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Residential radon and lung cancer in Sweden: risk analysis accounting for random error in the exposure assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22225
Source
Health Phys. 1997 Feb;72(2):269-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
F. Lagarde
G. Pershagen
G. Akerblom
O. Axelson
U. Bäverstam
L. Damber
A. Enflo
M. Svartengren
G A Swedjemark
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Health Phys. 1997 Feb;72(2):269-76
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air pollution, indoor
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Environmental pollution
Female
Housing
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Monte Carlo Method
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Normal Distribution
Questionnaires
Radon
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking
Smoking Cessation
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A large epidemiologic study on residential radon exposure and lung cancer has been conducted in Sweden. An attempt is now made to quantify the impact of random error in the exposure assessment on the risk estimate for lung cancer in this study. The study included 1,360 lung cancer cases, diagnosed from 1980 to 1984, and 2,847 population controls. Radon measurements were performed in 8,992 dwellings occupied by the study subjects some time since 1947. Questionnaires provided information on smoking and other risk factors. Imprecision in the retrospective exposure assessment for radon was estimated from a Monte Carlo technique modeling Swedish conditions. Adjusted risk estimates were obtained from regression analyses based on expected values for true time-weighted average residential radon concentration (TWA), conditional on observed TWA. Without adjustment for random error in the TWA estimates, the linear excess relative risk coefficient was 0.10 per 100 Bq m(-3), but an excess relative risk of about 0.15 to 0.20 per 100 Bq m(-3) was suggested following adjustment. The potentially significant consequences of errors in the retrospective radon exposure assessment should be taken into consideration in the risk estimation as well as in comparisons of results of different studies and in future pooled analyses.
Notes
Comment In: Health Phys. 1997 Aug;73(2):3939228178
Comment In: Health Phys. 1997 Aug;73(2):394-59228179
Comment In: Health Phys. 1997 Jul;73(1):272-39199239
PubMed ID
9003712 View in PubMed
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Environmental tobacco smoke and myocardial infarction among never-smokers in the Stockholm Heart Epidemiology Program (SHEEP).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47683
Source
Epidemiology. 2001 Sep;12(5):558-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
M. Rosenlund
N. Berglind
A. Gustavsson
C. Reuterwall
J. Hallqvist
F. Nyberg
G. Pershagen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health, Stockholm County Council, Norrbacka 3rd floor, Karolinska Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Epidemiology. 2001 Sep;12(5):558-64
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Diet
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
An increased risk for myocardial infarction (MI) related to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure has previously been reported, but several aspects of the association are still uncertain. We studied the MI risk associated with ETS exposure among 334 nonfatal never-smoking MI cases and 677 population controls, 45-70 years of age, in Stockholm County. A postal questionnaire with a telephone follow-up provided information on ETS exposure and other potential risk factors for MI. After adjustment for age, gender, hospital catchment area, body mass index, socioeconomic status, job strain, hypertension, diet, and diabetes mellitus, the odds ratio for MI was 1.58 (95% confidence interval = 0.97-2.56) for an average daily exposure of 20 cigarettes or more from the spouse. Combined exposure from spouse and work showed an increasing odds ratio for MI, up to 1.55 (95% confidence interval = 1.02-2.34) in the highest category of weighted duration, that is, more than 90 "hour-years" of exposure (1 "hour-year" = 365 hours, or 1 hour per day for 1 year). In addition, more recent exposure appeared to convey a higher risk. Our data confirm an increased risk of MI from exposure to ETS and suggest that intensity of spousal exposure, combined exposure from spouse and work, and time since last exposure are important.
PubMed ID
11505176 View in PubMed
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Antioxidant intake and allergic disease in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120524
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2012 Oct;42(10):1491-500
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
H. Rosenlund
J. Magnusson
I. Kull
N. Håkansson
A. Wolk
G. Pershagen
M. Wickman
A. Bergström
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Helen.Rosenlund@ki.se
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2012 Oct;42(10):1491-500
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Cohort Studies
Diet
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Magnesium - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Male
Questionnaires
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
alpha-Tocopherol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
beta Carotene - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Abstract
Antioxidant intake may reduce the risk of allergic disease by protecting against oxidative tissue damage. Major sources of antioxidants in the Western world are fruits, vegetables (vitamin C, ß-carotene, a-tocopherol), meat and milk (selenium, magnesium, zinc). Children may exclude or eat less of some fruits and vegetables due to cross-reactivity between pollen and these foods, complicating assessment of causal relationships.
To investigate the association between dietary antioxidant intake and allergic disease, taking potential reverse causation into account.
Data on 2442 8-year-old children from the Swedish birth cohort study BAMSE were analysed. Children with completed parental questionnaires on exposures and health, including a food-frequency questionnaire and who provided a blood sample were included. Associations between antioxidant intake during the past year and current allergic disease were analysed using logistic regression.
An inverse association was observed between intake of ß-carotene and rhinitis (OR(adj), highest vs. lowest quartile, 0.67, 95% CI 0.49-0.93). Magnesium intake was inversely related to asthma (OR(adj), 0.65, 95% CI 0.42-1.00) and atopic sensitisation (OR(adj), 0.78, 95% CI 0.61-1.00). Following exclusion of children who avoided certain fruits, vegetables or milk due to allergic symptoms (n = 285), the inverse association remained between magnesium intake and asthma (OR(adj), 0.58, 95% CI 0.35-0.98), whereas all other associations became non-significant.
Diet modifications due to allergy may affect the antioxidant intake and needs to be considered when investigating the relationship between diet and allergic disease. Magnesium intake seems to have a protective effect on childhood asthma.
Notes
Comment In: Clin Exp Allergy. 2012 Oct;42(10):1420-222994339
PubMed ID
22994346 View in PubMed
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Environmental risk factors for allergy and socioeconomic status in a birth cohort (BAMSE).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31449
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2002 Jun;13(3):182-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
E. Lannerö
I. Kull
M. Wickman
G. Pershagen
S L Nordvall
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health, Astrid Lindgren's Children's Hospital, Karolinska Hospital, Sweden. Eva.Lannero@kbh.ki.se
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2002 Jun;13(3):182-7
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Cats
Child
Cohort Studies
Dogs
Environment
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
Associations between parental educational level and possible risk factors for atopic disease during the first months of life were explored in a cohort of 4089 neonate children born 1994-96 in Stockholm, Sweden. Reports concerning a number of life style factors during pregnancy and after the baby was born were obtained by questionnaire. There was a strong negative association between duration of education and maternal smoking during pregnancy, parental smoking after the baby was born and keeping of cat and dog (p-trend
PubMed ID
12144640 View in PubMed
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Building characteristics, indoor air quality and recurrent wheezing in very young children (BAMSE).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15200
Source
Indoor Air. 2004 Feb;14(1):34-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
G. Emenius
M. Svartengren
J. Korsgaard
L. Nordvall
G. Pershagen
M. Wickman
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health, Stockholm County Council, Norrbacka, 3rd Floor, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. gunnel.emenius@smd.sll.se
Source
Indoor Air. 2004 Feb;14(1):34-42
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Case-Control Studies
Child, Preschool
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Humans
Humidity
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects - analysis
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Sounds
Sick Building Syndrome - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperature
Ventilation
Abstract
This study was conducted to examine the impact of building characteristics and indoor air quality on recurrent wheezing in infants. We followed a birth cohort (BAMSE) comprising 4089 children, born in predefined areas of Stockholm, during their first 2 years of life. Information on exposures was obtained from parental questionnaires when the children were 2 months and on symptoms and diseases when the children were 1 and 2 years old. Children with recurrent wheezing, and two age-matched controls per case, were identified and enrolled in a nested case-control study. The homes were investigated and ventilation rate, humidity, temperature and NO2 measured. We found that living in an apartment erected after 1939, or in a private home with crawl space/concrete slab foundation were associated with an increased risk of recurrent wheezing, odds ratio (OR) 2.5 (1.3-4.8) and 2.5 (1.1-5.4), respectively. The same was true for living in homes with absolute indoor humidity >5.8 g/kg, OR 1.7 (1.0-2.9) and in homes where windowpane condensation was consistently reported over several years, OR 2.2 (1.1-4.5). However, air change rate and type of ventilation system did not seem to affect the risk. In conclusion, relatively new apartment buildings, single-family homes with crawl space/concrete slab foundation, elevated indoor humidity, and reported wintertime windowpane condensation were associated with recurrent wheezing in infants. Thus, improvements of the building quality may have potential to prevent infant wheezing.
PubMed ID
14756844 View in PubMed
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Strategies for preventing wheezing and asthma in small children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15250
Source
Allergy. 2003 Aug;58(8):742-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
M. Wickman
E. Melén
N. Berglind
S. Lennart Nordvall
C. Almqvist
I. Kull
M. Svartengren
G. Pershagen
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 2003 Aug;58(8):742-7
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - etiology - genetics - prevention & control
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Maternal Age
Odds Ratio
Primary Prevention
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Respiratory Sounds - etiology - genetics
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of living in agreement with allergy preventive guidelines on wheezing and asthma at 2 years of age. DESIGN: Prospective birth cohort study (BAMSE). Questionnaires on heredity and environmental factors were answered when the child was 2 months, and detailed questionnaires on symptoms at 1 and 2 years of age. PARTICIPANTS: 4089 children, born during 1994-1996. SETTING: Child Health Centres in central and north-western parts of Stockholm, Sweden. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Wheezing and asthma up to the age of 2. RESULTS: The effects of preventive guidelines regarding breastfeeding, maternal tobacco smoke and home dampness on wheezing and asthma were assessed in multiple logistic regression models. The cumulative incidence of recurrent wheezing at 2 years of age was 12.6% and of asthma 6.8% among those with a lifestyle in agreement with all guidelines and 24.1 and 17.9%, respectively, in families exposed to at least two of the three risk factors. Among children with no heredity, family lifestyle according to the guidelines gave a twofold reduction of asthma (5.3 vs. 10.5%), while the group with heredity had a threefold reduction (9.1 vs. 27.3%). The attributable fraction for asthma associated with the guidelines was 23% in total and 33% among those with heredity. CONCLUSION: In this observational study, family lifestyle according to preventive guidelines is associated with an important reduction of recurrent wheezing and asthma at 2 years of age, especially among children with allergic heredity. A follow-up will determine whether there still a risk reduction of both symptoms and disease.
Notes
Comment In: Allergy. 2003 Aug;58(8):730-212859550
PubMed ID
12859552 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.