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Is skin exposure to water mainly occupational or nonoccupational? A population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116299
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2013 Jun;168(6):1281-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
B. Meding
G. Lindahl
M. Alderling
K. Wrangsjö
I. Anveden Berglind
Author Affiliation
Unit of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, SE-17177, Stockholm, Sweden. birgitta.meding@ki.se
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2013 Jun;168(6):1281-6
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology - etiology
Eczema - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology - etiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Water - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Skin exposure to water is considered to contribute to hand eczema. Knowledge about total water exposure during a day is scanty.
To investigate self-reported water exposure at work as well as throughout the day.
Skin exposure to water was assessed from two questionnaire-based health surveys: the nationwide Environmental Health Survey 2007 (EHS), which enquired about water exposure throughout the day, and the Stockholm Public Health Survey 2006 (PHS), which probed water exposure at work. Answers from 19,667 individuals (EHS) and 18,318 individuals (PHS) were available for analysis.
In total, 22% of respondents (women 30%, men 12%) reported skin exposure to water more than 20 times during an entire day (EHS) compared with 6% (women 8%, men 4%) at work (PHS). In a univariate analysis, using a merged file comprising data from the EHS and the PHS, water exposure more than 20 times a day was more common in the EHS (prevalence proportion ratio 3·570, 95% confidence interval 3·353-3·802). In multivariate models the variables studied did not fulfil the criteria for being confounders. Water exposure at work declined with increasing age in both women and men (P
Notes
Comment In: Br J Dermatol. 2013 Jun;168(6):1153-423738639
PubMed ID
23413840 View in PubMed
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Fish consumption and risk of stroke in Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138323
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Mar;93(3):487-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Jarmo Virtamo
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Mar;93(3):487-93
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Cohort Studies
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Female
Fishes
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Seafood
Stroke - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden
Abstract
Epidemiologic studies of fish consumption in relation to risk of stroke have yielded inconsistent results.
In this study, we examined the association between fish consumption and stroke incidence in women.
We analyzed data from a population-based prospective cohort of 34,670 women in the Swedish Mammography Cohort who were free of cardiovascular disease and cancer at baseline. Information on fish consumption was obtained by a self-administered questionnaire in 1997. Incident cases of stroke were ascertained from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Registry. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% CIs.
Over a mean follow-up of 10.4 y, we ascertained 1680 incident cases of stroke, including 1310 cerebral infarctions, 233 hemorrhagic strokes, and 137 unspecified strokes. Fish consumption was significantly inversely associated with risk of total stroke but not with cerebral infarction or hemorrhagic stroke. Compared with women in the lowest quintile of fish consumption (3.0 servings of fish/wk) was 0.84 (95% CI: 0.71, 0.98; P for trend = 0.049). Consumption of lean fish but not of other fish types was inversely associated with risk of stroke. The multivariable RR of total stroke was 0.67 (95% CI: 0.49, 0.93; P for trend = 0.07) for =3 servings of lean fish/wk compared with that for no consumption.
These results suggest that the consumption of fish, especially of lean fish, may reduce risk of stroke in women. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01127698.
Notes
Comment In: Womens Health (Lond Engl). 2011 May;7(3):279-8121612349
PubMed ID
21191140 View in PubMed
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Fifteen-year follow-up of hand eczema: persistence and consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70706
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2005 May;152(5):975-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
B. Meding
K. Wrangsjö
B. Järvholm
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden. birgitta.meding@niwl.se
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2005 May;152(5):975-80
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Employment
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hand Dermatoses - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Hand eczema is a skin disease often with a long-lasting and relapsing course. The long-term prognosis in the general population is unknown. OBJECTIVES: The aims were to examine the extent to which hand eczema had persisted and the medicosocial consequences of the disease. METHODS: In a 15-year follow-up of hand eczema, patients diagnosed in a previous population-based study were sent a questionnaire with 20 questions concerning the persistence and course of the disease, and its occupational and medicosocial consequences. RESULTS: Addresses were available for 1115 persons, of whom 868 answered the questionnaire. Sixty-six per cent of the respondents reported periods of hand eczema and 44% reported symptoms during the previous year, with no sex difference. Twelve per cent reported continuous eczema. However, 74% of those reporting symptoms considered that their hand eczema had improved; of these more were women than men (78% vs. 66%, P
PubMed ID
15888155 View in PubMed
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Self-diagnosed dermatitis in adults. Results from a population survey in Stockholm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71751
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2001 Dec;45(6):341-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
B. Meding
C. Lidén
N. Berglind
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2001 Dec;45(6):341-5
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cosmetics - adverse effects
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Facial Dermatoses - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nickel - adverse effects
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In a population-based survey of public health issues in Stockholm, Sweden, self-reported hand eczema, history of childhood eczema, nickel allergy, occurrence of skin symptoms on the face and intolerance to cosmetics and hygiene products, were investigated. A postal questionnaire was sent to 15,000 inhabitants aged 19-80 years. The response rate was 73%. The 1-year prevalence of hand eczema was 8% (females 10%, males 6%). History of childhood eczema was reported by 15% and, of these, 42% also stated positively that they had had hand eczema at some time. Hypersensitivity to nickel was owned to 15% of the females and 3% of the males. Of the nickel-sensitive, 30% reported ever having had hand eczema. The combination of nickel allergy and history of childhood eczema resulted in a cumulative prevalence of hand eczema of 56%. Females reported more hand-washings per day than did males, and a relation between number of hand-washings and hand eczema was found. Self-reported 1-year prevalence of skin symptoms on the face was 14% and, of these, 33% also owned to hypersensitivity to cosmetics. Dermatitis appears to be a common health problem. This fact should be made clear to those who give priority and allocate resources to health problems, e.g., by participation of dermatologists in performing population-based surveys.
PubMed ID
11846749 View in PubMed
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Smoking cessation and the risk of cataract: a prospective cohort study of cataract extraction among men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105430
Source
JAMA Ophthalmol. 2014 Mar;132(3):253-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Birgitta Ejdervik Lindblad
Niclas Håkansson
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden2School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden3Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
JAMA Ophthalmol. 2014 Mar;132(3):253-7
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cataract - epidemiology - etiology
Cataract Extraction - statistics & numerical data
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Smoking is a risk factor for cataract development, but the effect of smoking cessation on the risk of cataract is uncertain.
To examine the association between smoking cessation and the risk of cataract extraction.
A total of 44,371 men, participating in the Cohort of Swedish Men, aged 45 to 79 years, who in 1997 completed a self-administered questionnaire on smoking habits and lifestyle factors. The men were followed up from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2009. The cohort was matched with the Swedish National Day-Surgery Register and local registers of cataract extraction in the study area.
Incident cases of age-related cataract extraction.
During 12 years of follow-up, we identified 5713 incident cases of age-related cataract extraction. Smoking intensity and cumulative dose of smoking were associated with an increased risk of cataract extraction (P for trend
PubMed ID
24385206 View in PubMed
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Total antioxidant capacity of the diet and risk of age-related cataract: a population-based prospective cohort of women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105487
Source
JAMA Ophthalmol. 2014 Mar;132(3):247-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Susanne Rautiainen
Birgitta Ejdervik Lindblad
Ralf Morgenstern
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
JAMA Ophthalmol. 2014 Mar;132(3):247-52
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Cataract - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cataract Extraction - statistics & numerical data
Diet
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Women's health
Abstract
To our knowledge, no previous epidemiologic study has investigated the association between all antioxidants in the diet and age-related cataract. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC) concept aims to measure the capacity from all antioxidants in the diet by also taking synergistic effects into account.
To investigate the association between the TAC of the diet and the incidence of age-related cataract in a population-based prospective cohort of middle-aged and elderly women.
Questionnaire-based nutrition survey within the prospective Swedish Mammography Cohort study, which included 30,607 women (aged 49-83 years) who were observed for age-related cataract incidence for a mean of 7.7 years.
The TAC of the diet was estimated using a database of foods analyzed with the oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay.
Information on incident age-related cataract diagnosis and extraction was collected through linkage to registers in the study area.
There were 4309 incident cases of age-related cataracts during the mean 7.7 years of follow-up (234,371 person-years). The multivariable rate ratio in the highest quintile of the TAC of the diet compared with the lowest was 0.87 (95% CI, 0.79-0.96; P for trend =?.03). The main contributors to dietary TAC in the study population were fruit and vegetables (44.3%), whole grains (17.0%), and coffee (15.1%).
Dietary TAC was inversely associated with the risk of age-related cataract. Future studies examining all antioxidants in the diet in relation to age-related cataract are needed to confirm or refute our findings.
PubMed ID
24370844 View in PubMed
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Validation of questionnaire-based long-term dietary exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls using biomarkers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120718
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2012 Nov;56(11):1748-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Charlotte Bergkvist
Agneta Akesson
Anders Glynn
Karl Michaëlsson
Panu Rantakokko
Hannu Kiviranta
Alicja Wolk
Marika Berglund
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2012 Nov;56(11):1748-54
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Diet
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - toxicity
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The health consequences of lifelong low-level exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) via food are largely unknown, mainly due to the lack of large population-based prospective studies addressing this issue. We validated long-term food frequency questionnaire (FFQ)-based dietary PCB exposure against concentrations of six PCB congeners in serum.
Dietary PCB exposure was estimated in the Swedish Mammography Cohort by constructing a recipe-based database of CB-153, an indicator for total PCBs in food. The Spearman rank correlation (adjusted for within-person variability) was assessed between concurrent (2004-2006), past (1997), and long-term (mean of 1997 and 2004-2006) FFQ-based dietary PCB exposure, respectively, and the following serum PCB congeners, CB-118, CB-138, CB-153, CB-156, CB-170, and CB-180, in women (56-85 years of age, n = 201). The correlation between FFQ-based dietary PCB exposure and serum CB-153 was 0.41 (p
PubMed ID
22976994 View in PubMed
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Hormone replacement therapy in relation to risk of cataract extraction: a prospective study of women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98466
Source
Ophthalmology. 2010 Mar;117(3):424-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Birgitta Ejdervik Lindblad
Niclas Håkansson
Bo Philipson
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. birgitta.ejdervik.lindblad@swipnet.se
Source
Ophthalmology. 2010 Mar;117(3):424-30
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Cataract - epidemiology
Cataract Extraction - statistics & numerical data
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Women's health
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and the incidence of cataract extraction among postmenopausal women. DESIGN: Population-based, prospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 30 861 postmenopausal women participating in the Swedish Mammography Cohort, age 49 to 83 years, who completed a self-administered questionnaire in 1997 about hormone status, HRT, and lifestyle factors. METHODS: The women were followed from September 1997 through October 2005. The cohort was matched with registers of cataract extraction in the study area. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incident operative extraction of age-related cataract. RESULTS: We identified 4324 incident cases of cataract extractions during 98 months of follow-up. In multivariate adjusted analysis, ever use of HRT was associated with a 14% increased risk of cataract extraction (rate ratio [RR], 1.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-1.21) compared with those who never used HRT. Current use of HRT was associated with an 18% increased risk of cataract extraction (RR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.10-1.26). A significant linear trend was observed where increasing duration of HRT usage resulted in an increased risk of cataract extraction (P for trend = 0.006). Multivariate RR for current HRT usage for >10 years was 1.20 (95% CI, 1.06-1.36; P for trend = 0.001). Among women drinking on average >1 drink of alcohol per day, current HRT users had a 42% increased risk (RR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.11-1.80) for cataract extraction, compared with women who neither used HRT nor alcohol. The risk of cataract extraction among current users of HRT was similar among current smokers and those who never smoked. CONCLUSIONS: Our prospective, population-based study indicates that postmenopausal women using HRT for a long period of time may be at an increased risk for cataract extraction, especially those drinking >1 alcoholic drink daily.
PubMed ID
20045566 View in PubMed
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Intake and serum concentrations of a-tocopherol in relation to fractures in elderly women and men: 2 cohort studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106180
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Jan;99(1):107-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Karl Michaëlsson
Alicja Wolk
Liisa Byberg
Johan Ärnlöv
Håkan Melhus
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopedics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden (KM and LB); the Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden (AW); the School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden (JÄ); the Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden (JÄ); and the Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden (HM).
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Jan;99(1):107-14
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bone and Bones - chemistry - drug effects
Diet Surveys
Dietary Supplements
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - blood - complications
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Muscle, Skeletal - chemistry - drug effects
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden
Vitamin E Deficiency - blood - complications
alpha-Tocopherol - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
A reduction in the formation of free radicals and oxidative stress might reduce the rate of bone loss and muscle wasting.
The objective was to determine whether a-tocopherol intake or serum concentrations are associated with fracture risk in older women and men.
Two cohort studies, the Swedish Mammography Cohort (SMC; n = 61,433 women) and the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM; n = 1138 men), were used.
During 19 y of follow-up, 14,738 women in the SMC experienced a first fracture at any site (3871 hip fractures). A higher hip fracture rate was observed with lower intakes of a-tocopherol. Compared with the highest quintile of intake, the lowest quintile had a multivariable-adjusted HR of 1.86 (95% CI: 1.67, 2.06). The HR of any fracture was 1.20 (95% CI: 1.14, 1.28). a-Tocopherol-containing supplement use was associated with a reduced rate of hip fracture (HR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.65, 0.93) and any fracture (HR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.78, 0.94). Compared with the highest quintile of a-tocopherol intake in ULSAM (follow-up: 12 y), lower intakes (quintiles 1-4) were associated with a higher rate of hip fracture (HR: 3.33; 95% CI: 1.43, 7.76) and any fracture (HR: 1.84; 95% CI: 1.18, 2.88). The HR for hip fracture in men for each 1-SD decrease in serum a-tocopherol was 1.58 (95% CI: 1.13, 2.22) and for any fracture was 1.23 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.48).
Low intakes and low serum concentrations of a-tocopherol are associated with an increased rate of fracture in elderly women and men.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24225359 View in PubMed
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Protective gloves in Swedish dentistry: use and side-effects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15472
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2001 Jul;145(1):32-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
K. Wrangsjö
L M Wallenhammar
U. Ortengren
L. Barregård
H. Andreasson
B. Björkner
S. Karlsson
B. Meding
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Norrbacka, Karolinska Sjukhuset, 17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2001 Jul;145(1):32-7
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Dentistry
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Female
Gloves, Protective - adverse effects - utilization
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Latex Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: During the 1980s routine wearing of gloves in dentistry was recommended by health authorities in several countries. However, prolonged glove use is associated with side-effects of irritant and allergic origin. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the extent of glove use and self-reported glove intolerance reactions among Swedish dentists, and to examine how far IgE-mediated allergy to natural rubber latex (NRL) occurs in subjects who report rapid itching when in contact with protective gloves. SUBJECTS/METHODS: A postal questionnaire was answered by 3083 of 3500 licensed dentists, a response rate of 88%. Of the dentists who reported rapidly occurring itching of the hands from gloves, 131 of 170 attended a clinical examination including a skin prick test (SPT) and a serological examination (RAST) for IgE-mediated allergy. RESULTS: Seventy-three per cent of the dentists reported daily glove use of more than 2 h, 48% more than 6 h a day, and 6% reported no use. NRL gloves were used most frequently (P
PubMed ID
11453904 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.