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694 records – page 1 of 35.

[The informativeness of indices of the heart rate variability for the identification of the adverse effects of environmental factors on the health of adolescent girls].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264390
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Jan-Feb;94(1):121-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
I V Myl'nikova
N V Efimova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Jan-Feb;94(1):121-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Circadian Rhythm - physiology
Electrocardiography
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental health
Environmental Illness - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Incidence
Risk Assessment - methods
Rural Population
Siberia - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
There was performed an investigation of informativeness of indices of the heart rate variability at rest and during orthostatic testing in the adolescent girls residing in the industrial town and in the village. The influence of unfa- vorable environmental factors was established to be reflected by the indices of the spectral analysis and cardioin- tervalography. In urban girls there was noted the marked increase of the centralization of heart rhythm control on the background of the increased activity of the sympathetic compartment and the reduction of the influence of the parasympathetic compartment of the autonomous nervous system on the sinus node. In rural adolescent girls the func- tional state of the autonomic nervous system being the optimal is characterized by an adequate response to the active orthostatic test of the parasympathetic and sympathetic compartments with the moderate involvement of mechanisms of the central control of the cardiac rhythm. Results of the study have an important significance for the diagnosis of the early disorders of health in adolescent girls.
PubMed ID
26031057 View in PubMed
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[Main trends in children's population health in the Republic of Tatarstan].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264394
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Jan-Feb;94(1):92-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
N V Stepanova
E R Valeeva
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Jan-Feb;94(1):92-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child Welfare - trends
Child, Preschool
Environmental health
Environmental Illness - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Public Health - trends
Risk factors
Tatarstan - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
There was performed a comparative analysis of the dynamics of newly diagnosed and the overall morbidity of children's population of the Republic of Tatarstan (RT) and the city of Kazan of main classes of diseases for 2004- 2012 according to the statistical reporting form N12. As an assessment of the possible impact of environmental factors on the formation of separate groups of diseases and changes in the systems of the body there was used health risk assessment according to annual average concentrations of chemicals in the ambient air Average annual indices of prevalence for the most of classes of diseases in children (0-14 years) of the population of the Republic of Tatarstan (RT) and the city of Kazan 2004-2012 (per 1000 children) showed significant differences for most classes of diseases and their rise in children of the city. Results of the assessment of the non-carcinogenic risk based on evolutionary models determined the magnitude of additional risks for the respiratory system. Non-carcinogenic health risk is assessed before the age of 19 years as negligible, until the age of 36 years as a moderate, until the age of 45 years as highfor persons over 46 years as very high.
PubMed ID
26031050 View in PubMed
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Uppsala Consensus Statement on Environmental Contaminants and the Global Obesity Epidemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290785
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2016 05 01; 124(5):A81-3
Publication Type
Consensus Development Conference
Journal Article
Date
05-01-2016
Author
Lars Lind
P Monica Lind
Margareta H Lejonklou
Linda Dunder
Åke Bergman
Carlos Guerrero-Bosagna
Erik Lampa
Hong Kyu Lee
Juliette Legler
Angel Nadal
Youngmi Kim Pak
Richard P Phipps
Laura N Vandenberg
Daniel Zalko
Marlene Ågerstrand
Mattias Öberg
Bruce Blumberg
Jerrold J Heindel
Linda S Birnbaum
Author Affiliation
Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2016 05 01; 124(5):A81-3
Date
05-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Consensus Development Conference
Journal Article
Keywords
Consensus Development Conferences as Topic
Environmental health
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Epidemics
Global health
Humans
Obesity - chemically induced - epidemiology
Sweden
Notes
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2013 Mar;121(3):359-66 PMID 23322813
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2013 May;121(5):594-9 PMID 23591545
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e55387 PMID 23359474
Cites: Front Biosci (Elite Ed). 2013;5:725-33 PMID 23277027
Cites: PLoS One. 2009;4(4):e5186 PMID 19365547
Cites: Mol Endocrinol. 2006 Sep;20(9):2141-55 PMID 16613991
Cites: BMC Med. 2013;11:228 PMID 24228800
Cites: J Health Econ. 2012 Jan;31(1):219-30 PMID 22094013
Cites: Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2015 Dec 1;289(2):262-75 PMID 26415833
Cites: Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2009 May 25;304(1-2):19-29 PMID 19433244
Cites: PLoS One. 2014;9(7):e103337 PMID 25076055
Cites: JAMA. 2014 Jul;312(2):189-90 PMID 25005661
Cites: Obes Res Clin Pract. 2016 May-Jun;10(3):243-55 PMID 26383959
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 2008 Oct;97(10):1465-9 PMID 18665907
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2014 Feb;22(2):488-96 PMID 23963708
Cites: Reprod Toxicol. 2013 Dec;42:256-68 PMID 23892310
Cites: Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2009 May 25;304(1-2):97-105 PMID 19433254
Cites: Lancet. 2014 Aug 30;384(9945):766-81 PMID 24880830
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2009 Mar;66(3):143-9 PMID 19060027
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Oct;117(10):1549-55 PMID 20019905
Cites: Endocrinology. 2013 Apr;154(4):1465-75 PMID 23493373
Cites: Endocr Rev. 2015 Dec;36(6):E1-E150 PMID 26544531
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2015 Jul;123(7):730-6 PMID 25742056
Cites: Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2011 Jun;7(6):346-53 PMID 21467970
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2015 Oct;123(10):1030-7 PMID 25956007
PubMed ID
27135406 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Municipality of Anchorage (Alaska), Department of Health and Environmental Protection. v.
Publication Type
Report
Source
Municipality of Anchorage (Alaska), Department of Health and Environmental Protection. v.
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Public Health
Environmental health
Anchorage
Notes
ALASKA RA448.A5A558 (1979, 1980, 1981, 1983)
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Future challenges to health and public health services in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144483
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 Jan-Feb;101(1):5-8, 19
Publication Type
Article
Author
John Last
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 Jan-Feb;101(1):5-8, 19
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Climate change
Environmental health
Health planning
Health Services - trends
Humans
International Cooperation
Public Health - trends
Public Health Practice
Notes
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 2010 May-Jun;101(3):262; author reply 26220737823
PubMed ID
20364528 View in PubMed
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"We can't give up. It's too important." Health and safety stories from Canadian and U.S. schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144533
Source
New Solut. 2010;20(1):81-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Dorothy Wigmore
Author Affiliation
dorothyw@web.ca
Source
New Solut. 2010;20(1):81-93
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community-Based Participatory Research
Environment
Environmental Exposure
Environmental health
Health status
Humans
Occupational Exposure
Safety
Schools - organization & administration
United States
Abstract
Schools are supposed to be places where children learn and thrive; not where they, teachers, and other staff get sick. The hazards are many but recognition of those hazards is hard to come by in schools in Canada and the United States. The result can be an uphill fight for school-based organizations and unions. Representatives of four such groups, two each from Canada and the United States, discuss the hazards and their effects. They also have many-often unrecognized-successes and related lessons to share. These include taking comprehensive approaches, looking for broad sweeps and entrees, using building sciences and strategies of solid information, acting with respect and with persistence, including students and parents, going for green cleaners, and using participatory methods. The representatives build on these to discuss what else needs to be done. The ideas are underpinned by the creativity, dedication, and persistence evident in their work to date.
PubMed ID
20359993 View in PubMed
Less detail

Environmental justice in the therapeutic inner city.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144771
Source
Health Place. 2010 Jul;16(4):656-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Jeffrey R Masuda
Alexis Crabtree
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Geography, University of Manitoba, 222 Isbister, 183 Dafoe Road, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T2N2, Canada. jeff_masuda@umanitoba.ca
Source
Health Place. 2010 Jul;16(4):656-65
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
British Columbia
Causality
Community-Based Participatory Research
Consumer Participation
Environmental health
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Photography
Poverty Areas
Public Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Resilience, Psychological
Social Environment
Social Justice
Social Support
Stereotyping
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Urban Renewal
Abstract
Vancouver's Downtown Eastside (DTES) has long been characterized as Canada's skid row within public narratives that raise concerns about communicable diseases, open drug use, survival sex work, and homelessness. This stigmatizing gaze has bolstered a deficit-oriented philosophy that emphasizes measures to mitigate these threats, ostensibly by erasing the moral and environmental depravity from the landscape. However, such measures threaten to further marginalize DTES residents by perpetuating public sentiments of fear and disgust toward the inner city. In this paper, we challenge this orientation by reporting the results of a research process in which DTES residents chronicled their impressions of the neighbourhood. Our findings reveal a paradoxical therapeutic response to environmental injustice in the inner city, one that enables society's most marginalized people to find support, solidarity, and acceptance in their everyday struggles to survive, even thrive, amidst the structural and physical violence of the urban margins.
PubMed ID
20303316 View in PubMed
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[To the establishment of the sizes and organization of sanitary-hygienic zones].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168554
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 May-Jun;(3):79-82
Publication Type
Article
Author
E V Parakhonskii
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 May-Jun;(3):79-82
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
City Planning - standards
Environmental health
Humans
Industry - standards
Russia
PubMed ID
16808416 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Human health in the space rocket-making areas: medical and environmental aspects].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168568
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 May-Jun;(3):11-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
P I Sidorov
N V Skrebtsova
S L Sovershaeva
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 May-Jun;(3):11-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aviation
Environmental health
Environmental Illness - epidemiology - etiology
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Health status
Humans
Incidence
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The paper deals with the problems of medical and ecological escorts of space rocket-making activities. The properties of one of the highly toxic components of propellant - asymmetric dimethylhydrazine as a substance assigned to a class of ecological toxicants, are considered. The data obtained on implementing the program for a study of the health status in the population living not far from the asymmetric dimethylhydrazine-polluted areas are presented. The authors propose to consider a package of measures that can apply the systems approach to securing the safety of the population to live and work in areas under space-rocket making activities, which is based on the prevention principle provided by the Rio de Janeiro Environment and Development Declaration.
PubMed ID
16808395 View in PubMed
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[The prospects of application of methods of population immune status evaluation when performing mass hygienic studies].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168707
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2006;(5):37-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
M A Pinigin
Iu N Mol'kov
O V Budarina
I V Baeva
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2006;(5):37-9
Date
2006
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ecology
Environmental health
Humans
Hygiene
Immune System - physiology
Mass Screening - methods
Russia
Abstract
Non-invasive methods of sampling and a range of immunological assays for mass ecologo-hygienic studies of population were developed and introduced into practice in Sysin Scientific Research Institute of Human Ecology and Environmental Hygiene of Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. The studied materials were saliva, urine, breast milk, the condition of lymph nodes, and anamnesis. The complex of non-invasive methods was shown to be less complicated and, at the same time, informative and cheap, which allows recommending it for sociohygienic monitoring when performing mass hygienic studies.
PubMed ID
16789543 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ontario Medical Association position paper on health effects of ground-level ozone, acid aerosols and particulate matter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203809
Source
Can Respir J. 1998 Sep-Oct;5(5):367-84
Publication Type
Article
Author
B T Boadway
J. MacPhail
C. Jacobson
Author Affiliation
Ontario Medical Association, Toronto, Canada. ted_boadway@oma.org
Source
Can Respir J. 1998 Sep-Oct;5(5):367-84
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerosols - adverse effects
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Environmental health
Humans
Ontario
Oxidants, Photochemical - adverse effects
Ozone - adverse effects
Societies, Medical
Abstract
This review of the evidence of the health effects of air pollutants focuses on research conducted in Ontario. Seven key Ontario studies are cited. These findings are highly significant for people living in the Great Lakes basin (and particularly the Windsor-Quebec corridor), where high levels of certain air pollutants (eg, ground-level ozone and ultra-fine particles) occur more frequently than in other parts of Canada. The issue is a serious one, requiring an integrated and comprehensive approach by many stakeholders, including the active involvement of organized medicine. It is important that the health effects of these air pollutants are understood. Governments must act to reduce emission levels through statue and regulation bolstered by noncompliance penalties. The findings of research have included the following: in a Toronto study, a 2% to 4% excess of respiratory deaths were attributable to pollutant levels; children living in rural Ontario communities with the highest levels of airborne acids were significantly more likely to report at least one episode of bronchitis, as well as to show decreases in lung function; and have been linked to increases in pollutants, emergency room visits and hospitalizations in Ontario. Every Ontarian is affected by air pollutants, although he or she may be unaware of the asymptomatic effects such as lung and bronchial inflammation. This health problem is preventable; while physicians know of the adverse health impacts of air pollution and they are concerned, individually they now focus on the treatment of symptoms. The major recommendations of the report are as follows: Enactment of more stringent sulphur and nitrogen oxide emission limits, including a provincewide sulphur dioxide reduction of 75% from current cap levels, and the maximum allowable nitrogen oxides emission limits of 6000 tonnes annually from Ontario Hydro. New transportation sector emission limits that should include California-level standards for light and heavy duty vehicles, reductions from off-road engines, an expanded vehicle inspection and maintenance program, and tougher standards for sulphur-in-fuel content. Petitioning the United States Environmental Protection Agency administrator under Section 115 of the United States Clear Air Act to require reductions in the American emission of sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, which damage the health of Canadian residents and their environment. Physician advice to patients about the risks of smog exposure, physician support for more health effects research on air pollution, and physician promotion of the development of air pollution-related health education materials. The recommendations discussed in this paper will, if acted upon, lead to a significant reduction in the overall burden of illness from air pollutants, especially in children and the elderly. These recommendations have been selected from a review of recommendations made by various authorities, and are those that the OMA feels a particular responsibility to support.
PubMed ID
9832604 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1998 Sep;44:1775-7, 1787-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
W. Bell
A. Yassi
D C Cole
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1998 Sep;44:1775-7, 1787-90
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Canada
Environmental health
Family Practice
Humans
Lobbying
Male
Physician's Role
Ships
Abstract
On Saturday, August 24, 1996, a 40-year-old man from Edmonton was riding a personal motorized watercraft (PMW, a Seadoo or Jet Ski type of machine) on Shuswap Lake, in south-central British Columbia. He was approximately 200 m offshore. The man motioned to his sister, who was riding another PMW, to follow him across the lake. She did so, but as the turned her head to check for other boat traffic, her brother suddenly slowed down and her machine rode right up on his back, crushing him against his handlebars. His sister, a nurse, held her brother's head above water until help arrived but, 48 minutes after the moment of impact, he was pronounced dead at the Shuswap Lake General Hospital. He had suffered a ruptured aorta.
Notes
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 1993 Jul;28(7):920-28229569
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1991 Nov;78(5 Pt 2):986-81923248
Cites: Mo Med. 1994 May;91(5):241-38041353
Cites: JAMA. 1989 Apr 7;261(13):18832926925
Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 1999 Jan;45:26-7, 2910889847
PubMed ID
9789655 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
New Solut. 2009;19(2):201-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Hoffa James P
Author Affiliation
International Brotherhood of Teamsters, USA.
Source
New Solut. 2009;19(2):201-4
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental health
Humans
International Cooperation
Labor Unions - organization & administration
Politics
United States
Abstract
There's tremendous excitement across the land about good jobs and a clean environment. We teamsters have found that working together makes things happen. We have found a partnership with the Sierra Club and Public Citizen. We no longer support drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. We'll pass the Employee Free Choice Act, too. Working together as partners, labor and environmentalists, and under this President, we can accomplish great things for working people and for the environment.
PubMed ID
19608515 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Implementation of new knowledge in times of climate change?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95343
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3203-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2009
Author
Ringsted Charlotte
Author Affiliation
Københavns Universitet og Region Hovedstaden, Center for Klinisk Uddannelse, Rigshospitalet, DK-2100 København Ø, Denmark. charlotte.ringsted@rh.regionh.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3203-6
Date
Oct-26-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
Diffusion of Innovation
Education, Medical, Continuing
Environmental health
Humans
Information Dissemination
Knowledge
Professional Competence
Public Health
Risk factors
Abstract
Climate change is the primary threat to public health in the 21st century. There is a huge need for creation of new knowledge on how most effectively and efficiently to respond to the negative effects on health. Participatory research and development projects may be essential in creation and dissemination of new knowledge. Theoretically underpinned interventions and implementation strategies are necessary to ensure that knowledge is translated into action. Universities and health care organisations have a central role in preparing future health professionals by giving them the skills and knowledge needed.
PubMed ID
19857404 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Climate chance and research activity]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95344
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3200-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2009
Author
Manuel Celie
Author Affiliation
Københavns Universitet, Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab, København Ø, Denmark. celie24@gmail.com
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3200-3
Date
Oct-26-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical research
Climate
Environmental health
Greenhouse Effect
Health promotion
Humans
Risk factors
World Health
Abstract
There are three main focus areas relevant to health in research related to climate change: 1) disentangling of the complex associations between climate-sensitive risk factors and health 2) guidance as to where, when and how effective health adaptation strategies may be implemented for maximum effect, and 3) health impact assessment (with a focus on health co-benefits) of climate-related policies in other sectors. Further development in each of these areas will provide important opportunities for strengthening health promotion and protection.
PubMed ID
19857403 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 2003 May 27;168(11):1427-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-27-2003
Author
Howard Shapiro
Sandra Micucci
Author Affiliation
Peel Health, Brampton, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 2003 May 27;168(11):1427-30
Date
May-27-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bird Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Culicidae - physiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental health
Health education
Humans
Insect Vectors - physiology
Insecticides - adverse effects
Life Cycle Stages
Malathion - adverse effects
Methoprene - adverse effects
Mosquito Control - methods
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Protective Clothing
Risk assessment
West Nile Fever - epidemiology - prevention & control - veterinary
Notes
Cites: J Am Mosq Control Assoc. 1999 Dec;15(4):446-5210612606
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2001 Dec;951:235-5411797780
Cites: J Am Mosq Control Assoc. 1996 Mar;12(1):144-68723274
Cites: J Am Mosq Control Assoc. 1987 Jun;3(2):125-303504901
Cites: J Am Mosq Control Assoc. 1995 Mar;11(1):72-67616194
Cites: Am J Public Health Nations Health. 1967 Dec;57(12):2111-66070250
PubMed ID
12771072 View in PubMed
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[Challenges in public health for the new century].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185508
Source
P R Health Sci J. 2003 Mar;22(1):11-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Annette B Ramírez de Arellano
Source
P R Health Sci J. 2003 Mar;22(1):11-7
Date
Mar-2003
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Causality
Culture
Disease - etiology
Environmental health
Forecasting
Health education
Health Policy
Health Promotion - trends
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Infection Control
Life Style
Public Health - trends
Risk factors
United States
Abstract
The history of public health has followed different trends, depending on the prevailing theories of disease causality and the interventions that these suggest. From the concern with miasmas to the germ theory, to the stress on lifestyles and the current interest on the linkages between health, economic welfare, and social status, the proposed policies are contingent on how health and disease are conceptualized and explained. Ironically, now that there is increasing evidence on the socio-economic determinants of health, interventions continue to focus on specific target groups or disease categories, as well as on the medical sector.
PubMed ID
12733437 View in PubMed
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Cold hard cache: the arctic drilling controversy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100447
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Sep;118(9):a394-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010

694 records – page 1 of 35.