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Levels and Effects of Organohalogens on Corticosterone Hormones in glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus) from Kongsfjorden, Svalbard.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297158
Source
Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Department of Biology. vii, 85 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2014
Levels and Effects of Organohalogens on Corticosterone Hormones in glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus) from Kongsfjorden, Svalbard Mari Engvig Løseth Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Supervisor: Bjørn Munro Jenssen, IBI Co-supervisor: Geir Wing Gabrielsen, Polarinstituttet, NP
  1 document  
Author
Løseth, Mari Engvig
Source
Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Department of Biology. vii, 85 p.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1691408
Keywords
Svalbard
Glaucous gull
Organohalogenated contaminants (OHCs)
Corticosterone
Stress
Abstract
Long-range atmospheric transport, ocean currents, sea ice and rivers are transporting environmental contaminants into the Arctic. Some of these contaminants can reach high concentrations in the upper trophic levels in the Arctic food web due to processes of bioaccumulation and biomagnification. The present study indicates a sex-specific pattern of levels and effects of selected organohalogenated contaminants (OHCs) in the avian top predator, glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus), breeding in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard. The aim of this present study was to report levels of OHCs and investigate whether the high levels detected in glaucous gulls can induce stress and thereby influence the stress response (measured by corticosterone concentration). No statistical differences were recorded for stress-induced or baseline corticosterone concentrations for males and female glaucous gulls. In females, a significant negative association was reported for lipid weight in blood plasma and baseline corticosterone. In male glaucous gulls, positive associations were found between levels of twenty-two OHCs and elevated baseline levels of corticosterone; indicating for the first time a “cocktail” effect of specific OHCs in blood plasma associated with high baseline levels of corticosterone in male glaucous gulls. It is suggested that the high levels of OHCs may act as a chronic stressor. The OHCs may interfere with the Arctic seabirds’ ability to respond to environmental stressors, such as climate change and food availability, by disrupting the baseline levels of corticosterone and weakening the feedback mechanisms of the stress axis. Elevated baseline levels may lead to suppression of immune parameters and reduced survival rate. Due to a small sample size assessed in the present study, more research is needed to confirm a possible relationship between the disrupted stress axis and environmental contaminants in the Arctic seabirds.
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Resilience and adaptation among Alaska Native men

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293575
Source
Smith College School for Social Work.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2003
Author
Graves, K.
Source
Smith College School for Social Work.
Date
2003
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Indigenous Groups
Inuit
Athabaskan
Publication Type
Dissertation
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Keywords
Resilience
Adaptability
Adjustment
Stress
Eskimos - mental health
Indians of North America - Mental health
Dysfunctional families
Adult children of dysfunctional families
Substance abuse
Men - mental health
Psychiatry, transcultural
Abstract
This multi-method study examined the resilience, adaptive capacities, and gender role transitions of 73 Alaska Native men, using survey and ethnographic data from the 'Social Transitions of the North' (McNabb, Richards, et al, 1993-1995) and similar follow-up data ten years later. The study found that Alaska Native men are adapting to social and environmental transitions, collective emotional and psychological injury. They are being challenged by the redefinition of their position within the family and community. Data analysis suggested that reliance upon cultural values such as subsistence, responsibility to the tribe, respect for the land, honoring elders and reliance upon Christian values can help them adapt and minimize effects of chronic social problems. Numerous cultures have experienced genocide and unresolved trauma across generations. The results of this study can help social workers and other providers gain an understanding of the importance of improving resilience by helping cultures maintain their uniqueness and integrity.
Notes
BF698.35.R47 G73 2003 ALASKA
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Riddu Riddu, joik or rock-n-roll? A study of Riddu Riddu Festivála and its role as a cultural tool for ethnic revialization [sic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297029
Source
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
April 2008
  1 document  
Author
Leonenko, Anastassia Valerievna
Source
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Date
April 2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1656646
Keywords
International Indigenous Riddu Riddu Festivála
Manndalen
Coastal Saami
Culture
Language
Lifestyle
Revitalisation
Abstract
The International Indigenous Riddu Riddu Festivála has taken place every year since 1991 in Manndalen, a Coastal Saami hamlet, in the municipality of Kåfjord in the county of Troms in the North of Norway. The festival represents by itself an independent event that through indigenous management and developed ethno-relations inside the country, promoting the idea of cultural awareness and sensitivity to all ethnic groups, however different they might be, and support them in terms of preservation of their culture, language, and lifestyle in our global and developed world.
This thesis is intended to show the ambiguity and complexity of the Coastal Saami identity in Manndalen, not only with relation to Norwegians, but also with reference to the situation among locals, between adults and youth, traditions and modernity. In other words, which relations between traditions and modernity does Riddu Riddu demonstrate? Therefore this thesis will try to find out the relation of manndalinger to the cultural invention and show their chosen way of the invasion of traditions and how far they accept distortions as authentic to their heritage during the process of cultural invention and which sign-substitutions can be defined in relation to Coastal Saami culture today. Moreover, the purpose of this thesis is to understand the process by which means invented portions of culture acquire authenticity. In other words, how the social reproduction of culture – the process whereby people learn, embody, and transmit the conventional behaviours of their society (Hanson 1989:898) – is happening in the Coastal Saami community today. Therefore the Riddu Riddu festival will be considered further as one of the examples of Coastal Saami cultural invention with the purpose of revitalization an ethnic identity.
Thus, the Riddu Riddu festival can be seen as a visible tool in Manndalen’s process of ethnic revitalisation. In this case, can the festival be considered as an example of an imagined community (Anderson 1983), created as a cultural arena for the Saami political debates and bringing Saami people, the young and the old generation, together? Further, the festival can be seen as an important tool in the process of Coastal Saami ethnic revitalisation with perspectives on northern indigenous and in general world community nowadays. What is the role of this imagined community for its participants? What challenges do manndalinger have in creating both a local and a global symbolic community?
This master thesis is tended to bring up questions for further discussions and become one of the colourful pieces in the mosaic of understanding the Riddu Riddu festival and its role in the revitalisation of Saami identity.
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