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Food customs of rural and urban Inupiaq elders and their relationships to select nutrition parameters, food insecurity, health, and physical and mental functioning

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274183
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2007
FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY Miami, Florida FOOD CUSTOMS OF RURAL AND URBAN INUPIAQ ELDERS AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS TO SELECT NUTRITION PARAMETERS, FOOD INSECURITY, HEALTH, AND PHYSICAL AND MENTAL FUNCTIONING A dissertation submitted in partial
  1 document  
Author
Smith, Janell
Author Affiliation
Florida International University
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1102377
Keywords
Alaska
Customs
Diet
Elders
Food
Inupiaq
Mental health
Native foods
Subsistence lifestyle
Abstract
The Inupiaq Tribe resides north of the Arctic Circle in northwestern Alaska. The people are characterized by their continued dependence on harvested fish, game and plants, known as a subsistence lifestyle (Lee 2000:35-45). Many are suggesting that they leave their historical home and move to urban communities, places believed to be more comfortable as they age. Tribal Elders disagree and have stated, "Elders need to be near the river where they were raised" (Branch 2005:1). The research questions focused on differences that location had on four groups of variables: nutrition parameters, community support, physical functioning and health. A total of 101 Inupiaq Elders ≥50 years were surveyed: 52 from two rural villages, and 49 in Anchorage. Location did not influence energy intake or intake of protein; levels of nutrition risk and food insecurity; all had similar rates between the two groups. Both rural and urban Elders reported few limitations of ADLs and IADLs. Self-reported general health scores (SF-12.v2 GH) were also similar by location. Differences were found with rural Elders reporting higher physical functioning summary scores (SF-12.v2 PCS), higher mental health scores (SF-12.v2 MH), higher vitality and less pain even though the rural mean ages were five years older than the urban Elders. Traditional food customs appear to support the overall health and well being of the rural Inupiaq Elders as demonstrated by higher intakes of Native foods, stronger food sharing networks and higher family activity scores than did urban Elders. The rural community appeared to foster continued physical activity. It has been said that when Elders are in the rural setting they are near "people they know" and it is a place "where they can get their Native food" (NRC 2005). These factors appear to be important as Inupiaq Elders age, as rural Inupiaq Elders fared as well or better than Inupiaq Elders in terms of diet, mental and physical health.
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Engaging Inupiaq values in land management for health through an action research appreciative inquiry process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294064
Source
Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center: San Francisco, CA. April 2007.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2007
ENGAGING INUPIAQ VALUES IN LAND MANAGEMENT FOR HEALTH THROUGH AN ACTION RESEARCH APPRECIATIVE INQUIRY PROCESS A dissertation presented to the Faculty of Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree
  1 document  
Author
Hild CM
Source
Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center: San Francisco, CA. April 2007.
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1172267
Keywords
Alaska
Kotzebue
Tribal Doctor Program
Maniilaq Association
Abstract
The investigation identified organizational system processes, which allow indigenous cultural values to be formally incorporated into planning and sustainable caring of traditionally used landscapes that promote healing and well-being. This community-based participatory research was based on a two-year effort to identify research needs within the Maniilaq Association’s Tribal Doctor Program in Kotzebue, Alaska. Information was requested on the processes required to utilize places of ancient traditional healing (PATH) that are now on public lands managed by the federal government. Ernest T. Stringer’s community-based action research of 1999 was utilized to engage 27 stakeholders from 14 interest groups, which included six traditional healers and one Alaska Native medical doctor. Appreciative inquiry was employed to solicit information, insights, ideas, and innovations for how best to assure that a well-known place of ancient traditional healing can be used in a sustainable manner. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in a naturalistic process after archival research and preliminary discussions yielded a foundation for the inquiry. Information was placed into a case dynamics matrix to assess thematic content. To provide for meaning-making, all participants reviewed all of the comments and provided their own written or oral interpretation of what was being said. These results were synthesized to include the multicultural worldviews of the participants through the use of their direct interpretations and recommendations for action. The participants told personal stories that reflected the contemporary spiritual and healing attributes of this ancient site. They repeatedly requested that its solitary and rustic nature be preserved. The primary indigenous values identified with the place are: respect for nature, spirituality, knowledge of the language, sharing, respect for elders, respect for others, and cooperation. The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) provides for traditional cultural practices to be discussed under formal agreements with tribal bodies and the federal government. The process being proposed for future application is the one used within this dissertation: Multicultural Engagement for Learning and Understanding (MELU) through action research and the use of appreciative inquiry. To assure the sustainable utilization of these PATH the process must employ geopiety, a respect for the natural healing quality of place.
Notes
A dissertation presented to the Faculty of Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Organizational Systems.
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The nature of Inuit Self-governance in Nunavut Territory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294491
Source
Dartmouth College. Hannover, NH: Senior Honors Thesis for Native American Studies.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
Spring 2009
Inuit, especially in the areas of health, education, and culture, legislators, bureaucrats, and many ordinary citizens are conversant in or at least have a concept of what is important to them as Inuit living in Inuit society. In my view, this is what makes Nunavut especially intriguing: the
  1 document  
Author
Argetsinger, Timothy H. Aqukkasuk
Source
Dartmouth College. Hannover, NH: Senior Honors Thesis for Native American Studies.
Date
Spring 2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
U.S.
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
894970
Keywords
Nunavut
Alaska
Inuit
History
Land claims
Education
Self-governance
Documents

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Competitive binding of persistent organic pollutants to the thyroid hormone transport protein transthyretin in glaucous gull ( Larus hyperboreus ).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297153
Source
Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Department of Biology. ix, 63, 12 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2015
, precipitation, sea ice conditions) and combined with the effect of contaminations and anthropogenic stressors, organisms may be vulnerable to detrimental effects (Bustnes et al., 2008). Climate change might adverse this by increasing the amount of stress in wildlife when adapting to the environmental
  1 document  
Author
Mortensen, Åse-Karen
Source
Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Department of Biology. ix, 63, 12 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
2569706
Keywords
Arctic
Glaucous gull
Persistent orgnic pollutants (POPS)
Metabolites
Thyroid
Svalbard
Abstract
The glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus) is one of the largest avian top predators in the Arctic. High levels of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and their metabolites have been detected in the glaucous gull, and several studies indicate that high levels of different POPs can contribute to detrimental effects. The mechanism behind these disruptions could be that chemicals interfere with the endocrine system. Thyroid hormones (THs) are important for thermogenesis, reproduction, growth and differentiation. They are transported in the circulation system of glaucous gull mainly bound to the transport proteins globulin, albumin and transthyretin (TTR). The aim of this study was to use molecular modeling to construct a homology model of the TTR in glaucous gull and to dock several well-known and new emerging POPs in the models to predict the binding affinity of POPs to the TH binding site in glaucous gull TTR...
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Perfluoroalkyl and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFASs) Affect the Thyroid Hormone System, Body Condition, and Body Mass in Two Arctic Seabird Species.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297154
Source
Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Department of Biology. xii, 60 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2015
Perfluoroalkyl and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFASs) Affect the Thyroid Hormone System, Body Condition, and Body Mass in Two Arctic Seabird Species Amalie Vigdel Ask Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Supervisor: Bjørn Munro Jenssen, IBI Co-supervisor: Geir Wing Gabrielsen, Norsk
  1 document  
Author
Ask, Amalie Vigdel
Source
Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Department of Biology. xii, 60 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1810790
Keywords
Arctic
Wildlife
Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs)
Thyroid
Kittiwakes
Arctic skuas
Abstract
Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are being transported into the Arctic where they are frequently detected in wildlife. These compounds are suspected thyroid hormone (TH) disruptors due to their structural similarity to triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), in addition to their propensity to bind to proteins. Therefore, PFASs may affect THs by competitive binding to the thyroid binding proteins in the blood. The aim of the study was to investigate the concentrations of PFASs and THs, and examine effects of PFASs on THs, body condition, and body mass in black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) and arctic skuas (Stercorarius parasiticus).
Blood was collected from breeding black-legged kittiwakes and arctic skuas. Black-legged kittiwakes (hereafter kittiwakes) were sampled in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard in 2013 and 2014. Arctic skuas were sampled on Brensholmen, Norway and in Kongsfjorden in 2014. The blood was analyzed for perfluorohexanoate (PFHxA), perfluoroheptanoate (PFHpA), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), perfluorononanoate (PFNA), perfluorodecanoate (PFDA), perfluoroundecanoate (PFUnDA), perfluorododecanoate (PFDoDA), perfluorotridecanoate (PFTrDA), perfluorotetradecanoate (PFTeDA), perfluorohexane sulfonate anion (PFHxS), branched and linear perfluorooctane sulfonate anion (brPFOS and linPFOS), perfluorodecane sulfonate anion (PFDS), and perfluorooctane sulfonamide (FOSA). The analyses were performed on plasma samples for the black-legged kittiwakes and on whole blood samples for the arctic skuas. PFHxA, PFHpA, PFOA, PFDS, and PFHxS were not detected in either bird species. Furthermore, total THs (TT3 and TT4) were quantified from plasma samples in both species. The resulting data was analyzed statistically to examine if there were associations between PFASs, THs, body condition (BC), and body mass.
The dominant PFASs in both kittiwakes and arctic skuas were linPFOS and PFUnDA. In both species, males generally had significantly higher concentrations of PFASs than the females. Furthermore, positive correlations between PFASs and THs were identified in both kittiwakes and arctic skuas. Male kittiwakes with high levels of PFDoDA, PFTrDA, and PFTeDA were in a better body condition than males with lower levels. Conversely, in female kittiwakes and male arctic skuas PFASs were negatively correlated to BC and body mass. The results indicate that PFASs affect the thyroid system, BC, and body mass in the two seabird species.
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Interactions between Pollutant Exposure and the Physiology in Adult Kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) at Svalbard.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297156
Source
Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Department of Biology. xii, 53 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2015
movement has been scientifically addressing environmental issues regarding ecology and health. Due to increasing human activity and the introduction of new chemicals into the environment, these two issues are more important today than ever. Some of these chemicals degrade slowly in the environment
  1 document  
Author
Svendsen, Niels Borup
Source
Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Department of Biology. xii, 53 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1326344
Keywords
Svalbard
Black-legged kittiwakes
Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs)
Polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs)
Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs)
Phosphorous flame retardants (PFRs)
Abstract
The present study investigated the use of feathers as a useful non-destructive biomonitoring tool for novel organic pollutants in black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla), and evaluated the interaction of both novel and legacy pollutants on body condition and thyroid hormones. In July and August 2014, feather and blood samples were collected from 20 black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) at two colonies (Blomstrandhalvøya and Krykkjefjellet) in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard. Samples were analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and phosphorous flame retardants (PFRs).
All compound classes were detected and quantified in feathers ranging from
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Levels and Effects of Organohalogens on Corticosterone Hormones in glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus) from Kongsfjorden, Svalbard.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297158
Source
Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Department of Biology. vii, 85 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2014
Levels and Effects of Organohalogens on Corticosterone Hormones in glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus) from Kongsfjorden, Svalbard Mari Engvig Løseth Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Supervisor: Bjørn Munro Jenssen, IBI Co-supervisor: Geir Wing Gabrielsen, Polarinstituttet, NP
  1 document  
Author
Løseth, Mari Engvig
Source
Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Department of Biology. vii, 85 p.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1691408
Keywords
Svalbard
Glaucous gull
Organohalogenated contaminants (OHCs)
Corticosterone
Stress
Abstract
Long-range atmospheric transport, ocean currents, sea ice and rivers are transporting environmental contaminants into the Arctic. Some of these contaminants can reach high concentrations in the upper trophic levels in the Arctic food web due to processes of bioaccumulation and biomagnification. The present study indicates a sex-specific pattern of levels and effects of selected organohalogenated contaminants (OHCs) in the avian top predator, glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus), breeding in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard. The aim of this present study was to report levels of OHCs and investigate whether the high levels detected in glaucous gulls can induce stress and thereby influence the stress response (measured by corticosterone concentration). No statistical differences were recorded for stress-induced or baseline corticosterone concentrations for males and female glaucous gulls. In females, a significant negative association was reported for lipid weight in blood plasma and baseline corticosterone. In male glaucous gulls, positive associations were found between levels of twenty-two OHCs and elevated baseline levels of corticosterone; indicating for the first time a “cocktail” effect of specific OHCs in blood plasma associated with high baseline levels of corticosterone in male glaucous gulls. It is suggested that the high levels of OHCs may act as a chronic stressor. The OHCs may interfere with the Arctic seabirds’ ability to respond to environmental stressors, such as climate change and food availability, by disrupting the baseline levels of corticosterone and weakening the feedback mechanisms of the stress axis. Elevated baseline levels may lead to suppression of immune parameters and reduced survival rate. Due to a small sample size assessed in the present study, more research is needed to confirm a possible relationship between the disrupted stress axis and environmental contaminants in the Arctic seabirds.
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Temporal trends of POPs in arctic foxes from Svalbard in light of a changing climate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297159
Source
Arctic University of Norway. Department of Arctic and Marine Biology. v, 31 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2013
. 2.5 Chemical analysis of OCPs and PCBs The liver samples were analyzed for POPs at the Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology at the Norwegian School of Veterinary Science (NVH) in Oslo. The laboratory is accredited by Norwegian Accreditation for testing the analyzed chemicals in biological
  1 document  
Author
Andersen, Martin Solhøi
Source
Arctic University of Norway. Department of Arctic and Marine Biology. v, 31 p.
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
7288057
Keywords
Svalbard
Arctic fox
Climate change
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
Liver
Reindeer
Abstract
The present study investigates concentrations and temporal trends of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) from Svalbard, Norway, adjusted for sex, age, body condition, diet, reindeer mortality and sea ice coverage. Number of reindeer carcasses in Adventdalen and sea ice coverage of Isfjorden in the spring preceding the trapping season were used as indexes for climate influenced food availability between years. We analysed liver of 100 foxes from Svalbard, collected in 1997/98, 1998/99, 1999/00, 2001/02, 2002/03, 2003/04 and 2010/11 for concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs; PCB -28, -52, -101, -118, -138, -153 and -180), chlordanes (cis-chlordane, trans-nonachlor and oxychlordane), p-p’-DDT, p-p’-DDE, HCB, mirex and ß-HCH. The POPs found in highest concentrations were oxychlordane, PCB-180 and PCB-153. We found evidence for a temporal decrease in SPCBs (PCB -118, -138, -153, -180), and Schlordanes (trans-nonachlor and oxychlordane) when controlling for possible confounding variables. We also found evidence for an effect of body condition and d13C on the POP concentrations, as thinner foxes and foxes feeding from the marine food web had significantly higher levels of POPs. There was no evidence for effects of sex, age, reindeer mortality and sea ice coverage on the concentrations of POPs, although increased reindeer mortality had a non-significant negative effect on all the POPs analysed. This study shows that correcting for body condition and diet is vital when investigating temporal trends of POPs in biota. It also illustrates some of the difficulties of investigating POP concentrations in an arctic predator living in an environment influenced by climatic variations.
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The health condition in the Sami population of Sweden, 1961-2002: Causes of death and incidences of cancer and cardiovascular diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296241
Source
Umeå University Medical Dissertations New Series no 962. Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. 71 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2005
Umeå University Medical Dissertations New Series no 962 – ISSN 0346-6612 – ISBN 91-7305-869-6 From Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, SE-901 85 Umeå, Sweden The health condition in the Sami population of Sweden
  1 document  
Author
Hassler, Sven
Source
Umeå University Medical Dissertations New Series no 962. Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. 71 p.
Date
2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
468671
Keywords
Sami
Health
Epidemiology
Reindeer herder
Cardiovascular diseases
Cancer
Causes of death
Acculturation
Sweden
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Mental health problems among the Swedish reindeer-herding Sami population in perspective of intersectionality, organisational culture and acculturation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296243
Source
Umeå University Medical Dissertations, New Series No 1430. Department of Clinical Sciences Division of Psychiatry, Umeå University. 67 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2011
Umeå University Medical Dissertations, New Series No 1430 Mental health problems among the Swedish reindeer-herding Sami population in perspective of intersectionality, organisational culture and acculturation Niclas Kaiser Department of Clinical Sciences Division of Psychiatry
  1 document  
Author
Kaiser, Niclas.
Source
Umeå University Medical Dissertations, New Series No 1430. Department of Clinical Sciences Division of Psychiatry, Umeå University. 67 p.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1189888
Keywords
Sami
Mental health
Sweden
Suicide
Prevention
Alcohol abuse
Depression
Anxiety
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The health of the Finnish Sami in light of mortality and cancer pattern.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296244
Source
University of Helsinki, Faculty of Medicine Department of Public Health. 197 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2015
Epidemiological Cancer Research Finland Helena Mussalo-Rauhamaa Ph D, MD, Adjunct professor Department of Public Health University of Helsinki Finland Reviewers: Simo Näyhä Professor emeritus Adjunct Professor in Public Health University of Oulu Center for Environmental and Respiratory Health
  1 document  
Author
Soininen, Leena.
Source
University of Helsinki, Faculty of Medicine Department of Public Health. 197 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
2190774
Keywords
Sami
Ethnicity
Cancer
Mortality
Accidents
Abstract
Objectives. The Sami are regarded as indigenous people of Scandinavia and northwest Russia. Their traditional dwelling zone consists of the most northern parts of those countries. The Sami consist of rather small groups that have been living in isolation for a long time in harsh circumstances. Because there was not much data about the health and diseases of these Finnish ethnic minorities, the health of the Sami is the object of this dissertation, approached in terms of cause specific mortality, cancer incidence and the cancer patient survival.
Material and methods. All persons living in the two northern municipalities of Finland (Inari and Utsjoki) on 31st December 1978 were identified from the National Population Register. The Sami cohort was extracted from that by using the grouping of Sami of the International Biological Program, Human Health Adaptability-study. Dates of death and emigration of the cohort members were obtained from the Population Register. Follow-up for cancer through the files of the population-based countrywide Finnish Cancer Registry was done using the personal identification code as the key. The first period of the follow-up for mortality and cancer started on 1st January 1979 and ended at death or on 31st December 2005 (Study I, mortality), on 31st December 1998 (Study II, cancer), and on 31th December 2009 (Study IV, survival of cancer patients). The second period started on 1st January 2006 and ended 31st December 2010 (Study I) and Study II started on 1st January 1999, and ended on 31st December 2010. In Study III, a comparison of several cancer studies from Finland, Sweden and Norway from different time periods between the years 1961–2006 was made. A person representing at least 75 per cent of any ethnic group of Sami was classified as Sami. A non-Sami is a person without any Sami ethnicity, and the remaining persons were classified into the mixed group. The Sami group was divided into subcategories of North Sami, Inari Sami and Skolt Sami with the same principle: to be classified in a specific Sami subgroup, a person had to represent at least 75 per cent of this type of the three specific Sami ethnicity. In Study III, in Sweden and Norway the defining of Sami people for epidemiological studies has been different. In Sweden, all possible registers have been combined to find the Sami, and in Norway, the defining is concentrated to the Sami counties and the interview. In all countries, the Sami have mixed more or less with the main population, and therefore the Finnish cohort was recalculated for Study III. The Finnish cohort in that study has included all Sami with 1–100% of Saminess.
Notes
ISBN 978-951-51-1111-1 (pbk.)
ISBN 978-951-51-1118-2 (PDF)
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Radioactive reindeer: the effect of Chernobyl on the Saami People of Northern Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296249
Source
Western Oregon University. 34 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2003
Scandinavian countries had gotten a much higher amount of 10 fallout due to the weather patterns. Once scientist knew that these areas were much more contaminated, the London papers were able to release their findings. These London news papers tended to focus on the environmental and health effects
  1 document  
Author
Dooney, Leslie Erin
Source
Western Oregon University. 34 p.
Date
2003
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
143273
Keywords
Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant
Contamination
Saami
Reindeer
Radiation
Nuclear fallout
Strontium-90
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Riddu Riddu, joik or rock-n-roll? A study of Riddu Riddu Festivála and its role as a cultural tool for ethnic revialization [sic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297029
Source
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
April 2008
  1 document  
Author
Leonenko, Anastassia Valerievna
Source
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Date
April 2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1656646
Keywords
International Indigenous Riddu Riddu Festivála
Manndalen
Coastal Saami
Culture
Language
Lifestyle
Revitalisation
Abstract
The International Indigenous Riddu Riddu Festivála has taken place every year since 1991 in Manndalen, a Coastal Saami hamlet, in the municipality of Kåfjord in the county of Troms in the North of Norway. The festival represents by itself an independent event that through indigenous management and developed ethno-relations inside the country, promoting the idea of cultural awareness and sensitivity to all ethnic groups, however different they might be, and support them in terms of preservation of their culture, language, and lifestyle in our global and developed world.
This thesis is intended to show the ambiguity and complexity of the Coastal Saami identity in Manndalen, not only with relation to Norwegians, but also with reference to the situation among locals, between adults and youth, traditions and modernity. In other words, which relations between traditions and modernity does Riddu Riddu demonstrate? Therefore this thesis will try to find out the relation of manndalinger to the cultural invention and show their chosen way of the invasion of traditions and how far they accept distortions as authentic to their heritage during the process of cultural invention and which sign-substitutions can be defined in relation to Coastal Saami culture today. Moreover, the purpose of this thesis is to understand the process by which means invented portions of culture acquire authenticity. In other words, how the social reproduction of culture – the process whereby people learn, embody, and transmit the conventional behaviours of their society (Hanson 1989:898) – is happening in the Coastal Saami community today. Therefore the Riddu Riddu festival will be considered further as one of the examples of Coastal Saami cultural invention with the purpose of revitalization an ethnic identity.
Thus, the Riddu Riddu festival can be seen as a visible tool in Manndalen’s process of ethnic revitalisation. In this case, can the festival be considered as an example of an imagined community (Anderson 1983), created as a cultural arena for the Saami political debates and bringing Saami people, the young and the old generation, together? Further, the festival can be seen as an important tool in the process of Coastal Saami ethnic revitalisation with perspectives on northern indigenous and in general world community nowadays. What is the role of this imagined community for its participants? What challenges do manndalinger have in creating both a local and a global symbolic community?
This master thesis is tended to bring up questions for further discussions and become one of the colourful pieces in the mosaic of understanding the Riddu Riddu festival and its role in the revitalisation of Saami identity.
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Canadian Inuit use of caribou and Swedish Sami use of reindeer in entrepreneurship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297035
Source
University of Canterbury. 460 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2015
xiii xiv xv Glossary ACIA. Arctic Climate Impact Assessment. ACL. Arctic Co-operatives Limited. The central service federation for 35 retail cooperatives across Arctic Canada. AEPS. Arctic Environmental Protection Strategy. AMAP. Arctic Monitoring and Assessment
  1 document  
Author
Mason, Aldene Helen Meis
Source
University of Canterbury. 460 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
8230174
Keywords
Reindeer herding
Entrepreneurship
Economic development
Inuit
Sami
Subsistence hunting
Documents

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Traditional food access for Alaska Native Elders in Anchorage long term care facilities

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77033
Source
RARE RA997.5.A4 S45 2006
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2006
TRADITIONAL FOOD ACCESS FOR ALASKA NATIVE ELDERS IN ANCHORAGE LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES by Mariko Selle THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the College of Health and Social Welfare University of Alaska Anchorage In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements For the Degree
  1 document  
Author
Selle, Mariko
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Anchorage, Master's Thesis
Source
RARE RA997.5.A4 S45 2006
Date
2006
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Traditional foods
Alaska
Elders
Long Term Care
Health and hygiene
Food service
Natives
Abstract
This project explored access to traditional native foods for Alaska Native elders residing in Anchorage long term care facilities. The study implemented a telephone survey of long term care facilities (N=64), qualitative key informant interviews with 11 long-term care facility operators, and qualitative key informant interviews with 14 Alaska Native elders and/or their family members with experience in long term care. It was found that Alaska Native elders in long term care generally had limited access to Native foods. Elders and their caregivers had differing perceptions on two key issues: 1) the perceived access elders had to traditional foods and 2) perceived importance of native foods. Cross cultural issues are important considerations in Anchorage?s long term care environment, due to the high number of ethnic minority caregivers in addition to the increasing number of ethnic minority residents. Several recommendations addressing barriers to traditional native food access are discussed.
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traditional_foods_ltc_facilities.pdf

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Resilience and adaptation among Alaska Native men

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293575
Source
Smith College School for Social Work.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2003
Author
Graves, K.
Source
Smith College School for Social Work.
Date
2003
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Indigenous Groups
Inuit
Athabaskan
Publication Type
Dissertation
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Keywords
Resilience
Adaptability
Adjustment
Stress
Eskimos - mental health
Indians of North America - Mental health
Dysfunctional families
Adult children of dysfunctional families
Substance abuse
Men - mental health
Psychiatry, transcultural
Abstract
This multi-method study examined the resilience, adaptive capacities, and gender role transitions of 73 Alaska Native men, using survey and ethnographic data from the 'Social Transitions of the North' (McNabb, Richards, et al, 1993-1995) and similar follow-up data ten years later. The study found that Alaska Native men are adapting to social and environmental transitions, collective emotional and psychological injury. They are being challenged by the redefinition of their position within the family and community. Data analysis suggested that reliance upon cultural values such as subsistence, responsibility to the tribe, respect for the land, honoring elders and reliance upon Christian values can help them adapt and minimize effects of chronic social problems. Numerous cultures have experienced genocide and unresolved trauma across generations. The results of this study can help social workers and other providers gain an understanding of the importance of improving resilience by helping cultures maintain their uniqueness and integrity.
Notes
BF698.35.R47 G73 2003 ALASKA
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Death and prices: the political economy of Russia's alcohol crisis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296385
Source
University of California, Los Angeles.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
August 2009
percent of the 13 Feshbach (1999) argued that: “Environmental issues lurk behind much of the public-health problem.” 14 Data from the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey suggest the prevalence of smoking among men rose from 57 percent in 1992 to
  1 document  
Author
Treisman, Daniel
Author Affiliation
University of California, Los Angeles. Department of Political Science
Source
University of California, Los Angeles.
Date
August 2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
216782
Keywords
Alcohol
Mortality
Price regulation
Abstract
Most experts agree that alcohol abuse has been a major cause of Russia’s soaring mortality rate. But why have ever more Russians been drinking themselves to death? Some attribute this to despair in the face of painful economic change. I present evidence that, in fact, the surge in alcohol-related deaths—and premature deaths in general— was fueled by a dramatic fall in the real price of vodka, which dropped 77 percent between December 1990 and December 1994. Variation in vodka prices—both over time and across Russia’s regions—closely matches variation in mortality. Although market competition and weak excise collection help explain the fall in prices, the main reason appears to be populist price regulation during inflationary periods.
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Death-and-Prices-Final-Sept-09.pdf

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Suicides in the Nenets Autonomous Okrug, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296388
Source
The Arctic University of Norway. Faculty of Health Sciences, The Department of Community Medicine. 90 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
September 2016
was suppressed by the invasion of state and private mining companies, and the balance of ethnicity and nature was broken. The environmental changes, along with an undeveloped infrastructure, affected lifestyle, livelihood, culture, and physical and mental health and well-being [89]. In the 1990s
  1 document  
Author
Sumarokov, Yury A.
Source
The Arctic University of Norway. Faculty of Health Sciences, The Department of Community Medicine. 90 p.
Date
September 2016
Language
English
Russian
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
3070579
Keywords
Nenets Autonomous Okrug (NAO)
Arkhangelsk Oblast (AO)
Suicide rates
Relative risks
Person-years
Indigenous Nenets
Suicide methods
Seasonality
Alcohol
Abstract
This is a study of suicides in the Nenets Autonomous Okrug (NAO), a region with a large proportion of indigenous Nenets. To our knowledge, this is the first study investigating the problem of suicide in the indigenous and non-indigenous populations of the Russian Arctic. Our study aim was to assess suicide rates in the indigenous and non-indigenous populations of the NAO, as well as the socio-demographic characteristics, differences in suicide methods, seasonal variations, and the potential role of alcohol in suicides in these two populations.
We conducted a retrospective, population-based mortality study of suicides in the NAO, using data from the autopsy reports of suicide victims in the region in 2002-2012. Sociodemographic data were obtained from passports and medical records, and then linked to total population data from the 2002 and 2010 censuses. Suicide rates for indigenous Nenets and the non-indigenous population were calculated according to different socio-demographic characteristics, and corresponding relative risks for these two populations were compared. Variations in suicide methods, seasonal variations, and variations in the day of the week suicides occurred in the NAO were compared with national data from the Russian Federal Statistics Service (Rosstat). Data on the presence of alcohol in the blood and blood alcohol content in suicide cases from the NAO were compared with data from the neighboring Arkhangelsk Oblast.
Suicide rates in the NAO were higher than corresponding national figures. Suicide rates were higher among the indigenous Nenets than the non-indigenous population, and were associated with different socio-demographic characteristics. We showed different relative frequencies of suicide by hanging, cutting, and firearm, as well as differences in suicide occurrence by month and day of the week in the NAO when compared with Russia as a whole.
The study results and conclusions may be useful to create suicide prevention programs that are targeted to different population groups in the Russian Arctic.
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Health and Wellbeing in the Arctic: The Critical Issues of Food Insecurity and Suicide Among Indigenous people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296454
Source
Social Humanities and Social Sciences University of Akureyri, Iceland
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
August 2018
discuss the mental health of Arctic indigenous people, with particular emphasis on high prevalence of suicide and how it is derived from past and present trauma and maintained by social, economic and environmental factors and conditions. Keywords: The Arctic, indigenous people, health and well
  1 document  
Author
Smáradóttir, Sveinbjörg
Author Affiliation
Bachelor of Arts degree in Social Sciences
Source
Social Humanities and Social Sciences University of Akureyri, Iceland
Date
August 2018
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
451032
Keywords
Arctic
Indigenous peoples
Health and welfare
Food insecurity
Spiritual health
Suicide
Abstract
Frumbyggjar Norðurslóða eru almennt við verri heilsu en aðrir íbúar svæðisins. Síðan afkomendur Evrópubúa hófu að leggja undir sig heimalönd frumbyggjanna, og fram á síðari hluta 20. aldar, gengu þeir í gegnum átakamiklar félagslegar- og efnahagslegar umbyltingar, voru neyddir til að yfirgefa heimalönd sín, samlagast og „nútímavæðast“ vestrænni menningu með alvarlegum afleiðingum fyrir heilsu þeirra og velferð. Í þessari ritgerð er fjallað um tvo mikilvæga þætti er varða heilsu og velferð frumbyggja á Norðurslóðum. Annarsvegar er það fæðu-óöryggi, orsakir og afleiðingar, og sambandið milli hefðbundinnar fæðu og leiða til fæðuöflunar og „vestræns“ mataræðis. Hinsvegar er fjallað andlega heilsu frumbyggjanna, með sérstaka áherslu á sjálfsvíg, orsakir og afleiðingar, hvernig þau tengjast atburðum og áföllum fortíðar og er viðhaldið af áskorunum sem frumbyggjarnir standa frammi fyrir í dag.
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Source
Univerza v Ljunljana. Fakulteta za Druzbene Vede. 241 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2016
important in all Sapmi, it has become the language of economy, health, education and other spheres of life. The global warming is affecting the whole world, but the changes are the most visible in the Arctic. The ice is melting and the temperatures of the air and sea are rising. Melting ice has
  1 document  
Source
Univerza v Ljunljana. Fakulteta za Druzbene Vede. 241 p.
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
2025863
Keywords
Sami
Parliaments
Arctic
Governance
Arctic Council
Fishing
Reindeer herding
Land rights
Mining
Climate change
Abstract
This Master's Thesis discusses two phenomena: the Sami people and the Arctic. The Sami are indigenous populations of Norway, Sweden, Finland and the Russian Federation. The Sami are a single people living in the four different countries, where they strive for their non-territorial autonomy. The main channels for their political influence are the Sami Parliaments on the respective nation states, while in Russia have very limited legal means for their political participation and influencing their position. The Arctic is the northernmost part of the World; it is the huge ocean mostly covered with ice, surrounded by land. It is the Sami peoples' homeland. The littoral states, the United States of America, Canada, the Russian Federation, Norway, and Greenland (Denmark) with Iceland, Sweden and Finland formed the Arctic Council have, the main intergovernmental and supranational organization in the Arctic, where major decisions are adopted. The Arctic is rich in natural resources and extractive industries are influencing both the peoples and environment of the Arctic. Global warming rapidly changes the face of the Arctic, while over-exploitation endangers the indigenous peoples and biodiversity.
The first part of the master thesis presents the Sami people, their history, political organization, legal regulation and protection of the Sami people, their everyday lives and the ongoing changes taking place in the Arctic. The second part presents the results of the survey among the Sami people. The survey tackled different set of personal views regarding topics discussed in the thesis.
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