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Is skin exposure to water mainly occupational or nonoccupational? A population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116299
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2013 Jun;168(6):1281-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
B. Meding
G. Lindahl
M. Alderling
K. Wrangsjö
I. Anveden Berglind
Author Affiliation
Unit of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, SE-17177, Stockholm, Sweden. birgitta.meding@ki.se
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2013 Jun;168(6):1281-6
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology - etiology
Eczema - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology - etiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Water - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Skin exposure to water is considered to contribute to hand eczema. Knowledge about total water exposure during a day is scanty.
To investigate self-reported water exposure at work as well as throughout the day.
Skin exposure to water was assessed from two questionnaire-based health surveys: the nationwide Environmental Health Survey 2007 (EHS), which enquired about water exposure throughout the day, and the Stockholm Public Health Survey 2006 (PHS), which probed water exposure at work. Answers from 19,667 individuals (EHS) and 18,318 individuals (PHS) were available for analysis.
In total, 22% of respondents (women 30%, men 12%) reported skin exposure to water more than 20 times during an entire day (EHS) compared with 6% (women 8%, men 4%) at work (PHS). In a univariate analysis, using a merged file comprising data from the EHS and the PHS, water exposure more than 20 times a day was more common in the EHS (prevalence proportion ratio 3·570, 95% confidence interval 3·353-3·802). In multivariate models the variables studied did not fulfil the criteria for being confounders. Water exposure at work declined with increasing age in both women and men (P
Notes
Comment In: Br J Dermatol. 2013 Jun;168(6):1153-423738639
PubMed ID
23413840 View in PubMed
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Fifteen-year follow-up of hand eczema: persistence and consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70706
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2005 May;152(5):975-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
B. Meding
K. Wrangsjö
B. Järvholm
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden. birgitta.meding@niwl.se
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2005 May;152(5):975-80
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Employment
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hand Dermatoses - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Hand eczema is a skin disease often with a long-lasting and relapsing course. The long-term prognosis in the general population is unknown. OBJECTIVES: The aims were to examine the extent to which hand eczema had persisted and the medicosocial consequences of the disease. METHODS: In a 15-year follow-up of hand eczema, patients diagnosed in a previous population-based study were sent a questionnaire with 20 questions concerning the persistence and course of the disease, and its occupational and medicosocial consequences. RESULTS: Addresses were available for 1115 persons, of whom 868 answered the questionnaire. Sixty-six per cent of the respondents reported periods of hand eczema and 44% reported symptoms during the previous year, with no sex difference. Twelve per cent reported continuous eczema. However, 74% of those reporting symptoms considered that their hand eczema had improved; of these more were women than men (78% vs. 66%, P
PubMed ID
15888155 View in PubMed
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Self-diagnosed dermatitis in adults. Results from a population survey in Stockholm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71751
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2001 Dec;45(6):341-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
B. Meding
C. Lidén
N. Berglind
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2001 Dec;45(6):341-5
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cosmetics - adverse effects
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Facial Dermatoses - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nickel - adverse effects
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In a population-based survey of public health issues in Stockholm, Sweden, self-reported hand eczema, history of childhood eczema, nickel allergy, occurrence of skin symptoms on the face and intolerance to cosmetics and hygiene products, were investigated. A postal questionnaire was sent to 15,000 inhabitants aged 19-80 years. The response rate was 73%. The 1-year prevalence of hand eczema was 8% (females 10%, males 6%). History of childhood eczema was reported by 15% and, of these, 42% also stated positively that they had had hand eczema at some time. Hypersensitivity to nickel was owned to 15% of the females and 3% of the males. Of the nickel-sensitive, 30% reported ever having had hand eczema. The combination of nickel allergy and history of childhood eczema resulted in a cumulative prevalence of hand eczema of 56%. Females reported more hand-washings per day than did males, and a relation between number of hand-washings and hand eczema was found. Self-reported 1-year prevalence of skin symptoms on the face was 14% and, of these, 33% also owned to hypersensitivity to cosmetics. Dermatitis appears to be a common health problem. This fact should be made clear to those who give priority and allocate resources to health problems, e.g., by participation of dermatologists in performing population-based surveys.
PubMed ID
11846749 View in PubMed
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Protective gloves in Swedish dentistry: use and side-effects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15472
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2001 Jul;145(1):32-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
K. Wrangsjö
L M Wallenhammar
U. Ortengren
L. Barregård
H. Andreasson
B. Björkner
S. Karlsson
B. Meding
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Norrbacka, Karolinska Sjukhuset, 17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2001 Jul;145(1):32-7
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Dentistry
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Female
Gloves, Protective - adverse effects - utilization
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Latex Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: During the 1980s routine wearing of gloves in dentistry was recommended by health authorities in several countries. However, prolonged glove use is associated with side-effects of irritant and allergic origin. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the extent of glove use and self-reported glove intolerance reactions among Swedish dentists, and to examine how far IgE-mediated allergy to natural rubber latex (NRL) occurs in subjects who report rapid itching when in contact with protective gloves. SUBJECTS/METHODS: A postal questionnaire was answered by 3083 of 3500 licensed dentists, a response rate of 88%. Of the dentists who reported rapidly occurring itching of the hands from gloves, 131 of 170 attended a clinical examination including a skin prick test (SPT) and a serological examination (RAST) for IgE-mediated allergy. RESULTS: Seventy-three per cent of the dentists reported daily glove use of more than 2 h, 48% more than 6 h a day, and 6% reported no use. NRL gloves were used most frequently (P
PubMed ID
11453904 View in PubMed
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