Skip header and navigation

Refine By

343 records – page 1 of 18.

[Scientific rationale for basic directions of the optimization of the population health in the development of municipal environmental programs].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264391
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Jan-Feb;94(1):117-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
M Iu Iakusheva
O V Astaf'eva
S E Deriagina
M B Sergeeva
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Jan-Feb;94(1):117-20
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Environmental Illness - epidemiology - prevention & control
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Local Government
Program Evaluation
Public Health
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
For the solution of ecological problems in the framework of the preparation of the municipal ecological program in the city of Verkhnyaya Pyshma (Sverdlovskaya Oblast) there was peiformed the assessment of the state of population health, the evaluation of carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic health risk from chemicals that pollute the air and drinking water Atmospheric air was established to be the main environment cause for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risks. The obtained results served as the basis for the development of technological, sanitary and hygienical measures of the program aimed at optimizing of the population health.
PubMed ID
26031056 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Effect of auto-road complex in the city of Surgut on air pollution and population health].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264399
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Jan-Feb;94(1):57-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
M V Vinokurova
M V Vinokurov
S A Voronin
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Jan-Feb;94(1):57-61
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Cities
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Humans
Motor Vehicles
Particulate Matter - analysis
Public Health
Retrospective Studies
Siberia
Urban health
Abstract
Currently, due to the increase in motorization, the problem of environmental pollution by emissions of objects of auto-road complex is becoming more and more important not only for cities, butfor dynamically developing regional cities. The negative impact is characterized by the increase of the morbidity rate of environmentally-dependent diseases, primarily respiratory diseases, neoplasms. This exposure is most pronounced near the motorways, at the gas station, and also spreads to residential areas, which requires the optimization of protective and preventive measures. Presented article is devoted to the characterization of air pollution of various areas in the city of Surgut due to emission of sources of auto-road complex with the assessment of public health risks.
PubMed ID
26031043 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Hazard assessment of the impact of high temperature and air pollution on public health in Moscow].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264401
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Jan-Feb;94(1):36-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
B A Revich
D A Shaposhnikov
S L Avaliani
K G Rubinshtein
S V Emelina
M V Shiriaev
E G Semutnikova
P V Zakharova
O Iu Kislova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Jan-Feb;94(1):36-40
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Illness - epidemiology
Hot Temperature - adverse effects
Humans
Morbidity - trends
Moscow - epidemiology
Public Health
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Urban health
Urban Population
Abstract
In the article there are considered the main problems of assessing public health risks of the combined effects of high temperatures and air pollution with the account taken of the consequences of abnormally hot weather observed in summer 2010 in Moscow and without equals in the history of meteorological measurements in the city. The daily average concentrations of fine suspended particles matter (PM10) in the city during peatland fires from 4 to 9 August are emphasized to be within the range of 431-906 µ/m3, being 7.2-15.1 times the Russian maximum permissible concentration (MPCs) (60 µ/m3). The anomalous heat and high levels of air pollution in this period were shown to cause a significant increase in excess mortality among the population of Moscow. There was established the relative gain in mortality from all natural causes per 10 µg/m3 increase in daily average concentrations of PM10 and ozone, which was respectively: 0.47% (95%; CI: 0.31-0.63) and 0.41% (95%; CI: 0.31-1.13). On the base of the statistical analysis of daily mortality rates, meteorological indices, the concentrations of PM10 and ozone there was developed marking scale for the risk assessment of these indices accordingly to 4 gradings--low (permissible), warning, alert, and a hazard level. There has been substantiated the importance of the introduction of the system for the early alert for hazard weather events and the unified rating scale for the hazard of high air temperatures and high levels of air pollution with PM10 and ozone, which allows to take timely measures for the protection of the public health.
PubMed ID
26031039 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Urbanization--a factor that increases the risk for health].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264404
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Jan-Feb;94(1):8-11
Publication Type
Article
Author
K B Fridman
T V Kriukova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Jan-Feb;94(1):8-11
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Illness - epidemiology
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects
Humans
Hygiene - standards
Morbidity - trends
Public Health
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Urbanization - trends
Abstract
The negative impact of urbanization on public health is obvious. However; due to the comprehensiveness and polymorphicity of its manifestations there are not established criteria for them. Health risk methodology allows, in principle, to obtain quantitative indices of the separate results of the impact on the health status of the citizens of metropolis that can be extremely effective in this area. The total cross-media riskfrom traffic pollution, drinking water quality, open ponds, noise, etc. permits to use of hygiene criteria in urban planning, insurance, taxation, etc.
PubMed ID
26031033 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Municipality of Anchorage (Alaska), Department of Health and Environmental Protection. v.
Publication Type
Report
Source
Municipality of Anchorage (Alaska), Department of Health and Environmental Protection. v.
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Public Health
Environmental health
Anchorage
Notes
ALASKA RA448.A5A558 (1979, 1980, 1981, 1983)
Less detail

Smoking is a major preventable risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis: estimations of risks after various exposures to cigarette smoke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138681
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2011 Mar;70(3):508-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Henrik Källberg
Bo Ding
Leonid Padyukov
Camilla Bengtsson
Johan Rönnelid
Lars Klareskog
Lars Alfredsson
Author Affiliation
Correspondence to Dr Henrik Källberg, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Box 210, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. henrik.kallberg@ki.se
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2011 Mar;70(3):508-11
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - etiology - genetics - immunology
Autoantibodies - blood
Case-Control Studies
Female
Genotype
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics
HLA-DRB1 Chains
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Peptides, Cyclic - immunology
Public Health
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Earlier studies have demonstrated that smoking and genetic risk factors interact in providing an increased risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Less is known on how smoking contributes to RA in the context of genetic variability, and what proportion of RA may be caused by smoking.
To determine the association between the amount of smoking and risk of RA in the context of different HLA-DRB1 shared epitope (SE) alleles, and to estimate proportions of RA cases attributed to smoking.
Setting and Participants Data from the Swedish Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis (EIRA) case-control study encompassing 1204 cases and 871 controls were analysed. Main Outcome Measure Estimated OR to develop RA and excess fraction of cases attributable to smoking according to the amount of smoking and genotype.
Smoking was estimated to be responsible for 35% of anticitrullinated protein/peptide antibody (ACPA)-positive cases. For each HLA-DRB1 SE genotype, smoking was dose-dependently associated with an increased risk of ACPA-positive RA (p trend
Notes
Cites: J Immunol. 2003 Jul 15;171(2):538-4112847215
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2003 Sep;62(9):835-4112922955
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2004 Oct;50(10):3085-9215476204
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1988 Mar;31(3):315-243358796
Cites: Epidemiology. 1992 Sep;3(5):452-61391139
Cites: Tissue Antigens. 1992 May;39(5):225-351357775
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 1994;16(1):51-647925727
Cites: Br Med Bull. 1996 Jan;52(1):3-118746292
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2004 Nov;50(11):3458-6715529351
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2005;20(7):563-416119427
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2005 Nov;64(11):1588-9415843455
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2006 Jan;54(1):38-4616385494
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2006 Mar;65(3):366-7116014670
Cites: Nat Clin Pract Rheumatol. 2006 Aug;2(8):425-3316932734
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2007 Jun;56(6):1745-5317530703
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2008 Feb;58(2):359-6918240242
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2008 Apr;67(4):466-7017660221
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2009 Feb;68(2):222-718535114
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2010 Jan;69(1):54-6019151010
PubMed ID
21149499 View in PubMed
Less detail

Volcanic ash should not be presumed harmless in long term.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97004
Source
Nature. 2010 May 13;465(7295):157
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-13-2010

Surveillance for human West Nile virus disease - United States, 1999-2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97483
Source
MMWR Surveill Summ. 2010 Apr 2;59(2):1-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2-2010
Author
Nicole P Lindsey
J Erin Staples
Jennifer A Lehman
Marc Fischer
Author Affiliation
Division of Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, CDC, 3150 Rampart Road, Fort Collins, CO 80521, USA. nplindsey@cdc.gov
Source
MMWR Surveill Summ. 2010 Apr 2;59(2):1-17
Date
Apr-2-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Public Health
Risk factors
Seasons
United States - epidemiology
West Nile Fever - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Young Adult
Abstract
PROBLEM/CONDITION: West Nile virus (WNV) is an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus) in the family Flaviviridae and is the leading cause of arboviral disease in the United States. An estimated 80% of WNV infections are asymptomatic. Most symptomatic persons develop an acute systemic febrile illness that often includes headache, myalgia, arthralgia, rash, or gastrointestinal symptoms. Less than 1% of infected persons develop neuroinvasive disease, which typically presents as encephalitis, meningitis, or acute flaccid paralysis. REPORTING PERIOD: 1999-2008. Description of System: WNV disease is a nationally notifiable disease with standardized case definitions. State and metropolitan heath departments report cases to CDC through ArboNET, an electronic passive surveillance system. Variables collected include patient age, sex, race, county and state of residence, date of illness onset, clinical syndrome, and outcome of illness. RESULTS: During 1999-2008, a total of 28,961 confirmed and probable cases of WNV disease, including 11,822 (41%) WNV neuroinvasive disease cases, were reported to CDC from 47 states and the District of Columbia. No cases were reported from Alaska, Hawaii, Maine, or any U.S. territories. A total of 93% of all WNV patients had illness onset during July-September. The national incidence of WNV neuroinvasive disease peaked in 2002 (1.02 cases per 100,000 population) and was stable during 2004-2007 (mean annual incidence: 0.44; range: 0.39-0.50). In 2008, the incidence was 0.23 per 100,000 population, compared with 0.41 in 2007 and 0.50 in 2006. During 1999-2008, the highest incidence of neuroinvasive disease occurred in West North Central and Mountain states. Neuroinvasive disease incidence increased with increasing age, with the highest incidence (1.35 cases per 100,000 population) occurring among persons aged >or=70 years. The hospitalization rate and case-fatality ratio increased with increasing age among persons with neuroinvasive disease. INTERPRETATION: The stability in reported incidence of neuroinvasive disease during 2004-2007 might represent an endemic level of WNV transmission. Whether the incidence reported in 2008 represents a decrease that will continue is unknown; variations in vectors, avian amplifying hosts, human activity, and environmental factors make predicting future WNV transmission levels difficult. PUBLIC HEALTH ACTION: Surveillance of WNV disease is important for detecting and monitoring seasonal epidemics and targeting prevention and control activities. Public health education programs should focus on older persons, who are at increased risk for neurologic disease and poor clinical outcomes. In the absence of an effective human vaccine, WNV disease prevention depends on community-level mosquito control and household and personal protection measures.
Notes
RefSource: MMWR Surveill Summ. 2010 Jun 18;59(23):720
PubMed ID
20360671 View in PubMed
Less detail

Feasibility and utility of mapping disease risk at the neighbourhood level within a Canadian public health unit: an ecological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143637
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2010;9:21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Eric J Holowaty
Todd A Norwood
Susitha Wanigaratne
Juanjo J Abellan
Linda Beale
Author Affiliation
Population Studies and Surveillance, Cancer Care Ontario, 620 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. eric.holowaty@cancercare.on.ca
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2010;9:21
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cluster analysis
Ecological and Environmental Processes
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Feasibility Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Models, Statistical
Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Ontario
Prevalence
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Public Health
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Rural Population
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
We conducted spatial analyses to determine the geographic variation of cancer at the neighbourhood level (dissemination areas or DAs) within the area of a single Ontario public health unit, Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph, covering a population of 238,326 inhabitants. Cancer incidence data between 1999 and 2003 were obtained from the Ontario Cancer Registry and were geocoded down to the level of DA using the enhanced Postal Code Conversion File. The 2001 Census of Canada provided information on the size and age-sex structure of the population at the DA level, in addition to information about selected census covariates, such as average neighbourhood income.
Age standardized incidence ratios for cancer and the prevalence of census covariates were calculated for each of 331 dissemination areas in Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph. The standardized incidence ratios (SIR) for cancer varied dramatically across the dissemination areas. However, application of the Moran's I statistic, a popular index of spatial autocorrelation, suggested significant spatial patterns for only two cancers, lung and prostate, both in males (p
Notes
Cites: Stat Med. 1999 Dec 15;18(23):3211-2010602146
Cites: Stat Med. 2000 Apr 30;19(8):1081-810790681
Cites: Cancer. 2000 Aug 15;89(4):901-1210951356
Cites: Stat Med. 2000 Sep 15-30;19(17-18):2203-1510960848
Cites: Stat Med. 2000 Sep 15-30;19(17-18):2217-4110960849
Cites: Stat Med. 2000 Sep 15-30;19(17-18):2295-30810960854
Cites: J Public Health Med. 2001 Mar;23(1):40-611315692
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2001 May 2;93(9):705-911333293
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2002 Feb 10;97(5):695-911807800
Cites: Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2002 Apr;205(3):169-8112040915
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2003;24:43-5612471269
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2003 Sep;39(14):1973-512957450
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Jun;112(9):1016-2515198922
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Jun;112(9):1026-3115198923
Cites: J Med Syst. 2004 Aug;28(4):385-9515366243
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1995 Dec;49 Suppl 2:S72-78594138
Cites: Clin Biochem. 1998 Feb;31(1):47-99559224
Cites: Public Health Nurs. 2004 Nov-Dec;21(6):547-5415566560
Cites: Stat Methods Med Res. 2005 Feb;14(1):35-5915690999
Cites: Epidemiology. 2005 Jul;16(4):526-3115951671
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2005 Jun;15(3):262-915755781
Cites: Epidemiol Bull. 2004 Dec;25(4):1-916127821
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2006 Feb;30(2 Suppl):S25-3616458787
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2006 Feb;30(2 Suppl):S37-4916458789
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2006 Feb;30(2 Suppl):S7-1516458793
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2006 Feb;30(2 Suppl):S88-10016458795
Cites: Stat Methods Med Res. 2006 Aug;15(4):385-40716886738
Cites: Int J Health Geogr. 2006;5:3916981996
Cites: Stat Med. 2006 Nov 30;25(22):3929-4316435334
Cites: Int J Health Geogr. 2006;5:4917092353
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2006 Dec;16(12):901-716843007
Cites: Health Policy. 2008 Aug;87(2):185-9318243396
Cites: Int J Health Geogr. 2008;7:4118662387
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2008 Aug;116(8):1105-1018709139
Cites: Stat Med. 2008 Nov 10;27(25):5111-4218712778
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2009 Jan;6(1):A0319080009
Cites: Public Health. 2009 Feb;123(2):103-919147163
Cites: Int J Health Geogr. 2009;8:5519822013
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2009 Oct;20(8):1431-4019526319
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Jun;112(9):995-715198919
PubMed ID
20459738 View in PubMed
Less detail

Should Canadian health care professionals support the call for a worldwide ban on asbestos?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195498
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Feb 20;164(4):495-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-2001
Author
J. Siemiatycki
Author Affiliation
INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Université du Québec, 531 boul. des Prairies, Laval QC H7V 1B7. Jack.Siemiatycki@iaf.uquebec.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Feb 20;164(4):495-7
Date
Feb-20-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - adverse effects
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Carcinogens, Environmental - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - prevention & control
Ethics, Medical
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health Policy
Humans
Industry
Lobbying
Philosophy, Medical
Public Health
World Health
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Feb 20;164(4):489-9011233868
Cites: Parasitol Today. 2000 Mar;16(3):119-2110689332
Cites: Science. 1990 Jan 19;247(4940):294-3012153315
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 1997 Jul-Sep;3(3):295-3029284373
Comment In: CMAJ. 2001 Feb 20;164(4):453, 45511233860
Comment In: CMAJ. 2001 Oct 30;165(9):1190-1; author reply 1191-311706903
Comment In: CMAJ. 2001 Oct 30;165(9):1190; author reply 1191-311706904
Comment In: CMAJ. 2001 Oct 30;165(9):1189; author reply 1191-311706901
Comment In: CMAJ. 2001 Oct 30;165(9):1191; author reply 1191-311706906
Comment On: CMAJ. 2001 Feb 20;164(4):489-9011233868
PubMed ID
11233870 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Feb 20;164(4):453, 455
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-2001
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Feb 20;164(4):453, 455
Date
Feb-20-2001
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - adverse effects
Canada
Carcinogens, Environmental - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - prevention & control
Health Policy
Humans
Public Health
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Feb 20;164(4):491-411233869
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Feb 20;164(4):489-9011233868
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Feb 20;164(4):495-711233870
Comment In: CMAJ. 2001 Oct 30;165(9):1189; author reply 1191-311706902
Comment On: CMAJ. 2001 Feb 20;164(4):491-411233869
Comment On: CMAJ. 2001 Feb 20;164(4):495-711233870
PubMed ID
11233860 View in PubMed
Less detail

Some considerations concerning multimedia-multipollutant risk assessment methodology: use of epidemiologic data for non-cancer risk assessment in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196021
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Jan;109(1):7-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
L I Privalova
K E Wilcock
B A Katsnelson
S E Keane
K. Cunningham
S V Kuzmin
S A Voronin
B I Nikonov
V B Gurvich
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Epidemiology, the Urals Branch of the Center for Preparation and Implementation of International Projects on Technical Assistance, Yekaterinburg, Russia. LarisaP@ocsen.mplik.ru
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Jan;109(1):7-13
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Humans
Industry
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Policy Making
Public Health
Public Policy
Research Design
Risk assessment
Russia - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
The highly industrialized small town of Verkhnyaya Pyshma (in the Urals region of Russia) was chosen as the site of a multimedia-multipollutant risk assessment using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency methodology. The assessment was based on routine environmental pollution monitoring data for ambient air, soils, drinking water, and food, and the international environmental epidemiology literature. Using an a priori set of the preliminary health-based criteria, we selected nine pollutants for risk assessment: total suspended particles (TSP), sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), ammonia arsenic, copper, cadmium, and lead. We used dose-response functions derived from epidemiologic studies to assess individual and population risks for TSP, SO2, NO2, As, Cd, and Pb. We assessed both cancer (for BaP, As, and Cd) and non-cancer (for all the chosen pollutants but BaP) responses, but in this paper we discuss only the assessments of noncarcinogenic risks due to TSP, SO2, NO2, Pb, and Cd as examples of how the quantitative estimates of health effects can be produced by using a risk function approach. We also schematically present a modified conceptual model of multimedia-multipollutant risk assessment taking into account the experience gained with this study.
Notes
Cites: Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 1987 Apr;38(4):553-603567392
Cites: Environ Res. 1989 Feb;48(1):7-162644119
Cites: Ann Ig. 1989 Sep-Oct;1(5):1185-962483901
Cites: J Air Waste Manage Assoc. 1992 May;42(5):662-711627322
Cites: Epidemiology. 2000 Sep;11(5):571-510955410
Cites: JAMA. 1994 Jul 27;272(4):284-918028141
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1997 Dec 26;837:372-869472353
Cites: Epidemiology. 1999 Sep;10(5):545-910468429
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1999;895:212-2210676419
Cites: Environ Res. 1994 Apr;65(1):42-558162884
PubMed ID
11171518 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Sanitary environmental issues and public health in a large industrial city].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184545
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 May-Jun;(3):66-8
Publication Type
Article

The effect of temperature on mortality in Stockholm 1998--2003: a study of lag structures and heatwave effects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92942
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2008 Jul;36(5):516-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Rocklöv Joacim
Forsberg Bertil
Author Affiliation
Occupational & Environmental Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. joacim.rocklov@envmed.umu.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2008 Jul;36(5):516-23
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
Heat Stress Disorders - mortality
Hot Temperature - adverse effects
Humans
Mortality
Poisson Distribution
Public Health
Respiratory Tract Diseases - mortality
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
AIMS: To describe seasonal patterns of natural mortality in Stockholm as well as the temperature-mortality relationship and the lag structure for effects of high and low temperatures; to describe the impact of high temperatures on cardiovascular and respiratory mortality, and the general effect of high temperatures in different age groups; and to investigate whether there is any indication of an additional heatwave or cold spell effect. METHODS: Generalized additive Poisson regression models were fitted to mortality and temperature data from Stockholm from the period 1998-2003, controlling for influenza, season, time trends, week day, and holidays. RESULTS: The mortality in Stockholm followed a seasonal pattern, with a peak in the winter season. The ;;optimal temperature'' was around 11-12 degrees C. Above this temperature, the cumulative general relative risk (RR) corresponded to a 1.4% (95% confidence interval (CI)=0.8-2.0) increase per degrees C, and below this temperature the cumulative RR corresponded to a 0.7% (95% CI=0.5-0.9) decrease per degrees C. Age-specific RRS were estimated above the threshold for age 74 years, with estimated increases of 0.5% (not significant), 1.5% (not significant) and 1.6% (95% CI=0.9-2.3) per degrees C, respectively. The RRs for cardiovascular and respiratory causes were studied above the breakpoint, and estimated to be 1.1% (95% CI=0.3-2.0) and 4.3% (95% CI=2.2-6.5) per degrees C, respectively. The lag structures from moving averages and polynomial distributed lag models coincided with a rather direct effect during summer (lag 0 and 1) and a more prolonged effect during winter, covering about a week. The inclusion of an indicator of heatwaves added an increase in daily mortality of 3.1-7.7%, depending on the threshold. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that the predicted increase in heat events must also be taken seriously in Scandinavia, whatever the extent of the decreasing cold related mortality. The relative risks associated with heat and heatwaves seem stronger than the cold effects and thus a larger public health threat, since northern populations have not yet adapted to heat as have been done over a long time for the cold periods. The pressure on the healthcare sector will probably increase in the warm season, periodically it may become even greater than the pressure due to cold weather, which will be a new phenomenon for the healthcare sector to cope with. We need to be prepared for these kind of events by developing adaptation and education strategies to handle the consequences that a warmer climate will have for public health and the healthcare sector.
PubMed ID
18567653 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Organizing the supervision over the turnover of nanomaterials presenting a potential hazard to human health].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134285
Source
Gig Sanit. 2011 Mar-Apr;(2):4-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
G G Onishchenko
Source
Gig Sanit. 2011 Mar-Apr;(2):4-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Humans
Nanostructures - adverse effects - analysis
Nanotechnology - standards
Public Health
Russia
Abstract
Nanoindustry encompasses very different branches of industry today. It should be noted that these are precisely the investigators who deal with researches and developments of nanomaterials will be to the largest measure exposed and hence the likelihood of the potential harm to their health is greatest. To elaborate the special regulations and programs, normative documents and guidelines designed to afford safety and health protection of the employees at work, which should consider the specific characteristics of nanotechnologies. Since 2007, work has proceeded on the safety evaluation of nanoparticles and nanomaterials. Nanotechnology as a key priority in the foreseeable future poses a number of problems facing hygiene science to develop hygienic safety criteria for the production, usage, utilization and storage of various nanomaterials and to elaborate procedures for determination of nanoparticles in different media. Russia will be able to rapidly progress in solving the safety problems in emerging nanoindustry and to minimize human health and environmental risks associated with the manufacture and use of nanoproducts.
PubMed ID
21604392 View in PubMed
Less detail

[On the measures for environmental and health safety in the development and implementation of nanotechnologies and nanomaterials].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134791
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2011;(3):28-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
G G Onishchenko
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2011;(3):28-31
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Humans
Nanostructures - adverse effects - analysis
Nanotechnology
Public Health
Russia
Abstract
Nanotechnologies find wide application in industry and medicine. The Russian market of nanotechnologies is at the very beginning of development. Rospotrebnadzor has amassed a wealth of experience in the creation of efficacious systems for estimation and sanitary-epidemiological control of the safety of goods and foodstuffs. The assessment of the safety of nanoparticles and nanomaterials has been carried out since 2007. In 2008-2009, a survey was initiated with a view to developing safety criteria for nanoproducts, nanomaterials, and nanotechnologies. In 2010, research institutions of Rospotrebnadzor were engaged in investigations aimed to develop relevant regulatory and procedural documentation. Studies are underway to work out new highly sensitive methods for the detection, identification and qualitative determination of nanomaterials in the environment, food-staffs, and biological media.
PubMed ID
21542372 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Dept. of Health and Human Services, Indian Health Service, Office of Public Health, Program Statistics Team. 272 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2000
program of prevent ive, cura tive, re h a bilita tive and environmental services. This system integrates health services delivered directly throug h IH S facilities, purchased by ms through contractual arrangements with providers in the pri va te secto r, and delivered through Tribally operated
  1 document  

[Survey of the public health impact of high-technology emergencies].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223145
Source
Can J Public Health. 1992 Sep-Oct;83(5):385-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Côté
T. Kosatsky
Author Affiliation
Bureau Régional en Santé Environnementale, Regroupement, Départements de Santé Communautaire du Montréal Métropolitain.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1992 Sep-Oct;83(5):385-7
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disaster planning
Disasters
Emergencies
Environmental health
Hazardous Substances
Humans
Public Health
Quebec
Retrospective Studies
PubMed ID
1473070 View in PubMed
Less detail

343 records – page 1 of 18.