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[Comparative characteristics of physical development of children and adolescents of the 1st and 2nd generation of European natives of the Magadan region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290338
Source
Gig Sanit. 2017; 96(2):171-6
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Author
L I Grechkina
V O Karandasheva
Source
Gig Sanit. 2017; 96(2):171-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Adolescent
Adolescent Development
Anthropometry - methods
Body Constitution - ethnology
Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena
Child
Cohort Effect
Cold Climate
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Male
Residence Characteristics
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
In the paper there are presented results of investigations of indices of the physical development of male adolescents aged of 11-17 years - residents of the 1-2 generation from new coming European migrants in the Magadan region during 2008-2014. There were observed 418 adolescents - representatives of the 1 generation, and 463 cases from the 2 generation. Representatives of the 2 generation in the initial period (11-12 years) were established to show higher tempos of growth. Maximal gains in the body length, body mass, and chest circumference in adolescents of the 1 generation occur at the age of 13-14 years, but in the 2 generation it is seen one year later - at the age of 14-15 years. In adolescents of each generation there was noted the high variability of the level of major indices of the physical development. However, among representatives of the 1 generation there is less proportion of cases with normal or average values of body length, body mass, and chest circumference along with larger proportion ofpersons with diverse deviations, as well deficit as excess in comparison with the 2 generation. At the final stage of the puberty age (17 years) more adolescents with microsomatic (25%) and disharmonic (38.2%) body constitution occur among the subjects from the 1 generation as compared to those of the 2 generation (19.7% and 28.2%, respectively).
PubMed ID
29446606 View in PubMed
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[Peculirities of physical development and state of the cardiovascular system in young males from various districts of Northeast of Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290339
Source
Gig Sanit. 2017; 96(2):162-5
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Author
I V Averyanova
A L Maksimov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2017; 96(2):162-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Adolescent
Adolescent Development
Anthropometry - methods
Body Constitution - ethnology
Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena
Cold Climate
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Male
Population Groups - ethnology
Russia
Abstract
The comparative research was carried to study basic indices of physical development and cardiovascular system in Aboriginals and north-born Europeans of different areas of Russia’s northeast (Chukotsky Autonomous District, Magadan Region). According to most examined morphofunctional characteristics no significant differences were found between the groups of subjects that testify to the formation, under the current social conditions, of convergent adaptation processes typical for the two ethnic cohorts from the observed areas of residing. High percentage of asthenia in body constitution of young residents from Magadan Region was common and mostly demonstrated by Aboriginals of the Magadan city.
PubMed ID
29446604 View in PubMed
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Hybrid practices as a means to implement quality improvement: A comparative qualitative study in a Dutch and Swedish hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298511
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 2018 Apr/Jun; 43(2):148-156
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Author
Julia Quartz-Topp
Johan M Sanne
Heide Pöstges
Author Affiliation
Julia Quartz-Topp, PhD, is Lecturer, Science and Technology Studies for Development, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Maastricht University, The Netherlands. E-mail: julia.quartz@maastrichtuniversity.nl. Johan M. Sanne, PhD, is Associate Professor and Senior Consultant, IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. Heide Pöstges, MSc, is Honorary Research Fellow, Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education, Kingston University and St. George's University of London, United Kingdom.
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 2018 Apr/Jun; 43(2):148-156
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Health Personnel - psychology
Health Plan Implementation - methods - organization & administration
Hospital Administration - methods - trends
Hospitals
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Netherlands
Organizational Innovation
Qualitative Research
Quality Improvement - standards
Sweden
Abstract
Managers and scholars commonly perceive resistance from professionals as hampering the implementation of quality improvement (QI) and refer to the incompatibility of clinical and managerial approaches to QI as a reason. Yet a growing body of research indicates that, in practice, these two approaches rather blend into hybrid practices that embody different types of QI-related knowledge and values. This opens up a new perspective on implementation challenges that moves attention away from resistance against managerial QI toward difficulties for clinicians to draw together different types of knowledge and values within their clinical work. So far, little is known about how managers can support clinicians to generate hybrid QI practices.
The aim of this study was to deepen our understanding of how managers can support the generation of hybrid practices that help clinicians to integrate QI into their everyday work.
We draw on comparative qualitative research including 21 semistructured interviews, documentary analysis, and participant observation that we conducted in one Dutch and one Swedish hospital over a period of 8 months in 2011/2012.
Hospital managers designed hybrid forums, tools, and professional roles in order to facilitate the integration of different QI practices, knowledge, and values. This integration generated new hybrid practices and an infrastructure for QI that has potential to support clinicians in their efforts to align different demands.
New opportunities to implement QI emerge when we change the implementation problem from clinical resistance to the need of support for clinicians to develop hybrid QI practices. Hospital managers then have to intentionally organize for the generation of hybrid practices by designing, for example, hybrid forums, tools, and professional roles that integrate different knowledge and values in a nonhierarchical way.
PubMed ID
27849647 View in PubMed
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Anthropogenic impact on marine ecosystem health: A comparative multi-proxy investigation of recent sediments in coastal waters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295677
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Aug; 133:328-335
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2018
Author
Anna Filipkowska
Ludwik Lubecki
Malgorzata Szymczak-Zyla
Tomasz M Ciesielski
Bjørn M Jenssen
Murat V Ardelan
Hanna Mazur-Marzec
Gijs D Breedveld
Amy M P Oen
Anna Zamojska
Grazyna Kowalewska
Author Affiliation
Marine Pollution Laboratory, Institute of Oceanology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sopot, Poland. Electronic address: afilipkowska@iopan.gda.pl.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Aug; 133:328-335
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Ecosystem
Ecotoxicology - methods
Endocrine Disruptors - analysis - toxicity
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Estuaries
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Metals - analysis
Mutagens - analysis - toxicity
Norway
Organotin Compounds - analysis
Phenols - analysis
Poland
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Hazardous substances entering the sea, and ultimately deposited in bottom sediments, pose a growing threat to marine ecosystems. The present study characterized two coastal areas exposed to significant anthropogenic impact - Gulf of Gdansk (Poland), and Oslofjord/Drammensfjord (Norway) - by conducting a multi-proxy investigation of recent sediments, and comparing the results in light of different available thresholds for selected contaminants. Sediment samples were analyzed for benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nonylphenols (NPs), organotin compounds (OTs), toxic metals (Cd, Hg, Pb), as well as mutagenic, genotoxic and endocrine-disrupting activities (in CALUX bioassays). In general, a declining trend in the deposition of contaminants was observed. Sediments from both basins were not highly contaminated with PAHs, NPs and metals, while OT levels may still give rise to concern in the Norwegian fjords. The results suggest that the contamination of sediments depends also on water/sediment conditions in a given region.
PubMed ID
30041322 View in PubMed
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Quantitative assessment of microbes from samples of indoor air and dust.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297647
Source
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2018 05; 28(3):231-241
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2018
Author
Hanna K Leppänen
Martin Täubel
Balamuralikrishna Jayaprakash
Asko Vepsäläinen
Pertti Pasanen
Anne Hyvärinen
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, P.O.Box 95, Kuopio 70701, Finland.
Source
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2018 05; 28(3):231-241
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Dust
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Finland
Fungi - isolation & purification
Gram-Negative Bacteria - isolation & purification
Gram-Positive Bacteria - isolation & purification
Housing
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Reproducibility of Results
Rural Population
Surveys and Questionnaires
Urban Population
Abstract
Different types of house dust samples are widely used as surrogates of airborne inhalation exposure in studies assessing health effects of indoor microbes. Here we studied-in a quantitative assessment-the representativeness of different house dust samples of indoor air (IA) and investigated seasonality and reproducibility of indoor samples. Microbial exposure was measured five times over 1 year in four rural and five urban Finnish homes. Six sampling methods were used: button inhalable aerosol sampler (actively collected personal and indoor air sampling), settled dust, floor dust, mattress dust and vacuum cleaner dust bag dust; the latter three referred to herein as "reservoir dust samples". Using quantitative PCR, we quantified the fungal species Cladosporium herbarum, the fungal group Penicillium/Aspergillus/Paecilomyces variotii, total fungal DNA, and Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We observed significant differences in microbial levels between rural and urban homes, most pronounced for personal air samples. Fungal species and groups but not total fungal DNA in indoor air correlated moderately to well with reservoir dust and with personal air samples. For bacterial groups, the correlations between air and dust were generally lower. Samples of indoor air and settled dust reflected similarly seasonal variation in microbial levels and were also similar compositionally, as assessed by ratios of qPCR markers. In general, determinations from mattress dust and other reservoir samples were better reproducible in repeated assessments over time than from indoor air or settled dust. This study indicates that settled dust reflects the microbial composition of indoor air and responds similarly to environmental determinants. Reservoir dusts tend to predict better microbial levels in indoor air and are more reproducible. Sampling strategies in indoor studies need to be developed based on the study questions and may need to rely on more than one type of sample.
PubMed ID
28975927 View in PubMed
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Do Associations Between Perceived Environmental and Individual Characteristics and Walking Limitations Depend on Lower Extremity Performance Level?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291084
Source
J Aging Health. 2017 Jun; 29(4):640-656
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Ritva Sakari
Merja Rantakokko
Erja Portegijs
Susanne Iwarsson
Sarianna Sipilä
Anne Viljanen
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
1 University of Jyvaskyla, Finland.
Source
J Aging Health. 2017 Jun; 29(4):640-656
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Environment
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Independent living
Interviews as Topic
Lower Extremity - physiopathology
Male
Mobility Limitation
Perception
Physical Fitness - physiology
Sweden
Task Performance and Analysis
Walking - physiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyze whether the associations between perceived environmental and individual characteristics and perceived walking limitations in older people differ between those with intact and those with poorer lower extremity performance.
Persons aged 75 to 90 ( N = 834) participated in interviews and performance tests in their homes. Standard questionnaires were used to obtain walking difficulties; environmental barriers to and, facilitators of, mobility; and perceived individual hindrances to outdoor mobility. Lower extremity performance was tested using Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB).
Among those with poorer lower extremity performance, the likelihood for advanced walking limitations was, in particular, related to perceived poor safety in the environment, and among those with intact performance to perceived social issues, such as lack of company, as well as to long distances.
The environmental correlates of walking limitations seem to depend on the level of lower extremity performance.
PubMed ID
27056910 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.