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Persistent Environmental Toxicants in Breast Milk and Rapid Infant Growth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289484
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2017; 70(3):210-216
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Rachel Criswell
Virissa Lenters
Siddhartha Mandal
Hein Stigum
Nina Iszatt
Merete Eggesbø
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Exposure and Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2017; 70(3):210-216
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Bayes Theorem
Birth weight
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Gestational Age
Growth - physiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Maternal Age
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Metals, Heavy - analysis - toxicity
Milk, human - chemistry
Norway
Obesity - physiopathology
Pesticides - analysis - toxicity
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - toxicity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - physiopathology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - physiopathology
Abstract
Many environmental toxicants are passed to infants in utero and through breast milk. Exposure to toxicants during the perinatal period can alter growth patterns, impairing growth or increasing obesity risk. Previous studies have focused on only a few toxicants at a time, which may confound results. We investigated levels of 26 toxicants in breast milk and their associations with rapid infant growth, a risk factor for later obesity.
We used data from the Norwegian HUMIS study, a multi-center cohort of 2,606 mothers and newborns enrolled between 2002 and 2008. Milk samples collected 1 month after delivery from a subset of 789 women oversampled by overweight were analyzed for toxicants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), heavy metals, and pesticides. Growth was defined as change in weight-for-age z-score between 0 and 6 months among the HUMIS population, and rapid growth was defined as change in z-score above 0.67. We used a Bayesian variable selection method to determine the exposures that most explained variation in the outcome. Identified toxicants were included in logistic and linear regression models to estimate associations with growth, adjusting for maternal age, smoking, education, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), gestational weight gain, parity, child sex, cumulative breastfeeding, birth weight, gestational age, and preterm status.
Of 789 infants, 19.2% displayed rapid growth. The median maternal age was 29.6 years, and the median pre-pregnancy BMI was 24.0 kg/m2, with 45.3% of mothers overweight or obese. Rapid growers were more likely to be firstborn. Hexachlorobenzene, ß-hexachlorocyclohexane (ß-HCH), and PCB-74 were identified in the variable selection method. An interquartile range (IQR) increase in ß-HCH exposure was associated with a lower odds of rapid growth (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42-0.94). Newborns exposed to high levels of ß-HCH showed reduced infant growth (ß = -0.03, 95% CI -0.05 to -0.01 for IQR increase in breast milk concentration). No other significant associations were found.
Our results suggest that early life ß-HCH exposure may be linked to slowed growth. Further research is warranted on the potential mechanism behind this association and the longer-term metabolic effects of perinatal ß-HCH exposure.
PubMed ID
28301833 View in PubMed
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Persistent Environmental Toxicants in Breast Milk and Rapid Infant Growth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289642
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2017; 70(3):210-216
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Rachel Criswell
Virissa Lenters
Siddhartha Mandal
Hein Stigum
Nina Iszatt
Merete Eggesbø
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Exposure and Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2017; 70(3):210-216
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Bayes Theorem
Birth weight
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Gestational Age
Growth - physiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Maternal Age
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Metals, Heavy - analysis - toxicity
Milk, human - chemistry
Norway
Obesity - physiopathology
Pesticides - analysis - toxicity
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - toxicity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - physiopathology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - physiopathology
Abstract
Many environmental toxicants are passed to infants in utero and through breast milk. Exposure to toxicants during the perinatal period can alter growth patterns, impairing growth or increasing obesity risk. Previous studies have focused on only a few toxicants at a time, which may confound results. We investigated levels of 26 toxicants in breast milk and their associations with rapid infant growth, a risk factor for later obesity.
We used data from the Norwegian HUMIS study, a multi-center cohort of 2,606 mothers and newborns enrolled between 2002 and 2008. Milk samples collected 1 month after delivery from a subset of 789 women oversampled by overweight were analyzed for toxicants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), heavy metals, and pesticides. Growth was defined as change in weight-for-age z-score between 0 and 6 months among the HUMIS population, and rapid growth was defined as change in z-score above 0.67. We used a Bayesian variable selection method to determine the exposures that most explained variation in the outcome. Identified toxicants were included in logistic and linear regression models to estimate associations with growth, adjusting for maternal age, smoking, education, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), gestational weight gain, parity, child sex, cumulative breastfeeding, birth weight, gestational age, and preterm status.
Of 789 infants, 19.2% displayed rapid growth. The median maternal age was 29.6 years, and the median pre-pregnancy BMI was 24.0 kg/m2, with 45.3% of mothers overweight or obese. Rapid growers were more likely to be firstborn. Hexachlorobenzene, ß-hexachlorocyclohexane (ß-HCH), and PCB-74 were identified in the variable selection method. An interquartile range (IQR) increase in ß-HCH exposure was associated with a lower odds of rapid growth (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42-0.94). Newborns exposed to high levels of ß-HCH showed reduced infant growth (ß = -0.03, 95% CI -0.05 to -0.01 for IQR increase in breast milk concentration). No other significant associations were found.
Our results suggest that early life ß-HCH exposure may be linked to slowed growth. Further research is warranted on the potential mechanism behind this association and the longer-term metabolic effects of perinatal ß-HCH exposure.
PubMed ID
28301833 View in PubMed
Less detail

Thermal perception thresholds among workers in a cold climate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295084
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2017 10; 90(7):645-652
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-2017
Author
Lage Burström
Bodil Björ
Tohr Nilsson
Hans Pettersson
Ingemar Rödin
Jens Wahlström
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden. lage.burstrom@gmail.com.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2017 10; 90(7):645-652
Date
10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Fingers - physiopathology
Hand - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Residence Characteristics
Sensory Thresholds - physiology
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden
Vibration - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate whether exposure to cold could influence the thermal perception thresholds in a working population.
This cross-sectional study was comprised of 251 males and females and was carried out at two mines in the northern part of Norway and Sweden. The testing included a baseline questionnaire, a clinical examination and measurements of thermal perception thresholds, on both hands, the index (Digit 2) and little (Digit 5) fingers, for heat and cold.
The thermal perception thresholds were affected by age, gender and test site. The thresholds were impaired by experiences of frostbite in the fingers and the use of medication that potentially could affect neurosensory functions. No differences were found between the calculated normative values for these workers and those in other comparative investigations conducted in warmer climates.
The study provided no support for the hypothesis that living and working in cold climate will lead to impaired thermal perception thresholds. Exposure to cold that had caused localized damage in the form of frostbite was shown to lead to impaired thermal perception.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28497276 View in PubMed
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Mortality Among Hardmetal Production Workers: Occupational Exposures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294339
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2017 Dec; 59(12):e297-e305
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Kathleen J Kennedy
Nurtan A Esmen
Jeanine M Buchanich
Sarah Zimmerman
Anne J Sleeuwenhoek
Gary M Marsh
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (Drs Kennedy, Esmen); Center for Occupational Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Biostatistics, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Dr Buchanich, Ms Zimmerman, Dr Marsh); Institute of Occupational Medicine, Edinburgh, UK (Dr Sleeuwenhoek).
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2017 Dec; 59(12):e297-e305
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Alloys - adverse effects - analysis
Austria
Chemical Industry - statistics & numerical data
Cobalt - adverse effects - analysis
Cohort Studies
Germany
Humans
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Tungsten - adverse effects - analysis
United Kingdom
United States
Abstract
To generate quantitative exposure estimates for use in retrospective occupational cohort mortality studies of the hardmetal industry.
Job-exposure matrices (JEMs) were constructed for cobalt, tungsten, and nickel over the time period 1952 to 2014. The JEMs consisted of job class categories, based on job titles and processes performed, and exposure estimates calculated from available company industrial hygiene measurements.
Exposure intervals of one-half order magnitude were established for all three agents. Eight job classes had significantly decreasing time trends for cobalt exposure; no significant time trends were detected for tungsten or nickel exposures.
The levels of exposures determined for this study were similar to or lower than those previously reported for the hardmetal industry during the 1952 to 2014 study period.
PubMed ID
28704227 View in PubMed
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