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3930 records – page 1 of 197.

Survey of ophthalmic conditions in a Labrador community. I. Refractive errors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1279
Source
British Journal of Ophthalmology. 1979 Jun; 63(6):440-448.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
Johnson, G.J.
Matthews, A.
Perkins, E.S.
Author Affiliation
Memorial University
Source
British Journal of Ophthalmology. 1979 Jun; 63(6):440-448.
Date
1979
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Nain
Height
Nutrition
Emmetropia
Hypermetropia
Axial length of eye
Astigmatism
School performance
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry
Body Height
Child
Child, Preschool
Continental Population Groups
Educational Status
Eye - anatomy & histology
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Myopia - epidemiology
Newfoundland
Refractive Errors - epidemiology
Aged
Blindness - epidemiology - etiology
Cataract - epidemiology
Corneal Diseases - epidemiology
European Continental Ancestry Group
Eye Diseases - epidemiology
Eyelid Diseases - epidemiology
Glaucoma - epidemiology
Indians, North American
Infant
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retinal Diseases - epidemiology
Strabismus - epidemiology
Uveitis - epidemiology
Abstract
Of the 745 available members of the population of Nain in Labrador 650 (87%) were screened for refractive errors and ocular disease. Refraction by retinoscopy was done in 553 and axial length measured by an optical method in 514. The results showed that the incidence of low degrees of myopia was higher in Inuit (Eskimos) and those of Mixed Inuit-Caucasian blood in the age groups 10 to 40 than in those over 40. 75% of the myopes came from 20 families in which myopia was present in 2 or more generations. Although there was no significant correlation between the refraction of parents and offspring, there were significant correlations between them for axial length. The axial lenths of the myopic eyes of the Inuit and Mixed populations were significantly longer than emmetropic and hypermetropic eyes. The younger memebers of the population were taller than their parents, and except in female Caucasians axial length showed a significant positive correlation with height. More myopes than emmetropes and hypermetropes achieved grade 8 or more in school. It is suggested that the increased incidence of myopia in the younger age groups might be due to environmental factors interfering with the process of emmetropisation in eyes with a genetic predisposition to myopia by virtue of inheriting a slightlt longer eye. Better nutrition resulting in an increase in stature may also have had some influence.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2498.
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Assessment of PCBs in arctic foods and diets. A pilot study in Broughton Island, Northwest Territories, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1333
Source
Pages 159-162 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Arctic Medical Research, Vol. 4 7: Suppl. 1, pp. 159-162, 1988 ASSESSMENT OF PCBs IN ARCTIC FOODS AND DIETS A Pilot Study in Broughton Island, Northwest Territories, Canada D. Kinloch (1), H. Kuhnlein (2) NWT Region, Medical Services Branch, Health and Welfare Canada, Yellowknife, NWT (1
  1 document  
Author
Kinloch, D.
Kuhnlein, H.
Author Affiliation
Department of National Health and Welfare (Canada)
Source
Pages 159-162 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Broughton Island
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet, traditional
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Food Habits
Food Supply
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant feeding
Male
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories
Nutrition Surveys
PCB
Pilot Projects
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Pregnancy
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 880.
PubMed ID
3152417 View in PubMed
Documents
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Neonatal cold injury in the Northwest Territories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1596
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 97:970-973.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1967
Author
Maxwell, B.E.
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 97:970-973.
Date
1967
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Cambridge Bay
Spence Bay
Infanticide
Arctic Regions
Body temperature
Body Temperature Regulation
Canada
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Hypothermia
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases
Inuits
Male
Frostbite
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2733.
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Inuit myopia: an environmentally induced 'epidemic'?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1768
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 1975 Mar 8;112(5):575-577.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1975
Author
Morgan, R.W.
Speakman, J.S.
Grimshaw, S.E.
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 1975 Mar 8;112(5):575-577.
Date
1975
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Gjoa Haven
Spence Bay
Myopia
Heredity
Acculturation
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Body Height
Body Weight
Canada
Culture
Educational Status
Environment
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Myopia - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Abstract
Among Inuit less than 30 years old the prevalence of myopia is far in excess of that of their elders. This is especially true for females. There seems to be little, if any, genetic contribution to this "epidemic" of myopia in the young. The age and sex distribution indicates the likelihood of an environmental factor, probably cultural, being responsible for the current pattern. Other data implicate school attendance as a possible etiologic factor.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2506.
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Reference values of body mass at. birth among native northern population of Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58468
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2002 Aug;61(3):245-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Galina Vershubsky
Andrew Kozlov
Author Affiliation
ArctAn-C Innovative Laboratory, Moscow, Russia, and Sula Lab, Balik, Balchik Bulgaria. ggver@email.com
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2002 Aug;61(3):245-50
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Birth weight
Body Height
Body mass index
Cold Climate
Continental Population Groups
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Male
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Reference Values
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Infants with body mass at birth deviating from the mean values exhibit higher level of mortality. The absence of the expressed phenotype deviations refers to the preservation and heredity of the most adopted genotypes (reference values). The newborns out of the adaptive norm are morbidity-prone. The reference value for body mass at birth was studied in the indegenous populations of the Kola Peninsula, Siberia, Far East and the Urals. By our data the Arctic Saami and the Far East Nanais show the reference values more distinct from other. Lasting (many-centuries-long) adaptation to specific environmental conditions leads to development of a special phenotype complex. The Saami and Nanais are the most representative populations of the arctic and the monsoon climate zones. Accordingly, the parameters of reference values of their newborns are significantly different from the characteristics of the infants of the moderate climate zone.
PubMed ID
12369113 View in PubMed
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Blood lead concentrations and iron deficiency in Canadian aboriginal infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58507
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2002 Apr 22;289(1-3):255-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-22-2002
Author
Noreen D Willows
Katherine Gray-Donald
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2002 Apr 22;289(1-3):255-60
Date
Apr-22-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - epidemiology - ethnology
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Female
Fishes
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant Welfare
Iron - blood
Lead - blood
Male
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Aboriginal Cree infants living in northern Quebec who were 9 months of age were screened for anemia, iron deficiency and elevated blood lead concentrations. Of the 314 infants who were eligible to participate, 274 (87.3%) were screened for anemia, 186 had blood lead concentration measured and 141 of the latter group had iron status determined. The median blood lead concentration was 0.08 micromol/l (range 0.01-1.00 micromol/l). The 25, 50 and 75 percentiles for blood lead concentration were 0.05, 0.08 and 0.12 micromol/l, respectively. The prevalence of elevated blood lead concentrations (> 0.48 micromol/l) was 2.7% (95% Cl 0.36-5.0). Among infants who had blood lead measured, the prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin
PubMed ID
12049403 View in PubMed
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Paternal contribution to birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58575
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2001 Dec;55(12):873-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
P. Magnus
H K Gjessing
A. Skrondal
R. Skjaerven
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Health Sciences, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. per.magnus@folkehelsa.no
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2001 Dec;55(12):873-7
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth Weight - genetics
Embryonic and Fetal Development - genetics
Fathers
Female
Genotype
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight - physiology
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mothers
Phenotype
Registries
Risk assessment
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Understanding causes of variation in birth weight has been limited by lack of sufficient sets of data that include paternal birth weight. The objective was to estimate risks of low birth weight dependent on parental birth weights and to estimate father-mother-offspring correlations for birth weight to explain the variability in birth weight in terms of effects of genes and environmental factors. DESIGN: A family design, using trios of father-mother-firstborn child. SETTING: The complete birth population in Norway 1967-98. PARTICIPANTS: 67 795 families. MAIN RESULTS: The birth weight correlations were 0.226 for mother-child and 0.126 for father-child. The spousal correlation was low, 0.020. The relative risk of low birth weight in the first born child was 8.2 if both parents were low birth weight themselves, with both parents being above 4 kg as the reference. The estimate of heritability is about 0.25 for birth weight, under the assumption that cultural transmission on the paternal side has no effect on offspring prenatal growth. CONCLUSIONS: Paternal birth weight is a significant and independent predictor of low birth weight in offspring. The estimate of the heritability of birth weight in this study is lower than previously estimated from data within one generation in the Norwegian population.
PubMed ID
11707480 View in PubMed
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The epidemiology of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in Sweden 1987-96.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58585
Source
Arch Dis Child. 2001 Nov;85(5):379-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
G. Hedbäck
K. Abrahamsson
B. Husberg
T. Granholm
A. Odén
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Surgery, Drottning Silvias Barn-och Ungdomsjukhus, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, S-416 85, Gothenburg, Sweden. g.hedback@home.se
Source
Arch Dis Child. 2001 Nov;85(5):379-81
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Hypertrophy - epidemiology - surgery
Incidence
Infant
Male
Poisson Distribution
Pyloric Stenosis - epidemiology - surgery
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban health
Abstract
AIMS: To find out whether the incidence of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) has changed over the past decade, and if so, to investigate possible contributory factors. METHODS: All infants undergoing pyloromyotomy for IHPS in Sweden between 1987 and 1996 were studied. Using the national patient registers the yearly incidence was determined and evaluated in relation to sex, latitude, urbanisation, and type of surroundings by use of a Poisson model. RESULTS: There was a substantial decline from 2.7/1000 to 0.85/1000 over the time period. The incidence in the south was almost three times greater than in the north. CONCLUSION: The declining incidence and geographical difference suggest that environmental factors are of importance in this disorder.
PubMed ID
11668097 View in PubMed
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[The anthropometric indices of newborn infants in the Kryvyy Rih industrial region]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58769
Source
Lik Sprava. 1999 Jul;(5):29-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
V F Bogoiavlenskaia
O I Gural'
E G Bichevaia
A V Stashenko
Source
Lik Sprava. 1999 Jul;(5):29-32
Date
Jul-1999
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Industry
Infant, Newborn
Male
Parity - drug effects
Pregnancy
Ukraine
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A study was made of anthropometric measures (body mass, length of the body, circumference of the head, circumference of the chest) in infants borne to women in separate primi-, secundi-, or multipara events in those areas of the Krivoy Rog industrial region arbitrarily taken as relatively pure (unpolluted) and those affected by radioactive contamination, with ages of the child-bearing women being 18-25, 26-30, and greater than 30 years old. Newborn babies from the contaminated district of the city were found to have higher anthropometric values. There was a persistent augmentation of the circumference of the chest in newborns from the contaminated district, which fact suggests development of adaptive processes in the fetus during the intrauterine development under conditions of contaminated atmosphere of the industrial region.
PubMed ID
10822670 View in PubMed
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Pregnancy outcome of personnel in Swedish biomedical research laboratories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58778
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2000 Apr;42(4):438-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
H. Wennborg
L. Bodin
H. Vainio
G. Axelsson
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Division of Health Risk Assessment, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. helena.wennborg@imm.ki.se
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2000 Apr;42(4):438-46
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - epidemiology
Abortion, Spontaneous - epidemiology - etiology
Birth weight
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Laboratory Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Research
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Possible hazardous effects of laboratory work on the reproduction outcomes of female laboratory personnel in Sweden from 1990 to 1994 were investigated in a questionnaire-based study (n = 1052) by comparison with personnel in non-laboratory departments. The individual woman constituted the primary sampling unit, with her pregnancies defined as the unit of analysis. Allowance for dependence between different pregnancies of the same woman was considered by applying random effect models. With regard to spontaneous abortions, no elevated odds ratio was found for laboratory work in general, but an odds ratio of 2.3 and a 95% confidence interval of 0.9 to 5.9 (n = 856) was connected to working with chloroform. The odds ratio for large for gestational age infants in association with the mother's laboratory work was 1.9 (confidence interval, 0.7 to 5.2). The result with regard to spontaneous abortion partly supports previously reported increased risks of miscarriage related to laboratory work with solvents.
PubMed ID
10774513 View in PubMed
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Maternal and paternal risk factors for cryptorchidism and hypospadias: a case-control study in newborn boys.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58222
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Nov;112(15):1570-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Frank H Pierik
Alex Burdorf
James A Deddens
Rikard E Juttmann
Rob F A Weber
Author Affiliation
Department of Andrology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. f.pierik@erasmusmc.nl
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Nov;112(15):1570-6
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cryptorchidism - etiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet
Educational Status
Female
Health status
Humans
Hypospadias - etiology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Life Style
Male
Maternal Exposure
Multivariate Analysis
Occupational Exposure
Odds Ratio
Paternal Exposure
Pesticides - poisoning
Premature Birth
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Turkey - ethnology
Abstract
Little is known on environmental risk factors for cryptorchidism and hypospadias, which are among the most frequent congenital abnormalities. The aim of our study was to identify risk factors for cryptorchidism and hypospadias, with a focus on potential endocrine disruptors in parental diet and occupation. In a case-control study nested within a cohort of 8,698 male births, we compared 78 cryptorchidism cases and 56 hypospadias cases with 313 controls. The participation rate was 85% for cases and 68% for controls. Through interviews, information was collected on pregnancy aspects and personal characteristics, lifestyle, occupation, and dietary phytoestrogen intake of both parents. Occupational exposure to potential endocrine disruptors was classified based on self-reported exposure and ratings of occupational hygienists based on job descriptions. Our findings indicate that paternal pesticide exposure was associated with cryptorchidism [odds ratio (OR) = 3.8; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.1-13.4]. Smoking of the father was associated with hypospadias (OR = 3.8; 95% CI, 1.8-8.2). Maternal occupational, dietary, and lifestyle exposures were not associated with either abnormality. Both abnormalities were associated with suboptimal maternal health, a lower maternal education, and a Turkish origin of the parents. Being small for gestational age was a risk factor for hypospadias, and preterm birth was a risk factor for cryptorchidism. Because paternal pesticide exposure was significantly associated with cryptorchidism and paternal smoking was associated with hypospadias in male offspring, paternal exposure should be included in further studies on cryptorchidism and hypospadias risk factors.
Notes
Comment In: Environ Health Perspect. 2005 May;113(5):A29615866749
PubMed ID
15531444 View in PubMed
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[Population health in some of the Northern regions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58237
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Istor Med. 2004 May-Jun;(3):3-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
E A Tishuk
V O Shchepin
N P Druzhinin
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Istor Med. 2004 May-Jun;(3):3-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Birth rate
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Environmental pollution
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity - trends
Mortality - trends
Population Dynamics
Public Health
Russia
Siberia
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide - trends
Transients and Migrants
Abstract
The conditions and dynamic changes of the most important indices related with population health in a number of Northern regions of the Russian Federation are under discussion. A conclusion is made that they are predetermined by migration processes, latitude effects and peculiarities of production activity.
PubMed ID
15455520 View in PubMed
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Secular trends in uncertain-sex births and proportion of male births in Norway, 1967-1998.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58242
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2003 Sep;58(9):554-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Agot Irgens
Lorentz M Irgens
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. agot.irgens@helse-bergen.no
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2003 Sep;58(9):554-9
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - epidemiology
Birth weight
Environmental pollution
Female
Gestational Age
Hermaphroditism - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Registries
Sex ratio
Abstract
It has been hypothesized that environmental factors influence sex differentiation in the fetus, thus causing a reduced sex ratio (male/female) at birth, an increase in the prevalence of ambiguous-sex infants, and possibly an increase in spontaneous abortion rates. In Norway, subsequent to 1967, all deliveries, including late abortions after 16 wk of gestation, have been reported to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. The authors used these data to assess birth-weight-specific secular trends of uncertain-sex infants and the proportion of male births, from 1967 through 1998. Total rates of uncertain-sex infants increased from 2.3/10,000 births in 1967 to 8.0/10,000 births in 1998 in the birth weight strata of less than 600 gm. The total proportion of male births was stable; however, there was a reduction in the proportion of male births among births weighing less than 400 gm--from 58.4% to 53.4%. Incomplete ascertainment of abortions may have biased the results, but it would not have accounted for the increased occurrence of uncertain-sex infants and the decreased proportion of males observed among late-term abortions.
PubMed ID
15369272 View in PubMed
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Chernobyl: prenatal loss of four hundred male fetuses in the Czech Republic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58297
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 2004 Jan-Feb;18(1):75-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Miroslav Peterka
Renata Peterková
Zbynek Likovský
Author Affiliation
Department of Teratology, Institute of Experimental Medicine Academy of Sciences CR, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague 4, Czech Republic. peterka@biomed.cas.cz
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 2004 Jan-Feb;18(1):75-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - etiology
Accidents, Radiation
Czech Republic
Female
Fetus - radiation effects
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Power Plants
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sex ratio
Ukraine
Abstract
The long-standing higher male birth fraction is considered an indicator of reproduction stability and health. In contrast, a decrease in the male birth fraction has been reported after prenatal exposure to environmental chemical factors. There is generally higher vulnerability of boys to prenatal damage by environmental stress. We formulated a hypothesis that the Chernobyl disaster might also have had a greater negative impact on male than on female fetuses, leading to their selective loss and to a decrease in the male birth fraction. To test this hypothesis, we examined demographic data on monthly natality in the territory of the Czech Republic from 1950 to 1999. The male birth fraction was higher in the Czech Republic each month between 1950 and 1999 except November 1986, when it was significantly (P
PubMed ID
15013066 View in PubMed
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Retinoic acid receptor alpha gene variants, multivitamin use, and liver intake as risk factors for oral clefts: a population-based case-control study in Denmark, 1991-1994.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58378
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Jul 1;158(1):69-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2003
Author
Laura E Mitchell
Jeffrey C Murray
Sarah O'Brien
Kaare Christensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Baylor College of Dentistry, The Texas A&M University System Health Science Center, Houston, TX, USA.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Jul 1;158(1):69-76
Date
Jul-1-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Cleft Lip - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Cleft Palate - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
DNA Primers
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet
Dietary Supplements
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Liver
Male
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Meat
Odds Ratio
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Pregnancy
Receptors, Retinoic Acid - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Variation (Genetics)
Vitamin A - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abstract
Previous studies suggest that the risks of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL+/-P) and isolated cleft palate are influenced by variation at several loci and that these loci interact with environmental factors to determine disease risk. One putative genetic risk factor for these conditions is the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA) locus, which is involved in cell-specific responses to retinoic acid. Hence, RARA may influence disease risk via an interaction with vitamin A and related compounds. Data from a Danish case-control study (1991-1994) were used to evaluate the relations between oral clefts, RARA, and maternal vitamin A exposure from multivitamins and liver. Analyses provided no compelling evidence that the risks of CL+/-P or isolated cleft palate are related to the RARA variant analyzed. Consistent with several previous studies, the authors' analyses indicated that maternal multivitamin supplement use protects against CL+/-P. Within the range observed in this population, higher levels of vitamin A intake from multivitamins and liver sources also seemed to protect against CL+/-P. Exploratory analyses suggested that the latter association was not entirely explained by the association between CL+/-P and multivitamin use, indicating that adequate levels of vitamin A may be required for normal development of the primary palate.
PubMed ID
12835288 View in PubMed
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Change in levels of persistent organic pollutants in human plasma after consumption of a traditional northern Norwegian fish dish-mølje (cod, cod liver, cod liver oil and hard roe).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71408
Source
J Environ Monit. 2003 Feb;5(1):160-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Torkjel M Sandanger
Magritt Brustad
Eiliv Lund
Ivan C Burkow
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Air Research, The Polar Environmental Centre, No-9296 Tromsø, Norway. torkjel.sandanger@nilu.no
Source
J Environ Monit. 2003 Feb;5(1):160-5
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Cod Liver Oil - chemistry
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - analysis - blood
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood
Female
Fishes
Food Contamination
Humans
Insecticides - analysis - blood
Liver - chemistry
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - blood
Public Health
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The traditional northern Norwegian fish dish "mølje", consisting of boiled cod, cod liver, cod liver oil and hard roe, is still consumed frequently during the winter months January to March. The liver of the cod is rich in lipids and the levels of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are relatively high. To better understand the short-term consequences of this traditional meal on the plasma levels of PCBs and p,p'-DDE, individual intake of liver and cod liver oil during one meal was measured. Blood samples were collected from 33 participants before the meal, and then 4 h, 12 h and 5 days after it. Lipid-weight and wet-weight levels of 10 PCB congeners and p,p'-DDE were determined in the plasma samples and the food. The plasma levels of p,p'-DDE was found to increase significantly from 0 to 4 h, both when expressed as wet-weight (35% change) and lipid-weight (20% change). The corresponding changes (0-4 h) in wet-weight levels of the most prevalent PCB congeners were non significant. By contrast, PCB congeners with low levels in the food showed a significant drop in lipid-weight levels during the first 4 h. The observed changes were independent of amount consumed. Significant differences in fasting and non-fasting samples were found for most PCBs and p,p'-DDE. For the lipid weight levels of sum PCBs there was a significant decrease of 16% from non-fasting to fasting samples. To obtain reliable data on human levels of POPs it is, on the basis of these findings, recommended that blood samples should be collected from fasting individuals and both wet-weight and lipid-weight levels should be reported.
PubMed ID
12619772 View in PubMed
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A comparison of the psychosocial environment of two types of residences for persons with severe mental illness: small congregate community residences and psychiatric inpatient settings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71446
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2002 Dec;48(4):243-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
David Brunt
Lars Hansson
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden. david.brunt@ivosa.vxu.se
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2002 Dec;48(4):243-52
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Personnel
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - rehabilitation
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residential Treatment
Severity of Illness Index
Social Environment
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Legislation was passed in Sweden to stimulate the development of different housing solutions for persons suffering from severe mental illness. Among these solutions are small congregate residences built in the community to provide suitable housing and support for those not able or willing to live independently. AIMS: The general aim of the present study was to compare the psychosocial environment of two types of residences for the persons with severe mental illness - congregate community residences and psychiatric inpatient settings. A specific aim was to see if the former provided higher levels of autonomy than the latter. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study the real version of the Community Oriented Program Environmental Scale (COPES) was administered to residents, patients and staff members. RESULTS: The study showed that the psychosocial environment differs between the two types of settings. Residents and staff in small congregate residences rated higher levels of Autonomy and lower levels of Practical Orientation, Anger and Aggression and Order and Organisation than patients and staff in inpatient settings. CONCLUSIONS: The psychosocial environment profiles for psychiatric settings in different phases of the care process may vary in terms of the aforementioned subscales.
PubMed ID
12553405 View in PubMed
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Positive health in a group of Swedish white-collar workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71452
Source
Psychol Rep. 2002 Dec;91(3 Pt 1):839-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Petra Lindfors
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
Source
Psychol Rep. 2002 Dec;91(3 Pt 1):839-45
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Quality of Life - psychology
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Ryff's Psychological Well-being scales cover six dimensions of psychological well-being (Self-acceptance, Environmental mastery, Positive relations with others, Personal growth, Purpose in life, and Autonomy) and have been suggested as an adequate measure of positive psychological functioning. Apart from translating the scales to Swedish and examining the psychometric properties of the measure, the present study aimed to explore the relationships between the Ryff scales and the General Health Questionnaire, negative affectivity, and physical symptoms using self-ratings from 91 full-time employed women and men. Given low internal consistency for the different dimensions of the Ryff scales, correlational analyses were based on a composite index. Analysis indicated negative relations between the Ryff index and other measures and are in line with prior findings showing that the index taps positive psychological functioning while other indices focus on negative functioning.
PubMed ID
12530731 View in PubMed
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A statistical human resources costing and accounting model for analysing the economic effects of an intervention at a workplace.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71473
Source
Ergonomics. 2002 Sep 15;45(11):764-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2002
Author
Bodil J Landstad
Gunnar Gelin
Claes Malmquist
Stig Vinberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Bodil.Landstad@adm.umu.se
Source
Ergonomics. 2002 Sep 15;45(11):764-87
Date
Sep-15-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accounting
Adult
Cost Allocation
Female
Housekeeping - economics - manpower
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Occupational Health Services - economics
Preventive Health Services - economics
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sick Leave - economics - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Workplace
Abstract
The study had two primary aims. The first aim was to combine a human resources costing and accounting approach (HRCA) with a quantitative statistical approach in order to get an integrated model. The second aim was to apply this integrated model in a quasi-experimental study in order to investigate whether preventive intervention affected sickness absence costs at the company level. The intervention studied contained occupational organizational measures, competence development, physical and psychosocial working environmental measures and individual and rehabilitation measures on both an individual and a group basis. The study is a quasi-experimental design with a non-randomized control group. Both groups involved cleaning jobs at predominantly female workplaces. The study plan involved carrying out before and after studies on both groups. The study included only those who were at the same workplace during the whole of the study period. In the HRCA model used here, the cost of sickness absence is the net difference between the costs, in the form of the value of the loss of production and the administrative cost, and the benefits in the form of lower labour costs. According to the HRCA model, the intervention used counteracted a rise in sickness absence costs at the company level, giving an average net effect of 266.5 Euros per person (full-time working) during an 8-month period. Using an analogue statistical analysis on the whole of the material, the contribution of the intervention counteracted a rise in sickness absence costs at the company level giving an average net effect of 283.2 Euros. Using a statistical method it was possible to study the regression coefficients in sub-groups and calculate the p-values for these coefficients; in the younger group the intervention gave a calculated net contribution of 605.6 Euros with a p-value of 0.073, while the intervention net contribution in the older group had a very high p-value. Using the statistical model it was also possible to study contributions of other variables and interactions. This study established that the HRCA model and the integrated model produced approximately the same monetary outcomes. The integrated model, however, allowed a deeper understanding of the various possible relationships and quantified the results with confidence intervals.
PubMed ID
12487690 View in PubMed
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Silent disaster: a European perspective on threat perception from Chernobyl far field fallout.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71476
Source
J Trauma Stress. 2002 Dec;15(6):453-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Arnfinn Tønnessen
Bertil Mårdberg
Lars Weisaeth
Author Affiliation
Radiation Medicine Department, Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority/University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. arnfinn.tonnessen@nrpa.no
Source
J Trauma Stress. 2002 Dec;15(6):453-9
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation - psychology
Adult
Attitude to Health
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Environmental Exposure - analysis - prevention & control
Europe
Female
Humans
Information Dissemination
Male
Radioactive fallout - analysis
Sex Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
Surveys investigated the perceived threat of radioactive fallout and public coping following a "silent disaster" (Chernobyl) across Europe. Survey data from national representative samples in 12 European countries are compiled, 6 months and 2 years after the accident, across 12 countries. Exposure to information about the accident, and perception of the consequences of Chernobyl as a health threat, were significantly related to the level of fallout in each country. Another significant relationship was found between the level of fallout in these 12 countries and the proportion of respondents who reported having taken countermeasures. Information challenges for the authorities are highlighted.
PubMed ID
12482183 View in PubMed
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