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Does income matter for troublesome neck pain? A population-based study on risk and prognosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126215
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Nov;66(11):1063-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Lina Palmlöf
Eva Skillgate
Lars Alfredsson
Eva Vingård
Cecilia Magnusson
Michael Lundberg
Lena W Holm
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. lina.palmlof@ki.se
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Nov;66(11):1063-70
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Income
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - diagnosis - economics - epidemiology
Pain Measurement
Population Surveillance
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Studies have shown associations between higher income and better health, but income has not been studied in relation to neck pain. The aims of this cohort study were to assess the sex-specific role of disposable income for onset and prognosis of neck pain in the general population and if economic stress influences such potential associations.
Two subcohorts were identified in the Stockholm Public Health Cohort with data from 2002. Cohort I (risk cohort) included persons without neck pain (n=8348). Cohort II (prognostic cohort) included persons with occasional neck pain during the previous 6 months (n=10?523). Both cohorts were assessed for long duration troublesome neck pain (LDNP) in 2007. Individual income was defined as aggregated annual family income in 2002 with each family member assigned a weighted consumption share, based on salary, pensions and social benefits. LDNP in 2007 was defined as having had troublesome neck pain lasting for three or more consecutive months the previous 5 years. Association between income and LDNP, considering potential confounding, was investigated by multivariable logistic regression. Economic stress was tested as effect modifier between income and LDNP.
In both cohorts, associations were found between lower income and a higher risk for LDNP. The results were similar between the sexes. Economic stress modified the associations in both cohorts.
Low income may be a risk as well as prognostic factor for developing LDNP. Furthermore, the results indicate that economic stress may be an underlying factor to consider when studying associations between income and neck pain.
PubMed ID
22412154 View in PubMed
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Survey context and question wording affects self reported annoyance due to road traffic noise: a comparison between two cross-sectional studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126274
Source
Environ Health. 2012;11(1):14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Theo Bodin
Jonas Björk
Evy Ohrström
Jonas Ardö
Maria Albin
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Skane University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. theo.bodin@med.lu.se
Source
Environ Health. 2012;11(1):14
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys - methods
Humans
Middle Aged
Noise, Transportation - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Self Report
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Surveys are a common way to measure annoyance due to road traffic noise, but the method has some draw-backs. Survey context, question wording and answer alternatives could affect participation and answers and could have implications when comparing studies and/or performing pooled analyses. The aim of this study was to investigate the difference in annoyance reporting due to road traffic noise in two types of surveys of which one was introduced broadly and the other with the clearly stated aim of investigating noise and health.
Data was collected from two surveys carried out in the municipality of Malmö, southern Sweden in 2007 and 2008 (n = 2612 and n = 3810). The first survey stated an aim of investigating residential environmental exposure, especially noise and health. The second survey was a broad public health survey stating a broader aim. The two surveys had comparable questions regarding noise annoyance, although one used a 5-point scale and the other a 4-point scale. We used geographic information systems (GIS) to assess the average road and railway noise (LAeq,24h) at the participants' residential address. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for annoyance in relation to noise exposure.
Annoyance at least once a week due to road traffic noise was significantly more prevalent in the survey investigating environment and health compared to the public health survey at levels > 45 dB(A), but not at lower exposure levels. However no differences in annoyance were found when comparing the extreme alternatives "never" and "every day". In the study investigating environment and health, "Noise sensitive" persons were more likely to readily respond to the survey and were more annoyed by road traffic noise compared to the other participants in that survey.
The differences in annoyance reporting between the two surveys were mainly due to different scales, suggesting that extreme alternatives are to prefer before dichotomization when comparing results between the two. Although some findings suggested that noise-sensitive individuals were more likely to respond to the survey investigating noise and health, we could not find convincing evidence that contextual differences affected either answers or participation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22404876 View in PubMed
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Community SES, perceived environment, and physical activity during home-based cardiac rehabilitation: is there a need to consider the urban vs. rural distinction?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126295
Source
J Urban Health. 2012 Apr;89(2):285-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Chris Blanchard
Daniel Rainham
Jill McSweeney
John Spence
Lisa McDonnell
Ryan Rhodes
Robert Reid
Kerry McGannon
Nancy Edwards
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. chris.blanchard@dal.ca
Source
J Urban Health. 2012 Apr;89(2):285-95
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Environment
Exercise
Female
Home Care Services - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Social Class
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Physical activity (MVPA) levels during home-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) remain problematic. Consequently, the present study examined the association between MVPA and urban vs. rural residential status and the perceived environment in patients attending home-based CR. A total of 280 patients completed a questionnaire assessing demographic, clinical, MVPA, and perceived environmental variables measured at baseline and 3 months later. Patient addresses were geocoded and linked to the 2006 Canadian census to establish the urban/rural distinction. Results showed that urban and rural patients had similar baseline MVPA and improvements in MVPA by 3 months. Several perceived environmental variables were significantly related to MVPA throughout home-based CR that were common and urban/rural-specific. Therefore, although there does not appear to be an urban vs. rural advantage in MVPA levels during home-based CR, there does appear to be environmental/MVPA-specific relationships specific to urban and rural patients that may warrant attention.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22402918 View in PubMed
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Exploring bikeability in a metropolitan setting: stimulating and hindering factors in commuting route environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126313
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:168
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Lina Wahlgren
Peter Schantz
Author Affiliation
The Research Unit for Movement, Health and Environment, The Åstrand Laboratory, GIH - The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Sweden.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:168
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bicycling
Environment Design
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Urban Population
Abstract
Route environments may influence people's active commuting positively and thereby contribute to public health. Assessments of route environments are, however, needed in order to better understand the possible relationship between active commuting and the route environment. The aim of this study was, therefore, to assess the potential associations between perceptions of whether the route environment on the whole hinders or stimulates bicycle commuting and perceptions of environmental factors.
The Active Commuting Route Environment Scale (ACRES) was used for the assessment of bicycle commuters' perceptions of their route environments in the inner urban parts of Greater Stockholm, Sweden. Bicycle commuters (n = 827) were recruited by advertisements in newspapers. Simultaneous multiple regression analyses were used to assess the relation between predictor variables (such as levels of exhaust fumes, noise, traffic speed, traffic congestion and greenery) and the outcome variable (hindering - stimulating route environments). Two models were run, (Model 1) without and (Model 2) with the item traffic: unsafe or safe included as a predictor.
Overall, about 40% of the variance of hindering - stimulating route environments was explained by the environmental predictors in our models (Model 1, R2 = 0.415, and Model 2, R 2= 0.435). The regression equation for Model 1 was: y = 8.53 + 0.33 ugly or beautiful + 0.14 greenery + (-0.14) course of the route + (-0.13) exhaust fumes + (-0.09) congestion: all types of vehicles (p = 0.019). The regression equation for Model 2 was y = 6.55 + 0.31 ugly or beautiful + 0.16 traffic: unsafe or safe + (-0.13) exhaust fumes + 0.12 greenery + (-0.12) course of the route (p = 0.001).
The main results indicate that beautiful, green and safe route environments seem to be, independently of each other, stimulating factors for bicycle commuting in inner urban areas. On the other hand, exhaust fumes, traffic congestion and low 'directness' of the route seem to be hindering factors. Furthermore, the overall results illustrate the complexity of a research area at the beginning of exploration.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22401492 View in PubMed
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Genetic susceptibility to burnout in a Swedish twin cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126454
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2012 Mar;27(3):225-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Victoria Blom
Gunnar Bergström
Lennart Hallsten
Lennart Bodin
Pia Svedberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2012 Mar;27(3):225-31
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burnout, Professional - genetics
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Health Surveys
Heredity
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Genetic
Models, Statistical
Questionnaires
Registries
Sweden
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics - psychology
Abstract
Most previous studies of burnout have focused on work environmental stressors, while familial factors so far mainly have been overlooked. The aim of the study was to estimate the relative importance of genetic influences on burnout (measured with Pines Burnout Measure) in a sample of monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) Swedish twins. The study sample consisted of 20,286 individuals, born 1959-1986 from the Swedish twin registry who participated in the cross-sectional study of twin adults: genes and environment. Probandwise concordance rates (the risk for one twin to be affected given that his/her twin partner is affected by burnout) and within pair correlations were calculated for MZ and DZ same--and opposite sexed twin pairs. Heritability coefficients i.e. the proportion of the total variance attributable to genetic factors were calculated using standard biometrical model fitting procedures. The results showed that genetic factors explained 33% of the individual differences in burnout symptoms in women and men. Environmental factors explained a substantial part of the variation as well and are thus important to address in rehabilitation and prevention efforts to combat burnout.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22388765 View in PubMed
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Children's health and its association with indoor environments in Danish homes and daycare centres - methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126493
Source
Indoor Air. 2012 Dec;22(6):467-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
G. Clausen
A. Høst
J. Toftum
G. Bekö
C. Weschler
M. Callesen
S. Buhl
M B Ladegaard
S. Langer
B. Andersen
J. Sundell
C-G Bornehag
T. Sigsgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Civil Engineering, International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark. gc@byg.dtu.dk
Source
Indoor Air. 2012 Dec;22(6):467-75
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child Day Care Centers - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Questionnaires
Abstract
The principle objective of the Danish research program 'Indoor Environment and Children's Health' (IECH) was to explore associations between various exposures that children experience in their indoor environments (specifically their homes and daycare centers) and their well-being and health. The targeted health endpoints were allergy, asthma, and certain respiratory symptoms. The study was designed with two stages. In the first stage, a questionnaire survey was distributed to more than 17,000 families with children between the ages of 1 and 5. The questionnaire focused on the children's health and the environments within the homes they inhabited and daycare facilities they attended. More than 11,000 questionnaires were returned. In the second stage, a subsample of 500 children was selected for more detailed studies, including an extensive set of measurements in their homes and daycare centers and a clinical examination; all clinical examinations were carried out by the same physician. In this study, the methods used for data collection within the IECH research program are presented and discussed. Furthermore, initial findings are presented regarding descriptors of the study population and selected characteristics of the children's dwellings and daycare centers.
This study outlines methods that might be followed by future investigators conducting large-scale field studies of potential connections between various indoor environmental factors and selected health endpoints. Of particular note are (i) the two-stage design - a broad questionnaire-based survey followed by a more intensive set of measurements among a subset of participants who have been selected based on their responses to the questionnaire; (ii) the case-base approach utilized in the stage 2 in contrast to the more commonly used case-control approach; (iii) the inclusion of the children's daycare environment when conducting intensive sampling to more fully capture the children's total indoor exposure; and (iv) all clinical examinations conducted by the same physician. We recognize that future investigators are unlikely to fully duplicate the methods outlined in this study, but we hope that it provides a useful starting point in terms of factors that might be considered when designing such a study.
PubMed ID
22385284 View in PubMed
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Eczema among adults: prevalence, risk factors and relation to airway diseases. Results from a large-scale population survey in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126618
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2012 Jun;166(6):1301-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
E P Rönmark
L. Ekerljung
J. Lötvall
G. Wennergren
E. Rönmark
K. Torén
B. Lundbäck
Author Affiliation
Krefting Research Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 424, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden. erik.ronmark@gu.se
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2012 Jun;166(6):1301-8
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Eczema - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Respiratory Tract Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Rhinitis - complications - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
In contrast to asthma and rhinitis, few studies among adults investigating the prevalence and risk factors of eczema have been published.
To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of eczema among adults in West Sweden. A further aim was to study the associations between asthma, rhinitis and eczema.
A questionnaire on respiratory health was mailed in 2008 to 30,000 randomly selected subjects in West Sweden aged 16-75 years; 62% responded. The questionnaire included questions about eczema, respiratory symptoms and diseases and their possible determinants. A subgroup of 669 subjects underwent skin prick testing against common airborne allergens.
'Eczema ever' was reported by 40·7% and 'current eczema' by 11·5%. Both conditions were significantly more common among women. The prevalence decreased with increasing age. The coexistence of both asthma and rhinitis with eczema was common. The main risk factors were family history of allergy and asthma. The dominant environmental risk factor was occupational exposure to gas, dust or fumes. Smoking increased the risk. Eczema was associated with urbanization, while growing up on a farm was associated with a decreased risk. Added one by one to the multivariate model, asthma, allergic rhinitis and any positive skin prick test were associated with eczema.
Eczema among adults is a common disease with more women than men having and having had eczema. Eczema is associated with other atopic diseases and with airway symptoms. Hereditary factors and exposure to gas, dust and fumes are associated with eczema.
PubMed ID
22372948 View in PubMed
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An investigation of social and pharmacological exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke as possible predictors of perceived nicotine dependence, smoking susceptibility, and smoking expectancies among never-smoking youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134104
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2011 Oct;13(10):926-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Simon Racicot
Jennifer J McGrath
Jennifer O'Loughlin
Author Affiliation
Pediatric Public Health Psychology Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Concordia University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. racicot.simon@gmail.com
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2011 Oct;13(10):926-33
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Cotinine - analysis
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Saliva - chemistry
Smoking - psychology
Social Environment
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Tobacco Use Disorder - psychology
Abstract
Recent studies evidenced that adolescent never-smokers exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS) endorsed nicotine dependence symptoms. Other studies showed that SHS exposure measured with biomarkers among never-smokers independently predicted withdrawal sensations and prospective smoking initiation. The aim of the present study was to replicate and extend these findings by investigating whether social and pharmacological measures of SHS exposure predicted precursors to smoking among never-smoking adolescents.
Participants included 327 never-smokers aged 11-15 years attending sixth or seventh grade in French language schools in Montréal, Canada. They completed self-report questionnaires measuring their smoking status, social smoke exposure (number of smokers in their environment and number of situations where SHS exposure occurs), and precursors to smoking initiation (smoking expectancies, perceived nicotine dependence, and smoking susceptibility). Each participant provided a saliva sample from which cotinine biomarkers were derived to measure pharmacological exposure to SHS.
When predictors were modeled individually, number of smokers predicted perceived nicotine dependence (p = .05), smoking susceptibility (p = .001), and expected benefits (p = .05), whereas number of situations predicted smoking susceptibility (p = .01). When predictors were modeled simultaneously, number of smokers predicted perceived nicotine dependence (p = .01), smoking susceptibility (p = .01), and expected benefits (p = .05).
Social smoke exposure was a predictor for smoking precursors. Pharmacological exposure to SHS did not predict smoking precursors, which may be partly attributable to the low cotinine values observed in our sample. Suggestions for improved pharmacological measurement of SHS and implications for public health are discussed.
PubMed ID
21622492 View in PubMed
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Assessing implementation difficulties in tobacco use prevention and cessation counselling among dental providers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134158
Source
Implement Sci. 2011;6:50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Masamitsu Amemori
Susan Michie
Tellervo Korhonen
Heikki Murtomaa
Taru H Kinnunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Public Health, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. masamitsu.amemori@helsinki.fi
Source
Implement Sci. 2011;6:50
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Counseling
Dental Hygienists
Dentist's Practice Patterns
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Finland
Guideline Adherence
Health Plan Implementation
Humans
Male
Models, Theoretical
Patient Education as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Tobacco Use Cessation - methods
Abstract
Tobacco use adversely affects oral health. Clinical guidelines recommend that dental providers promote tobacco abstinence and provide patients who use tobacco with brief tobacco use cessation counselling. Research shows that these guidelines are seldom implemented, however. To improve guideline adherence and to develop effective interventions, it is essential to understand provider behaviour and challenges to implementation. This study aimed to develop a theoretically informed measure for assessing among dental providers implementation difficulties related to tobacco use prevention and cessation (TUPAC) counselling guidelines, to evaluate those difficulties among a sample of dental providers, and to investigate a possible underlying structure of applied theoretical domains.
A 35-item questionnaire was developed based on key theoretical domains relevant to the implementation behaviours of healthcare providers. Specific items were drawn mostly from the literature on TUPAC counselling studies of healthcare providers. The data were collected from dentists (n = 73) and dental hygienists (n = 22) in 36 dental clinics in Finland using a web-based survey. Of 95 providers, 73 participated (76.8%). We used Cronbach's alpha to ascertain the internal consistency of the questionnaire. Mean domain scores were calculated to assess different aspects of implementation difficulties and exploratory factor analysis to assess the theoretical domain structure. The authors agreed on the labels assigned to the factors on the basis of their component domains and the broader behavioural and theoretical literature.
Internal consistency values for theoretical domains varied from 0.50 ('emotion') to 0.71 ('environmental context and resources'). The domain environmental context and resources had the lowest mean score (21.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 17.2 to 25.4) and was identified as a potential implementation difficulty. The domain emotion provided the highest mean score (60%; 95% CI, 55.0 to 65.0). Three factors were extracted that explain 70.8% of the variance: motivation (47.6% of variance, a = 0.86), capability (13.3% of variance, a = 0.83), and opportunity (10.0% of variance, a = 0.71).
This study demonstrated a theoretically informed approach to identifying possible implementation difficulties in TUPAC counselling among dental providers. This approach provides a method for moving from diagnosing implementation difficulties to designing and evaluating interventions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21615948 View in PubMed
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Family eczema-history in 2-year-olds with eczema; a prospective, population-based study. The PACT-study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134321
Source
BMC Dermatol. 2011;11:11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Marit Saunes
Torbjørn Øien
Ola Storrø
Roar Johnsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. marit.saunes@ntnu.no
Source
BMC Dermatol. 2011;11:11
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Eczema - epidemiology - genetics
Environmental Exposure
Family Health
Fathers
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mothers
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Siblings
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A maternal line of inheritance regarding eczema has been described in several studies, whereas others find associations to both a maternal as well as a paternal line of inheritance. When studying family history of eczema symptoms, cohort studies including siblings are rare. Time point for assessing family eczema-history could be of importance when studying the associations between family eczema-history and children with eczema, as parents with unaffected children may not recall mild symptoms in other siblings or their own disease history. We therefore aimed to study the associations between reported eczema in mother, father and siblings and reported eczema in index child where information on family history was collected at two different ages of index child.
Parents/children participating in The Prevention of Allergy among Children in Trondheim (PACT) study were given questionnaires on reported eczema symptoms in mother, father and siblings at 6 weeks and 1 year. When index child was 2 years of age, a detailed questionnaire on different health issues with emphasize on different allergy related disorders were filled in.
Both maternal and paternal reports on eczema were significantly associated with eczema in index child. Reporting family eczema-history at 1 year (N = 3087), "eczema sibling only" [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 3.13 (2.27-4.33)] as well as all other family-groups containing siblings with eczema were strongly associated with eczema 2 years. When family eczema-history was reported at 6 weeks (N = 2657), reporting of "eczema sibling only" was not associated to reported eczema at 2 years in index child [aOR = 1.31 (0.77-2.23)].
Having sibling(s) with eczema strengthened the associations between maternal and paternal reports on eczema with eczema in index child only when exposure was reported at 1 year. These findings indicate that results from questionnaires-based studies of family eczema-history depend on whether or not index child has yet developed eczema.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21599876 View in PubMed
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Clustering patients on the basis of their individual course of low back pain over a six month period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134441
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2011;12:99
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Iben Axén
Lennart Bodin
Gunnar Bergström
Laszlo Halasz
Fredrik Lange
Peter W Lövgren
Annika Rosenbaum
Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde
Irene Jensen
Author Affiliation
The Karolinska Institutet, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Sweden. iben.axen@ki.se
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2011;12:99
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cellular Phone
Cluster analysis
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Male
Manipulation, Chiropractic
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Several researchers have searched for subgroups in the heterogeneous population of patients with non-specific low back pain (LBP). To date, subgroups have been identified based on psychological profiles and the variation of pain.
This multicentre prospective observational study explored the 6- month clinical course with measurements of bothersomeness that were collected from weekly text messages that were sent by 176 patients with LBP. A hierarchical cluster analysis, Ward's method, was used to cluster patients according to the development of their pain.
Four clusters with distinctly different clinical courses were described and further validated against clinical baseline variables and outcomes. Cluster 1, a "stable" cluster, where the course was relatively unchanged over time, contained young patients with good self- rated health. Cluster 2, a group of "fast improvers" who were very bothered initially but rapidly improved, consisted of patients who rated their health as relatively poor but experienced the fewest number of days with bothersome pain of all the clusters. Cluster 3 was the "typical patient" group, with medium bothersomeness at baseline and an average improvement over the first 4-5 weeks. Finally, cluster 4 contained the "slow improvers", a group of patients who improved over 12 weeks. This group contained older individuals who had more LBP the previous year and who also experienced most days with bothersome pain of all the clusters.
It is possible to define clinically meaningful clusters of patients based on their individual course of LBP over time. Future research should aim to reproduce these clusters in different populations, add further clinical variables to distinguish the clusters and test different treatment strategies for them.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21586117 View in PubMed
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Prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins is associated with increased risk of wheeze and infections in infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134515
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2011 Aug;49(8):1843-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Solvor Berntsen Stølevik
Unni Cecilie Nygaard
Ellen Namork
Margaretha Haugen
Helen Engelstad Kvalem
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Jan Alexander
Joost H M van Delft
Henk van Loveren
Martinus Løvik
Berit Granum
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, NO-0403 Oslo, Norway. solvor.berntsen@fhi.no
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2011 Aug;49(8):1843-8
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - toxicity
Adult
Cohort Studies
Dioxins - toxicity
Eating
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Female
Humans
Infant
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - toxicity
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Questionnaires
Respiratory Sounds - physiopathology
Respiratory Tract Infections - chemically induced
Risk factors
Abstract
The birth cohort BraMat (n = 205; a sub-cohort of the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health) was established to study whether prenatal exposure to toxicants from the maternal diet affects immunological health outcomes in children. We here report on the environmental pollutants polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dioxins, as well as acrylamide generated in food during heat treatment. The frequency of common infections, eczema or itchiness, and periods of more than 10 days of dry cough, chest tightness or wheeze (called wheeze) in the children during the first year of life was assessed by questionnaire data (n = 195). Prenatal dietary exposure to the toxicants was estimated using a validated food frequency questionnaire from MoBa. Prenatal exposure to PCBs and dioxins was found to be associated with increased risk of wheeze and exanthema subitum, and also with increased frequency of upper respiratory tract infections. We found no associations between prenatal exposure to acrylamide and the health outcomes investigated. Our results suggest that prenatal dietary exposure to dioxins and PCBs may increase the risk of wheeze and infectious diseases during the first year of life.
PubMed ID
21571030 View in PubMed
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Unemployment and pregnancy outcomes: a study within the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134627
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(5):449-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Maria Morales-Suárez-Varela
Linda Kaerlev
Jin Liang Zhu
Jens P Bonde
Ellen A Nohr
Agustín Llopis-González
Natalia Gimeno-Clemente
Jørn Olsen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Public Health and Environmental Care, Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain. maria.m.morales@uv.es
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(5):449-56
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology
Pregnancy outcome
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Unemployment
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the relation between employment status, type of unemployment and pregnancy outcomes.
A cohort study of 7,282 pregnancies of unemployed women and 56,014 pregnancies among women in paid jobs was performed within the Danish National Birth Cohort. Pregnancy outcomes were ascertained and information about lifestyle, occupational, medical, and obstetric factors was obtained. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) for fetal loss, congenital anomalies, multiple births, sex ratio, preterm and very preterm birth and small for gestational age status, adjusting for lifestyle, medical and obstetric factors.
There were no differences in pregnancy outcomes between employed and unemployed women but women receiving unemployment benefit had an increased risk of preterm birth (adjusted OR (aOR) 1.16, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.03-1.31) and having a small for gestational age child (aOR 1.08, 95% CI 1.00-1.19) compared with employed women. Women receiving sickness or maternity benefit had an increased risk of multiple birth (aOR 1.70, 95% CI 1.43-2.04), preterm (aOR 1.47, 95% CI 1.22-1.77) and very preterm birth (aOR 1.88, 95% CI 1.22-2.89), while those receiving an unreported type of support had an increased risk of preterm birth (aOR 1.40, 95% CI 1.02-1.93).
We found no indication that being unemployed during pregnancy benefits or endangers the health of the child. Within the subgroups of unemployed women, we observed that women receiving unemployment and sickness or maternity benefits were at higher risk for some adverse pregnancy outcomes.
PubMed ID
21558297 View in PubMed
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Diet before pregnancy and the risk of hyperemesis gravidarum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134673
Source
Br J Nutr. 2011 Aug;106(4):596-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Margaretha Haugen
Ase Vikanes
Anne Lise Brantsaeter
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Andrej M Grjibovski
Per Magnus
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Department of Food Safety, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. margaretha.haugen@fhi.no
Source
Br J Nutr. 2011 Aug;106(4):596-602
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Allium
Cohort Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Hyperemesis Gravidarum - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Seafood
Severity of Illness Index
Water - administration & dosage
Young Adult
Abstract
Hyperemesis gravidarum (hyperemesis), characterised by severe nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy, has an unknown aetiology. The aim of the present study was to investigate food and nutrient intake before pregnancy and the risk of developing hyperemesis in women participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. From 1999 to 2002, a total of 7710 pregnant women answered a FFQ about their diet during the 12 months before becoming pregnant and a questionnaire about illnesses during pregnancy, including hyperemesis. Only women who were hospitalised for hyperemesis were included as cases. Nutrient intakes during the year before pregnancy did not differ between the ninety-nine women who developed hyperemesis and the 7611 who did not. However, the intake of seafood, allium vegetables and water was significantly lower among women who developed hyperemesis than among women in the non-hyperemesis group. Relative risks of hyperemesis were approximated as OR, and confounder control was performed with multiple logistic regression. Women in the upper tertile of seafood consumption had a lower risk of developing hyperemesis than those in the lower tertile (OR 0·56, 95 % CI 0·32, 0·98), and women in the second tertile of water intake had a lower risk of developing hyperemesis than those in the first tertile (OR 0·43, 95 % CI 0·25, 0·73). The findings suggest that a moderate intake of water and adherence to a healthy diet that includes vegetables and fish are associated with a lower risk of developing hyperemesis.
PubMed ID
21554820 View in PubMed
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Effect of dietary factors in pregnancy on risk of pregnancy complications: results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134772
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Dec;94(6 Suppl):1970S-1974S
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Roy M Nilsen
Per Magnus
Jan Alexander
Margareta Haugen
Author Affiliation
Divisions of Environmental Medicine and Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. helle.margrete.meltzer@fhi.no
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Dec;94(6 Suppl):1970S-1974S
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Diet, Mediterranean
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Food Habits
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Status
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Premature Birth - metabolism
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
There has been a thrilling development , as well as profound changes, in our understanding of the effect of fetal nutrition on the development and health of the child. The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) is an ongoing nationwide population-based pregnancy cohort study that between 1999 and 2008 recruited 90,723 women with 106,981 pregnancies and 108,487 children. The objective of MoBa is to test specific etiologic hypotheses by estimating the association between exposures and diseases with a special focus on disorders that may originate in early life. An important aspect in this regard is maternal diet and nutritional status during pregnancy. Nutritional factors have long been considered to be important determinants of maternal and fetal health, and dietary information is currently being collected in a number of pregnancy cohorts in Europe and the United States. Thus far, pregnancy complications studied in MoBa are preterm birth, preeclampsia, and fetal growth; and the aim of this article is to report results of recently published studies of dietary factors in relation to these outcomes. Numerous studies are planned using MoBa data, and the aim is to add to the knowledge of the interplay between dietary factors, nonnutrients, and toxic dietary substances and epigenetic modulation on fetal development and health later in life.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21543541 View in PubMed
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Dioxin exposure and age of pubertal onset among Russian boys.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134923
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2011 Sep;119(9):1339-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Susan A Korrick
Mary M Lee
Paige L Williams
Oleg Sergeyev
Jane S Burns
Donald G Patterson
Wayman E Turner
Larry L Needham
Larisa Altshul
Boris Revich
Russ Hauser
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. susan.korrick@channing.harvard.edu
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2011 Sep;119(9):1339-44
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Dioxins - blood - toxicity
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
Furans - blood - toxicity
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - toxicity
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Puberty - drug effects
Questionnaires
Russia - epidemiology
Sensitivity and specificity
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Animal data demonstrate associations of dioxin, furan, and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposures with altered male gonadal maturation. It is unclear whether these associations apply to human populations.
We investigated the association of dioxins, furans, PCBs, and corresponding toxic equivalent (TEQ) concentrations with pubertal onset among boys in a dioxin-contaminated region.
Between 2003 and 2005, 499 boys 8-9 years of age were enrolled in a longitudinal study in Chapaevsk, Russia. Pubertal onset [stage 2 or higher for genitalia (G2+) or testicular volume (TV) > 3 mL] was assessed annually between ages 8 and 12 years. Serum levels at enrollment were analyzed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. We used Cox proportional hazards models to assess age at pubertal onset as a function of exposure adjusted for potential confounders. We conducted sensitivity analyses excluding boys with pubertal onset at enrollment.
The median (range) total serum TEQ concentration was 21 (4-175) pg/g lipid, approximately three times higher than values in European children. At enrollment, boys were generally healthy and normal weight (mean body mass index, 15.9 kg/m2), with 30% having entered puberty by G2+ and 14% by TV criteria. Higher dioxin TEQs were associated with later pubertal onset by TV (hazard ratio = 0.68, 95% confidence interval, 0.49-0.95 for the highest compared with the lowest quartile). Similar associations were observed for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and dioxin concentrations for TV but not G2+. Results were robust to sensitivity analyses.
Findings support an association of higher peripubertal serum dioxin TEQs and concentrations with later male pubertal onset reflected in delayed testicular maturation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21527364 View in PubMed
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Raynaud's phenomenon among men and women with noise-induced hearing loss in relation to vibration exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104340
Source
Noise Health. 2014 Mar-Apr;16(69):89-94
Publication Type
Article
Author
Hans Pettersson
Lage Burström
Tohr Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Noise Health. 2014 Mar-Apr;16(69):89-94
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome - epidemiology
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Raynaud Disease - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Vibration - adverse effects
Abstract
Raynaud's phenomenon is characterized by constriction in blood supply to the fingers causing finger blanching, of white fingers (WF) and is triggered by cold. Earlier studies found that workers using vibrating hand-held tools and who had vibration-induced white fingers (VWF) had an increased risk for hearing loss compared with workers without VWF. This study examined the occurrence of Raynaud's phenomenon among men and women with noise-induced hearing loss in relation to vibration exposure. All 342 participants had a confirmed noise-induced hearing loss medico legally accepted as work-related by AFA Insurance. Each subject answered a questionnaire concerning their health status and the kinds of exposures they had at the time when their hearing loss was first discovered. The questionnaire covered types of exposures, discomforts in the hands or fingers, diseases and medications affecting the blood circulation, the use of alcohol and tobacco and for women, the use of hormones and whether they had been pregnant. The participation rate was 41% (n = 133) with 38% (n = 94) for men and 50% (n = 39) for women. 84 men and 36 women specified if they had Raynaud's phenomenon and also if they had used hand-held vibrating machines. Nearly 41% of them had used hand-held vibrating machines and 18% had used vibrating machines at least 2 h each workday. There were 23 men/6 women with Raynaud's phenomenon. 37% reported WF among those participants who were exposed to hand-arm vibration (HAV) and 15% among those not exposed to HAV. Among the participants with hearing loss with daily use of vibrating hand-held tools more than twice as many reports WF compared with participants that did not use vibrating hand-held tools. This could be interpreted as Raynaud's phenomenon could be associated with an increased risk for noise-induced hearing loss. However, the low participation rate limits the generalization of the results from this study.
PubMed ID
24804712 View in PubMed
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Development of a Swedish Comprehensive International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Set for adult patients with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104729
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Apr;68(3):161-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Staffan Söderström
Richard Pettersson
Kerstin Edlund-Söderström
Gunnar Ganse
Eva Holmkvist
Olof Westin
Lena Haglund
Author Affiliation
Staffan Söderström, Neuropsychologist, Neuropsychological Clinic, Central Hospital , Västerås , Sweden.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Apr;68(3):161-8
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - classification - diagnosis
Delphi Technique
Disabled Persons - psychology
Employment - organization & administration
Humans
International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - organization & administration - utilization
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Psychiatry
Questionnaires
Social Security - organization & administration
Stress, Psychological
Sweden
World Health Organization
Abstract
Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults is a phenomenon that attracts a lot of attention in society today. Advances in research have made it clear that many conditions that make people seek medical and psychiatric care may have pervasive deficits in attention, motor control and impulsivity at their roots. Since ADHD in adults is a relatively new and very versatile concept, there is a great need for systemized classification of the ramifications of the deficit that extends into every aspect of these patients' lives.
To develop a Swedish Comprehensive International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Set for adult patients with ADHD.
A national expert survey was conducted using the Delphi technique and a formal consensus conference. Forty-two experts from different professions and organizations, including psychiatrists and physicians, psychologists, occupational therapists, a counsellor, a specialist nurse, representatives from a patient organization and representatives from the Swedish Social Insurance Agency, participated in the Delphi process and 28 participants from the expert group attended the consensus conference.
At the formal consensus conference, 66 categories from the ICF were identified and included in the national Comprehensive Core Set for ADHD: 21 categories from the component body functions, 26 categories from the component activities and participation, and 19 categories from the component environmental factors.
The Comprehensive Core Set for ADHD should be regarded as national and preliminary, and should be further tested and evaluated by experts in ADHD in clinical settings in Sweden.
PubMed ID
24627961 View in PubMed
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Environmental factors as predictors of smoking among ninth-grade adolescents in Pitkäranta (Russian Karelia) and in eastern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166338
Source
Res Nurs Health. 2006 Dec;29(6):543-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Ulla Kemppainen
Kerttu Tossavainen
Erkki Vartiainen
Veikko Jokela
Pekka Puska
Vladimir Pantelejev
Mihail Uhanov
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Kuopio, PL 1627, 70211 Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Res Nurs Health. 2006 Dec;29(6):543-55
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology
Adolescent Psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cultural Characteristics
Family - ethnology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Friends - ethnology
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Models, Psychological
Nursing Methodology Research
Peer Group
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Smoking - ethnology - prevention & control
Social Environment
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess whether similar environmental factors predict adolescents' smoking in two different cultures: in the Pitkäranta district in Russian Karelia and in eastern Finland. The data were gathered by self-administered questionnaires from ninth-grade students in 10 comprehensive schools in Pitkäranta (n = 385) and from age-matched students in 24 schools in eastern Finland (n = 2,098). Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test whether similar path structures fit for boys and for girls in Pitkäranta and in eastern Finland, and to test whether regression coefficients were similar between the cultures by sex. Smoking by family members and best friends was positively related to adolescents' smoking both directly and indirectly. Environmental factors were similar predictors of smoking between the cultures for boys. For girls, different regression coefficients in Pitkäranta and in eastern Finland were found. Best friend's smoking was the most important predictor of adolescents' own smoking in every sub-sample. When indirect relationships were identified, the significance of parents' and siblings' smoking, in addition to smoking by best friends, was strongly supported.
PubMed ID
17131279 View in PubMed
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Exposure to diesel and gasoline engine emissions and the risk of lung cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166899
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Jan 1;165(1):53-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2007
Author
Marie-Elise Parent
Marie-Claude Rousseau
Paolo Boffetta
Aaron Cohen
Jack Siemiatycki
Author Affiliation
INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, University of Quebec, Laval, Quebec, Canada. marie-elise.parent@iaf.inrs.ca
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Jan 1;165(1):53-62
Date
Jan-1-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - toxicity
Case-Control Studies
Gasoline
Health Surveys
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Vehicles
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Vehicle Emissions - toxicity
Abstract
Pollution from motor vehicles constitutes a major environmental health problem. The present paper describes associations between diesel and gasoline engine emissions and lung cancer, as evidenced in a 1979-1985 population-based case-control study in Montreal, Canada. Cases were 857 male lung cancer patients. Controls were 533 population controls and 1,349 patients with other cancer types. Subjects were interviewed to obtain a detailed lifetime job history and relevant data on potential confounders. Industrial hygienists translated each job description into indices of exposure to several agents, including engine emissions. There was no evidence of excess risks of lung cancer with exposure to gasoline exhaust. For diesel engine emissions, results differed by control group. When cancer controls were considered, there was no excess risk. When population controls were studied, the odds ratios, after adjustments for potential confounders, were 1.2 (95% confidence interval: 0.8, 1.8) for any exposure and 1.6 (95% confidence interval: 0.9, 2.8) for substantial exposure. Confidence intervals between risk estimates derived from the two control groups overlapped considerably. These results provide some limited support for the hypothesis of an excess lung cancer risk due to diesel exhaust but no support for an increase in risk due to gasoline exhaust.
PubMed ID
17062632 View in PubMed
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