similarly, other reports have shown a high correlation between PBDE in mother's milk and fetal exposure. In accord with reports on other biologic samples, the tetrabrominated PBDE congener BDE-47 accounted for 53-64% of total PBDEs in the serum. The concentrations of PBDEs found in maternal and fetal serum samples were 20-106-fold higher than the levels reported previously in a similar population of Swedish mothers and infants. In this small sample, there was no apparent correlation between serum PBDEs and thyroid hormone concentrations. Our study shows that human fetuses in the United States may be exposed to relatively high levels of PBDEs. Further investigation is required to determine if these levels are specific to central Indiana and to assess the toxic potential of these exposure levels.
Notes
Comment In: Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jul;111(9):A48012877153
PubMed ID
12842781 View in PubMed
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Positive health in a group of Swedish white-collar workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71452
Source
Psychol Rep. 2002 Dec;91(3 Pt 1):839-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Petra Lindfors
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
Source
Psychol Rep. 2002 Dec;91(3 Pt 1):839-45
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Quality of Life - psychology
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Ryff's Psychological Well-being scales cover six dimensions of psychological well-being (Self-acceptance, Environmental mastery, Positive relations with others, Personal growth, Purpose in life, and Autonomy) and have been suggested as an adequate measure of positive psychological functioning. Apart from translating the scales to Swedish and examining the psychometric properties of the measure, the present study aimed to explore the relationships between the Ryff scales and the General Health Questionnaire, negative affectivity, and physical symptoms using self-ratings from 91 full-time employed women and men. Given low internal consistency for the different dimensions of the Ryff scales, correlational analyses were based on a composite index. Analysis indicated negative relations between the Ryff index and other measures and are in line with prior findings showing that the index taps positive psychological functioning while other indices focus on negative functioning.
PubMed ID
12530731 View in PubMed
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A statistical human resources costing and accounting model for analysing the economic effects of an intervention at a workplace.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71473
Source
Ergonomics. 2002 Sep 15;45(11):764-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2002
Author
Bodil J Landstad
Gunnar Gelin
Claes Malmquist
Stig Vinberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Bodil.Landstad@adm.umu.se
Source
Ergonomics. 2002 Sep 15;45(11):764-87
Date
Sep-15-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accounting
Adult
Cost Allocation
Female
Housekeeping - economics - manpower
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Occupational Health Services - economics
Preventive Health Services - economics
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sick Leave - economics - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Workplace
Abstract
The study had two primary aims. The first aim was to combine a human resources costing and accounting approach (HRCA) with a quantitative statistical approach in order to get an integrated model. The second aim was to apply this integrated model in a quasi-experimental study in order to investigate whether preventive intervention affected sickness absence costs at the company level. The intervention studied contained occupational organizational measures, competence development, physical and psychosocial working environmental measures and individual and rehabilitation measures on both an individual and a group basis. The study is a quasi-experimental design with a non-randomized control group. Both groups involved cleaning jobs at predominantly female workplaces. The study plan involved carrying out before and after studies on both groups. The study included only those who were at the same workplace during the whole of the study period. In the HRCA model used here, the cost of sickness absence is the net difference between the costs, in the form of the value of the loss of production and the administrative cost, and the benefits in the form of lower labour costs. According to the HRCA model, the intervention used counteracted a rise in sickness absence costs at the company level, giving an average net effect of 266.5 Euros per person (full-time working) during an 8-month period. Using an analogue statistical analysis on the whole of the material, the contribution of the intervention counteracted a rise in sickness absence costs at the company level giving an average net effect of 283.2 Euros. Using a statistical method it was possible to study the regression coefficients in sub-groups and calculate the p-values for these coefficients; in the younger group the intervention gave a calculated net contribution of 605.6 Euros with a p-value of 0.073, while the intervention net contribution in the older group had a very high p-value. Using the statistical model it was also possible to study contributions of other variables and interactions. This study established that the HRCA model and the integrated model produced approximately the same monetary outcomes. The integrated model, however, allowed a deeper understanding of the various possible relationships and quantified the results with confidence intervals.
PubMed ID
12487690 View in PubMed
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Nordic dentists' knowledge and attitudes on dental amalgam from health and environmental perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71518
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2002 Oct;60(5):315-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
Katariina Ylinen
Göran Löfroth
Author Affiliation
Inkoon kunnan terveyskeskus, Finland.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2002 Oct;60(5):315-20
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Composite Resins - adverse effects - chemistry
Denmark
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects - chemistry - economics
Dental Restoration, Permanent - economics
Dental Waste
Dentist-Patient Relations
Dentists
Education, Dental
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Ethics, Dental
Female
Finland
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Health
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Medical Waste Disposal
Mercury - adverse effects
Middle Aged
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to identify differences and similarities between the Nordic countries in dentists' use of dental amalgam as a restorative material, and also their knowledge and attitudes about amalgam from health, environmental, ethical, economic and social points of view. Procedures for handling amalgam waste were also studied. A random sample of 250 dentists was drawn from the national registers of authorized dentists in each country in late autumn 1997. At the beginning of 1998, a questionnaire was sent to all the dentists in the study group. The response rate was 77.6% in Denmark, 73.2% in Finland, 78.8% in Norway, and 84.0% in Sweden. In Finland and Sweden the use of dental amalgam had almost ceased, particularly for younger patients, while in Norway and especially in Denmark it was still widely used. Dentists' knowledge of the environmental effects of amalgam was confused, but most dentists had installed amalgam separators in their dental units by 1998. The majority of dentists in each country wanted to keep dental amalgam as a restorative material even in the future, and they did not want to ban the import of mercury to their home countries. Most dentists considered amalgam to be a health risk for at least some patients, and a great majority (from 76% in Sweden to 94% in Norway) considered composite as a possible odontological risk to patients. Since a majority of the dentists considered both amalgam and composites possibly harmful to patients, efforts to develop better alternatives to amalgam should continue.
PubMed ID
12418724 View in PubMed
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Factors promoting sustainable work in women with fibromyalgia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117089
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2013 Sep;35(19):1622-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Annie Palstam
Gunvor Gard
Kaisa Mannerkorpi
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. annie.palstam@gu.se
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2013 Sep;35(19):1622-9
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - psychology
Employment
Female
Fibromyalgia - diagnosis - psychology
Focus Groups
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Pain - etiology - psychology
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Urban Population
Women, Working - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
To examine and describe the factors promoting sustainable work in women with fibromyalgia (FM).
A qualitative interview study. Twenty-seven gainfully employed women with FM participated in five focus group interviews. Their median age was 52 years, ranging from 33 to 62. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed by qualitative latent content analysis.
Four categories were identified describing factors promoting sustainable work: the meaning of work and individual strategies were individual promoters while a favourable work environment and social support outside work were environmental promoters. The meaning of work included individual meaning and social meaning. The individual strategies included handling symptoms, the work day and long-term work life. A favourable work environment included the physical and psychosocial work environment. Social support outside work included societal and private social supports.
Promoting factors for work were identified, involving individual and environmental factors. These working women with FM had developed advanced well-functioning strategies to enhance their work ability. The development of such strategies should be supported by health-care professionals as well as employers to promote sustainable work in women with FM.
Work disability is a common consequence of fibromyalgia (FM). Working women with FM appear to have developed advanced well-functioning individual strategies to enhance their work ability. The development of individual strategies should be supported by health-care professionals as well as employers to promote sustainable work and health in women with FM.
PubMed ID
23336119 View in PubMed
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Altered microRNA profiles in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid exosomes in asthmatic patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117113
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2013 Mar;131(3):894-903
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Bettina Levänen
Nirav R Bhakta
Patricia Torregrosa Paredes
Rebecca Barbeau
Stefanie Hiltbrunner
Joshua L Pollack
C Magnus Sköld
Magnus Svartengren
Johan Grunewald
Susanne Gabrielsson
Anders Eklund
Britt-Marie Larsson
Prescott G Woodruff
David J Erle
Åsa M Wheelock
Author Affiliation
Respiratory Medicine Unit, Department of Medicine, and Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. bettina.levanen@ki.se
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2013 Mar;131(3):894-903
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Asthma - genetics - physiopathology
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - chemistry
Case-Control Studies
Cytokines - genetics
Environmental Exposure
Exosomes - genetics
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Janus Kinases - genetics
Male
MicroRNAs - analysis
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases - genetics
STAT Transcription Factors - genetics
Sweden
Vital Capacity
Young Adult
Abstract
Asthma is characterized by increased airway narrowing in response to nonspecific stimuli. The disorder is influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. Exosomes are nanosized vesicles of endosomal origin released from inflammatory and epithelial cells that have been implicated in asthma. In this study we characterized the microRNA (miRNA) content of exosomes in healthy control subjects and patients with mild intermittent asthma both at unprovoked baseline and in response to environmental challenge.
To investigate alterations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) exosomal miRNA profiles due to asthma, and following subway air exposure.
Exosomes were isolated from BALF from healthy control subjects (n = 10) and patients with mild intermittent asthma (n = 10) after subway and control exposures. Exosomal RNA was analyzed by using microarrays containing probes for 894 human miRNAs, and selected findings were validated with quantitative RT-PCR. Results were analyzed by using multivariate modeling.
The presence of miRNAs was confirmed in exosomes from BALF of both asthmatic patients and healthy control subjects. Significant differences in BALF exosomal miRNA was detected for 24 miRNAs with a subset of 16 miRNAs, including members of the let-7 and miRNA-200 families, providing robust classification of patients with mild nonsymptomatic asthma from healthy subjects with 72% cross-validated predictive power (Q(2) = 0.72). In contrast, subway exposure did not cause any significant alterations in miRNA profiles.
These studies demonstrate substantial differences in exosomal miRNA profiles between healthy subjects and patients with unprovoked, mild, stable asthma. These changes might be important in the inflammatory response leading to bronchial hyperresponsiveness and asthma.
Notes
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Comment In: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2013 Mar;131(3):904-523360758
PubMed ID
23333113 View in PubMed
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Current trends in arctic medical research in the Nordic countries with special reference to Sweden

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94088
Source
Pages 8-11 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
be better utilized and the investigations may be broadened to examine a greater number of variables. Further- more, by comparing various ethnic groups living in similar environments, it may be possible to distinguish the signi- ficance of environmental contra-genetic factors. It may finally be
  1 document  
Author
Linderholm, H
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden
Source
Pages 8-11 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Finland
Norway
Sweden
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic medical research
Denmark
Environmental contra-genetic factors
Ethnic minorities
Finland
Greenland
Human adaptability
Iceland
Lapps
Nordic Council for Arctic Medical Reserach (NCAMR)
Nordic countries
Norway
Sweden
Documents
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Valuation and handling of dialogue in leadership: a grounded theory study in Swedish hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134789
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2011;25(1):34-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
C. Grill
G. Ahlborg
E C Lindgren
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Institute of Medicine at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. christina.grill@lthalland.se
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2011;25(1):34-54
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Communication
Female
Hospitals, Public
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Leadership
Male
Middle Aged
Observation
Sweden
Abstract
Leadership can positively affect the work environment and health. Communication and dialogue are an important part in leadership. Studies of how dialogue is valued and handled in first-line leadership have not so far been found. The aim of this study is to develop a theoretical understanding of how first-line leaders at hospitals in western Sweden value and handle dialogue in the organisation.
The study design was explorative and based on grounded theory. Data collection consisted of interviews and observations. A total of 11 first-line leaders at two hospitals in western Sweden were chosen as informants, and for four of them observation was also used.
One core category emerged in the analysis: leaders' communicative actions, which could be strategically or understanding-oriented, and experienced as equal or unequal and performed equitably or inequitably, within a power relationship. Four different types of communicativeactions emerged: collaborative, nurturing, controlling, and confrontational. Leaders had strategies for creating arenas and relationships for dialogue, but dialogue could be constrained by external circumstances or ignorance of the frameworks needed to conduct and accomplish dialogue.
First-line leaders should be offered guidance in understanding the consequences of consciously choosing and strengthening the communication component in leadership.
The positive valuation of dialogue was not always manifest in practical action. One significant consequence of not using dialogue was that information with impact on organisational efficiency and finances was communicated upwards in the management system.
PubMed ID
21542461 View in PubMed
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Concepts of functioning and health important to people with systemic sclerosis: a qualitative study in four European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134810
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2011 Jun;70(6):1074-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Tanja A Stamm
Malin Mattsson
Carina Mihai
Juliane Stöcker
Alexa Binder
Bettina Bauernfeind
Georg Stummvoll
Gunvor Gard
Roger Hesselstrand
Gunnel Sandqvist
Oana Draghicescu
Ana Maria Gherghe
Malina Voicu
Klaus P Machold
Oliver Distler
Josef S Smolen
Carina Boström
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Rheumatology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna, Austria. tanja.stamm@meduniwien.ac.at
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2011 Jun;70(6):1074-9
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Austria
Disability Evaluation
Environment
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Romania
Scleroderma, Systemic - physiopathology - psychology - rehabilitation
Sweden
Switzerland
Abstract
To describe the experiences of people with systemic sclerosis (SSc) in different European countries of functioning and health and to link these experiences to the WHO International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to develop a common understanding from a bio-psycho-social perspective.
A qualitative multicentre study with focus-group interviews was performed in four European countries: Austria, Romania, Sweden and Switzerland. The qualitative data analysis followed a modified form of 'meaning condensation' and the concepts that emerged in the analysis were linked to the ICF.
63 people with SSc participated in 13 focus groups. In total, 86 concepts were identified. 32 (37%) of these were linked to the ICF component body functions and structures, 21 (24%) to activities and participation, 26 (30%) to environmental factors, 6 (7%) to personal factors and 1 (1%) to the health condition itself. 19 concepts (22%) were identified in all four countries and included impaired hand function, household activities, paid work, drugs, climate and coldness, support from others and experiences with healthcare institutions, non-pharmacological treatment, social security and benefits.
Concepts identified in all four countries could be used for guiding clinical assessment, as well as interdisciplinary team care and rheumatological rehabilitation for patients with SSc. For a full understanding of the aspects of the disease that were most relevant to people with SSc, people with SSc from multiple countries needed to be involved.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21540204 View in PubMed
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Lung cancer and mesothelioma among engine room crew--case reports with risk assessment of previous and ongoing exposure to carcinogens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93427
Source
Int Marit Health. 2007;58(1-4):5-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Forsell Karl
Hageberg S.
Nilsson Ralph
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Sahlgrenska, Goeteborg, Sweden. karl.forsell@amm.gu.se
Source
Int Marit Health. 2007;58(1-4):5-13
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Asbestos - toxicity
Carcinogens - toxicity
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced
Male
Men's health
Mesothelioma - chemically induced
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced
Occupational Exposure
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - toxicity
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Ships
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article is to illustrate, by means of case reports on occupational exposure in four men with cancer, the hazards of previous and ongoing carcinogenic exposures in ships' engine rooms. Several cases of cancer occurred within a few years among the engine room crew of a passenger ferry. An investigation was undertaken to establish the number of cases, the types of cancers involved, and their possible relation to work. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Nine cases of cancer among crew members of the ferry were reported between 2001 and 2006, six of which occurred in crew working in the engine room. During the investigated time period, 65 men had been employed in the engine room (mean age 40, range 16-65, years). Four cases were referred to our department. Medical history, personal risk factors and specific diagnoses were collected by medical examinations and from the medical files. An experienced occupational hygienist evaluated work-related exposure to carcinogens. RESULTS: Two engine room ratings contracted lung cancer at the age of 54 and 61, respectively. Both men had been smokers for many years (33 and 45 years, respectively). One engine room rating and one electrical engineer were diagnosed with mesothelioma at the age of 61 and 63, respectively. All four had started to work in engine rooms between 1959 and 1967. Carcinogenic exposure included asbestos, with an estimated cumulative exposure of 2-5 fibreyears/mL, as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitroarenes from oils, soot and engine exhaust. CONCLUSIONS: For the lung cancer cases, smoking and asbestos exposure were considered clear risk factors, and PAHs and nitroarenes possible risk factors. For the mesothelioma cases, former asbestos exposure was considered a causal factor. Asbestos can still be present on ships. Steps should be taken to reduce the exposure to asbestos, PAHs and nitroarenes, and smoking.
PubMed ID
18350972 View in PubMed
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The same factors influence job turnover and long spells of sick leave--a 3-year follow-up of Swedish nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93576
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2008 Aug;18(4):380-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Josephson Malin
Lindberg Per
Voss Margaretha
Alfredsson Lars
Vingård Eva
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Malin.Josephson@medsci.uu.se
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2008 Aug;18(4):380-5
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Age Factors
Cohort Studies
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Middle Aged
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In many countries, a general shortage of nurses is a public health problem, and retention of nurses in active work is a challenge. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether the same individual factors, working conditions and health problems had led to increased probability of both leaving jobs and prolonged sickness absence in a cohort of Swedish nurses over a period of 3 years. METHODS: A baseline questionnaire was answered by 2293 nurses, representing a response rate of 86%. Exposed and unexposed nurses were compared with regard to two outcomes. During the 3-year follow-up, exposed and unexposed nurses were compared with regard to two outcomes: resigning and having at least one sick leave spell that lasted 28 days or longer. RESULTS: We found that 18% of the nurses left their employment, and 16% had sick leave spells > or =28 days. Work in geriatric care, being socially excluded by superiors and/or workmates, negative effects of organizational changes and poor self-rated general health were factors that increased the likelihood of both leaving jobs and long-term sick leave. CONCLUSIONS: The present results underline the importance of improving working conditions and supporting sustainable health in order to prevent high turnover and prolonged sick leave among nurses. Resigning and moving to another institution can be interpreted as a way to actively cope with an unhealthy work environment.
PubMed ID
18292122 View in PubMed
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Variability of personal chemical exposure in eight office buildings in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180313
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 2004;14 Suppl 1:S49-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Bo Glas
Jan-Olof Levin
Berndt Stenberg
Hans Stenlund
Anna-Lena Sunesson
Author Affiliation
Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. bo.glas@vll.se
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 2004;14 Suppl 1:S49-57
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Aldehydes - analysis
Amines - analysis
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiologic Studies
Facility Design and Construction
Humans
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Organic Chemicals - analysis
Ozone - analysis
Particle Size
Reproducibility of Results
Sick Building Syndrome - etiology
Sweden
Workplace
Abstract
This study focuses on the variability in chemical exposures for individuals working in office buildings. The study involved eight office buildings with 79 participants, and exposures were measured using personal samplers for volatile organic compounds, aldehydes, amines, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and particles. Ventilation was assessed in each individual office. "Variability among buildings" and "variability among individuals" were evaluated for any component (of the 123) measured in samples from at least 20 persons, using variance component analysis and principal component analysis. Interpersonal differences explained the major part of the variance for 78% of the compounds versus between-buildings differences for 14% of the compounds. For 8% of compounds, the variation was explained in equal amounts by the differences among individuals and among buildings. This study illustrates the necessity for individualised measurements (versus stationary measurements in building) to estimate personal exposures. These results also support the conclusion that in case-referent studies of "sick building syndrome" (SBS), referents to SBS cases can be randomised for building location.
PubMed ID
15118745 View in PubMed
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Influence of persistent organic pollutants on the complement system in a population-based human sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257350
Source
Environ Int. 2014 Oct;71:94-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Jitender Kumar
P Monica Lind
Samira Salihovic
Bert van Bavel
Kristina N Ekdahl
Bo Nilsson
Lars Lind
Erik Ingelsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Epidemiology and Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: Jitender.Kumar@medsci.uu.se.
Source
Environ Int. 2014 Oct;71:94-100
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Complement C3 - immunology
Complement C3a - immunology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dioxins - analysis - toxicity
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Female
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - analysis - toxicity
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - analysis - toxicity
Immune System - drug effects
Male
Models, Statistical
Pesticides - analysis - toxicity
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - toxicity
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are toxic compounds generated through various industrial activities and have adverse effects on human health. Studies performed in cell cultures and animals have revealed that POPs can alter immune-system functioning. The complement system is part of innate immune system that helps to clear pathogens from the body. We performed a large-scale population-based study to find out associations between summary measures of different POPs and different complement system markers.
In this cross-sectional study, 16 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 3 organochlorine (OC) pesticides, octachloro-p-dibenzodioxin, and 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) were analyzed for their association with levels of protein complement 3 (C3), 3a (C3a), 4 (C4) and C3a/C3 ratio. A total of 992 individuals (all aged 70 years, 50% females) were recruited from the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors cohort. Regression analysis adjusting for a variety of confounders was performed to study the associations of different POP exposures (total toxic equivalency value or TEQ and sum of 16 PCBs) with protein complements.
The TEQ values were found to be positively associated with C3a (Ã?=0.07, 95% CI=0.017-0.131, p=0.01) and C3a/C3 ratio (Ã?=0.07, 95% CI=0.015-0.126, p=0.01) taking possible confounders into account. The association observed was mainly driven by PCB-126.
In this study involving 992 elderly individuals from the general population, we showed that POPs, mainly PCB-126, were associated with levels of complement system markers indicating that the association of these toxic compounds with downstream disease could be mediated by activation of immune system.
PubMed ID
24996157 View in PubMed
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Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in female Swedish physical therapists with more than 15 years of job experience: prevalence and associations with work exposures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101934
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2011 Apr;27(3):213-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Wilhelmus Johannes Andreas Grooten
Philip Wernstedt
Marc Campo
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. wim.grooten@ki.se
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2011 Apr;27(3):213-22
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Health
Odds Ratio
Physical Therapy (Specialty)
Posture
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMDs) in female physiotherapists with more than 15 years of job experience. A self-administered postal questionnaire was sent to 203 female physiotherapists with more than 15 years of job experience. Unconditional logistic regression was used to study the association between job exposures and the risk for WRMDs. The questionnaire was returned by 131 physiotherapists (64.5%). Of 99 subjects who answered specific questions about WRMDs, 52 (53.5%) were affected by WRMDs in at least one body part. Regions most affected were the hand/wrist (n=31; 58.5%) and the lower back (n=30; 56.5%). For hand/wrist pain, associations were found with: orthopedic manual therapy techniques (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=3.90; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.2-13.1); working in awkward or cramped positions (OR=4.96; 95% CI=1.3-18.7); and high psychological job demands (OR=4.34; 95% CI=1.2-15.0). For lower back pain, associations were found with: working in awkward or cramped positions (adjusted OR=6.37; 95% CI=1.6-24.7); and kneeling or squatting (adjusted OR=4.76; 95% CI=1.4-15.9). More than half of the respondents reported WRMDs. General physical and psychosocial work-related exposures, as well as specific therapy tasks, were strongly associated with WRMDs. Larger, longitudinal studies are needed to determine the direction of causality.
PubMed ID
20690880 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2009 Jun;59(4):280
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Magnus Svartengren
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Services, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. magnus.svartengren@ki.se
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2009 Jun;59(4):280
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Male
Occupational Health
Occupational Medicine - organization & administration
Sweden
PubMed ID
19471040 View in PubMed
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Environmentally reformed travel habits during the 2006 congestion charge trial in Stockholm--a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131412
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2011 Aug;8(8):3202-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Greger Henriksson
Olle Hagman
Håkan Andréasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Urban Planning and Environment, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas väg 30, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden. gregerh@kth.se
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2011 Aug;8(8):3202-15
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Attitude
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Cities
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Policy - economics
Humans
Particulate Matter - analysis
Questionnaires
Sweden
Transportation - economics - methods
Vehicle Emissions - analysis
Abstract
Policy measures that reduce or replace road traffic can improve environmental conditions in most large cities. In Stockholm a congestion charge was introduced during a test period in 2006. This was a full-scale trial that proved to meet its targets by reducing traffic crossing the inner city segment during rush hours by 20%. Emissions of carbon dioxide and particles were also substantially reduced. This study, based on in-depth interviews with 40 inhabitants, analyses how and why new travel habits emerged. The results show that particular, sometimes unexpected, features of everyday life (habits, resources, opportunities, values, etc.) were crucial for adjustment of travel behaviour in relation to the policy instrument. One example was that those accustomed to mixing different modes of transport on a daily basis more easily adapted their travel in the targeted way. On a more general level, the results revealed that the policy measure could actually tip the scales for the individual towards trying out a new behaviour.
PubMed ID
21909301 View in PubMed
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Genome-wide linkage analysis of Swedish families to identify putative susceptibility loci for cutaneous malignant melanoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131480
Source
Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2011 Dec;50(12):1076-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Veronica Höiom
Rainer Tuominen
Johan Hansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, S-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. Veronica.Hoiom@ki.se
Source
Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2011 Dec;50(12):1076-84
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17
Family Health
Female
Genes, p16
Genetic Linkage
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genome-Wide Association Study - methods
Germ-Line Mutation
Humans
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Melanoma - genetics
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Skin Neoplasms - genetics
Sweden
Abstract
Cutaneous malignant melanoma is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder which is caused by an interaction between hereditary and environmental factors. In Sweden, a small portion of the inherited susceptibility is explained by the presence of germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2A. But still, the genetic background of melanoma susceptibility is largely unknown. Here, we conducted a genome-wide linkage scan on melanoma-prone families using high-density single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) arrays to identify novel melanoma susceptibility genes. We investigated 35 families of Swedish origin without CDKN2A mutations. Nonparametric and parametric multipoint linkage analyses were performed. After removal of SNPs in strong linkage disequilibrium, the strongest evidence of linkage was detected on chromosome 17p11-12 (logarithm (base 10) of odds (LOD) scores of 2.76) using parametric linkage analysis assuming a dominant trait with full penetrance. Analyses were also performed on a subset of families with low age at diagnosis (mean age = 47 years), to obtain a more homogenous subset. This subgroup analysis based on 22 families yielded suggestive evidence of linkage to the chromosomal regions 11p12-p11 and 18q22 (multipoint LOD scores of 2.10 and 2.02, respectively). Also, the 17p region that was detected in the complete family set showed suggestive linkage in this cohort (multipoint LOD scores of 2.01). Our data suggest that these chromosomal regions, 17p12-p11 in particular as it was present in both analyses, may harbor genes involved in the susceptibility of malignant melanoma in the Swedish population.
PubMed ID
21901783 View in PubMed
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Historical usage of aqueous film forming foam: a case study of the widespread distribution of perfluoroalkyl acids from a military airport to groundwater, lakes, soils and fish.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268814
Source
Chemosphere. 2015 Jun;129:39-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Marko Filipovic
Andreas Woldegiorgis
Karin Norström
Momina Bibi
Maria Lindberg
Ann-Helen Österås
Source
Chemosphere. 2015 Jun;129:39-45
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Airports
Animals
Drinking Water - standards
Fishes - metabolism
Fluorocarbons - analysis - chemistry
Groundwater - chemistry
Humans
Lakes - chemistry
Military Facilities
Muscle, Skeletal - chemistry
Soil Pollutants - analysis - chemistry
Surface Properties
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - chemistry
Water Supply - standards
Abstract
Historical usage of aqueous film forming foams (AFFFs) at military airports is a potential source of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) to the nearby environment. In this study, the distribution of perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in soil, groundwater, surface water, tap water well, and fish muscle was investigated at a closed down military airfield (F18) and its surroundings in Stockholm, Sweden. The presence of PFOS at AFFF training sites was inventoried. One major finding of the study is that a former airfield, abandoned since 1994, may still be a point source of PFAAs to nearby recipients. PFOS and PFOA were ubiquitous in the soil samples at former AFFF training sites with concentrations ranging from 2.18 to 8520ngg(-1) dry weight and
PubMed ID
25262531 View in PubMed
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Childhood tuberculosis and exposure to indoor air pollution: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269091
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2015 May;19(5):596-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
N. Jafta
P M Jeena
L. Barregard
R N Naidoo
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2015 May;19(5):596-602
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child health
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects
Male
Needs Assessment
Pediatrics
Risk assessment
Sweden
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Abstract
Indoor air pollution (IAP) from environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and biomass fuel smoke (BMS) poses respiratory health risks, with children and women bearing the major burden.
We used a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the relation between childhood tuberculosis (TB) and exposure to ETS and BMS.
We searched three databases for epidemiological studies that investigated the association of childhood TB with exposure to ETS and BMS. We calculated pooled estimates and heterogeneity for studies eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis and stratified studies on ETS by outcome.
Five case-control and three cross-sectional studies were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis and quality assessment. Pooled effect estimates showed that exposure to ETS is associated with tuberculous infection and TB disease (OR 1.9, 95%CI 1.4-2.9) among exposed compared to non-exposed children. TB disease in ETS studies produced a pooled OR of 2.8 (95%CI 0.9-4.8), which was higher than the OR for tuberculous infection (OR 1.9, 95%CI 0.9-2.9) for children exposed to ETS compared to non-exposed children. Studies on BMS exposure were too few and too small to permit a conclusion.
Exposure to ETS increases the risk of childhood TB disease or tuberculous infection.
PubMed ID
25868030 View in PubMed
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Isocyanate exposure in bathtub refinishing: à propos a case of occupational asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87541
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2007;20(3):287-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Seldén Anders I
Andersson Lennart
Barlas Georgios
Westberg Håkan
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Orebro University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden. anders.selden@orebroll.se
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2007;20(3):287-90
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Asthma - chemically induced
Hospitalization
Humans
Isocyanates - analysis - poisoning
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Sweden
Abstract
Work-related asthma in a bathtub refinishing technician prompted measurements of isocyanate exposure in this operation. Very high levels of hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) oligomer, up to 8500 microg/m3 NCO, were found during top varnish spray-painting, whereas the levels of HDI monomer were substantially lower. The results suggest that only full-piece, self-contained respirators would suffice to protect technicians from serious pulmonary disease.
PubMed ID
17932019 View in PubMed
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