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Genetic susceptibility to burnout in a Swedish twin cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126454
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2012 Mar;27(3):225-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Victoria Blom
Gunnar Bergström
Lennart Hallsten
Lennart Bodin
Pia Svedberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2012 Mar;27(3):225-31
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burnout, Professional - genetics
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Health Surveys
Heredity
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Genetic
Models, Statistical
Questionnaires
Registries
Sweden
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics - psychology
Abstract
Most previous studies of burnout have focused on work environmental stressors, while familial factors so far mainly have been overlooked. The aim of the study was to estimate the relative importance of genetic influences on burnout (measured with Pines Burnout Measure) in a sample of monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) Swedish twins. The study sample consisted of 20,286 individuals, born 1959-1986 from the Swedish twin registry who participated in the cross-sectional study of twin adults: genes and environment. Probandwise concordance rates (the risk for one twin to be affected given that his/her twin partner is affected by burnout) and within pair correlations were calculated for MZ and DZ same--and opposite sexed twin pairs. Heritability coefficients i.e. the proportion of the total variance attributable to genetic factors were calculated using standard biometrical model fitting procedures. The results showed that genetic factors explained 33% of the individual differences in burnout symptoms in women and men. Environmental factors explained a substantial part of the variation as well and are thus important to address in rehabilitation and prevention efforts to combat burnout.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22388765 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mercury in serum predicts low risk of death and myocardial infarction in Gothenburg women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126836
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Jan;86(1):71-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Ingvar A Bergdahl
Margareta Ahlqwist
Lars Barregard
Cecilia Björkelund
Ann Blomstrand
Staffan Skerfving
Valter Sundh
Maria Wennberg
Lauren Lissner
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, SE 90185 Umeå, Sweden. Ingvar.Bergdahl@envmed.umu.se
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Jan;86(1):71-7
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Mercury - blood
Myocardial Infarction - blood - mortality
Risk factors
Stroke - blood - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Markers of mercury (Hg) exposure have shown both positive and negative associations with cardiovascular disease (CVD). We assessed the association between serum Hg (S-Hg) and risk of cardiovascular disease in a prospective population-based cohort, with attention to the roles of dental health and fish consumption.
Total mortality, as well as morbidity and mortality from acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke, was followed up for 32 years in 1,391 women (initially age 38-60), in relation to S-Hg at baseline, using Cox regression models. Potential confounders (age, socioeconomic status, serum lipids, alcohol consumption, dental health, smoking, hypertension, waist-hip ratio, and diabetes) and other covariates (e.g., fish consumption) were also considered.
Hazard ratios (HR) adjusted only for age showed strong inverse associations between baseline S-Hg and total mortality [highest quartile: hazard ratio (HR) 0.76; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.59-0.97], incident AMI (HR 0.56; CI 0.34-0.93), and fatal AMI (HR 0.31; CI 0.15-0.66). Adjustment for potential confounding factors, especially dental health, had a strong impact on the risk estimates, and after adjustment, only the reduced risk of fatal AMI remained statistically significant.
There was a strong inverse association between Hg exposure and CVD. Likely, reasons are confounding with good dental health (also correlated with the number of amalgam fillings in these age groups) and/or fish consumption. The results suggest potential effects of dental health and/or fish consumption on CVD that deserve attention in preventive medicine.
PubMed ID
22350276 View in PubMed
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Genetic and environmental influences underlying externalizing behaviors, cigarette smoking and illicit drug use across adolescence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126838
Source
Behav Genet. 2012 Jul;42(4):614-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Tellervo Korhonen
Antti Latvala
Danielle M Dick
Lea Pulkkinen
Richard J Rose
Jaakko Kaprio
Anja C Huizink
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. tellervo.korhonen@helsinki.fi
Source
Behav Genet. 2012 Jul;42(4):614-25
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Child
Cohort Studies
Environment
Female
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Models, Genetic
Prospective Studies
Smoking - genetics - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - genetics - psychology
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics - psychology
Abstract
We investigated genetic and environmental influences common to adolescent externalizing behavior (at age 12), smoking (at age 14) and initiation of drug use (at age 17) using the FinnTwin12 cohort data. Multivariate Cholesky models were fit to data from 737 monozygotic and 722 dizygotic twin pairs. Heritability of externalizing behavior was 56%, that of smoking initiation/amount 20/32%, and initiation of drug use 27%. In the best-fitting model common environmental influences explained most of the covariance between externalizing behavior and smoking initiation (69%) and amount (77%). Covariance between smoking initiation/amount and drug use was due to additive genetic (42/22%) and common environmental (58/78%) influences. Half of the covariance between externalizing behavior and drug use was due to shared genetic and half due to the environments shared by co-twins. Using a longitudinal, prospective design, our results indicate that early observed externalizing behavior provides significant underlying genetic and environmental influences common to later substance use, here manifested as initiation of drug use in late adolescence.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22350186 View in PubMed
Less detail

Functional outcomes of nursing home residents in relation to features of the environment: validity of the Professional Environmental Assessment Protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127078
Source
J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2012 Jun;13(5):487.e1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Susan E Slaughter
Debra G Morgan
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. susan.slaughter@ualberta.ca
Source
J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2012 Jun;13(5):487.e1-7
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Cohort Studies
Dementia
Eating
Environment Design
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Nursing Homes
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics
Walking
Abstract
The aim of this article was to examine associations between specific dimensions of nursing home environments and the functional ability (walking and eating) of residents with dementia, and to contribute to the ongoing psychometric development of the Professional Environmental Assessment Protocol (PEAP).
One-year prospective cohort study.
Fifteen nursing homes in a western Canadian province.
Convenience sample of 120 nursing home residents with middle-stage dementia.
Every 2 weeks we observed residents' abilities to walk to the dining room and to feed themselves. At the end of a year of observation and immediately following a brief interview with the unit managers, we used the PEAP to measure the extent to which 9 specific dimensions of nursing home environments support the ability of residents with dementia to walk and to eat. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the effect of specific environmental features on residents' walking and eating disability.
"Support of functional ability" was associated with a reduced hazard of both walking and eating disability. The environmental dimensions of "maximizing awareness and orientation" and better "quality of stimulation" were associated specifically with reduced hazard of walking disability, whereas the dimensions of the nursing home environment specifically associated with a reduced hazard of eating disability included improved "safety and security," "opportunities for personal control," and "regulation of stimulation." The Cox proportional hazards models using the 13-point PEAP scale were not significantly different from nested models using the 5-point PEAP scale, indicating that the 2 scales did not differ in their ability to discriminate between more and less supportive environments for residents with dementia.
Specific dimensions of the nursing home environment reduced the hazard of walking disability, whereas others reduced the hazard of eating disability. Modifying specific features of nursing home environments may reduce disability in nursing home residents with dementia. The 5-point PEAP scale is able to discriminate between nursing home environments as well as the 13-point scale.
PubMed ID
22326948 View in PubMed
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Associations between brominated flame retardants in human milk and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in neonates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134309
Source
Environ Res. 2011 Aug;111(6):737-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Merete Eggesbø
Cathrine Thomsen
Jens V Jørgensen
Georg Becher
Jon Øyvind Odland
Matthew P Longnecker
Author Affiliation
Department of Genes and Environment, Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo, Norway. merete.eggesbo@fhi.no
Source
Environ Res. 2011 Aug;111(6):737-43
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Flame Retardants - analysis
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - analysis
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Exposure
Milk, human - chemistry
Norway - epidemiology
Thyrotropin - blood - drug effects
Abstract
Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have been in widespread use in a vast array of consumer products since the 1970s. The metabolites of some BFRs show a structural similarity to thyroid hormones and experimental animal studies have confirmed that they may interfere with thyroid hormone homeostasis. A major concern has been whether intrauterine exposure to BFRs may disturb thyroid homeostasis since the fetal brain is particularly susceptible to alterations in thyroid hormones. However, few reports on newborns have been published to date.
To evaluate the association between BFRs and neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH).
We studied six polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) measured in milk samples from 239 women who were part of the "Norwegian Human Milk Study" (HUMIS), 2003-2006. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and BDE-209 were measured in a subset of the women (193 and 46 milk samples, respectively). The milk was sampled at a median of 33 days after delivery. TSH was measured in babies three days after delivery as part of the routine national screening program for early detection of congenital hypothyroidism. Additional information was obtained through the Medical Birth Registry and questionnaires to the mothers.
The PBDE concentrations in human milk in Norway were comparable to concentrations reported from other European countries and Asia, but not the US and Canada where levels are approximately one order of higher magnitude. We observed no statistically significant associations between BDE-47, 99, 153, 154, 209 and HBCD in human milk and TSH in models adjusted for possible confounders and other environmental toxicants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).
We did not observe an association between TSH and exposure to HBCD and PBDEs within the exposure levels observed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21601188 View in PubMed
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Farming environment and prevalence of atopy at age 31: prospective birth cohort study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134479
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2011 Jul;41(7):987-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
J. Lampi
D. Canoy
D. Jarvis
A-L Hartikainen
L. Keski-Nisula
M-R Järvelin
J. Pekkanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Kuopio, Finland. jussi.lampi@thl.fi
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2011 Jul;41(7):987-93
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agriculture
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Animals, Domestic - immunology
Asthma - epidemiology
Cats
Cohort Studies
Conjunctivitis, Allergic - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dogs
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Rhinitis - epidemiology
Skin Tests
Abstract
Cross-sectional studies have shown an association between the farming environment and a decreased risk of atopic sensitization, mainly related to contact with farm animals in the childhood.
Investigate the association of a farming environment, especially farm animal contact, during infancy, with atopic sensitization and allergic diseases at the age of 31.
In a prospective birth cohort study, 5509 subjects born in northern Finland in 1966 were followed up at the age of 31. Prenatal exposure to the farming environment was documented before or at birth. At age 31, information on health status and childhood exposure to pets was collected by a questionnaire and skin prick tests were performed.
Being born to a family having farm animals decreased the risk of atopic sensitization [odds ratio (OR) 0.67; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.56-0.80], atopic eczema ever (OR 0.77; 95% CI 0.66-0.91), doctor-diagnosed asthma ever (OR 0.74; 95% CI 0.55-1.00), allergic rhinitis at age 31 (OR 0.87; 95% CI 0.73-1.03) and allergic conjunctivitis (OR 0.86; 95% CI 0.72-1.02) at age 31. There was a suggestion that the reduced risk of allergic sensitization was particularly evident among the subjects whose mothers worked with farm animals during pregnancy, and that the reduced risk of the above diseases by farm animal exposure was largely explained by the reduced risk of atopy. Having cats and dogs in childhood revealed similar associations as farm animals with atopic sensitization.
Contact with farm animals in early childhood reduces the risk of atopic sensitization, doctor-diagnosed asthma and allergic diseases at age 31.
PubMed ID
21575087 View in PubMed
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Prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins is associated with increased risk of wheeze and infections in infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134515
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2011 Aug;49(8):1843-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Solvor Berntsen Stølevik
Unni Cecilie Nygaard
Ellen Namork
Margaretha Haugen
Helen Engelstad Kvalem
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Jan Alexander
Joost H M van Delft
Henk van Loveren
Martinus Løvik
Berit Granum
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, NO-0403 Oslo, Norway. solvor.berntsen@fhi.no
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2011 Aug;49(8):1843-8
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - toxicity
Adult
Cohort Studies
Dioxins - toxicity
Eating
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Female
Humans
Infant
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - toxicity
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Questionnaires
Respiratory Sounds - physiopathology
Respiratory Tract Infections - chemically induced
Risk factors
Abstract
The birth cohort BraMat (n = 205; a sub-cohort of the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health) was established to study whether prenatal exposure to toxicants from the maternal diet affects immunological health outcomes in children. We here report on the environmental pollutants polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dioxins, as well as acrylamide generated in food during heat treatment. The frequency of common infections, eczema or itchiness, and periods of more than 10 days of dry cough, chest tightness or wheeze (called wheeze) in the children during the first year of life was assessed by questionnaire data (n = 195). Prenatal dietary exposure to the toxicants was estimated using a validated food frequency questionnaire from MoBa. Prenatal exposure to PCBs and dioxins was found to be associated with increased risk of wheeze and exanthema subitum, and also with increased frequency of upper respiratory tract infections. We found no associations between prenatal exposure to acrylamide and the health outcomes investigated. Our results suggest that prenatal dietary exposure to dioxins and PCBs may increase the risk of wheeze and infectious diseases during the first year of life.
PubMed ID
21571030 View in PubMed
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Association between parental history of diabetes and type 2 diabetes genetic risk scores in the PPP-Botnia and Framingham Offspring Studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134523
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2011 Aug;93(2):e76-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Jason L Vassy
Peter Shrader
Anna Jonsson
Caroline S Fox
Valeriya Lyssenko
Bo Isomaa
Leif Groop
James B Meigs
Paul W Franks
Author Affiliation
General Medicine Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2011 Aug;93(2):e76-9
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - etiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Life Style
Medical History Taking
Middle Aged
Parents
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Parental history of diabetes and specific gene variants are risk factors for type 2 diabetes, but the extent to which these factors are associated is unknown.
We examined the association between parental history of diabetes and a type 2 diabetes genetic risk score (GRS) in two cohort studies from Finland (population-based PPP-Botnia study) and the US (family-based Framingham Offspring Study).
Mean (95% CI) GRS increased from 16.8 (16.8-16.9) to 16.9 (16.8-17.1) to 17.1 (16.8-17.4) among PPP-Botnia participants with 0, 1, and 2 parents with diabetes, respectively (p(trend)=0.03). The trend was similar among Framingham Offspring but was not statistically significant (p=0.07). The meta-analyzed p value for trend from the two studies was 0.005.
The very modest associations reported above suggest that the increased risk of diabetes in offspring of parents with diabetes is largely the result of shared environmental/lifestyle factors and/or hitherto unknown genetic factors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21570145 View in PubMed
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Unemployment and pregnancy outcomes: a study within the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134627
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(5):449-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Maria Morales-Suárez-Varela
Linda Kaerlev
Jin Liang Zhu
Jens P Bonde
Ellen A Nohr
Agustín Llopis-González
Natalia Gimeno-Clemente
Jørn Olsen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Public Health and Environmental Care, Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain. maria.m.morales@uv.es
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(5):449-56
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology
Pregnancy outcome
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Unemployment
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the relation between employment status, type of unemployment and pregnancy outcomes.
A cohort study of 7,282 pregnancies of unemployed women and 56,014 pregnancies among women in paid jobs was performed within the Danish National Birth Cohort. Pregnancy outcomes were ascertained and information about lifestyle, occupational, medical, and obstetric factors was obtained. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) for fetal loss, congenital anomalies, multiple births, sex ratio, preterm and very preterm birth and small for gestational age status, adjusting for lifestyle, medical and obstetric factors.
There were no differences in pregnancy outcomes between employed and unemployed women but women receiving unemployment benefit had an increased risk of preterm birth (adjusted OR (aOR) 1.16, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.03-1.31) and having a small for gestational age child (aOR 1.08, 95% CI 1.00-1.19) compared with employed women. Women receiving sickness or maternity benefit had an increased risk of multiple birth (aOR 1.70, 95% CI 1.43-2.04), preterm (aOR 1.47, 95% CI 1.22-1.77) and very preterm birth (aOR 1.88, 95% CI 1.22-2.89), while those receiving an unreported type of support had an increased risk of preterm birth (aOR 1.40, 95% CI 1.02-1.93).
We found no indication that being unemployed during pregnancy benefits or endangers the health of the child. Within the subgroups of unemployed women, we observed that women receiving unemployment and sickness or maternity benefits were at higher risk for some adverse pregnancy outcomes.
PubMed ID
21558297 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diet before pregnancy and the risk of hyperemesis gravidarum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134673
Source
Br J Nutr. 2011 Aug;106(4):596-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Margaretha Haugen
Ase Vikanes
Anne Lise Brantsaeter
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Andrej M Grjibovski
Per Magnus
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Department of Food Safety, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. margaretha.haugen@fhi.no
Source
Br J Nutr. 2011 Aug;106(4):596-602
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Allium
Cohort Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Hyperemesis Gravidarum - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Seafood
Severity of Illness Index
Water - administration & dosage
Young Adult
Abstract
Hyperemesis gravidarum (hyperemesis), characterised by severe nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy, has an unknown aetiology. The aim of the present study was to investigate food and nutrient intake before pregnancy and the risk of developing hyperemesis in women participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. From 1999 to 2002, a total of 7710 pregnant women answered a FFQ about their diet during the 12 months before becoming pregnant and a questionnaire about illnesses during pregnancy, including hyperemesis. Only women who were hospitalised for hyperemesis were included as cases. Nutrient intakes during the year before pregnancy did not differ between the ninety-nine women who developed hyperemesis and the 7611 who did not. However, the intake of seafood, allium vegetables and water was significantly lower among women who developed hyperemesis than among women in the non-hyperemesis group. Relative risks of hyperemesis were approximated as OR, and confounder control was performed with multiple logistic regression. Women in the upper tertile of seafood consumption had a lower risk of developing hyperemesis than those in the lower tertile (OR 0·56, 95 % CI 0·32, 0·98), and women in the second tertile of water intake had a lower risk of developing hyperemesis than those in the first tertile (OR 0·43, 95 % CI 0·25, 0·73). The findings suggest that a moderate intake of water and adherence to a healthy diet that includes vegetables and fish are associated with a lower risk of developing hyperemesis.
PubMed ID
21554820 View in PubMed
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Evidence that serum levels of the soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products are inversely associated with pancreatic cancer risk: a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134808
Source
Cancer Res. 2011 May 15;71(10):3582-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2011
Author
Li Jiao
Stephanie J Weinstein
Demetrius Albanes
Philip R Taylor
Barry I Graubard
Jarmo Virtamo
Rachael Z Stolzenberg-Solomon
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. jiao@bcm.edu
Source
Cancer Res. 2011 May 15;71(10):3582-9
Date
May-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Double-Blind Method
Finland
Glucose - metabolism
Humans
Insulin - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Oxidative Stress
Pancreatic Neoplasms - blood - metabolism
Placebos
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Receptors, Immunologic - blood - physiology
Risk
Smoking
Abstract
Cigarette smoking, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and, to a lesser extent, meat cooked at high temperatures are associated with pancreatic cancer. Cigarette smoke and foods cooked at higher temperatures are major environmental sources of advanced glycation end products (AGE). AGEs accumulate during hyperglycemia and elicit oxidative stress and inflammation through interaction with the receptor for AGEs (RAGE). Soluble RAGE (sRAGE) acts as an anti-inflammatory factor to neutralize AGEs and block the effects mediated by RAGE. In this study, we investigated the associations of prediagnostic measures of N(e)-(carboxymethyl)-lysine (CML)-AGE and sRAGE with pancreatic cancer in a case-cohort study within a cohort of 29,133 Finnish male smokers. Serum samples and exposure information were collected at baseline (1985-1988). We measured CML-AGE, sRAGE, glucose, and insulin concentrations in fasting serum from 255 incident pancreatic cancer cases that arose through April 2005 and from 485 randomly sampled subcohort participants. Weighted Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to calculate relative risks (RR) and 95% CI, adjusted for age, years of smoking, and body mass index. CML-AGE and sRAGE were mutually adjusted. CML-AGE levels were not associated with pancreatic cancer [fifth compared with first quintile, RR (95% CI): 0.68 (0.38-1.22), P(trend) = 0.27]. In contrast, sRAGE levels were inversely associated with pancreatic cancer [fifth compared with first quintile, RR (95% CI): 0.46 (0.23-0.73), P(trend) = 0.002]. Further adjustment for glucose or insulin levels did not change the observed associations. Our findings suggest that sRAGE is inversely associated with pancreatic cancer risk among Finnish male smokers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21540233 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dioxin exposure and age of pubertal onset among Russian boys.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134923
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2011 Sep;119(9):1339-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Susan A Korrick
Mary M Lee
Paige L Williams
Oleg Sergeyev
Jane S Burns
Donald G Patterson
Wayman E Turner
Larry L Needham
Larisa Altshul
Boris Revich
Russ Hauser
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. susan.korrick@channing.harvard.edu
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2011 Sep;119(9):1339-44
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Dioxins - blood - toxicity
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
Furans - blood - toxicity
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - toxicity
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Puberty - drug effects
Questionnaires
Russia - epidemiology
Sensitivity and specificity
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Animal data demonstrate associations of dioxin, furan, and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposures with altered male gonadal maturation. It is unclear whether these associations apply to human populations.
We investigated the association of dioxins, furans, PCBs, and corresponding toxic equivalent (TEQ) concentrations with pubertal onset among boys in a dioxin-contaminated region.
Between 2003 and 2005, 499 boys 8-9 years of age were enrolled in a longitudinal study in Chapaevsk, Russia. Pubertal onset [stage 2 or higher for genitalia (G2+) or testicular volume (TV) > 3 mL] was assessed annually between ages 8 and 12 years. Serum levels at enrollment were analyzed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. We used Cox proportional hazards models to assess age at pubertal onset as a function of exposure adjusted for potential confounders. We conducted sensitivity analyses excluding boys with pubertal onset at enrollment.
The median (range) total serum TEQ concentration was 21 (4-175) pg/g lipid, approximately three times higher than values in European children. At enrollment, boys were generally healthy and normal weight (mean body mass index, 15.9 kg/m2), with 30% having entered puberty by G2+ and 14% by TV criteria. Higher dioxin TEQs were associated with later pubertal onset by TV (hazard ratio = 0.68, 95% confidence interval, 0.49-0.95 for the highest compared with the lowest quartile). Similar associations were observed for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and dioxin concentrations for TV but not G2+. Results were robust to sensitivity analyses.
Findings support an association of higher peripubertal serum dioxin TEQs and concentrations with later male pubertal onset reflected in delayed testicular maturation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21527364 View in PubMed
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Familial risk of cerebral palsy: population based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104108
Source
BMJ. 2014;349:g4294
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Mette C Tollånes
Allen J Wilcox
Rolv T Lie
Dag Moster
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, PB 7804, 5020 Bergen, Norway mette.tollanes@igs.uib.no.
Source
BMJ. 2014;349:g4294
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology - genetics
Cohort Studies
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Pedigree
Prevalence
Risk factors
Abstract
To investigate risks of recurrence of cerebral palsy in family members with various degrees of relatedness to elucidate patterns of hereditability.
Population based cohort study.
Data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway, linked to the Norwegian social insurance scheme to identify cases of cerebral palsy and to databases of Statistics Norway to identify relatives.
2,036,741 Norwegians born during 1967-2002, 3649 of whom had a diagnosis of cerebral palsy; 22,558 pairs of twins, 1,851,144 pairs of first degree relatives, 1,699,856 pairs of second degree relatives, and 5,165,968 pairs of third degree relatives were identified.
Cerebral palsy.
If one twin had cerebral palsy, the relative risk of recurrence of cerebral palsy was 15.6 (95% confidence interval 9.8 to 25) in the other twin. In families with an affected singleton child, risk was increased 9.2 (6.4 to 13)-fold in a subsequent full sibling and 3.0 (1.1 to 8.6)-fold in a half sibling. Affected parents were also at increased risk of having an affected child (6.5 (1.6 to 26)-fold). No evidence was found of differential transmission through mothers or fathers, although the study had limited power to detect such differences. For people with an affected first cousin, only weak evidence existed for an increased risk (1.5 (0.9 to 2.7)-fold). Risks in siblings or cousins were independent of sex of the index case. After exclusion of preterm births (an important risk factor for cerebral palsy), familial risks remained and were often stronger.
People born into families in which someone already has cerebral palsy are themselves at elevated risk, depending on their degree of relatedness. Elevated risk may extend even to third degree relatives (first cousins). The patterns of risk suggest multifactorial inheritance, in which multiple genes interact with each other and with environmental factors. These data offer additional evidence that the underlying causes of cerebral palsy extend beyond the clinical management of delivery.
Notes
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Comment In: BMJ. 2014;349:g451425026893
PubMed ID
25028249 View in PubMed
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Increased risk of rheumatoid arthritis in women with pregnancy complications and poor self-rated health: a study within the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104580
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2014 Aug;53(8):1513-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Kristian Tore Jørgensen
Maria C Harpsøe
Søren Jacobsen
Tine Jess
Morten Frisch
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital and Department of Rheumatology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital and Department of Rheumatology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. kristian.tore.joergensen@regionh.dk.
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2014 Aug;53(8):1513-9
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Humans
Incidence
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Risk
Self Report
Young Adult
Abstract
This study assessed the suggested association between pregnancy-associated hypertensive disorders, hyperemesis and subsequent risk of RA using a cohort with information about pre-pregnancy health.
Self-reported information on pre-pregnancy health, pregnancy course, gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia and hyperemesis was available from 55 752 pregnant women included in the Danish National Birth Cohort. Information about pregnancy-related factors and lifestyle was obtained by interviews twice during pregnancy and at 6 months post-partum. Women were followed for RA hospitalizations identified in the Danish National Patient Register. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models. Women with RA and non-specific musculoskeletal problems at the time of pregnancy were excluded.
On average, women were followed for 11 years after childbirth and 169 cases of RA were identified. The risk of RA was increased in women with pre-eclampsia (n = 11, HR = 1.96, 95% CI 1.06, 3.63), a poor self-rated pregnancy course (n = 32, HR = 1.63, 95% CI 1.11, 2.39) and fair or poor self-rated pre-pregnancy health (fair health: n = 86, HR = 1.52, 95% CI 1.11, 2.09; poor health: n = 14, HR = 3.24, 95% CI 1.82, 5.76). Hyperemesis was not associated with risk of RA.
We confirmed the previously suggested increased risk of RA in women with pre-eclampsia and also found an inverse association between self-rated pre-pregnancy health and risk of RA. These results suggest that the clinical onset of RA is preceded by a prolonged subclinical phase that may interfere with women's general well-being and pregnancy course or that some women carry a shared predisposition to pre-eclampsia and RA.
PubMed ID
24692576 View in PubMed
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Repeated measurements of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) from 1979 to 2007 in males from Northern Norway: assessing time trends, compound correlations and relations to age/birth cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104662
Source
Environ Int. 2014 Jun;67:43-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Therese Haugdahl Nøst
Robin Vestergren
Vivian Berg
Evert Nieboer
Jon Øyvind Odland
Torkjel Manning Sandanger
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Chemistry, NILU - Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Fram Centre, Hjalmar Johansens Gate 14, NO-9296 Tromsø, Norway; Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø-The Arctic University of Norway, Sykehusveien 44, NO-9037 Tromsø, Norway; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Diagnostic Clinic, University Hospital of North Norway, Sykehusveien 38, NO-9038 Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: zhn@nilu.no.
Source
Environ Int. 2014 Jun;67:43-53
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alkanesulfonic Acids - blood
Caprylates - blood
Cohort Studies
Decanoic Acids - blood
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Fluorocarbons - blood
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Time
Abstract
Longitudinal biomonitoring studies can provide unique information on how human concentrations change over time, but have so far not been conducted for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in a background exposed population.
The objectives of this study were to determine: i) serum PFAS time trends on an individual level; ii) relative compositions and correlations between different PFASs; and iii) assess selected PFAS concentrations with respect to periodic (calendar year), age and birth cohort (APC) effects.
Serum was sampled from the same 53 men in 1979, 1986, 1994, 2001 and 2007 in Northern Norway and analysed for 10 PFASs. APC effects were assessed by graphical and mixed effect analyses.
The median concentrations of perfluorooctane sulphonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) increased five-fold from 1979 to 2001 and decreased by 26% and 23%, respectively, from 2001 to 2007. The concentrations of PFOS and PFOA peaked during 1994-2001 and 2001, respectively, whereas perfluorohexane sulphonic acid (PFHxS) increased to 2001, but did not demonstrate a decrease between 2001 and 2007. Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), and perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA) displayed increasing trends throughout the entire study period (1979-2007). Although PFOS comprised dominating and stable proportions of PFAS burdens during these years, the contributions from PFOA and PFHxS were considerable. The evaluation of APC effects demonstrated that calendar year was the dominating influence on concentrations of PFOA, PFUnDA, and PFOS, although time-variant and weaker associations with age/birth cohort were indicated.
The concentration changes of 10 PFASs in the repeated measurements from 1979 to 2007 demonstrated divergent time trends between the different PFASs. The temporal trends of PFASs in human serum during these 30years reflect the overall trends in historic production and use, although global transport mechanisms and bioaccumulation potential of the different PFASs together with a varying extent of consumer exposure influenced the observed trends. Sampling year was the strongest descriptor of PFOA, PFUnDA and PFOS concentrations, and the calendar-year trends were apparent for all birth year quartiles. Discrepancies between the trends in this current longitudinal study and previous cross-sectional studies were observed and presumably reflect the different study designs and population characteristics.
PubMed ID
24657493 View in PubMed
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Baseline selenium status and effects of selenium and vitamin e supplementation on prostate cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104917
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2014 Mar;106(3):djt456
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Alan R Kristal
Amy K Darke
J Steven Morris
Catherine M Tangen
Phyllis J Goodman
Ian M Thompson
Frank L Meyskens
Gary E Goodman
Lori M Minasian
Howard L Parnes
Scott M Lippman
Eric A Klein
Author Affiliation
Affiliations of authors: Cancer Prevention Program (ARK) and SWOG Statistical Center (AKD, CMT, PJG), Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; Department of Epidemiology (ARK, GEG) and Department of Environmental Health (GEG), University of Washington, Seattle, WA; University of Missouri, Research Reactor Center, Columbia, MO (JSM); Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans Hospital, Columbia, MO (JSM); Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (IMT); Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA (FLM); Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (LMM, HLP); Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA (SML); Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (EAK).
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2014 Mar;106(3):djt456
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nails - chemistry
Neoplasm Grading
Odds Ratio
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostatic Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Puerto Rico - epidemiology
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk
Selenium - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Trace Elements - adverse effects
United States - epidemiology
Vitamin E - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Vitamins - adverse effects
Abstract
The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial found no effect of selenium supplementation on prostate cancer (PCa) risk but a 17% increased risk from vitamin E supplementation. This case-cohort study investigates effects of selenium and vitamin E supplementation conditional upon baseline selenium status.
There were 1739 total and 489 high-grade (Gleason 7-10) PCa cases and 3117 men in the randomly selected cohort. Proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for effects of supplementation within quintiles of baseline toenail selenium. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios, and all statistical tests are two-sided.
Toenail selenium, in the absence of supplementation, was not associated with PCa risk. Selenium supplementation (combined selenium only and selenium + vitamin E arms) had no effect among men with low selenium status (
Notes
Comment In: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2014 Mar;106(3):dju00524563520
Comment In: Nat Rev Urol. 2014 Apr;11(4):18424619375
PubMed ID
24563519 View in PubMed
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Perfluoroalkyl substances during pregnancy and validated preeclampsia among nulliparous women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104930
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2014 Apr 1;179(7):824-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2014
Author
Anne P Starling
Stephanie M Engel
David B Richardson
Donna D Baird
Line S Haug
Alison M Stuebe
Kari Klungsøyr
Quaker Harmon
Georg Becher
Cathrine Thomsen
Azemira Sabaredzovic
Merete Eggesbø
Jane A Hoppin
Gregory S Travlos
Ralph E Wilson
Lill I Trogstad
Per Magnus
Matthew P Longnecker
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2014 Apr 1;179(7):824-33
Date
Apr-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alkanesulfonic Acids - blood
Caprylates - blood
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - blood
Fatty Acids - blood
Female
Fluorocarbons - blood
Humans
Norway
Parity
Pre-Eclampsia - blood - etiology
Pregnancy
Proportional Hazards Models
Young Adult
Abstract
Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are persistent and ubiquitous environmental contaminants, and human exposure to these substances may be related to preeclampsia, a common pregnancy complication. Previous studies have found serum concentrations of PFAS to be positively associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension and preeclampsia in a population with high levels of exposure to perfluorooctanoate. Whether this association exists among pregnant women with background levels of PFAS exposure is unknown. Using data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health, we carried out a study of nulliparous pregnant women enrolled in 2003-2007 (466 cases, 510 noncases) to estimate associations between PFAS concentrations and an independently validated diagnosis of preeclampsia. We measured levels of 9 PFAS in maternal plasma extracted midpregnancy; statistical analyses were restricted to 7 PFAS that were quantifiable in more than 50% of samples. In proportional hazards models adjusted for maternal age, prepregnancy body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)(2)), educational level, and smoking status, we observed no strongly positive associations between PFAS levels and preeclampsia. We found an inverse association between preeclampsia and the highest quartile of perfluoroundecanoic acid concentration relative to the lowest quartile (hazard ratio = 0.55, 95% confidence interval: 0.38, 0.81). Overall, our findings do not support an increased risk of preeclampsia among nulliparous Norwegian women with background levels of PFAS exposure.
PubMed ID
24557813 View in PubMed
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Maternal intake of seafood and supplementary long chain n-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids and preterm delivery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290099
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2017 Jan 19; 17(1):41
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-19-2017
Author
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Linda Englund-Ögge
Margareta Haugen
Bryndis Eva Birgisdottir
Helle Katrine Knutsen
Verena Sengpiel
Ronny Myhre
Jan Alexander
Roy M Nilsen
Bo Jacobsson
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Exposure and Epidemiology, Domain of Infection Control and Environmental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404, Nydalen, NO-0403, Oslo, Norway. AnneLise.Brantsaeter@fhi.no.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2017 Jan 19; 17(1):41
Date
Jan-19-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Diet Surveys - methods
Dietary Supplements - statistics & numerical data
Eating
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - therapeutic use
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Seafood - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Preterm delivery increases the risk of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Studies suggest that maternal diet may affect the prevalence of preterm delivery. The aim of this study was to assess whether maternal intakes of seafood and marine long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFA) from supplements were associated with preterm delivery.
The study population included 67,007 women from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Maternal food and supplement intakes were assessed by a validated self-reported food frequency questionnaire in mid-pregnancy. Information about gestational duration was obtained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. We used Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for associations between total seafood, lean fish, fatty fish, and LCn-3PUFA intakes and preterm delivery. Preterm was defined as any onset of delivery before gestational week 37, and as spontaneous or iatrogenic deliveries and as preterm delivery at early, moderate, and late preterm gestations.
Lean fish constituted 56%, fatty fish 34% and shellfish 10% of seafood intake. Any intake of seafood above no/rare intake (>5 g/d) was associated with lower prevalence of preterm delivery. Adjusted HRs were 0.76 (CI: 0.66, 0.88) for 1-2 servings/week (20-40 g/d), 0.72 (CI: 0.62, 0.83) for 2-3 servings/week (40-60 g/d), and 0.72 (CI: 0.61, 0.85) for =3 servings/week (>60 g/d), p-trend
Notes
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ErratumIn: BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2017 Feb 10;17 (1):61 PMID 28187761
PubMed ID
28103845 View in PubMed
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The MATEX cohort - a Finnish population register birth cohort to study health effects of prenatal exposures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290669
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 Nov 07; 17(1):871
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-07-2017
Author
Isabell K Rumrich
Kirsi Vähäkangas
Matti Viluksela
Mika Gissler
Heljä-Marja Surcel
Hanna de Ruyter
Jukka Jokinen
Otto Hänninen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland (UEF), Kuopio, Finland. Isabell.Rumrich@thl.fi.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 Nov 07; 17(1):871
Date
Nov-07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Registries
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
The prevalence of chronic diseases, such as immune, neurobehavioral, and metabolic disorders has increased in recent decades. According to the concept of Developmental Origin of Health and Disease (DOHaD), developmental factors associated with environmental exposures and maternal lifestyle choices may partly explain the observed increase. Register-based epidemiology is a prime tool to investigate the effects of prenatal exposures over the whole life course. Our aim is to establish a Finnish register-based birth cohort, which can be used to investigate various (prenatal) exposures and their effects during the whole life course with first analyses focusing on maternal smoking and air pollution. In this paper we (i) review previous studies to identify knowledge gaps and overlaps available for cross-validation, (ii) lay out the MATEX study plan for register linkages, and (iii) analyse the study power of the baseline MATEX cohort for selected endpoints identified from the international literature.
The MATEX cohort is a fully register-based cohort identified from the Finnish Medical Birth Register (MBR) (1987-2015). Information from the MBR will be linked with other Finnish health registers and the population register to link the cohort with air quality data. Epidemiological analyses will be conducted for maternal smoking and air pollution and a range of health endpoints.
The MATEX cohort consists of 1.75 million mother-child pairs with a maximum follow up time of 29 years. This makes the cohort big enough to reach sufficient statistical power to investigate rare outcomes, such as birth anomalies, childhood cancers, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The linkage between different registers allows for an extension of the scope of the cohort and a follow up from the prenatal period to decades later in life.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29115964 View in PubMed
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Population-based study shows that teenage girls with asthma had impaired health-related quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290881
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2017 Jul; 106(7):1128-1135
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Linnea Hedman
Caroline Stridsman
Martin Andersson
Helena Backman
Sven-Arne Jansson
Eva Rönmark
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, The OLIN Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2017 Jul; 106(7):1128-1135
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control - psychology
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study examined the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of teenagers with and without asthma, including the impact of their sex, allergic conditions, smoking, living conditions and physical activity.
The Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden (OLIN) studies recruited a cohort of schoolchildren in 2006. The parents of all children aged seven to eight years in three municipalities were invited to complete a questionnaire and 2585 (96%) participated. The cohort was followed up at the ages of 11-12 years and 14-15 years with high participation rates. At 14-15 years, the HRQoL questionnaire KIDSCREEN-10 and Asthma Control Test were added.
Girls with current asthma at 14-15 years had a lower mean HRQoL score than girls without asthma (46.4 versus 49.3, p
PubMed ID
28345180 View in PubMed
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