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Age-related macular degeneration among the Inuit in Greenland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6642
Source
Pages 320-323 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
, and at the Sisi- miut Health Centre during the months of April and May in 2001 . More than 70 % of the invited persons partici- pated in the study. Preliminary genealogical in- vestigations were subsequently performed in the National Eye Clinic for the Visually Impaired. The original fundus
  1 document  
Author
Andersen, N
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Rigshospitalet, The University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark
Source
Pages 320-323 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Date
2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Macular degeneration - epidemiology - ethnology
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Visual impairment
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate the clinical appearance and prevalence of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) among the Inuit in Greenland, to investigate risk factors and to initiate the search for possible genetic markers. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional population study including all individuals older than 60 years of age, born in Greenland and living in the communities of Nuuk and Sisimiut, was performed in 2000 and 2001. METHODS: All participants underwent an ophthalmologic examination, which was complemented by fundus photography and a questionnaire. RESULTS: 689 individuals, or more than 70%, participated in the study. Data are currently being processed. The preliminary data suggest that AMD among the Inuit is characterised by a rather uniform morphology and poor visual outcome. The detection of more cases of AMD in the early and late stages in relation to intermediate stages furthermore indicates a rapid development of AMD among the Inuit. CONCLUSION: The relative homogeneity of the Inuit population of Greenland may represent an opportunity for identifying the aetiological factors responsible for the development of AMD. The future results of this research project will hopefully also contribute towards an increased focus on the growing number of individuals with visual impairment due to AMD among the Inuit.
PubMed ID
15736677 View in PubMed
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The AMAP Human Health program for Greenland 1999-2001: organic pollutants, lifestyle, dietary composition and blood lipids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296386
Source
Second AMAP International Symposium on Environmental Pollution of the Arctic. Rovaniemi, 1-4 October 2002. Poster session P-H02.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2002
Second AMAP International Symposium on Environmental Pollution of the Arctic. Rovaniemi, 1-4 October 2002 P – H02 The AMAP Human Health Program for Greenland 1999- 2001: Organic pollutants, lifestyle, dietary composition and blood lipids Bente Deutch,* Henning Sloth Pedersen***, Eva Bonefeld
  1 document  
Author
Deutch, Bente
Pedersen, Henning Sloth
Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva
Hansen, Jens
Source
Second AMAP International Symposium on Environmental Pollution of the Arctic. Rovaniemi, 1-4 October 2002. Poster session P-H02.
Date
2002
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
17561
Keywords
Diet
Smoking
Drinking
Body fat
Selenium
Cotinin
Biomarkers
Documents
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Contaminants in local human diet items in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296411
Source
Second AMAP International Symposium on Environmental Pollution of the Arctic. Rovaniemi, 1-4 October 2002. Poster session H06.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2002
., Receveur, O., Muir, D., Chan, H.M. and Soueida, R. (1995) Arctic Indigeneous women consume greater than acceptable levels of organochlorines. J.Nutr. 125, 2501-2510. WHO (1990) Environmental Health Criteria Vol. 101. Methylmercury. International Programme on Chemical Safety, Geneva. 144 pp.
  1 document  
Author
Johansen, Poul
Muir, Derek
Asmund, Gert
Kirkegaard, Maja
Source
Second AMAP International Symposium on Environmental Pollution of the Arctic. Rovaniemi, 1-4 October 2002. Poster session H06.
Date
2002
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
19653
Keywords
Traditional food
Mercury
Cadmium
Organoshlorines
PCBs
Selenium
Documents
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Long term trends in particle deposition in NE Greenland as assessed by a passive aerosol sampling technique.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296441
Source
Second AMAP International Symposium on Environmental Pollution of the Arctic. Rovaniemi, 1-4 October 2002. Poster session X23.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2002
Second AMAP International Symposium on Environmental Pollution of the Arctic. Rovaniemi, 1-4 October 2002 P – X23 Long term trends in particle deposition in NE Greenland as assessed by a passive aerosol sampling technique Eckart Schultz1 and Benoit Sittler2 1German Weather Service, D
  1 document  
Author
Schultz, Eckart
Sittler, Benoit
Source
Second AMAP International Symposium on Environmental Pollution of the Arctic. Rovaniemi, 1-4 October 2002. Poster session X23.
Date
2002
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
16858
Keywords
Aerosol particles
Documents
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2009 Circumpolar Inuit Health Summit: Yellowknife, Canada, July 9-10, 2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296469
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC), Canada. 17 p.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2009
where we live. Environmental factors, economic opportunities and other local conditions all contribute to different health results. In short, the way in which communities and countries respond can vary, depend- ing on local circumstances, available resources and the broader political context. But
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC), Canada. 17 p.
Date
2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
1875662
Keywords
Alaska
Chukotka
Inuit
Health and wellness
Documents

2009_healthsummitreport_final.pdf

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Source
Papers presented at the Symposium on Circumpolar Health Related Problems, Fairbanks, Alaska, July 23-28, 1967. Archives of Environmental Health. 17(4):501-506
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1968
aretic climate and the poor economy have made these people a prime target for infectious diseases. For many years, probably for centuries, tubercu- losis has been the most serious health prob- len. Reliable data on the frequency of the disease, however, are available only for re- cent years and show
  1 document  
Author
Stein, K.P
Lange, P.K
Gad, U
Wilbek, E
Author Affiliation
M Statistics, Copenhagen
Source
Papers presented at the Symposium on Circumpolar Health Related Problems, Fairbanks, Alaska, July 23-28, 1967. Archives of Environmental Health. 17(4):501-506
Date
Oct-1968
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
BCG Vaccine
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Greenland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
PubMed ID
5682257 View in PubMed
Documents

67-11-Tuberculosis in Greenland.pdf

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Health systems serving Inuit communities across the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295954
Source
Health Canada (Northern Region). 15 pp.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2011
are a range of health, social, economic and environmental factors which have affected Inuit health outcomes. This inequity between Inuit and broader national populations is consistent with the poor health status of indigenous peoples globally. It is increasingly recognized that the
  1 document  
Author
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada
Source
Health Canada (Northern Region). 15 pp.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Denmark
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
505903
Keywords
Inuit
Health care
Abstract
The Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC), which was formed in 1977, represents the interests of the Inuit of Canada, Alaska (USA), Greenland and Chukotka (Russia) supporting them in addressing challenges of circumpolar and international importance which are impacting on their lives. One of the top priorities for ICC is the health and wellbeing of circumpolar Inuit. Within the ICC network across the four Arctic countries, ICC Canada has been given responsibility for taking the lead on health. As a permanent participant of the Arctic Council, ICC is an active member of the AHHEG and is represented by ICC Canada. As part of its work program, AHHEG has agreed to undertake a review and analysis of the health care systems in circumpolar countries. The objective of this work is to compile a comparison of circumpolar health systems to highlight the different responses to similar challenges (e.g. low population density, reduced access, cultural and linguistic differences from the majority population in the country, impact of cold climate on morbidity and service delivery), and focus on the effects of differing governance and organization (e.g. autonomy of sub-states, role of sub-states in terms of health funding, administration and delivery, primary care models, and special arrangements for indigenous populations). The final paper will be published by the International Journal of Circumpolar Health.
Documents

finalcircumpolarinuithealthsystems.pdf

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Vitamins and minerals in the traditional Greenland diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295343
Source
National Environmental Research Institute (NERI) Technical report, no.528. 44 pp.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2005
National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark Vitamins and minerals in the traditional Greenland diet NERI Technical Report, No. 528 [Blank page] National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark Vitamins and minerals in the
  1 document  
Author
Andersen, Signe May
Source
National Environmental Research Institute (NERI) Technical report, no.528. 44 pp.
Date
2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Report
File Size
907304
Keywords
Traditional foods
Vitamins
Minerals
Nutrition
Greenland
Inuit
Abstract
The relative importance of traditional Greenlandic food items has diminished during the last decades. Today these account for 25% of the Greenland diet with a dominance of fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. This report synthesises the available information on concentrations of vitamins and minerals in the various food items that form the traditional Greenlandic diet. However, through this diet people in Greenland are also exposed to a high intake of heavy metals and organochlorines, due to a contamination of many of these food items. In combination with information on the concentration of contaminants, the information about vitamins and minerals will potentially make it possible to adjust the diet in Greenland, taking both nutrients and contaminants into account.
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The Arctic as a food producing region. Phase 1: Current status in five Arctic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295345
Source
Nofima. Report 10/2018. 99 pp.
Publication Type
Report
Date
April 2018
. Food production in this region is however associated with some challenges. The food producers are often faced with challenging environmental conditions, poor and/or costly infrastructure, limited entrepreneurial capacity and qualified labor and long distance to export markets. Climate change is
  1 document  
Author
Silje Elde
Ingrid Kvalvik
Bjørg Helen Nøstvold
Rune Rødbotten
Sigridur Dalmannsdottir
Hilde Halland
Eivind Uleberg
Ólafur Reykdal
Jón Árnason
Páll Gunnar Pálsson
Rakel Halldórsdóttir
Óli Þór Hilmarsson
Gunnar Þórðarson
Þóra Valsdóttir
Rebekka Knudsen
David Natcher
Daria Sidorova
Source
Nofima. Report 10/2018. 99 pp.
Date
April 2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Denmark
Greenland
Iceland
Norway
Russia
Publication Type
Report
File Size
5515073
Keywords
Arctic
Food
Production
Industry and market
Possibilities
Challenges
Abstract
The "Arctic as a food producing region" is a project funded by the Nordic Council of Ministries, the Canadian Arctic Council office, the University of Saskatchewan (Canada), the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Nofima – Norwegian Institute of Food, fisheries and Aquaculture Research, the Icelandic Foreign Ministry, and endorsed by the Arctic Council Sustainable Development Working Group (SDWG). The project has participation from Canada, Denmark, Greenland, Iceland, Norway and Russia. The aim of the "Arctic as a food producing region" - project is to assess the potential for increased production and added value of food from the Arctic region, with the overarching aim of improving economic and social conditions of Arctic communities. This report is the output from the first phase of the project, providing a description of the main food production and examples of conditions for food production in the Arctic areas of the countries involved.
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Food security across the Arctic : background paper of the Steering Committee of the Circumpolar Inuit Health Strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295940
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council - Canada. 12 pp.
Publication Type
Report
Date
May 2012
8 SLiCA Results, March 2007; pp 4-5. 9 Prevalence of food insecurity in a Greenlandic community and the importance of social, econmic and environmental stressors, C. Goldhar, J.D. Ford, L. Berrang-Ford, International Journal of Circumpolar Health, 69:3 2010 10 Ibid, p. 297 11 The
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council - Canada. 12 pp.
Date
May 2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
149162
Keywords
Alaska
Food security
Inuit
Documents

icc_food_security_across_the_arctic_may_2012.pdf

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Contaminants, health, and effective risk assessment & communication in the circumpolar north

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96122
Source
Page 318 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
Studies Program, Trent University There is growing recognition of the importance of Indigenous knowledge and the incorporation of Indigenous perspectives and perceptions in environment and health research today. There have been certain challenges when assessing and communicating environmental health
  1 document  
Author
Friendship, K.
Furgal, C.
Council of Yukon First Nations, Yukon Contaminants Committee
Author Affiliation
Canadian Studies Indigenous Studies Graduate Program, Trent University
Indigenous Environmental Studies Program, Trent University
Source
Page 318 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
U.S.
Greenland
Russia
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cross-cultural misunderstandings
Environment and health research
Indigenous knowledge
Politicization of information
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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Dietary transition and contaminants in the Arctic: Emphasis on Greenland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96165
Source
Circumpolar Health Supplements. 2008 (2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Hansen, JC
Deutch, B
Odland, JØ
Author Affiliation
Centre of Arctic Environmental Medicine, University of Aarhu, Denmark
Source
Circumpolar Health Supplements. 2008 (2)
Date
2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic
Contaminants
Dietary transition
Exposure levels
Greenland
Food Supply
Human diet
Indigenous people
Inuit
Local diet
Marine food chains
Nutritional pattern
Traditional food
Abstract
The purpose of this review is to evaluate the nutritional qualities of the Inuit traditional food pattern seen in an evolutionary and historical perspective and to describe the present-day nutritional pattern as influenced by dietary transition. Observed exposure levels to contaminants and their potential negative effects will be discussed. Finally, we attempt to indicate what could be the direction for future developments in order to conserve the cultural and nutritional values of the local diet, and at the same time reduce contaminant exposure levels.
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Sundhedstilstanden i Grønland: Årsberetning for 1991

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96193
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1992
Author
Chief Medical Officer in Greenland
Date
June 1992
Language
Danish
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Abstract
This report summarizes public health concerns in Greenland for the year 1991, including health promotion, environmental health, housing conditions, water supply, sanitation, food safety, forensic medicine, infectious diseases, cancer, atherosclerosis, and infant and child mortality. The report includes 25 tables and 24 figures.
Notes
Available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 96193.
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The state of health in Greenland: Report from the chief medical officer for 1991

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96194
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1992
Author
Chief Medical Officer in Greenland
Date
June 1992
Language
Danish
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Abstract
This report summarizes public health concerns in Greenland for the year 1991, including health promotion, environmental health, housing conditions, water supply, sanitation, food safety, forensic medicine, infectious diseases, cancer, atherosclerosis, and infant and child mortality. The report includes 25 tables and 24 figures.
Notes
Available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 96194.
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Biomonitoring in Greenland: Human biomarkers of exposure and effects - A short review

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96585
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1362
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Author
Bonefeld-Jorgensen, EC
Author Affiliation
Centre for Arctic Environmental Medicine, School of Public Health, University of Aarhus, Denmark. ebj@mil.au.dk
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1362
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP)
Arctic ecosystem
Arctic populations
Bioaccumulation
Biomarkers
Biomonitoring
Exposure
Generation studies
Genetic polymorphisms
Greenland
Immune system
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
Receptor effect studies
Traditional diet
Abstract
CONTEXT: Since 1997 the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) has produced integrated assessment reports on the status of and trends in environmental persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the Arctic ecosystem. Three reports on biomonitoring POPs and their health risks for Arctic populations were published in 1998, 2002, and 2009. ISSUE: The present review summarizes data from Greenland on human monitoring of biomarkers of POP exposure and bioaccumulation and the determination of biomarkers for POP effects. The review focuses on hormone disruptive potentials and some genetic sensitivity biomarkers. The overview covers Greenlandic studies from 2000 to 2006. LESSONS LEARNED: The Greenland biomonitoring studies showed general geographical and gender differences of bioaccumulated serum POP levels, which were primarily related to diet and lifestyle. A high intake of traditional Greenlandic diet (eg seal, whale, polar bear, and seabirds) together with smoking caused higher blood concentrations of POPs. The highest POP values were found on the east coast of Greenland. The receptor effect studies showed a general inverse relationship between high serum POP concentration and estrogen receptor (ER) and Ah-receptor (AhR) transactivity; in addition for men in the two West Greenlandic districts, Nuuk and Sisimiut, a trend towards increased induced AR activity was found. An observed trend to an opposite direction between the dioxin-like AhR and ER activity supports the perception of that dioxins exert an antiestrogen effect. In conclusion, the actual mixtures of serum POPs in Greenlandic Inuit have an endocrine disrupting potential. Comparisons between European and Greenlandic male serum POP levels showed significantly higher levels in Inuit; however, in the same study Inuit had significantly lower sperm DNA damage. Further studies are required to elucidate whether the serum POP related effects on hormone receptors and/or AhR are explanatory factors. 'The Arctic dilemma' is that along with the intake of the Greenlandic traditional diet that contains POPs, there are also a number of important nutrients, such as trace elements/antioxidants and marine unsaturated fatty acids which have favorable effects on health. However, a number of studies suggest that an increase in Western food items in the diet can lead to other health risks, such as the metabolic syndrome and its sequels increase in weight, hypertension, diabetes type 2, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, including breast cancer. To elucidate these aspects further studies are required, including those into biomarkers for exposure and effects, epigenetic contexts and the determination of relevant genetic polymorphisms, case-control as well as generation studies. Finally, there is a need for the development of new biomarkers to study the potential POP effects that inhibit the immune system and affect the development of the central nervous system.
PubMed ID
20572746 View in PubMed
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Causes of death, age of death, and changes in mortality in the twentieth century in Ammassalik (East Greenland)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76526
Source
Pages 154-158 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
. In more recent times, the effort of health authorities to reduce infant mortality has been particular- ly oriented towards vaccinations, distribu- tion of powdered milk to pregnant women and nursing mothers (since 1945), development of prenatal care, and encouragement to give birth in the
  1 document  
Author
Robert-Lamblin, J.
Author Affiliation
Laboratoire d'Anthropologie, Musée de l'Homme, Paris, France
Source
Pages 154-158 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Date
1985
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Danish colonization
Epidemics
Hygiene
Infant mortality
Life expectancy
Mortality
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Peoples of the Arctic: Characteristics of human populations relevant to pollution issues

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100828
Source
Chapter 5 (pp. 141-183) of AMAP Assessment Report: Arctic Pollution Issues
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1998
  1 website  
Author
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme
Source
Chapter 5 (pp. 141-183) of AMAP Assessment Report: Arctic Pollution Issues
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Canada
Greenland
Iceland
Faroe Islands
Norway
Sweden
Russia
Finland
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Diet
Education
Employment
Environmental contaminants
Geography
Health care
Housing
Hunting, fishing, gathering
Indigenous knowledge
Indigenous peoples
Language
Mortality and morbidity
Nonindigenous residents
Population
Saami
Abstract
This chapter provides an introduction to the inhabitants of the Arctic. While there is insufficient space to explore the extent of information that exists in the written literature or in the oral traditions of indigenous cultures, the information given here is intended to help understand how contaminants may affect Arctic residents, and to encourage further investigation of these effects. The impacts that both contaminants and, more insidiously, the fear of contaminants have on, in particular, indigenous peoples and cultures demonstrate the need for effective communication and for preventing contamination that may lead to adverse effects on Arctic peoples.
Notes
Book available in UAA/APU Consortium Library Alaskana Collection: TD190.5.A75 1998; and in ARLIS General Collection: TD190.5A46 1998
Online Resources
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Tradition and transition: parasitic zoonoses of people and animals in Alaska, northern Canada, and Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115065
Source
Adv Parasitol. 2013;82:33-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Emily J Jenkins
Louisa J Castrodale
Simone J C de Rosemond
Brent R Dixon
Stacey A Elmore
Karen M Gesy
Eric P Hoberg
Lydden Polley
Janna M Schurer
Manon Simard
R C Andrew Thompson
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Microbiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B4, Canada. emily.jenkins@usask.ca
Source
Adv Parasitol. 2013;82:33-204
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Canada
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Communicable Diseases, Emerging - epidemiology - parasitology
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infection Control - methods
Parasites - classification - isolation & purification
Parasitic Diseases - epidemiology - transmission
Prevalence
Zoonoses - epidemiology - parasitology
Abstract
Zoonotic parasites are important causes of endemic and emerging human disease in northern North America and Greenland (the North), where prevalence of some parasites is higher than in the general North American population. The North today is in transition, facing increased resource extraction, globalisation of trade and travel, and rapid and accelerating environmental change. This comprehensive review addresses the diversity, distribution, ecology, epidemiology, and significance of nine zoonotic parasites in animal and human populations in the North. Based on a qualitative risk assessment with criteria heavily weighted for human health, these zoonotic parasites are ranked, in the order of decreasing importance, as follows: Echinococcus multilocularis, Toxoplasma gondii, Trichinella and Giardia, Echinococcus granulosus/canadensis and Cryptosporidium, Toxocara, anisakid nematodes, and diphyllobothriid cestodes. Recent and future trends in the importance of these parasites for human health in the North are explored. For example, the incidence of human exposure to endemic helminth zoonoses (e.g. Diphyllobothrium, Trichinella, and Echinococcus) appears to be declining, while water-borne protozoans such as Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Toxoplasma may be emerging causes of human disease in a warming North. Parasites that undergo temperature-dependent development in the environment (such as Toxoplasma, ascarid and anisakid nematodes, and diphyllobothriid cestodes) will likely undergo accelerated development in endemic areas and temperate-adapted strains/species will move north, resulting in faunal shifts. Food-borne pathogens (e.g. Trichinella, Toxoplasma, anisakid nematodes, and diphyllobothriid cestodes) may be increasingly important as animal products are exported from the North and tourists, workers, and domestic animals enter the North. Finally, key needs are identified to better assess and mitigate risks associated with zoonotic parasites, including enhanced surveillance in animals and people, detection methods, and delivery and evaluation of veterinary and public health services.
PubMed ID
23548085 View in PubMed
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Obesity and metabolic correlates among the Inuit and a general Danish population

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5989
Source
Pages 77-85 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
, glucose intolerance, hypertension and dyslipldc1nla in 1nost populations. The study aims to assess the occurrence and metabolic correlates of obesity an1ong Greenlanders and Da- nes. Study design. From 1999 to 200!, 917 adult Inuit participated in a health survey in Greenland. The examination included
  1 document  
Author
J�¸rgensen, ME
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Centre, Gentofte, Denmark. maej@steno.dk
Source
Pages 77-85 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Date
2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Body mass index
BMI
Denmark
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Greenland
Humans
Insulin - analysis
Inuit - statistics & numerical data
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Metabolic syndrome
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology - metabolism
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
OBEJECTIVES: Obesity and central fat pattern are associated with several cardiovascular risk factors incluy ding insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, hypertension and dyslipidemia in most populations. The study aims to assess the occurrence and metabolic correlates of obesity among Greenlanders and Danes. STUDY DESIGN: From 1999 to 2001, 917 adult Inuit participated in a health survey in Greenland. The examination included an oral glucose tolerance test. Body Mass Index, waist circumference, and blood pressure were measured. P-glucose, s-insulin, and lipids were measured. Data from the Danish study 'Inter99' (n=5606) conducted in 1999-2000 were used for comparison. RESULTS: Compared with the Inter99 population, a larger proportion of Inuit women were centrally obese (58.1% vs.17.8%, p
PubMed ID
15736626 View in PubMed
Documents
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Health transitions in Arctic populations

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100814
Source
Toronto, Ont.: University of Toronto Press; 485 pp.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2008
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark
Source
Toronto, Ont.: University of Toronto Press; 485 pp.
Date
2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Canada
Russia
Finland
Greenland
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic peoples
Circumpolar peoples
Economic changes
Environmental changes
Health determinants and outcomes
Health status
Indigenous populations
Political changes
Social changes
Abstract
The Arctic regions are inhabited by diverse populations, both indigenous and non-indigenous. 'Health Transitions in Arctic Populations' describes and explains changing health patterns in these areas, how particular patterns came about, and what can be done to improve the health of Arctic peoples. This collaborative study correlates changes in health status with major environmental, social, economic, and political changes in the Arctic. Together the contributors explore commonalities in the experiences of different peoples while recognizing their considerable diversity. The volume focuses on five Arctic regions--Greenland, Northern Canada, Alaska, Arctic Russia, and Northern Fennoscandia. A general overview of the geography, history, economy, population characteristics, health status, and health services of each region is provided and followed by discussion of specific indigenous populations, major health determinants and outcomes, and, finally, an integrative examination of what can be done to improve the health of circumpolar peoples. 'Health Transitions in Arctic Populations' offers both a detailed examination of key health issues in the North and a vision for the future well-being of Arctic inhabitants.
Notes
Available at UAA/APU Consortium Library: WA100.H43 2008; and at ARLIS: RC957.H43 2008
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