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Multilevel analysis of childhood nonviral gastroenteritis associated with environmental risk factors in Quebec, 1999-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105912
Source
J Environ Health. 2013 Oct;76(3):34-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Henri Kaboré
Alexandre Lebel
Patrick Levallois
Pascal Michel
Pierre Payment
Pierre Déry
Germain Lebel
Author Affiliation
Institut national de santé publique du Quebec Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Université Laval.
Source
J Environ Health. 2013 Oct;76(3):34-45
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Infections - complications - transmission
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - microbiology - parasitology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Livestock - microbiology - parasitology
Multilevel Analysis
Parasitic Diseases - complications - transmission
Poisson Distribution
Population Density
Population Surveillance
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Water Microbiology
Water Resources - analysis
Zoonoses - microbiology - parasitology - transmission
Abstract
Childhood nonviral gastroenteritis is a priority for various public health authorities. Given that waterborne transmission is sometimes incriminated during investigation of gastroenteritis outbreaks, the authors hypothesized that watershed characteristics may influence the occurrence of this disease and could contribute additional insights for better prevention and control. The study described here aimed to investigate watershed characteristics in relation to nonviral gastroenteritis and specifically three bacterial and parasitic forms of childhood gastroenteritis to assess their relative importance in the province of Quebec, Canada. Information on children aged 0-4 years with bacterial or parasitic enteric infections reported through ongoing surveillance between 1999 and 2006 in the province of Quebec was collected. Factors measured at the municipal and watershed levels were analyzed using multilevel models with a Poisson distribution and log link function. Childhood nonviral gastroenteritis, giardiasis, and campylobacteriosis were positively associated with small ruminants and cattle density. Childhood salmonellosis was positively associated with cattle density. Also, childhood campylobacteriosis incidence was positively associated with larger watershed agricultural surface. In addition to local agroenvironmental factors, this analysis revealed an important watershed effect.
PubMed ID
24288849 View in PubMed
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Mortality related to air pollution with the moscow heat wave and wildfire of 2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258959
Source
Epidemiology. 2014 May;25(3):359-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Dmitry Shaposhnikov
Boris Revich
Tom Bellander
Getahun Bero Bedada
Matteo Bottai
Tatyana Kharkova
Ekaterina Kvasha
Elena Lezina
Tomas Lind
Eugenia Semutnikova
Göran Pershagen
Source
Epidemiology. 2014 May;25(3):359-64
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Cause of Death
Child
Disasters
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Extreme Heat - adverse effects
Female
Fires
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Moscow
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Urban Population
Young Adult
Abstract
Prolonged high temperatures and air pollution from wildfires often occur together, and the two may interact in their effects on mortality. However, there are few data on such possible interactions.
We analyzed day-to-day variations in the number of deaths in Moscow, Russia, in relation to air pollution levels and temperature during the disastrous heat wave and wildfire of 2010. Corresponding data for the period 2006-2009 were used for comparison. Daily average levels of PM10 and ozone were obtained from several continuous measurement stations. The daily number of nonaccidental deaths from specific causes was extracted from official records. Analyses of interactions considered the main effect of temperature as well as the added effect of prolonged high temperatures and the interaction with PM10.
The major heat wave lasted for 44 days, with 24-hour average temperatures ranging from 24°C to 31°C and PM10 levels exceeding 300 µg/m on several days. There were close to 11,000 excess deaths from nonaccidental causes during this period, mainly among those older than 65 years. Increased risks also occurred in younger age groups. The most pronounced effects were for deaths from cardiovascular, respiratory, genitourinary, and nervous system diseases. Continuously increasing risks following prolonged high temperatures were apparent during the first 2 weeks of the heat wave. Interactions between high temperatures and air pollution from wildfires in excess of an additive effect contributed to more than 2000 deaths.
Interactions between high temperatures and wildfire air pollution should be considered in risk assessments regarding health consequences of climate change.
Notes
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Comment In: Epidemiology. 2014 May;25(3):365-724713879
PubMed ID
24598414 View in PubMed
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Acute illness associated with use of pest strips - seven U.S. States and Canada, 2000-2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105281
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2014 Jan 17;63(2):42-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-17-2014
Author
Rebecca J Tsai
Jennifer Sievert
Joanne Prado
Kaci Buhl
Dave L Stone
Mathias Forrester
Shelia Higgins
Yvette Mitchell
Abby Schwartz
Geoffrey M Calvert
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2014 Jan 17;63(2):42-3
Date
Jan-17-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Dichlorvos - toxicity
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Insect Control - methods
Insecticides - toxicity
Male
Middle Aged
Product Labeling
United States - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Dichlorvos-impregnated resin strips (DDVP pest strips) are among the few organophosphate products still available for indoor residential use. The residential uses for most other organophosphate products, including most DDVP products, were canceled because they posed unreasonable risks to children. DDVP pest strips act by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain and nerves of insect pests and are designed to gradually release DDVP vapor for up to 4 months. Acute illnesses in humans associated with nonlethal acute exposures usually resolve completely, but recovery is not always rapid. To assess the frequency of acute illnesses associated with DDVP pest strips, cases from 2000 through June 2013 were sought from the 12 states that participate in the Sentinel Event Notification System for Occupational Risks (SENSOR)-Pesticides Program, the National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC), and Health Canada.* A total of 31 acute DDVP pest strip-related illness cases were identified in seven U.S. states and Canada. The majority of these illnesses resulted from use of the product in commonly occupied living areas (e.g., kitchens and bedrooms), in violation of label directions. Although 26 of the 31 cases involved mild health effects of short duration, five persons had moderate health effects. Illnesses caused by excess exposure to DDVP pest strips can be reduced by educating the public about the proper usage of DDVP pest strips and with improvements in label directions.
PubMed ID
24430101 View in PubMed
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Maternal concentrations of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and duration of breastfeeding.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145086
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2010 Sep;36(5):413-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Chunyuan Fei
Joseph K McLaughlin
Loren Lipworth
Jørn Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, UCLA, Box 951772, 650 Charles E Young Drive South, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1772, USA. cfei@ucla.edu
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2010 Sep;36(5):413-21
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alkanesulfonic Acids - blood - toxicity
Breast Feeding
Caprylates - blood - toxicity
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Confidence Intervals
Denmark
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Fluorocarbons - blood - toxicity
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Logistic Models
Mass Spectrometry
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Maternal Welfare
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Proportional Hazards Models
Statistics as Topic
Time Factors
Abstract
Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) has been associated with impaired lactation in mice. We examined whether maternal perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and PFOA concentrations correlated with duration of breastfeeding among women.
We randomly selected 1400 pregnant women from the Danish national birth cohort (1996-2002) and measured PFOS and PFOA concentrations in early pregnancy by using high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Self-reported data on the duration of any and exclusive breastfeeding were collected twice during telephone interviews around 6 and 18 months after the birth of the child.
The duration of breastfeeding decreased with increasing concentrations of pregnancy PFOS and PFOA among multiparous women, for whom the adjusted odds ratios (OR) for weaning before 6 months of age were 1.20 (95% CI 1.06-1.37) per 10 ng/ml increase in PFOS concentrations and 1.23 (95% CI 1.13-1.33) per 1 ng/ml increase in PFOA concentrations. No consistent association was found for primiparous women.
These findings suggest that PFOA and PFOS may reduce the ability to lactate, but could equally reflect reverse causation since no association was seen in primiparous women.
PubMed ID
20200757 View in PubMed
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[The health status of the rural population living in the areas contiguous with industrial towns].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168567
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 May-Jun;(3):19-23
Publication Type
Article
Author
A Ia Sharafutdinov
Z S Khakimova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 May-Jun;(3):19-23
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Illness - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Retrospective Studies
Rural Population
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Exposed to environmental pollution with emissions from industrial enterprises, the population of their contiguous rural areas faces a high risk of their health. The studies of the health status of the population from the contiguous rural areas versus that from the non-contiguous ones have established that measurements of a risk to the children's health revealed the highest risk among the contiguous areas in the Sterlitamaksky district and the least risk among the non-contiguous ones in the Askinsky district. The markers of carcinogenic ill-being in the contiguous rural areas were the incidence of cancer of the lip, esophagus, stomach, larynx, cervix uteri, uterine appendages, and prostate and leukemia. The high risk of cancer of the lip and esophagus in the control area and in other non-contiguous rural areas may be accounted for by the bad life-style in villagers, alcohol abuse, and smoking.
PubMed ID
16808397 View in PubMed
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Dietary intake of organotin compounds in Finland: a market-basket study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168585
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2006 Aug;23(8):749-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Panu Rantakokko
Tiina Kuningas
Katri Saastamoinen
Terttu Vartiainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health, National Public Health Institute, P.O. Box 95, FI-70701, Kuopio, Finland. panu.rantakokko@ktl.fi
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2006 Aug;23(8):749-56
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Diet
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Pollutants - administration & dosage
Finland
Fishes
Food contamination - analysis
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry - methods
Humans
Organotin Compounds - administration & dosage - analysis
Abstract
The objective of this study was to estimate the intake of organic tin compounds from foodstuffs in a Finnish market basket. The study was conducted by collecting 13 market baskets from supermarkets and market places in the city of Kuopio, eastern Finland. Altogether 115 different food items were bought. In each basket, foodstuffs were mixed in proportion to their consumption and analysed by GC/MS for seven organic tin compounds (mono-, di-, and tributyltin, mono-, di-, and triphenyltin, and dioctyltin). Organotin compounds were detected in only four baskets, with the fish basket containing the largest number of different organotins. The European Food Safety Authority has established a tolerable daily intake of 250 ng kg(-1) body weight for the sum of dibutyltin, tributyltin, triphenyltin and dioctyltin. According to this study, the daily intake of these compounds was 2.47 ng kg(-1) body weight, of which 81% originated from the fish basket. This exposure is only 1% of the tolerable daily intake and poses negligible risk to the average consumer. However, for consumers eating large quantities of fish from contaminated areas, the intake may be much higher.
PubMed ID
16807202 View in PubMed
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[The rehabilitation of children with chronic pyelonephritis and who have lived for a long time under radiation-hazard conditions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35965
Source
Lik Sprava. 1994 Jan;(1):27-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1994
Author
I T Shimonko
O V Grebeniuk
Source
Lik Sprava. 1994 Jan;(1):27-31
Date
Jan-1994
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Air Pollution, Radioactive - adverse effects
Child
Chronic Disease
Combined Modality Therapy
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Health Resorts
Humans
Physical Therapy Modalities - methods
Pyelonephritis - physiopathology - rehabilitation - urine
Time Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
Isolated and complex effects of environmental factors on adaptation abilities of the body, function of different organs and systems, composition of peripheral blood and course of disease were studies in 245 children aging from 6 to 14 years with remitted chronic pyelonephritis with normal renal function. Mineral water "Naftusia" (100-200 ml a day), lumbar applications of ozocerite, mineral baths and exercise therapy were used. Our findings give a reason to consider sanatory rehabilitation a promising method of health promotion and correction of functional disorders.
PubMed ID
8067009 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The status of the selection and sanatorium-health resort treatment of children from areas of radionuclide pollution]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36207
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 1993 Jul-Aug;(4):45-8
Publication Type
Article

Personal monitoring of lead and cadmium exposure--a Swedish study with special reference to methodological aspects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226864
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1991 Feb;17(1):65-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1991
Author
M. Vahter
M. Berglund
B. Lind
L. Jorhem
S. Slorach
L. Friberg
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1991 Feb;17(1):65-74
Date
Feb-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Cadmium - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Feces
Female
Food Analysis - methods
Humans
Lead - adverse effects - analysis
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Methods for determining personal exposure to lead and cadmium were tested in Stockholm in 1988. Lead and cadmium in breathing-zone air, 24-h duplicate diets, and feces of 15 nonsmoking women (27-46 years of age) were studied. Blood was collected at the beginning of and immediately after the test period (seven consecutive days). An extensive quality assurance program was included. Most technical problems were encountered in the 24-h collection of airborne particles. The pumps were noisy, and the batteries had to be recharged every 6-8 h. The lead and cadmium levels in feces were found to be useful indicators of the total ingested amounts of these metals. Because of the large day-to-day variation in the dietary intake of lead and cadmium, the sampling period for duplicate diets and feces should be at least 5-6 d.
PubMed ID
2047809 View in PubMed
Less detail

Increasing use of pyrethroids in Canadian households: should we be concerned?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114433
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Nov-Dec;103(6):e404-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Erna C van Balen
Marcelo J Wolansky
Tom Kosatsky
Author Affiliation
National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health, Vancouver, BC. e.vanbalen@gmail.com
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Nov-Dec;103(6):e404-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Housing
Humans
Insecticides - toxicity
Pest Control - methods
Public Health
Pyrethrins - toxicity
Risk assessment
Abstract
Pyrethroids are a class of plant-derived insecticides and their man-made analogues that are increasingly applied in Canada as first choice for pest control in many agricultural and residential settings. Their popularity is partly due to their alleged safety compared to the older organochlorine and organophosphate insecticides. Application of pyrethroids is expanding because of recent increases in the level of pest infestations--such as bed bugs--and the decreased susceptibility of target species to many pest control products. Pyrethroid residues have been documented in homes, child care centres and food. While pyrethroids are considered of low health risk for humans, their increased use is of concern. Our current understanding of the adverse effects of pyrethroids derives mainly from studies of short-term effects in laboratory animals, case reports of self- and accidental poisonings, and high-dose occupational exposures, for which the levels and formulations of pyrethroid products differ from those relevant for long-term exposure in the general population. The available data suggest that the reproductive and nervous systems, endocrine signalling pathways, and early childhood development may be targets for adverse effects in the case of repeated exposure to pyrethroid formulations. Given uncertainty about the existence of long-term health effects of exposure to pyrethroids, particularly under realistic scenarios, we should be cautious when promoting pyrethroid products as safe methods for pest control.
PubMed ID
23618016 View in PubMed
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Quality of indoor residential air and health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156165
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Jul 15;179(2):147-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2008
Author
Robert Dales
Ling Liu
Amanda J Wheeler
Nicolas L Gilbert
Author Affiliation
The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON. R_Dales@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Jul 15;179(2):147-52
Date
Jul-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - adverse effects
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis
Allergens - adverse effects
Carcinogens, Environmental - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Humans
Lung Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
North America
Ontario
Radon - adverse effects
Risk assessment
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
About 90% of our time is spent indoors where we are exposed to chemical and biological contaminants and possibly to carcinogens. These agents may influence the risk of developing nonspecific respiratory and neurologic symptoms, allergies, asthma and lung cancer. We review the sources, health effects and control strategies for several of these agents. There are conflicting data about indoor allergens. Early exposure may increase or may decrease the risk of future sensitization. Reports of indoor moulds or dampness or both are consistently associated with increased respiratory symptoms but causality has not been established. After cigarette smoking, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and radon are the most common causes of lung cancer. Homeowners can improve the air quality in their homes, often with relatively simple measures, which should provide health benefits.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18625986 View in PubMed
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[Determinants of morbidity in the areas situated along the Techa and Iset Rivers].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156411
Source
Gig Sanit. 2008 May-Jun;(3):8-11
Publication Type
Article
Author
L G Konyshina
V N Shershnev
N V Konovalova
A V Evdokimov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2008 May-Jun;(3):8-11
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health)
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Illness - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Hazardous Substances
Humans
Risk factors
Rivers - chemistry - microbiology
Russia - epidemiology
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Due to the massive pollution of the Techa-Iset river system with the radioactive sewage of the Mayak industrial association in the 1950s, the factors responsible for the incidence of diseases were studied in 5 districts of the Kurgan Region along the territory of which rivers flow. There is a direct relationship of children's morbidity to ambient air pollution. The determinants of adult morbidity are air pollution and water quality. There is an inverse correlation of morbidity with the provision with therapists and with the economic indices of districts. The prevalence of some types of diseases, such as those of the endocrine and respiratory systems, ulcer disease correlates with the ranking position of a district in the level of pollution in the Techa and Iset Rivers.
PubMed ID
18590140 View in PubMed
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[Meta-analysis of association between pentachlorophenol exposure and cancer risk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156427
Source
Wei Sheng Yan Jiu. 2008 Mar;37(2):151-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Weiwei Zheng
Ying Zhou
Weidong Qu
Hao Zhang
et al
Author Affiliation
Key Laboratory of the Public Health and Safety, Ministry of Education, Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China.
Source
Wei Sheng Yan Jiu. 2008 Mar;37(2):151-4
Date
Mar-2008
Language
Chinese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Pentachlorophenol - toxicity
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The epidemiological data based on the exposure of pentachlorophenol (PCP) and cancer incidence and mortality were analyzed to study the relationship between PCP exposure and cancer risk.
According to the online search of relevant literatures, Poisson regression was used to analyze mortality rates for major cancer sites and fixed-effect model was employed to assess cancer SMR. The dose-response relationship between PCP exposure and cancer risk was also analyzed.
Major cancer mortality rates of exposure populations researched in American and Canadian studies were approximate to or lower than national male cancer mortality rates respectively. The incidence rate of colorectal cancer in occupational exposure population was over 16.4 times in comparison with the population exposed from to drinking water and food. The pooled SMR value of kidney cancer was 1.34 (95% CI 1.02-1.77). The pooled RR for major cancer mortality increased with the rise of PCP exposure level.
A potential dose-response relationship between PCP exposure and cancer risk could exist. In comparison with to the population to exposed from the drinking water and food, the risk of colorectal cancer in occupational exposure population was higher. PCP may be one of the risk factors of the kidney cancer in occupational exposure population.
PubMed ID
18589595 View in PubMed
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Pre- and post-conception pesticide exposure and the risk of birth defects in an Ontario farm population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156439
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 2008 Aug;25(4):472-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Mandy Weselak
Tye E Arbuckle
Donald T Wigle
Mark C Walker
Daniel Krewski
Author Affiliation
R. Samuel McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, Canada. mandy_weselak@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 2008 Aug;25(4):472-80
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agriculture
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology
Dicamba - toxicity
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Pesticides - toxicity
Pregnancy
Risk
Triazines - toxicity
Young Adult
Abstract
The use of pesticides has enhanced the health and economies of nations around the world by improving crop production. However, pesticides may pose health risks, particularly to the fetus and young children. In a secondary analysis of the Ontario Farm Family Health Study, we explored the relationship between birth defects and parental pesticide exposure during the 3 months prior to conception and the first trimester of pregnancy. A total of 3412 pregnancies were included in the study. Logistic regression fit by maximum likelihood was used in the analysis. The results showed that pre-conception exposure to both cyanazine (odds ratio=4.99, 95% confidence interval: 1.63-15.27) and dicamba (OR=2.42, 95% CI: 1.06-5.53) were associated with increased risk of birth defects in male offspring. Nevertheless, given the self-reported nature of the exposure and outcomes in this study, the present findings should be considered primarily as hypothesis generating, requiring verification in subsequent investigations.
PubMed ID
18586452 View in PubMed
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[Influence of poor factors of airports on human health].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156980
Source
Gig Sanit. 2008 Mar-Apr;(2):50-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
E I Pochekaeva
Source
Gig Sanit. 2008 Mar-Apr;(2):50-2
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Aircraft
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Illness - epidemiology - etiology
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Hygiene
Morbidity - trends
Noise, Transportation - adverse effects
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The hygienic study conducted in Rostov-on-Don has shown that air transport and airports are important sources of physical and chemical pollution of the environment. Human health examinations served to illustrate the adverse impact of airports on the environmental and hygienic living conditions of the population. The performed studies provided the basis for purpose-oriented program to enhance the environment and to reduce morbidity rates in accordance with the National Environmental Hygiene Program. The developed algorithm of the assessment and reduction of a risk for diseases under the influence of poor factors associated with the activities of airports is designed to provide the authorities and concerned organizations with information, to make managerial decisions, and to work out health-improving measures.
PubMed ID
18509916 View in PubMed
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[Adolescents' physical development in a poor environmental area].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156996
Source
Gig Sanit. 2008 Mar-Apr;(2):89-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
A N Uzunova
I P Tsvetova
S V Neriakhina
O V Lopatina
M L Zaitseva
A G Ural'shin
Source
Gig Sanit. 2008 Mar-Apr;(2):89-91
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development - physiology
Child
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental health
Environmental Illness - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Male
Morbidity - trends
Russia - epidemiology
Sexual Development - physiology
Abstract
Physical and sexual developments were determined in 285 schoolchildren aged 12 to 17 years from the town of Karabash, an area of ecological ill-being in the environmental levels of heavy metal salts. The atmospheric air pollution was in parallel monitored at route observational stations. It was found that 39% of the schoolchildren had disharmonic physical development; of them a fourth had lower body weight and decreased chest circumference with normal growth indices. The girls were observed to have a high frequency of a microsomatotype of harmonic physical development and disharmonic physical development mainly at the expense of underweight (52.9% of all the disharmonically developed girls) as compared with the boys. There was a preponderance of female adolescents with sexual retardation. In the population of Karabash girls, the mean age at menarche was 12 years and 9 months +/- 1.5 months.
PubMed ID
18507177 View in PubMed
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[Development of an extended immunological system parameters for assessment influence of environmental factors on the population's health status].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144358
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Jan-Feb;(1):11-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
A K Makovetskaia
V N Fedoseeva
O V Mislavskii
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Jan-Feb;(1):11-2
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cytokines - blood - immunology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Health status
Humans
Hypersensitivity - blood - epidemiology - immunology
Immune System - metabolism
Immunoglobulin E - blood - immunology
Moscow - epidemiology
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Urban Population
Abstract
The immune status of Moscow dwellers was studied. The findings indicate the criterion significance of immunological and allergological parameters in the estimation of a risk of allergic diseases under the influence of poor environmental factors influence. Hyperactivity in individuals with high immunoglobulin class E levels to environmental factors is suggested by the elevated concentrations of serum specific IgE to intrahouse factors that in combination with the increased levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines (interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha) and the suppressed production interleukin-4 are criteria for the early manifestations of allergy.
PubMed ID
20376931 View in PubMed
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Methylmercury blood guidance values for Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144477
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 Jan-Feb;101(1):28-31
Publication Type
Article
Author
Melissa Legrand
Mark Feeley
Constantine Tikhonov
Deborah Schoen
Angela Li-Muller
Author Affiliation
Healthy Environment and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON. melissa.legrand@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 Jan-Feb;101(1):28-31
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Canada
Child
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Mammals
Methylmercury Compounds - blood - toxicity
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Public Health
Reference Values
Risk assessment
Seafood - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) from fish and marine mammal consumption continues to present a public health concern. To date, developmental neurotoxicity is the most sensitive health outcome, forming the basis for health-risk assessments and the derivation of biomonitoring guidance values. This article summarizes existing Health Canada MeHg blood guidance values for general population and expands them to include a harmonized provisional interim blood guidance value of 8 microg/L based on the existing provisional Tolerable Daily Intake for children, pregnant women and women of childbearing age. Associated public health actions, according to age, sex, and level of exposure are recommended.
PubMed ID
20364534 View in PubMed
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Hand cold recovery responses before and after 15 months of military training in a cold climate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92075
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2008 Sep;79(9):904-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Brändström Helge
Grip Helena
Hallberg Per
Grönlund Christer
Angquist Karl-Axel
Giesbrecht Gordon G
Author Affiliation
University Hospital of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden. helge.brandstrom@vll.se
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2008 Sep;79(9):904-8
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization - physiology
Adaptation, Physiological
Adult
Body Temperature Regulation
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Military Medicine
Military Personnel
Pilot Projects
Time Factors
Vasoconstriction - physiology
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The ability of fingers to rapidly rewarm following cold exposure is a possible indicator of cold injury protection. We categorized the post-cooling hand-rewarming responses of men before and after participation in 15 mo of military training in a cold environment in northern Sweden to determine: 1) if the initial rewarming category was related to the occurrence of local cold injury during training; and 2) if cold training affected subsequent hand-rewarming responses. METHODS: Immersion of the dominant hand in 10 degrees C water for 10 min was performed pre-training on 77 men. Of those, 45 were available for successful post-training retests. Infrared thermography monitored the dorsal hand during 30 min of recovery. Rewarming was categorized as normal, moderate, or slow based on mean fingertip temperature at the end of 30 min of recovery (TFinger,30) and the percentage of time that fingertips were vasodilated (%VD). RESULTS: Cold injury occurrence during training was disproportionately higher in the slow rewarmers (four of the five injuries). Post-training, baseline fingertip temperatures and cold recovery variables increased significantly in moderate and slow rewarmers: TFinger30 increased from 21.9 +/- 4 to 30.4 +/- 6 degrees C (Moderate), and from 17.4 +/- 0 to 22.3 +/- 7 degrees C (Slow); %VD increased from 27.5 +/- 16 to 65.9 +/- 34% (Moderate), and from 0.7 +/- 2 to 31.7 +/- 44% (Slow). CONCLUSIONS: Results of the cold recovery test were related to the occurrence of local cold injury during long-term cold-weather training. Cold training itself improved baseline and cold recovery in moderate and slow rewarmers.
PubMed ID
18785360 View in PubMed
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