Skip header and navigation

Refine By

384 records – page 1 of 20.

[Methodological aspects of the assessment of phytotoxicic properties of ice-melter reagents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290147
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(8):773-8
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
A V Sbitnev
M A Vodianova
I A Kriatov
L G Donerian
I S Evseeva
O V Ushakova
D I Ushakov
I S Matveeva
O M Rodionova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(8):773-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Freezing
Humans
Ice
Plants - drug effects
Russia
Snow
Sodium Chloride - chemistry - toxicity
Soil Pollutants - chemistry - toxicity
Solvents - chemistry
Toxicological Phenomena
Transportation
Abstract
One of the main criteria which determine the possibility of the use of a particular type of ice-melter reagents (IMR) is the degree of their safety for the environment and human health, which is reflected in the establishment of safe doses and concentrations. In this regard, the current area of research is to improve the ecological and epidemiological principles of risk assessment of modern types of anti-icing agents. Currently available data concerning monitoring soil studies and the snow held in various cities of Russia, show that there is a process of accumulation of the main components of IMR - sodium and chlorine ions in the areas related to the roadway. The article is designated a problem of existing methodological approaches to the assessment of the phytotoxic impact in the investigation of anti-icing agents in the laboratory. There was executed the comparative characteristics of the results of the preliminary pilot studies on the phytotoxic properties of IMR under using different substrates for germination of seeds - soil and filter paper. The data obtained are characterized by differences in the degree of phytotoxic action of the same species depending upon ice-melter reagents methodical setting circuit laboratory experiment. As a result, there was shown the imperfection of the existing method of rapid analysis in relation to ice-melter materials (IMM).
PubMed ID
29430905 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Hygienic environmental assessment in the oil-and-gas bearing area on the base of cytogenetical and molecular-genetic methods].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290340
Source
Gig Sanit. 2017; 96(2):121-4
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
N N Ilyinskikh
E N Ilyinskikh
I N Ilyinskikh
A E Yankovskaya
S A Saushkin
Source
Gig Sanit. 2017; 96(2):121-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cytogenetic Analysis - methods - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Exposure - analysis - prevention & control
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Humans
Micronucleus Tests - methods - statistics & numerical data
Mouth Mucosa - pathology
Oil and Gas Industry - standards - statistics & numerical data
Public Health - methods
Siberia - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The study have been conducted in settlements located near oilfields of the Nizhnevartovsk area, the Khanty-Mansi autonomous district (Russian Federation). There were examined 802 persons aged of from 18 to 56 years not proximately employed in processes of the oil extraction. Control group was consisted of329 residents of the north of Tomsk Region living in the area without any polluting environment industry. By using such methods of analysis as micronucleus test in human buccal cells, the xenobiotic biotransformation of both GSTM1 and GSTT1 gene polymorphism, as well as the assessment of oil contamination of local drinking water there was executed the hygienic assessment of ecology in the settlements located near oil fields. The elevated rate of cytogenetic disorders was established to be observed most of all in the residents of this region, as well as in persons recently moved to this area. Most significant deviations from the control according to the micronucleus test were detected in individuals with the GSTM1 (0) /GSTT1(0) genotype. In the control group no such consistent pattern was seen.
PubMed ID
29446592 View in PubMed
Less detail

Presence of bisphenol S and surfactants in the sediments of Kongsfjorden: a negative impact of human activities in Arctic?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290662
Source
Environ Monit Assess. 2017 Dec 14; 190(1):22
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-14-2017
Author
K K Nejumal
D Dineep
Mahesh Mohan
K P Krishnan
U K Aravind
C T Aravindakumar
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, Kerala, 686560, India.
Source
Environ Monit Assess. 2017 Dec 14; 190(1):22
Date
Dec-14-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental pollution - analysis
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Human Activities
Humans
Mass Spectrometry
Phenols - analysis
Sulfones - analysis
Surface-Active Agents - analysis
Abstract
Pollution and fate of pollutants in polar region are important topics of investigation in the last several decades. We have analysed sediment samples from Kongsfjorden and Krossfjorden, two sites from Arctic region, and detected a number of emerging contaminants (ECs) using high-resolution mass spectrometry connected to UPLC (LC-Q-ToF-MS). Out of the seven sampling sites selected, bisphenol S (BPS), an identified pollutant and plasticiser, was detected and quantified in three sediment samples from Kongsfjorden (˜?0.2 ppm). Four major surfactants (decylbenzenesulphonic acid, undecylbenzenesulphonic acid, 2-dodecylbenzenesulphonic acid and tridecylbenzenesulphonic acid) were also identified. A possible metabolite of BPS (sulphur trioxide derivative of BPS) was identified in one of the samples. It is proposed that the presence of ECs is the result of human activities in the region for a long time. To the best our knowledge, this is the first report on the identification of BPS and surfactants in the Arctic region.
Notes
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2013 Aug 6;47(15):8793-800 PMID 23806087
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Oct 20;49(20):12333-41 PMID 26418421
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2011 Jun 15;409(14):2783-95 PMID 21600630
Cites: Talanta. 2012 Jan 15;88:1-13 PMID 22265464
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Jun 19;46(12):6860-6 PMID 22620267
Cites: Environ Geochem Health. 2013 Apr;35(2):257-69 PMID 22965895
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Jun 19;46(12):6515-22 PMID 22591511
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Mar 17;49(6):3860-8 PMID 25679259
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Oct 1;44(19):7705-10 PMID 20836489
Cites: Chemosphere. 2010 Aug;80(9):1075-80 PMID 20510433
Cites: Mar Pollut Bull. 2013 Dec 15;77(1-2):367-74 PMID 24210011
Cites: Steroids. 2008 Nov;73(12):1242-51 PMID 18634814
Cites: Food Chem. 2016 Jan 1;190:793-800 PMID 26213040
Cites: J Chromatogr A. 2012 Mar 23;1230:66-76 PMID 22342207
Cites: Mar Pollut Bull. 2015 Dec 15;101(1):442-7 PMID 26453403
Cites: Nature. 2008 May 15;453(7193):353-7 PMID 18480817
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 1992 Jul 15;122(1-2):1-74 PMID 1514103
Cites: J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci. 2011 Oct 15;879(28):2998-3004 PMID 21930438
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2016 Jan 15;542(Pt A):108-20 PMID 26519572
Cites: Anal Bioanal Chem. 2010 May;397(1):115-125 PMID 20127078
Cites: J Chromatogr A. 2014 Sep 19;1360:248-57 PMID 25129389
Cites: Anal Bioanal Chem. 2014 Jul;406(17):4089-116 PMID 24770804
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Oct 15;45(20):9024-9 PMID 21888330
Cites: J Phys Chem B. 2014 Apr 10;118(14):3832-43 PMID 24635450
Cites: Talanta. 2016;146:16-22 PMID 26695228
Cites: J Chromatogr A. 2014 Sep 19;1360:66-75 PMID 25115454
PubMed ID
29243078 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing PCB pollution in the Baltic Sea - An equilibrium partitioning based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290670
Source
Chemosphere. 2018 Jan; 191:886-894
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2018
Author
Susann-Cathrin Lang
Philipp Mayer
Andrew Hursthouse
Danijela Kötke
Ines Hand
Detlef Schulz-Bull
Gesine Witt
Author Affiliation
University of Applied Sciences Hamburg, Department of Environmental Engineering, Ulmenliet 20, 21033 Hamburg, Germany; Institute of Biomedical and Environmental Health Research, School of Science & Sport, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley Campus, Paisley PA 1 2BE, United Kingdom. Electronic address: susann-cathrin.lang@agilent.com.
Source
Chemosphere. 2018 Jan; 191:886-894
Date
Jan-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental pollution - analysis
Finland
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Organic Chemicals - analysis
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Seawater - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Sediment cores and bottom water samples from across the Baltic Sea region were analyzed for freely dissolved concentrations (Cfree), total sediment concentrations (CT) and the dissolved aqueous fraction in water of seven indicator PCBs. Ex-situ equilibrium sampling of sediment samples was conducted with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coated glass fibers that were analyzed by automated thermal desorption GC-MS, which yielded PCB concentrations in the fiber coating (CPDMS). Measurements of CPDMS and CT were then applied to determine (i) spatially resolved freely dissolved PCB concentrations; (ii) baseline toxicity potential based on chemical activities (a); (iii) site specific mixture compositions; (iv) diffusion gradients at the sediment water interface and within the sediment cores; and (vi) site specific distribution ratios (KD). The contamination levels were low in the Gulf of Finland and moderate to elevated in the Baltic Proper, with the highest levels observed in the western Baltic Sea. The SPME method has been demonstrated to be an appropriate and sensitive tool for area surveys presenting new opportunities to study the in-situ distribution and thermodynamics of hydrophobic organic chemicals at trace levels in marine environments.
PubMed ID
29107230 View in PubMed
Less detail

[THE HEALTH OF CHILDREN IN THE INDUSTRIALIZED REGION].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268681
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Sep-Oct;94(5):39-44
Publication Type
Article
Author
I V Yatsyna
E L Sineva
A V Tulakin
I Yu Zhadan
E A Preobrazhenskaya
E O Sarancha
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Sep-Oct;94(5):39-44
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Child
Child Health - standards - trends
Environmental Health - organization & administration - standards
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology
Rural Population
Russia
Skin Diseases - epidemiology
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
There was performed an assessment of the quality of the environment and the state of health of the child population of the one out of industrialized regions of the Moscow region. There were determined priority risk factors for diseases of the respiratory system and skin. The indices and the structure of morbidity rate were analyzed according to the incidence of outpatient visits. There was developed a comprehensive hygienic model for the preventive and therapeutic activities aimed at the improvement of the environment and reduction of the morbidity rate in children's population.
PubMed ID
26625614 View in PubMed
Less detail

[HYGIENIC JUSTIFICATION OF OPTIMIZATION OF THE INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT OF DRINKING WATER ACCORDING TO THE WATER QUALITY INDEX].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268688
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Sep-Oct;94(5):5-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
G N Krasovskiy
Yu Rakhmanin
N. Egorova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Sep-Oct;94(5):5-10
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drinking Water - chemistry - microbiology - standards
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Hygiene - standards
Models, Theoretical
Russia
Water Microbiology - standards
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Water Pollution, Chemical - analysis
Water Quality - standards
Water Supply - standards
Abstract
The present study is devoted to theoretical questions of optimization of integrated assessment of the composition and properties of drinking water with the use of the Water Quality Index (WQI) and considering in it all 4 criteria for its hygienic quality-sanitary-toxicological, microbiological, radiation and organoleptic. There is presented a sequence of the analysis of benchmark data of the laboratory study of drinking water, including the selection of priority indices, their distribution into 4 groups according to hygienic criteria, calculations the ratios of real values (C) of indices to their hygiene MPC and the final calculation of the WQI. There is emphasized the importance of classes of hazard of substances, and the need for the special attention to the substances-carcinogens in the integrated assessment of water quality. To overcome the non-equivalence of contributions to the assessment of water quality factors, measured in different units, often disparated in their effect on human health, there are used the principles of combined action at levels below the MCL:C/MPC indices of performance of the unidirectional action are summed (e.g. carcinogenic substances), from indices of the independent action there are selected the most significant ones with the highest values of C/MPC, besides that there are also used counterbalancing factors K determined accordingly to Delphi method, with a maximum values of 5 for carcinogens and the minimum value of 1 for the substances affecting the organoleptic properties ofwater. There is presented the scheme of the final calculation of the value of WQI.
PubMed ID
26625606 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of indoor environmental quality in existing multi-family buildings in North-East Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268743
Source
Environ Int. 2015 Jun;79:74-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Liuliu Du
Tadas Prasauskas
Virpi Leivo
Mari Turunen
Maria Pekkonen
Mihkel Kiviste
Anu Aaltonen
Dainius Martuzevicius
Ulla Haverinen-Shaughnessy
Source
Environ Int. 2015 Jun;79:74-84
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Finland
Formaldehyde - analysis
Housing - standards
Humans
Lithuania
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Particulate Matter - analysis
Ventilation - standards
Volatile Organic Compounds - analysis
Abstract
Sixteen existing multi-family buildings (94 apartments) in Finland and 20 (96 apartments) in Lithuania were investigated prior to their renovation in order to develop and test out a common protocol for the indoor environmental quality (IEQ) assessment, and to assess the potential for improving IEQ along with energy efficiency. Baseline data on buildings, as well as data on temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), particulate matter (PM), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), radon, and microbial content in settled dust were collected from each apartment. In addition, questionnaire data regarding housing quality and health were collected from the occupants. The results indicated that most measured IEQ parameters were within recommended limits. However, different baselines in each country were observed especially for parameters related to thermal conditions and ventilation. Different baselines were also observed for the respondents' satisfaction with their residence and indoor air quality, as well as their behavior related to indoor environment. In this paper, we present some evidence for the potential in improving IEQ along with energy efficiency in the current building stock, followed by discussion of possible IEQ indicators and development of the assessment protocol.
PubMed ID
25797585 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood tuberculosis and exposure to indoor air pollution: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269091
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2015 May;19(5):596-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
N. Jafta
P M Jeena
L. Barregard
R N Naidoo
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2015 May;19(5):596-602
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child health
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects
Male
Needs Assessment
Pediatrics
Risk assessment
Sweden
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Abstract
Indoor air pollution (IAP) from environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and biomass fuel smoke (BMS) poses respiratory health risks, with children and women bearing the major burden.
We used a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the relation between childhood tuberculosis (TB) and exposure to ETS and BMS.
We searched three databases for epidemiological studies that investigated the association of childhood TB with exposure to ETS and BMS. We calculated pooled estimates and heterogeneity for studies eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis and stratified studies on ETS by outcome.
Five case-control and three cross-sectional studies were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis and quality assessment. Pooled effect estimates showed that exposure to ETS is associated with tuberculous infection and TB disease (OR 1.9, 95%CI 1.4-2.9) among exposed compared to non-exposed children. TB disease in ETS studies produced a pooled OR of 2.8 (95%CI 0.9-4.8), which was higher than the OR for tuberculous infection (OR 1.9, 95%CI 0.9-2.9) for children exposed to ETS compared to non-exposed children. Studies on BMS exposure were too few and too small to permit a conclusion.
Exposure to ETS increases the risk of childhood TB disease or tuberculous infection.
PubMed ID
25868030 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does intake of trace elements through urban gardening in Copenhagen pose a risk to human health?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269419
Source
Environ Pollut. 2015 Jul;202:17-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Marlies Warming
Mette G Hansen
Peter E Holm
Jakob Magid
Thomas H Hansen
Stefan Trapp
Source
Environ Pollut. 2015 Jul;202:17-23
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cities
Crops, Agricultural - chemistry
Denmark
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Gardening - methods
Humans
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Risk assessment
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Trace Elements - analysis
Urbanization
Abstract
This study investigates the potential health risk from urban gardening. The concentrations of the trace elements arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn) in five common garden crops from three garden sites in Copenhagen were measured. Concentrations (mg/kg dw) of As were 0.002-0.21, Cd 0.03-0.25, Cr 
PubMed ID
25796073 View in PubMed
Less detail

Residential outdoor air pollution and lung function in schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87597
Source
Epidemiology. 2008 Jan;19(1):129-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Oftedal Bente
Brunekreef Bert
Nystad Wenche
Madsen Christian
Walker Sam-Erik
Nafstad Per
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. bente.oftedal@fhi.no
Source
Epidemiology. 2008 Jan;19(1):129-37
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Child
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis - toxicity
Norway - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics
Respiration
Sex Factors
Spirometry
Vehicle Emissions
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Long-term exposure to outdoor air pollution has typically been estimated on the aggregate level, and more individual measures of exposure are needed. We investigated the associations with lung function of residential outdoor air pollution in early life, total lifetime, and days before lung function test. METHODS: In 2001-2002, spirometry was performed in 2307 9- and 10-year-old children who had lived in Oslo, Norway, since birth. Outdoor air pollution exposure for each child was assessed by the EPISODE dispersion model, calculating hourly concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulate matter (PM) with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microm (PM10) and 2.5 microm (PM2.5). We applied linear regression analysis stratified by sex. RESULTS: Early and lifetime exposures to outdoor air pollution were associated with reduced peak expiratory flow and reduced forced expiratory flow at 25% and 50% of forced vital capacity, especially in girls. One interquartile increase of lifetime exposure to NO2, PM10, and PM2.5 was associated with change in adjusted peak respiratory flow of, respectively, -79 mL/s (95% confidence interval = -128 to -31), -66 mL/s (-110 to -23), and -58 mL/s (-94 to -21). We also found short-term effects of NO2 that became stronger with increasing time lags, but no short-term effects of PM. When we included short- and long-term NO2 exposures simultaneously, only the long-term effect remained. We found no effect on forced volumes. Adjusting for a contextual socioeconomic factor diminished the associations. CONCLUSIONS: Short- and long-term residential exposures to traffic-related pollutants in Oslo were associated with reduced peak expiratory flow and forced expiratory flow at 25% and 50% in 9- to 10-year-old children, especially in girls, with weaker associations after adjusting for a contextual socioeconomic factor.
PubMed ID
18091005 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Microbiological monitoring of urban soils state ].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144355
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Jan-Feb;(1):45-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
M V Medvedeva
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Jan-Feb;(1):45-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cities
Environmental Health - organization & administration
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Humans
Russia
Soil Microbiology - standards
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Abstract
A comprehensive study of the state of urban soils revealed the altered structural and functional organization of microbiocenosis versus that of the soils of intact forest ecosystems. The indicator microbial and biochemical parameters of the state of the soils under urban technological pressure were identified. The findings may be used to evaluate the natural environment, to make an urban environmental monitoring.
PubMed ID
20376936 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Use of methodology of assessing the risk in the sociohygienic monitoring system of the pediatric population in the town of Zhukovsky, Moscow Region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168925
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 Mar-Apr;(2):85-8
Publication Type
Article

[Impact of discharges by enterprises dealing with the microbiological synthesis of food additives on the environment and human health].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168933
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 Mar-Apr;(2):17-21
Publication Type
Article

[Hygienic assessment of the use of pesticides in the areas of the Kursk Region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168934
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 Mar-Apr;(2):14-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
A M Chernykh
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 Mar-Apr;(2):14-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health)
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiological Monitoring
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Pesticides - adverse effects
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The paper deals with the evaluation of current trends in the application of pesticides and in the detection of their residues in the environmental objects of the Kursk Region. A reduction in the rate of use of pesticides and changes in their structure and range has been established. The amount of organic chlorides and organic phosphates has been decreased while the use of carbamates, heterocyclic compounds, pyrethroids, the derivatives of azoles, avermectins, meonicotinoids, and the derivatives of aryloxyphenoxypropionic acids increased. The degree of environmental danger of the applied pesticides to human health has decreased by 11.2 times in the past 18 years.
PubMed ID
16758812 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The sanitary and epidemiological assessment of the risk from economic and other activities that are a potential public hazard].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168935
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 Mar-Apr;(2):12-4
Publication Type
Article

A theoretical approach to using faecal indicator data to model norovirus concentration in surface water for QMRA: Glomma River, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277429
Source
Water Res. 2016 Mar 15;91:31-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2016
Author
Susan R Petterson
Thor Axel Stenström
Jakob Ottoson
Source
Water Res. 2016 Mar 15;91:31-7
Date
Mar-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Feces - virology
Models, Theoretical
Norovirus - isolation & purification
Norway
Rivers - virology
Waste Water - virology
Water Purification
Water Quality
Abstract
Monitoring of faecal indicator organisms, such as Escherichia coli, in environmental and drinking waters is inadequate for the protection public health, primarily due to the poor relationship between E. coli and the occurrence of human pathogens, especially viruses, in environmental samples. Nevertheless, measurements of faecal indicator organisms within the risk based approach, can provide valuable information related to the magnitude and variability of faecal contamination, and hence provide insight into the expected level of potential pathogen contamination. In this study, a modelling approach is presented that estimates the concentration of norovirus in surface water relying on indicator monitoring data, combined with specific assumptions regarding the source of faecal contamination. The model is applied to a case study on drinking water treatment intake from the Glomma River in Norway. Norovirus concentrations were estimated in two sewage sources discharging into the river upstream of the drinking water offtake, and at the source water intake itself. The characteristics of the assumed source of faecal contamination, including the norovirus prevalence in the community, the size of the contributing population and the relative treatment efficacy for indicators and pathogens in the sewage treatment plant, influenced the magnitude and variability in the estimated norovirus concentration in surface waters. The modelling exercise presented is not intended to replace pathogen enumeration from environmental samples, but rather is proposed as a complement to better understand the sources and drivers of viruses in surface waters. The approach has the potential to inform sampling regimes by identifying when the best time would be to collect environmental samples; fill in the gaps between sparse datasets; and potentially extrapolate existing datasets in order to model rarer events such as an outbreak in the contributing population. In addition, and perhaps most universally, in the absence of pathogen data, this approach can be used as a first step to predict the source water pathogen concentration under different contamination scenarios for the purpose of quantifying microbial risks.
PubMed ID
26773482 View in PubMed
Less detail

[System monitoring health state of individuals suffering from occupational diseases in the Rostov region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186081
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2003;(1):6-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
I N Piktushanskaia
S A Popov
A I Shabalkin
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2003;(1):6-8
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health)
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Epidemiological Monitoring
Health status
Humans
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The authors describe experience associated with creation of automated system registering patients with occupational diseases, monitoring health state of patients with occupational diseases, specifying thorough analysis of occupational morbidity.
PubMed ID
12666619 View in PubMed
Less detail

Syndromic surveillance to assess the potential public health impact of the Icelandic volcanic ash plume across the United Kingdom, April 2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100576
Source
Euro Surveill. 2010;15(23)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
A J Elliot
N. Singh
P. Loveridge
S. Harcourt
S. Smith
R. Pnaiser
K. Kavanagh
C. Robertson
C N Ramsay
J. McMenamin
A. Kibble
V. Murray
S. Ibbotson
M. Catchpole
B. McCloskey
G E Smith
Author Affiliation
Real-time Syndromic Surveillance Team, Health Protection Agency, Birmingham, United Kingdom. alex.elliot@hpa.org.uk
Source
Euro Surveill. 2010;15(23)
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disaster Planning - methods
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Public Health - methods
Respiration Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Volcanic Eruptions - adverse effects
Abstract
The Health Protection Agency and Health Protection Scotland used existing syndromic surveillance systems to monitor community health in the UK following the volcanic eruption in Iceland in April 2010.
PubMed ID
20546694 View in PubMed
Less detail

384 records – page 1 of 20.