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[Methodical ware for the hygienic risk assessment of vanadium exposure to the children's health].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263722
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Jul-Aug;(4):115-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
N V Zaytseva
T S Ulanova
O O Sinitsyna
O V Gileva
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Jul-Aug;(4):115-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis - blood
Air Pollution
Child
Environmental Exposure - prevention & control
Environmental Illness - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Metallurgy
Russia
Vanadium - adverse effects - analysis - blood
Water Pollutants, Chemical - adverse effects - analysis - blood
Water Pollution, Chemical
Abstract
In the article there is considered the complex of methodological approaches for the detection of vanadium in the air and biological substrates of the population for the practical use in the frameworks of public health monitoring in areas with localization of steel industry facilities. The developed complex of methods on the base of mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma (ICP-MS) allowed to perform the hygienic assessment of the quality of objects of the environment in the territory located in the zone of the impact of emissions of ferrovanadium production (the city of Tchusovoy of the Perm Krai). From the results of the study there was established the significant excess of the vanadium content in the ambient air of the studied area in relation to the control territory and to the reference concentration for chronic inhalation exposure (RfCxp) to 6.0 times. There was revealed a significant excess of vanadium content in the blood of children residing in the study area, with respect to the regional background levels (0.0001-0.00016 mg/dm3). Complex clinical laboratory and chemical-analytical studies of biosubstrates of the children population allowed to substantiate the marker of the inhalation exposure (the vanadium content in the blood) and its reference level (0.0023 dm3).
PubMed ID
25842514 View in PubMed
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[Topical issues of biological safety under current conditions. Part 3. Scientific provision for the national regulation of the biological safety framework in its broad interpretation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263903
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2014;(11-12):118-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
G G Onishchenko
V Yu Smolensky
E B Ezhlova
Yu V Demina
V P Toporkov
A V Toporkov
M N Lyapin
V V Kutyrev
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2014;(11-12):118-27
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Warfare
Civil Defense - methods - organization & administration
Disaster Planning - methods - organization & administration
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Government Programs
Humans
Public Policy
Russia
Safety
Toxins, Biological
Abstract
Consequent of investigation concerned with biological safety (BS) framework development in its broad interpretation, reflected in the Russian Federation State Acts, identified have been conceptual entity parameters of the up-to-date broad interpretation of BS, which have formed a part of the developed by the authors system for surveillance (prophylaxis, localization, indication, identification, and diagnostics) and control (prophylaxis, localization, and response/elimination) over the emergency situations of biological (sanitary-epidemiological) character. The System functionality is activated through supplying the content with information data which are concerned with monitoring and control of specific internal and external threats in the sphere of BS provision fixed in the Supplement 2 of the International Health Regulations (IHR, 2005), and with the previously characterized nomenclature of hazardous biological factors. The system is designed as a network-based research-and-practice tool for evaluation of the situation in the sphere of BS provision, as well as assessment of efficacy of management decision making as regards BS control and proper State policy implementation. Most of the system elements either directly or indirectly relate to the scope of activities conducted by Federal Service for Surveillance in the Sphere of Consumers Rights Protection and Human Welfare, being substantial argument for allocating coordination functions in the sphere of BS provision to this government agency and consistent with its function as the State Coordinator on IHR (2005). The data collected serve as materials to Draft Federal Law "Concerning biological safety provision of the population".
PubMed ID
25971137 View in PubMed
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[Methodological aspects of the assessment of phytotoxicic properties of ice-melter reagents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290147
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(8):773-8
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
A V Sbitnev
M A Vodianova
I A Kriatov
L G Donerian
I S Evseeva
O V Ushakova
D I Ushakov
I S Matveeva
O M Rodionova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(8):773-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Freezing
Humans
Ice
Plants - drug effects
Russia
Snow
Sodium Chloride - chemistry - toxicity
Soil Pollutants - chemistry - toxicity
Solvents - chemistry
Toxicological Phenomena
Transportation
Abstract
One of the main criteria which determine the possibility of the use of a particular type of ice-melter reagents (IMR) is the degree of their safety for the environment and human health, which is reflected in the establishment of safe doses and concentrations. In this regard, the current area of research is to improve the ecological and epidemiological principles of risk assessment of modern types of anti-icing agents. Currently available data concerning monitoring soil studies and the snow held in various cities of Russia, show that there is a process of accumulation of the main components of IMR - sodium and chlorine ions in the areas related to the roadway. The article is designated a problem of existing methodological approaches to the assessment of the phytotoxic impact in the investigation of anti-icing agents in the laboratory. There was executed the comparative characteristics of the results of the preliminary pilot studies on the phytotoxic properties of IMR under using different substrates for germination of seeds - soil and filter paper. The data obtained are characterized by differences in the degree of phytotoxic action of the same species depending upon ice-melter reagents methodical setting circuit laboratory experiment. As a result, there was shown the imperfection of the existing method of rapid analysis in relation to ice-melter materials (IMM).
PubMed ID
29430905 View in PubMed
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[Hygienic environmental assessment in the oil-and-gas bearing area on the base of cytogenetical and molecular-genetic methods].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290340
Source
Gig Sanit. 2017; 96(2):121-4
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
N N Ilyinskikh
E N Ilyinskikh
I N Ilyinskikh
A E Yankovskaya
S A Saushkin
Source
Gig Sanit. 2017; 96(2):121-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cytogenetic Analysis - methods - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Exposure - analysis - prevention & control
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Humans
Micronucleus Tests - methods - statistics & numerical data
Mouth Mucosa - pathology
Oil and Gas Industry - standards - statistics & numerical data
Public Health - methods
Siberia - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The study have been conducted in settlements located near oilfields of the Nizhnevartovsk area, the Khanty-Mansi autonomous district (Russian Federation). There were examined 802 persons aged of from 18 to 56 years not proximately employed in processes of the oil extraction. Control group was consisted of329 residents of the north of Tomsk Region living in the area without any polluting environment industry. By using such methods of analysis as micronucleus test in human buccal cells, the xenobiotic biotransformation of both GSTM1 and GSTT1 gene polymorphism, as well as the assessment of oil contamination of local drinking water there was executed the hygienic assessment of ecology in the settlements located near oil fields. The elevated rate of cytogenetic disorders was established to be observed most of all in the residents of this region, as well as in persons recently moved to this area. Most significant deviations from the control according to the micronucleus test were detected in individuals with the GSTM1 (0) /GSTT1(0) genotype. In the control group no such consistent pattern was seen.
PubMed ID
29446592 View in PubMed
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Presence of bisphenol S and surfactants in the sediments of Kongsfjorden: a negative impact of human activities in Arctic?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290662
Source
Environ Monit Assess. 2017 Dec 14; 190(1):22
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-14-2017
Author
K K Nejumal
D Dineep
Mahesh Mohan
K P Krishnan
U K Aravind
C T Aravindakumar
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, Kerala, 686560, India.
Source
Environ Monit Assess. 2017 Dec 14; 190(1):22
Date
Dec-14-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental pollution - analysis
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Human Activities
Humans
Mass Spectrometry
Phenols - analysis
Sulfones - analysis
Surface-Active Agents - analysis
Abstract
Pollution and fate of pollutants in polar region are important topics of investigation in the last several decades. We have analysed sediment samples from Kongsfjorden and Krossfjorden, two sites from Arctic region, and detected a number of emerging contaminants (ECs) using high-resolution mass spectrometry connected to UPLC (LC-Q-ToF-MS). Out of the seven sampling sites selected, bisphenol S (BPS), an identified pollutant and plasticiser, was detected and quantified in three sediment samples from Kongsfjorden (˜?0.2 ppm). Four major surfactants (decylbenzenesulphonic acid, undecylbenzenesulphonic acid, 2-dodecylbenzenesulphonic acid and tridecylbenzenesulphonic acid) were also identified. A possible metabolite of BPS (sulphur trioxide derivative of BPS) was identified in one of the samples. It is proposed that the presence of ECs is the result of human activities in the region for a long time. To the best our knowledge, this is the first report on the identification of BPS and surfactants in the Arctic region.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29243078 View in PubMed
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Assessing PCB pollution in the Baltic Sea - An equilibrium partitioning based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290670
Source
Chemosphere. 2018 Jan; 191:886-894
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2018
Author
Susann-Cathrin Lang
Philipp Mayer
Andrew Hursthouse
Danijela Kötke
Ines Hand
Detlef Schulz-Bull
Gesine Witt
Author Affiliation
University of Applied Sciences Hamburg, Department of Environmental Engineering, Ulmenliet 20, 21033 Hamburg, Germany; Institute of Biomedical and Environmental Health Research, School of Science & Sport, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley Campus, Paisley PA 1 2BE, United Kingdom. Electronic address: susann-cathrin.lang@agilent.com.
Source
Chemosphere. 2018 Jan; 191:886-894
Date
Jan-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental pollution - analysis
Finland
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Organic Chemicals - analysis
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Seawater - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Sediment cores and bottom water samples from across the Baltic Sea region were analyzed for freely dissolved concentrations (Cfree), total sediment concentrations (CT) and the dissolved aqueous fraction in water of seven indicator PCBs. Ex-situ equilibrium sampling of sediment samples was conducted with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coated glass fibers that were analyzed by automated thermal desorption GC-MS, which yielded PCB concentrations in the fiber coating (CPDMS). Measurements of CPDMS and CT were then applied to determine (i) spatially resolved freely dissolved PCB concentrations; (ii) baseline toxicity potential based on chemical activities (a); (iii) site specific mixture compositions; (iv) diffusion gradients at the sediment water interface and within the sediment cores; and (vi) site specific distribution ratios (KD). The contamination levels were low in the Gulf of Finland and moderate to elevated in the Baltic Proper, with the highest levels observed in the western Baltic Sea. The SPME method has been demonstrated to be an appropriate and sensitive tool for area surveys presenting new opportunities to study the in-situ distribution and thermodynamics of hydrophobic organic chemicals at trace levels in marine environments.
PubMed ID
29107230 View in PubMed
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Not just 'a few wisps': real-time measurement of tobacco smoke at entrances to office buildings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138426
Source
Tob Control. 2011 May;20(3):212-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Pamela Kaufman
Bo Zhang
Susan J Bondy
Neil Klepeis
Roberta Ferrence
Author Affiliation
Ontario Tobacco Research Unit, 33 Russell Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 2S1, Canada. pam_kaufman@camh.net
Source
Tob Control. 2011 May;20(3):212-8
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Humans
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Ontario
Public Facilities
Smoking
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - analysis
Workplace
Abstract
An unintended consequence of indoor smoking restrictions is the relocation of smoking to building entrances, where non-smokers may be exposed to secondhand smoke, and smoke from outdoor areas may drift through entrances, exposing people inside. Tobacco smoke has been linked to numerous health effects in non-smokers and there is no safe level of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure. This paper presents data on levels of tobacco smoke inside and outside entrances to office buildings.
Real-time air quality monitors were used to simultaneously measure respirable particulate matter (PM(2.5); air pollutant particles with a diameter of 2.5 µg or less) as a marker for tobacco smoke, outside and inside 28 entrances to office buildings in downtown Toronto, Ontario, in May and June 2008. Measurements were taken when smoking was and was not present within 9 m of entrances. Background levels of PM(2.5) were also measured for each session. A mixed model analysis was used to estimate levels of PM(2.5), taking into account repeated measurement errors.
Peak levels (10 s averages) of PM(2.5) were as high as 496 µg/m(3) when smoking was present. Mixed model analysis shows that the average outdoor PM(2.5) with smoking was significantly higher than the background level (p
PubMed ID
21177666 View in PubMed
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Health risk evaluation of nitrogen oxides. Exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222313
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1993;19 Suppl 2:14-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
M. Berglund
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1993;19 Suppl 2:14-20
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Humans
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Nitrogen Oxides - adverse effects - analysis
Sweden
PubMed ID
8209191 View in PubMed
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Atmospheric deposition of trace elements around point sources and human health risk assessment. II. Uptake of arsenic and chromium by vegetables grown near a wood preservation factory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223063
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1992 Sep 25;126(3):263-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-1992
Author
E H Larsen
L. Moseholm
M M Nielsen
Author Affiliation
National Food Agency of Denmark, Søborg.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1992 Sep 25;126(3):263-75
Date
Sep-25-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Arsenic - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Chromium - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Denmark
Eating
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Food contamination - analysis
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Models, Biological
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Vegetables - chemistry - metabolism
Wood
Abstract
Kale, lettuce, carrots and potatoes were grown in 20 experimental plots surrounding a wood preservation factory, to investigate the amount and pathways for plant uptake of arsenic and chromium. Arsenate used in the wood preservation process is converted to the more toxic arsenite by incineration of waste wood and is emitted into the atmosphere. Elevated concentrations of inorganic arsenic and chromium were found both in the test plants and in the soil around the factory. Multivariate statistical analysis of the results indicated that the dominating pathway of arsenic and chromium from the factory to the leafy vegetables grown nearby was by direct atmospheric deposition, while arsenic in the root crops originated from both the soil and the atmosphere. Consumption of vegetables grown near the source would result in an increased intake of inorganic arsenic, but the intake via the total diet was estimated to be below the provisional tolerable daily intake for inorganic arsenic established by FAO/WHO.
PubMed ID
1439755 View in PubMed
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Indoor measurements of the sum of the nitrate radical, NO3, and nitrogen pentoxide, N2O5 in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97636
Source
Chemosphere. 2010 May;79(8):898-904
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Jacob K Nøjgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Atmospheric Environment, National Environmental Research Institute, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark. jakn@dmu.dk
Source
Chemosphere. 2010 May;79(8):898-904
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Denmark
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Models, Chemical
Nitrates - analysis - chemistry
Nitrogen Oxides - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
There is a need for indoor measurements of nitrate radicals (NO(3)) and nitrogen pentoxide (N(2)O(5)) to better understand removal and transformation of volatile organic compounds in indoor environments, and to evaluate the possible health effects from exposure to nitrated reaction products. NO(3) and NO(2) react to form N(2)O(5) in the presence of a third molecule, and the fast equilibrium necessitates measurements of both NO(3) and N(2)O(5) in the evaluation of indoor NO(3) chemistry. The sum of these two species, NO(3)( *), was quantified in an office building in Denmark by measuring an oxidation product of the cyclohexene/NO(3) reaction in a flow-tube set-up. NO(3)( *) concentrations ranged from 1 to 58ppt, where N(2)O(5) was estimated to account for more than 68%. The concentrations of the precursors, NO(2) and O(3), and the photolysis of NO(3) were parameters, which clearly influenced NO(3)( *) apparent from the different precursor concentrations, lighting and daylight versus dark samples in this study. Also indoor air pollutants, in particular alkenes such as limonene and alpha-pinene, can significantly reduce NO(3)( *). These first indoor measurements of NO(3)( *), warrant further high time resolution measurements of NO(3), N(2)O(5), and organic nitrates indoors.
PubMed ID
20304460 View in PubMed
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Indoor environment in three North European cities in relationship to atopy and respiratory symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97660
Source
Clin Respir J. 2009 Apr;3(2):85-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
María Ingibjörg Gunnbjörnsdóttir
Dan Norbäck
Eythor Björnsson
Argo Soon
Deborah Jarvis
Rain Jõgi
David Gislason
Thorarinn Gislason
Christer Janson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences: Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. mariaig@landspitali.is
Source
Clin Respir J. 2009 Apr;3(2):85-94
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Analysis of Variance
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Estonia
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Iceland
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Probability
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Sweden
Urban Population
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) I, the lowest prevalence of asthma and atopy was found in Reykjavík (Iceland) and Tartu (Estonia). The aim of this study was to compare home environments in Reykjavík and Tartu to a town with a higher prevalence of asthma and atopy (Uppsala, Sweden) in an attempt to identify factors in the indoor environment that could explain these differences. METHOD: A random sample of 129 ECRHS II participants was included in this analysis at each of the three study centres. The subjects answered a questionnaire, blood was analysed for specific immunoglobulin E, a methacholine test was performed and home indoor measurements were taken. RESULTS: The prevalence of atopy was 11.9% in Reykjavík, 35.5% in Uppsala and 28.2% in Tartu (P
PubMed ID
20298383 View in PubMed
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Lung mineral fibers of former miners and millers from Thetford-Mines and asbestos regions: a comparative study of fiber concentration and dimension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195329
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2001 Jan-Feb;56(1):65-76
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Nayebzadeh
A. Dufresne
B. Case
H. Vali
A E Williams-Jones
R. Martin
C. Normand
J. Clark
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University Montreal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2001 Jan-Feb;56(1):65-76
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos, Amosite - adverse effects - analysis - classification
Asbestos, Amphibole - adverse effects - analysis - classification
Asbestos, Crocidolite - adverse effects - analysis - classification
Asbestosis - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Autopsy
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Epidemiological Monitoring
Extraction and Processing Industry
Humans
Incidence
Microscopy, Electron
Middle Aged
Mineral Fibers - adverse effects - analysis - classification
Mining
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Quebec - epidemiology
Spectrometry, X-Ray Emission
Abstract
Fiber dimension and concentration may vary substantially between two necropsy populations of former chrysotile miners and millers of Thetford-Mines and Asbestos regions. This possibility could explain, at least in part, the higher incidence of respiratory diseases among workers from Thetford-Mines than among workers from the Asbestos region. The authors used a transmission electron microscope, equipped with an x-ray energy-dispersive spectrometer, to analyze lung mineral fibers of 86 subjects from the two mining regions and to classify fiber sizes into three categories. The most consistent difference was the higher concentration of tremolite in lung tissues of workers from Thetford-Mines, compared with workers from the Asbestos region. Amosite and crocidolite were also detected in lung tissues of several workers from the Asbestos region. No consistent and biologically important difference was found for fiber dimension; therefore, fiber dimension does not seem to be a factor that accounts for the difference in incidence of respiratory diseases between the two groups. The greater incidence of respiratory diseases among workers of Thetford-Mines can be explained by the fact that they had greater exposure to fibers than did workers at the Asbestos region. Among the mineral fibers studied, retention of tremolite fibers was most apparent.
PubMed ID
11256859 View in PubMed
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Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2000 Oct;59(3-4):240-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
I. Espejord
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Regional Hospital in Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2000 Oct;59(3-4):240-5
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cold Climate
Environment, Controlled
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Heating
Housing
Humans
Norway
Ventilation
Abstract
From 1950 and until today, building technology has developed continuously, especially concerning insulation and sealing (2). Therefore the Norwegian houses of today resist cold and wind very well. But there are still factors that can provide thermal discomfort. Some of these factors can for instance be open indoor solutions, placement and number of windows and sources of heat, upgrading and maintenance of old houses. Important thermal parameters are draught and air velocity, vertical air temperature differences, asymmetry of thermal radiation, floor temperature and relative humidity (4).
PubMed ID
11209674 View in PubMed
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Integrated environmental impact assessment: a Canadian example.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184214
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 2003;81(6):434-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Roy E Kwiatkowski
Maria Ooi
Author Affiliation
Office of Environmental Health Assessment, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. roy_kwiatkowski@hs-sc.gc.ca
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 2003;81(6):434-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Environmental health
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Mining - economics
Risk assessment
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The Canadian federal process for environmental impact assessment (EIA) integrates health, social, and environmental aspects into either a screening, comprehensive study, or a review by a public panel, depending on the expected severity of potential adverse environmental effects. In this example, a Public Review Panel considered a proposed diamond mining project in Canada's northern territories, where 50% of the population are Aboriginals. The Panel specifically instructed the project proposer to determine how to incorporate traditional knowledge into the gathering of baseline information, preparing impact prediction, and planning mitigation and monitoring. Traditional knowledge is defined as the knowledge, innovations and practices of indigenous and/or local communities developed from experience gained over the centuries and adapted to local culture and environment. The mining company was asked to consider in its EIA: health, demographics, social and cultural patterns; services and infrastructure; local, regional and territorial economy; land and resource use; employment, education and training; government; and other matters. Cooperative efforts between government, industry and the community led to a project that coordinated the concerns of all interested stakeholders and the needs of present and future generations, thereby meeting the goals of sustainable development. The mitigation measures that were implemented take into account: income and social status, social support networks, education, employment and working conditions, physical environments, personal health practices and coping skills, and health services.
PubMed ID
12894328 View in PubMed
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[Medico-ecological monitoring of cardiovascular diseases in the urbanized north].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184232
Source
Kardiologiia. 2003;43(1):51-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
V A Karpin
Source
Kardiologiia. 2003;43(1):51-4
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Catchment Area (Health)
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Russia - epidemiology
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Urbanization
Abstract
Aim of the study was to elucidate relationship between complex effect on organism of unfavorable ecological factors of high altitudes and course of ischemic heart disease (IHD) and hypertensive disease in Surgut (Khanty-Mansi Autonomous District). Five year medico-ecological monitoring established direct relation between dynamics of average monthly hospital admissions of patients with IHD and hypertension, level of atmospheric pressure and concentration of phenol in the air. Complex of nature conservation measures resulted in decreases of frequency of hospitalizations as well as cardiovascular morbidity with temporary loss of working capacity.
PubMed ID
12891287 View in PubMed
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[Ecologic and epidemiologic studies in social and hygienic monitoring systems].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184376
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2003;(5):23-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003

Organochlorine-induced histopathology in kidney and liver tissue from Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93600
Source
Chemosphere. 2008 Apr;71(7):1214-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Sonne Christian
Wolkers Hans
Leifsson Pall S
Jenssen Bjørn Munro
Fuglei Eva
Ahlstrøm Oystein
Dietz Rune
Kirkegaard Maja
Muir Derek C G
Jørgensen Even
Author Affiliation
Section for Contaminants, Effects and Marine Mammals, Department of Arctic Environment, National Environmental Research Institute, University of Aarhus, Frederiksborgvej 399, PO Box 358, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark. csh@dmu.dk
Source
Chemosphere. 2008 Apr;71(7):1214-24
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed
Animals
Arctic Regions
Energy intake
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Food chain
Foxes - growth & development - metabolism
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - toxicity
Kidney - drug effects - pathology
Kidney Diseases - chemically induced - pathology
Liver - drug effects - pathology
Liver Diseases - chemically induced - pathology
Pesticides - toxicity
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - toxicity
Abstract
The effects of persistent organic pollutants on renal and liver morphology in farmed arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) were studied under experimental conditions. Control animals received a diet containing pork (Sus scrofa) fat with low amounts of persistent organic pollutants, while the diet of the exposed animals contained whale blubber, 'naturally' contaminated with persistent organic pollutants. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and organochlorine pesticide (OCP) concentrations in the whale blubber were 488 and 395 ng/g wet weight, respectively. Animals were sacrificed and sampled when they were at their fattest (winter) as well as their lowest body weight (summer). The results show that PCB and OCP exposure causes renal (and probably also liver) lesions in arctic foxes. The prevalence of glomerular, tubular and interstitial lesions was significantly highest in the exposed group (chi-square: all p0.05). The prevalence of lesions was not significantly different between lean (winter) and fat (summer) foxes for any of the lesions (chi-square: all p>0.05). We suggest that wild arctic foxes exposed to an environmental cocktail of persistent organic pollutants, such as PCBs and OCPs, in their natural diet are at risk for developing chronic kidney and liver damage. Whether such lesions may have an impact on age and health of the animals remains uncertain.
PubMed ID
18279914 View in PubMed
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Caffeine in wastewater is a tracer for human fecal contamination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126536
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Mar;120(3):A108-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Carol Potera
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Mar;120(3):A108-9
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caffeine - analysis - isolation & purification
Carbamazepine - analysis - isolation & purification
Enterobacteriaceae - isolation & purification - physiology
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Feces - chemistry - microbiology
Humans
Quebec
Water - chemistry
Water Microbiology
Water Pollution
Notes
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2011 Dec;119(12):A514-922133540
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Jun;115(6):856-6417589591
Cites: MMWR Surveill Summ. 2008 Sep 12;57(9):39-6218784643
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Jan;105(1):110-315635355
Cites: Chemosphere. 2012 Jan;86(2):118-2322075053
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2009 Mar;157(3):994-100219038482
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Feb;120(2):192-722030231
PubMed ID
22382130 View in PubMed
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Can persistent organic pollutants and plastic-associated chemicals cause cardiovascular disease?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126616
Source
J Intern Med. 2012 Jun;271(6):537-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
L. Lind
P M Lind
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. lars.lind@medsci.uu.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2012 Jun;271(6):537-53
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Atherosclerosis - chemically induced
Benzhydryl Compounds
Cardiovascular Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Coronary Disease - chemically induced
Diabetes Complications - chemically induced
Diabetes Mellitus - chemically induced
Dioxins - adverse effects
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Epidemiological Monitoring
Evidence-Based Medicine
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Humans
Peripheral Arterial Disease - chemically induced
Pesticides - adverse effects
Phenols - adverse effects
Plastics - adverse effects
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - adverse effects
Risk factors
Stroke - chemically induced
Sweden - epidemiology
World Health
Abstract
During the last decade, associations between persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins and pesticides, and cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and overt CV disease (CVD) have been reported in humans. Recently, associations between plastic-associated chemicals (PACs), such as bisphenol A and phthalates, and CVD have also begun to emerge. Several approaches to evaluating such associations have been used: accidents with a high level of exposure, occupational exposure studies, geographical studies of subjects living near a contaminated area and traditional case-control or cohort studies with measurements of circulating levels of different environmental contaminants in the general population. Exposure to POPs has consistently been associated with diabetes using all the approaches described above, including prospective studies. The evidence regarding associations between exposure to POPs and other CV risk factors, such as hypertension, obesity and lipids, is less strong and is mainly based on cross-sectional data. Associations between overt CVD and POPs have been reported using all the above approaches, but prospective data from population-based studies are still lacking to provide firm evidence of an important and independent role of POP exposure in the pathogenesis of CVD. Nevertheless, taken together, current evidence suggests that further longitudinal and experimental studies should be conducted to investigate the effect of exposure to both POPs and PACs, such as bisphenol A and phthalates.
PubMed ID
22372998 View in PubMed
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