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Death and prices: the political economy of Russia's alcohol crisis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296385
Source
University of California, Los Angeles.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
August 2009
percent of the 13 Feshbach (1999) argued that: “Environmental issues lurk behind much of the public-health problem.” 14 Data from the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey suggest the prevalence of smoking among men rose from 57 percent in 1992 to
  1 document  
Author
Treisman, Daniel
Author Affiliation
University of California, Los Angeles. Department of Political Science
Source
University of California, Los Angeles.
Date
August 2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
216782
Keywords
Alcohol
Mortality
Price regulation
Abstract
Most experts agree that alcohol abuse has been a major cause of Russia’s soaring mortality rate. But why have ever more Russians been drinking themselves to death? Some attribute this to despair in the face of painful economic change. I present evidence that, in fact, the surge in alcohol-related deaths—and premature deaths in general— was fueled by a dramatic fall in the real price of vodka, which dropped 77 percent between December 1990 and December 1994. Variation in vodka prices—both over time and across Russia’s regions—closely matches variation in mortality. Although market competition and weak excise collection help explain the fall in prices, the main reason appears to be populist price regulation during inflationary periods.
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Death-and-Prices-Final-Sept-09.pdf

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The health of the Finnish Sami in light of mortality and cancer pattern.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296244
Source
University of Helsinki, Faculty of Medicine Department of Public Health. 197 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2015
Epidemiological Cancer Research Finland Helena Mussalo-Rauhamaa Ph D, MD, Adjunct professor Department of Public Health University of Helsinki Finland Reviewers: Simo Näyhä Professor emeritus Adjunct Professor in Public Health University of Oulu Center for Environmental and Respiratory Health
  1 document  
Author
Soininen, Leena.
Source
University of Helsinki, Faculty of Medicine Department of Public Health. 197 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
2190774
Keywords
Sami
Ethnicity
Cancer
Mortality
Accidents
Abstract
Objectives. The Sami are regarded as indigenous people of Scandinavia and northwest Russia. Their traditional dwelling zone consists of the most northern parts of those countries. The Sami consist of rather small groups that have been living in isolation for a long time in harsh circumstances. Because there was not much data about the health and diseases of these Finnish ethnic minorities, the health of the Sami is the object of this dissertation, approached in terms of cause specific mortality, cancer incidence and the cancer patient survival.
Material and methods. All persons living in the two northern municipalities of Finland (Inari and Utsjoki) on 31st December 1978 were identified from the National Population Register. The Sami cohort was extracted from that by using the grouping of Sami of the International Biological Program, Human Health Adaptability-study. Dates of death and emigration of the cohort members were obtained from the Population Register. Follow-up for cancer through the files of the population-based countrywide Finnish Cancer Registry was done using the personal identification code as the key. The first period of the follow-up for mortality and cancer started on 1st January 1979 and ended at death or on 31st December 2005 (Study I, mortality), on 31st December 1998 (Study II, cancer), and on 31th December 2009 (Study IV, survival of cancer patients). The second period started on 1st January 2006 and ended 31st December 2010 (Study I) and Study II started on 1st January 1999, and ended on 31st December 2010. In Study III, a comparison of several cancer studies from Finland, Sweden and Norway from different time periods between the years 1961–2006 was made. A person representing at least 75 per cent of any ethnic group of Sami was classified as Sami. A non-Sami is a person without any Sami ethnicity, and the remaining persons were classified into the mixed group. The Sami group was divided into subcategories of North Sami, Inari Sami and Skolt Sami with the same principle: to be classified in a specific Sami subgroup, a person had to represent at least 75 per cent of this type of the three specific Sami ethnicity. In Study III, in Sweden and Norway the defining of Sami people for epidemiological studies has been different. In Sweden, all possible registers have been combined to find the Sami, and in Norway, the defining is concentrated to the Sami counties and the interview. In all countries, the Sami have mixed more or less with the main population, and therefore the Finnish cohort was recalculated for Study III. The Finnish cohort in that study has included all Sami with 1–100% of Saminess.
Notes
ISBN 978-951-51-1111-1 (pbk.)
ISBN 978-951-51-1118-2 (PDF)
Documents

THEHEALTHO_korjattu.pdf

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Sami lifestyle and health : epidemiological studies from northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295942
Source
Umea Universitet, Dean of Medical Faculty. Medical dissertation, New series no 1475. 78 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2012
Sami lifestyle and health epidemiological studies from northern Sweden Lena Maria Nilsson Public health and clinical medicine Nutritional research Umeå 2012 Responsible publisher under Swedish law: the Dean of the Medical Faculty This work is protected by the Swedish
  1 document  
Author
Nilsson, Lena Maria
Source
Umea Universitet, Dean of Medical Faculty. Medical dissertation, New series no 1475. 78 p.
Date
2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1806673
Keywords
Sami
Traditional diet
Traditional lifestyle
Cohort
Mortality
Cancer
Cardiovascular disease
Abstract
The aim of this PhD thesis was to expand the current knowledge of “traditional Sami” diet and lifestyle, and to test aspects of the Sami diet and lifestyle, specifically dietary pattern, macronutrient distribution and coffee consumption, in population-based epidemiological studies of mortality and incident cardiovascular disease and cancer in a general population...
Notes
ISBN 978-91-7459-359-4
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Riddu Riddu, joik or rock-n-roll? A study of Riddu Riddu Festivála and its role as a cultural tool for ethnic revialization [sic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297029
Source
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
April 2008
  1 document  
Author
Leonenko, Anastassia Valerievna
Source
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Date
April 2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1656646
Keywords
International Indigenous Riddu Riddu Festivála
Manndalen
Coastal Saami
Culture
Language
Lifestyle
Revitalisation
Abstract
The International Indigenous Riddu Riddu Festivála has taken place every year since 1991 in Manndalen, a Coastal Saami hamlet, in the municipality of Kåfjord in the county of Troms in the North of Norway. The festival represents by itself an independent event that through indigenous management and developed ethno-relations inside the country, promoting the idea of cultural awareness and sensitivity to all ethnic groups, however different they might be, and support them in terms of preservation of their culture, language, and lifestyle in our global and developed world.
This thesis is intended to show the ambiguity and complexity of the Coastal Saami identity in Manndalen, not only with relation to Norwegians, but also with reference to the situation among locals, between adults and youth, traditions and modernity. In other words, which relations between traditions and modernity does Riddu Riddu demonstrate? Therefore this thesis will try to find out the relation of manndalinger to the cultural invention and show their chosen way of the invasion of traditions and how far they accept distortions as authentic to their heritage during the process of cultural invention and which sign-substitutions can be defined in relation to Coastal Saami culture today. Moreover, the purpose of this thesis is to understand the process by which means invented portions of culture acquire authenticity. In other words, how the social reproduction of culture – the process whereby people learn, embody, and transmit the conventional behaviours of their society (Hanson 1989:898) – is happening in the Coastal Saami community today. Therefore the Riddu Riddu festival will be considered further as one of the examples of Coastal Saami cultural invention with the purpose of revitalization an ethnic identity.
Thus, the Riddu Riddu festival can be seen as a visible tool in Manndalen’s process of ethnic revitalisation. In this case, can the festival be considered as an example of an imagined community (Anderson 1983), created as a cultural arena for the Saami political debates and bringing Saami people, the young and the old generation, together? Further, the festival can be seen as an important tool in the process of Coastal Saami ethnic revitalisation with perspectives on northern indigenous and in general world community nowadays. What is the role of this imagined community for its participants? What challenges do manndalinger have in creating both a local and a global symbolic community?
This master thesis is tended to bring up questions for further discussions and become one of the colourful pieces in the mosaic of understanding the Riddu Riddu festival and its role in the revitalisation of Saami identity.
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