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The epidemiology of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in Sweden 1987-96.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58585
Source
Arch Dis Child. 2001 Nov;85(5):379-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
G. Hedbäck
K. Abrahamsson
B. Husberg
T. Granholm
A. Odén
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Surgery, Drottning Silvias Barn-och Ungdomsjukhus, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, S-416 85, Gothenburg, Sweden. g.hedback@home.se
Source
Arch Dis Child. 2001 Nov;85(5):379-81
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Hypertrophy - epidemiology - surgery
Incidence
Infant
Male
Poisson Distribution
Pyloric Stenosis - epidemiology - surgery
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban health
Abstract
AIMS: To find out whether the incidence of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) has changed over the past decade, and if so, to investigate possible contributory factors. METHODS: All infants undergoing pyloromyotomy for IHPS in Sweden between 1987 and 1996 were studied. Using the national patient registers the yearly incidence was determined and evaluated in relation to sex, latitude, urbanisation, and type of surroundings by use of a Poisson model. RESULTS: There was a substantial decline from 2.7/1000 to 0.85/1000 over the time period. The incidence in the south was almost three times greater than in the north. CONCLUSION: The declining incidence and geographical difference suggest that environmental factors are of importance in this disorder.
PubMed ID
11668097 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence in a cohort of Swedish chimney sweeps, 1958-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117177
Source
Am J Public Health. 2013 Sep;103(9):1708-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Christer Hogstedt
Catarina Jansson
Marcus Hugosson
Håkan Tinnerberg
Per Gustavsson
Author Affiliation
Unit of Occupational Medicine, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. christer.hogstedt@gmail.com
Source
Am J Public Health. 2013 Sep;103(9):1708-14
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - adverse effects
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pleural Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Poisson Distribution
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Soot - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We examined cancer incidence in an expanded cohort of Swedish chimney sweeps.
We added male chimney sweep trade union members (1981-2006) to an earlier cohort (employed 1918-1980) and linked them to nationwide registers of cancer, causes of deaths, and total population. The total cohort (n = 6320) was followed from 1958 through 2006. We estimated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) using the male Swedish population as reference. We estimated exposure as years of employment and analyzed for exposure-response associations by Poisson regression.
A total of 813 primary cancers were observed versus 626 expected (SIR = 1.30; 95% confidence interval = 1.21, 1.39). As in a previous follow-up, SIRs were significantly increased for cancer of the esophagus, liver, lung, bladder, and all hematopoietic cancer. New findings included significantly elevated SIRs for cancer of the colon, pleura, adenocarcinoma of the lung, and at unspecified sites. Total cancer and bladder cancer demonstrated positive exposure-response associations.
Exposure to soot and asbestos are likely causes of the observed cancer excesses, with contributions from adverse lifestyle factors. Preventive actions to control work exposures and promote healthier lifestyles are an important priority.
PubMed ID
23327283 View in PubMed
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Trends in male reproductive health. Environmental aspects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203086
Source
Adv Exp Med Biol. 1998;444:1-2; discussion 3-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998

Progression to type 1 diabetes and autoantibody positivity in relation to HLA-risk genotypes in children participating in the ABIS study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93477
Source
Pediatr Diabetes. 2008 Jun;9(3 Pt 1):182-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Gullstrand Camilla
Wahlberg Jeanette
Ilonen Jorma
Vaarala Outi
Ludvigsson Johnny
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatrics and Diabetes Research Centre, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. camgu@imk.liu.se
Source
Pediatr Diabetes. 2008 Jun;9(3 Pt 1):182-90
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autoantibodies - blood
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - genetics - immunology
Disease Progression
Genotype
Glutamate Decarboxylase - immunology
HLA Antigens - genetics
HLA-D Antigens - genetics
Humans
Incidence
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Autoantibodies against beta-cell antigens together with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-risk genotypes are used as predictive markers for type 1 diabetes (T1D). In this study, we have investigated the role of HLA-risk and -protective genotypes for development of beta-cell autoantibodies and progression to T1D in healthy children. METHODS: T1D-related HLA genotypes and autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase [glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA)] and islet antigen-2 (IA-2A) were studied at 1, 2.5 and 5 yr of age in unselected healthy children and children with T1D participating in the All Babies In Southeast Sweden (ABIS) study. Results: GADA or IA-2A positivity at 5 yr of age was associated with DR4-DQ8 haplotype and DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 genotype. By the age of 6-7 yr, we identified 32 children with T1D among the 17 055 participants in the ABIS study. Eight of 2329 (0.3%) non-diabetic children had permanent autoantibodies, and 143 of 2329 (6%) children had transient autoantibodies. HLA-risk genotypes associated with T1D, whereas protective genotypes were seldom found in children with T1D. Children with permanent autoantibodies had more often risk-associated DR4-DQ8 haplotype than autoantibody-negative children. No associations with HLA-risk or -protective genotypes were found for transient autoantibodies. CONCLUSIONS: The strong relation between HLA-risk alleles and T1D once again confirmed that HLA-risk genotypes play an important role for development of T1D. However, HLA genotypes seem not to explain induction of autoantibodies, especially transient autoantibodies, in the general population, emphasizing the role of environmental factors in the initiation of autoimmunity. It seems that HLA-risk genotypes are responsible for maturation of the permanent autoantibody response.
PubMed ID
18331414 View in PubMed
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Nitrogen dioxide exposure assessment and cough among preschool children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196297
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2000 Nov-Dec;55(6):431-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Mukala
S. Alm
P. Tiittanen
R O Salonen
M. Jantunen
J. Pekkanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Medicine, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2000 Nov-Dec;55(6):431-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Cough - epidemiology - etiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects
Poisson Distribution
Risk factors
Rural Population
Sampling Studies
Urban Population
Abstract
The association between exposure to ambient air nitrogen dioxide and cough was evaluated in a panel study among 162 children aged 3-6 y. The weekly average nitrogen dioxide exposure was assessed with Palmes-tube measurements in three ways: (1) personally, (2) outside day-care centers, and (3) inside day-care centers. Ambient air nitrogen dioxide concentrations were obtained from the local network that monitored air quality. The parents recorded cough episodes daily in a diary. The risk of cough increased significantly (relative risk = 3.63; 95% confidence interval = 1.41, 9.30) in the highest personal nitrogen dioxide exposure category in winter, and a nonsignificant positive trend was noted for the other assessment groups. In spring, risk increased nonsignificantly in all exposure-assessment groups, except for the fixed-site monitoring assessment. It is important that investigators select an exposure-assessment method sufficiently accurate to reflect the effective pollutant dose in subjects.
PubMed ID
11128882 View in PubMed
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Respiratory health impact of working in sawmills in eastern Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196298
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2000 Nov-Dec;55(6):424-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
Y. Cormier
A. Mérlaux
C. Duchaine
Author Affiliation
Centre de Pneumologie, H pital and Université Laval, Sainte-Foy, Québec, Canada.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2000 Nov-Dec;55(6):424-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Canada - epidemiology
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Forestry
Fungi - isolation & purification
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory Tract Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Abstract
Air contamination in sawmills can cause respiratory health problems. The authors measured respirable dust, bacteria, endotoxins, and molds collected from 17 sawmills in eastern Canada. A total of 1,205 sawmill workers answered a respiratory-health questionnaire, and they all participated in lung-function measurements, skin-prick tests, and venous blood sampling for specific immunoglobulins against molds found in the sawmills. Workers had normal lung functions, and most respiratory symptoms could be explained by smoking histories. Workers in pine sawmills had a greater prevalence of positive skin-prick test to pine than did workers in sawmills where other woods were used. High levels of specific antibodies were seen in some workers. The presence of a positive skin-prick test and/or specific antibodies had no impact on lung function(s). These Quebec sawmill workers did not experience significant respiratory illnesses; however, some of these workers may be at a higher risk of developing asthma and hypersensitivity pneumonitis than nonworkers.
PubMed ID
11128881 View in PubMed
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Space-time analysis of testicular cancer clusters using residential histories: a case-control study in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269285
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(3):e0120285
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Chantel D Sloan
Rikke B Nordsborg
Geoffrey M Jacquez
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Jaymie R Meliker
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(3):e0120285
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Seminoma - epidemiology
Space-Time Clustering
Spatio-Temporal Analysis
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Though the etiology is largely unknown, testicular cancer incidence has seen recent significant increases in northern Europe and throughout many Western regions. The most common cancer in males under age 40, age period cohort models have posited exposures in the in utero environment or in early childhood as possible causes of increased risk of testicular cancer. Some of these factors may be tied to geography through being associated with behavioral, cultural, sociodemographic or built environment characteristics. If so, this could result in detectable geographic clusters of cases that could lead to hypotheses regarding environmental targets for intervention. Given a latency period between exposure to an environmental carcinogen and testicular cancer diagnosis, mobility histories are beneficial for spatial cluster analyses. Nearest-neighbor based Q-statistics allow for the incorporation of changes in residency in spatial disease cluster detection. Using these methods, a space-time cluster analysis was conducted on a population-wide case-control population selected from the Danish Cancer Registry with mobility histories since 1971 extracted from the Danish Civil Registration System. Cases (N=3297) were diagnosed between 1991 and 2003, and two sets of controls (N=3297 for each set) matched on sex and date of birth were included in the study. We also examined spatial patterns in maternal residential history for those cases and controls born in 1971 or later (N= 589 case-control pairs). Several small clusters were detected when aligning individuals by year prior to diagnosis, age at diagnosis and calendar year of diagnosis. However, the largest of these clusters contained only 2 statistically significant individuals at their center, and were not replicated in SaTScan spatial-only analyses which are less susceptible to multiple testing bias. We found little evidence of local clusters in residential histories of testicular cancer cases in this Danish population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25756204 View in PubMed
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Stroke and acute myocardial infarction in the Swedish Sami population: incidence and mortality in relation to income and level of education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87016
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2008 Jan;36(1):84-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
factor patterns and their association with diet in Saami and Finnish Reindeer herders. Arctic Med Res 1994;53(Suppl 2):301–4. [6] Luoma P. Antioxidants, infections and environmental factors in health and disease in northern Finland. Int J Circumpolar Health 1998;57:109–13. [7] Hermansen R, Njølstad
  1 document  
Author
Sjölander Per
Hassler Sven
Janlert Urban
Author Affiliation
Southern Lapland Research Department, Vilhelmina, Sweden. per.sjolander@vilhelmina.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2008 Jan;36(1):84-91
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
456294
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Cohort Studies
Educational Status
Ethnic Groups
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - ethnology - mortality
Reindeer
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Stroke - epidemiology - ethnology - mortality
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - epidemiology - ethnology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Gender differences in cardiovascular diseases (CVD) among the Sami have been reported previously. The aim of the present study was to investigate the incidence of and mortality from stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in the Swedish Sami population between 1985 and 2002, and to analyse the potential impact of income and level of education on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. METHODS: A Sami cohort of 15,914 persons (4,465 reindeer herding and 11,449 non-herding Sami) were followed up from 1985 to 2002 with regard to incidence and mortality rates of AMI, stroke, and SAH. Incidence and mortality ratios were calculated using a demographically matched non-Sami control population (DMC) as the standard (71,550 persons). RESULTS: There was no elevated risk of developing AMI among the Sami compared with the DMC. However, the mortality ratio of AMI was significantly higher for Sami women. Higher incidence rates of stroke and SAH for both Sami men and women was observed, but no differences in mortality rates. Apart from the reindeer-herding men who demonstrated lower levels of income and education, the income and education levels among Sami were similar to the DMC. CONCLUSIONS: High mortality rates from AMI rather than stroke explain the excess mortality for CVD previously shown among Sami women. The results suggest that the differences in incidence of stroke between herding and non-herding Sami men, and between Sami women and non-Sami women, are caused by behavioural and psychosocial risk factors rather than by traditional socioeconomic ones.
PubMed ID
18426788 View in PubMed
Documents

Stroke-and-acute-myocardial-infarction-in-the-Swedish-Sami-population.pdf

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Climate change and infectious diseases in North America: the road ahead.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87225
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Mar 11;178(6):715-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-2008
Author
Greer Amy
Ng Victoria
Fisman David
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Mar 11;178(6):715-22
Date
Mar-11-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Climate
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - transmission
Disease Transmission, Horizontal
Environment
Female
Forecasting
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
Incidence
Male
North America - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Abstract
Global climate change is inevitable--the combustion of fossil fuels has resulted in a buildup of greenhouse gases within the atmosphere, causing unprecedented changes to the earth's climate. The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change suggests that North America will experience marked changes in weather patterns in coming decades, including warmer temperatures and increased rainfall, summertime droughts and extreme weather events (e.g., tornadoes and hurricanes). Although these events may have direct consequences for health (e.g., injuries and displacement of populations due to thermal stress), they are also likely to cause important changes in the incidence and distribution of infectious diseases, including vector-borne and zoonotic diseases, water-and food-borne diseases and diseases with environmental reservoirs (e.g., endemic fungal diseases). Changes in weather patterns and ecosystems, and health consequences of climate change will probably be most severe in far northern regions (e.g., the Arctic). We provide an overview of the expected nature and direction of such changes, which pose current and future challenges to health care providers and public health agencies.
PubMed ID
18332386 View in PubMed
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Gender differences and temporal variation in the incidence of type 1 diabetes: results of 8012 cases in the nationwide Diabetes Incidence Study in Sweden 1983-2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87253
Source
J Intern Med. 2008 Apr;263(4):386-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Ostman J.
Lönnberg G.
Arnqvist H J
Blohmé G.
Bolinder J.
Ekbom Schnell A.
Eriksson J W
Gudbjörnsdottir S.
Sundkvist G.
Nyström L.
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm. jan.j.c.oestman@solna.mail.telia.com
Source
J Intern Med. 2008 Apr;263(4):386-94
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - diagnosis - economics - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Medical Records - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Seasons
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To establish the gender difference amongst newly diagnosed type 1 diabetic patients aged 15-34 years, considering age at diagnosis, temporal trend and seasonal variation at time of diagnosis. STUDY DESIGN: A population-based prospective study with a mean annual population at risk of 2.3 million. SETTING: All departments of medicine, endocrinology and paediatrics and primary health care units in Sweden. SUBJECTS: Incident cases of diabetes aged 15-34 years at diagnosis 1983-2002. MEASURE INSTRUMENT: Basic characteristics of patients at diagnosis were reported by the diagnosing doctor on a standardized form. Level of ascertainment was estimated at 80-90%. RESULTS: Amongst all incident cases (n = 8012), 74% was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. The mean annual incidence rate of type 1 diabetes was 12.7/100,000, in men 16.4/100,000 and in women 8.9/100,000. The incidence of type 1 diabetes decreased slowly by increasing age but was in all age groups higher in men, yielding an overall male/female ratio of 1.8. In both genders the incidence of type 1 diabetes decreased in average of 1.0% per year. A seasonal pattern with significantly higher incidence during January-March and lower during May-July was seen in both genders. CONCLUSIONS: A clear male predominance of type 1 diabetes was seen in all ages. The temporal trend and the seasonal pattern was similar in men and women. Hence, internal factors related to the gender rather than differences in the exposure to environmental factors seem to explain the consistent male-female bias in the postpubertal risk of developing type 1 diabetes.
PubMed ID
18205768 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence and mortality in a Swedish rubber tire manufacturing plant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87623
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2007 Dec;50(12):901-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Wingren Gun
Axelson Olav
Author Affiliation
Divison of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. gunwi@imk.liu.se
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2007 Dec;50(12):901-9
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Manufactured Materials - toxicity
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupational Health
Petroleum - toxicity
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Risk factors
Rubber - toxicity
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A classification of 12 work categories was used to evaluate the cancer incidence and mortality among a cohort of Swedish rubber tire workers. METHODS: Cancer incidence and mortality in the cohort was compared with expected values from national rates. Standardized incidence and mortality ratios were calculated for the total cohort, for sub-cohorts and with the inclusion of a latency requirement. RESULTS: Among men, increased incidence and mortality risks were found for cancer in the larynx; SIR=2.10; 95% confidence intervals (95% CI): 1.05-3.76, SMR=2.08; 95% CI: 0.42-6.09. Increased risks were also seen for cancer in the trachea, bronchus, and lung; SIR=1.62; 95% CI: 1.28-2.02, SMR=1.54; 95% CI: 1.21-1.94, the incidence risk was highest among those with the longest exposure duration and among workers in compounding/mixing, milling, and maintenance. Decreased incidence risks were seen for cancer of the prostate (SIR=0.74; 95% CI: 059-0.92) and skin (SIR=0.57; 95% CI: 0.36-0.84). CONCLUSIONS: The finding of an excess of tumors in the respiratory system is in agreement with earlier findings in other studies on rubber tire workers. The results on other cancer types are compared to earlier findings and related to work processes and chemical exposures of possible causal importance.
PubMed ID
17972254 View in PubMed
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Influence of family history of diabetes on incidence and prevalence of latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult: results from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87690
Source
Diabetes Care. 2007 Dec;30(12):3040-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Carlsson Sofia
Midthjell Kristian
Grill Valdemar
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Stockholm Centre of Public Health and Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. sofia.carlsson@ki.se
Source
Diabetes Care. 2007 Dec;30(12):3040-5
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
C-Peptide - blood
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - genetics
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Medical History Taking
Risk factors
Siblings
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between family history of diabetes (FHD) and prevalence and incidence of latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult (LADA), type 1 diabetes, and type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The results were based on cross-sectional data from 64,498 men and women (aged >or=20 years) who were in the Nord-Tr?ndelag Health Study, which included 128 cases of LADA, 1,134 cases of type 2 diabetes, and 123 cases of type 1 diabetes. In addition, prospective data on 46,210 subjects, which included 80 incident cases of LADA, observed between 1984 and 1986 and 1995 and 1997 were available. Patients with LADA had antibodies against GAD and were insulin independent at diagnosis. RESULTS: FHD was associated with a four times (odds ratio [OR] 3.92 [95% CI 2.76-5.58]) increased prevalence of LADA. Corresponding estimates for type 2 and type 1 diabetes were 4.2 (3.72-4.75) and 2.78 (1.89-4.10), respectively. Patients with LADA who had FHD had lower levels of C-peptide (541 vs. 715 pmol/l) and were more often treated with insulin (47 vs. 31%) than patients without FHD. Prospective data indicated that subjects with siblings who had diabetes had a 2.5 (1.39-4.51) times increased risk of developing LADA during the 11-year follow-up compared with those without. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that FHD is a strong risk factor for LADA and that the influence of family history may be mediated through a heritable reduction of insulin secretion.
PubMed ID
17878245 View in PubMed
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Does relative melanoma distribution by body site 1960-2004 reflect changes in intermittent exposure and intentional tanning in the Swedish population?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87772
Source
Eur J Dermatol. 2007 Sep-Oct;17(5):428-34
Publication Type
Article
Author
Dal Henrik
Boldemann Cecilia
Lindelöf Bernt
Author Affiliation
Centre for Public Health, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Dermatol. 2007 Sep-Oct;17(5):428-34
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Back - pathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Extremities - pathology
Female
Head - pathology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Middle Aged
Recreation
Registries
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Sunlight - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Tanning - trends
Thorax - pathology
Abstract
Intermittent exposure to UV-radiation at an early age is a known important factor in the aetiology of malignant melanoma. We surveyed data from the Swedish Cancer Registry for melanoma by body site for age and gender cohorts from 1960 to 2004, in an attempt to discern a reflection of major behavioural and societal changes in the relative distribution of melanoma by body site. The study comprised patients with malignant melanoma from the Swedish Cancer Registry, including information on body site of tumour (January 1, 1960 - December 31, 2004). In total, 46,337 malignant melanomas were diagnosed in 44,623 patients. Trends were assessed by incidence per site, and relative site distribution per age group and calendar period, and dividing body sites by exposure type to the sun: head (mostly continuous), trunk (mostly intermittent), and limbs (mixed exposure). Between calendar periods 1960-1964 and 2000-2004 melanomas increased most rapidly on the upper limbs (men 885%, women 1216%) on the trunk (men 729%, women 759%) and on the lower limbs (men 418%, women 289%) in both genders. The incidence increase of head tumors was slower. Across the life span, melanomas of the trunk and lower limbs dominate among patients or= 70 years. Tumors of the trunk formed an increasing proportion of all melanomas during the period studied, particularly in females. The relative shift of melanomas from the head to the trunk with mostly intermittent UV exposure coincides with behavioral and societal changes with regard to sun exposure. This supports the hypothesis of a relationship between intentional exposure to ultraviolet radiation and malignant melanoma.
PubMed ID
17673388 View in PubMed
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Source
Verh K Acad Geneeskd Belg. 2001;63(2):123-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
J V Joossens
H. Kesteloot
Author Affiliation
Faculteit Geneeskunde Departement School voor Maatschappelijke Gezondheidszorg Afdeling Epidemiologie Kapucijnenvoer 35, B-3000 Leuven.
Source
Verh K Acad Geneeskd Belg. 2001;63(2):123-35
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Sex Distribution
World Health
Abstract
The level in each sex of site-specific cancers mortality is highly variable among 40 countries worldwide and somewhat less in the EU. The mortality ratio of the country worldwide with the highest upon that of the lowest cancer rate varied from 6 to 24 times in men and 6 to 17 times in women. In the EU it ranked from 3 to 10 in men and from 2 to 9 in women. Total cancer mortality had a smaller ratio (2 to 4) suggesting external and/or internal feedback mechanisms. The changes in site-specific cancer mortality rates worldwide over the years are also markedly different. A decreasing pattern since 1980 is more frequent in stomach and rectum cancer rates in each sex, in male lung cancer and in endometrium cancer. An increasing pattern is more often seen in prostate cancer, breast cancer, female lung cancer and male colon cancer. The most significant positive correlations of cardiovascular diseases are observed with rectum cancer in each sex and with endometrium cancer. Only male lung cancer correlates significantly with cardiovascular diseases. Prostate, breast and colon cancer are not positively and significantly related to cardiovascular diseases. The comparison of cancer mortality data from Belgium, The Netherlands and Denmark between 1955 and 1993 are consistent with previous results. The reliability of cancer mortality data and the role of genetic and environmental factors are discussed in two addenda. Finally it can be concluded that colon and rectum cancer behave differently at the population level. Colorectal cancer mortality data will provide misleading epidemiological results.
PubMed ID
11436417 View in PubMed
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Cancer risks to spouses and offspring in the Family-Cancer Database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20027
Source
Genet Epidemiol. 2001 Feb;20(2):247-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
K. Hemminki
C. Dong
P. Vaittinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden. Kari.Hemmink@cnt.ki.se
Source
Genet Epidemiol. 2001 Feb;20(2):247-57
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Environment
Family Health
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Parents
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Spouses
Sweden
Abstract
It is generally accepted that cancer is caused by environmental and inherited factors but these are only partially identified. Family studies can be informative but they do not separate shared lifestyles and genes. We estimate familial risks for concordant cancers between spouses in common cancers of both sexes in order to quantify cancer risks from the shared environment. The risks are compared to those seen between parents and offspring in order to estimate the inherited component. The nation-wide Family-Cancer Database was used as the source of family and cancer data. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for concordant cancer in offspring by parental cancer and in spouses. Among the 23 cancer sites considered, all but two showed an increased SIR for offspring by father or mother. Only two sites, stomach and lung, showed an increase in SIR of concordant cancer among spouses. Additionally, pancreatic cancer and melanoma were increased in couples where at least one spouse was diagnosed before age 50. If both spouses presented melanoma before age 40, SIR was 3.82 for husbands. SIRs of colon, renal, and skin (squamous cell) cancers were unchanged by spouses' concordant cancer. Shared lifestyle among spouses seems to explain only a small proportion of cancer susceptibility. Because lifestyles are likely to differ more between parents and offspring than between spouses, familial cancer risks between parents and offspring are likely to be more due to heritable rather than environmental effects.
PubMed ID
11180450 View in PubMed
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Empirical Bayes adjustments for multiple results in hypothesis-generating or surveillance studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20221
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2000 Sep;9(9):895-903
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
K. Steenland
I. Bray
S. Greenland
P. Boffetta
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, Ohio 45226, USA.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2000 Sep;9(9):895-903
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Bayes Theorem
Carcinogens
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Population Surveillance - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Social Class
Abstract
Traditional methods of adjustment for multiple comparisons (e.g., Bonferroni adjustments) have fallen into disuse in epidemiological studies. However, alternative kinds of adjustment for data with multiple comparisons may sometimes be advisable. When a large number of comparisons are made, and when there is a high cost to investigating false positive leads, empirical or semi-Bayes adjustments may help in the selection of the most promising leads. Here we offer an example of such adjustments in a large surveillance data set of occupation and cancer in Nordic countries, in which we used empirical Bayes (EB) adjustments to evaluate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for cancer and occupation among craftsmen and laborers. For men, there were 642 SIRs, of which 138 (21%) had a P 1.0 and 8% negative with SIR
PubMed ID
11008906 View in PubMed
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Mycosis fungoides: review of epidemiological observations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20276
Source
Dermatology. 2000;201(1):21-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
M M Morales Suárez-Varela
A. Llopis González
A. Marquina Vila
J. Bell
Author Affiliation
Unit of Public Health, Hygiene and Environmental Health, Valencia University, Valencia, Spain. maria.m.morales@uv.es
Source
Dermatology. 2000;201(1):21-8
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Carcinogens - adverse effects
England - epidemiology
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Mycosis Fungoides - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced
Netherlands - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Survival Analysis
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a chronic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma characterized by small cells with cerebriform nuclei that usually express a mature peripheral T-helper cell (CD4+) immunophenotype. Its evolution is typically quite slow, with years between the first manifestations and development of advanced stages of disease. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present paper is to contribute to the material about MF already present in the literature. The review articles that have appeared to date fundamentally address the morphological characteristics, diagnostic criteria and treatment of the disease; in contrast, the present study centers on the evolution of the incidence of MF and on the knowledge of the possible risk factors implicated in its development. METHODS: Review of published papers about MF epidemiology. RESULTS: The evidence suggests that the incidence is increasing, but this may be artifactual due to improved diagnostic techniques. The risk of MF is limited to gender and race, being higher in males and in blacks. Survival is highly stage dependent, but 90% of patients survive 15 years with only 10% of cutaneous involvement. Few risk factors have been identified, but several studies have found an association with industrial exposure, particularly to oils. CONCLUSION: MF is a rare disease and its risk factors have not been studied in any great detail. A European case-control study in progress will substantially increase the evidence available and progress towards identifying a prevention strategy.
PubMed ID
10971054 View in PubMed
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[Chernobyl 13 years after: consequences for protection of populations]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20359
Source
Rev Prat. 1999 Sep 15;49(14):1489-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1999
Author
M. Schlumberger
H. Métivier
F. Pacini
Author Affiliation
Service de médecine nucléaire Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif.
Source
Rev Prat. 1999 Sep 15;49(14):1489-91
Date
Sep-15-1999
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Environmental monitoring
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Public Health
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Ukraine
PubMed ID
10887592 View in PubMed
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Endocrine disruptors and human health--is there a problem? An update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20399
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Jun;108(6):487-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
S H Safe
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843-4466, USA.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Jun;108(6):487-93
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Endocrine System - drug effects
Environmental Exposure
Estrogens - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated
Incidence
Infertility, Male - epidemiology - etiology
Insecticides - adverse effects
Male
Public Health
Risk assessment
Sperm Count
Abstract
It has been hypothesized that environmental exposure to synthetic estrogenic chemicals and related endocrine-active compounds may be responsible for a global decrease in sperm counts, decreased male reproductive capacity, and breast cancer in women. Results of recent studies show that there are large demographic variations in sperm counts within countries or regions, and analyses of North American data show that sperm counts have not decreased over the last 60 years. Analyses of records for hypospadias and cryptorchidism also show demographic differences in these disorders before 1985; however, since 1985 rates of hypospadias have not changed and cryptorchidism has actually declined. Temporal changes in sex ratios and fertility are minimal, whereas testicular cancer is increasing in most countries; however, in Scandinavia, the difference between high (Denmark) and low (Finland) incidence areas are not well understood and are unlikely to be correlated with differences in exposure to synthetic industrial chemicals. Results from studies on organochlorine contaminants (DDE/PCB) show that levels were not significantly different in breast cancer patients versus controls. Thus, many of the male and female reproductive tract problems linked to the endocrine-disruptor hypothesis have not increased and are not correlated with synthetic industrial contaminants. This does not exclude an endocrine-etiology for some adverse environmental effects or human problems associated with high exposures to some chemicals.
Notes
Comment In: Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Jun;109(6):A250-111445523
PubMed ID
10856020 View in PubMed
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Incidence rates of malignant mesothelioma in Denmark and predicted future number of cases among men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20441
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2000 Apr;26(2):112-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
J. Kjaergaard
M. Andersson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Registry, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen. jesperk@cancer.dk
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2000 Apr;26(2):112-7
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mediastinal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Mesothelioma - diagnosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Peritoneal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Predictive value of tests
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Survival Rate
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study analyzed the incidence rates of malignant mesothelioma in Denmark in order to predict the future number of cases that will occur among Danish men. METHODS: The 1912 cases of malignant mesothelioma reported to the Danish Cancer registry in 1943-1993 were analyzed in order to describe current incidence rates. By a Poisson regression model the relative risks of synthetic birth cohorts were estimated and used in the prediction of the future number of cases that will occur among Danish men. RESULTS: The incidence rate increased to 1.33 per 100000 person-years in 1983-1987 among men and to 0.51 in 1973-1977 among women. From the Poisson regression model, the risk for birth cohorts of men, relative to the 1940-1944 cohort, peaked in the 1940-1944 cohort and decreased to 0.57 in the 1950-1954 cohort. The age-specific incidence rate peaked at 246 per 100000 person-years in the age group 80-84 years. The future annual number of mesothelioma cases is expected to peak around 2015 with 93 cases among men born before 1955. CONCLUSIONS: The fit of the models was not ideal, but with careful interpretation of the results, it was concluded that a further increase in the number of mesothelioma cases can be expected, and the effect of regulating the environmental exposure to asbestos cannot be expected within the next 10-15 years.
PubMed ID
10817376 View in PubMed
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