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The SELMA study: a birth cohort study in Sweden following more than 2000 mother-child pairs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121724
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2012 Sep;26(5):456-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Carl-Gustaf Bornehag
Syed Moniruzzaman
Malin Larsson
Cecilia Boman Lindström
Mikael Hasselgren
Anna Bodin
Laura B von Kobyletzkic
Fredrik Carlstedt
Fredrik Lundin
Eewa Nånberg
Bo A G Jönsson
Torben Sigsgaard
Staffan Janson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Karlstad University, Sweden. carl-gustaf.bornehag@kau.se
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2012 Sep;26(5):456-67
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Life Style
Mothers
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Selection Bias
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics as Topic
Sweden
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
This paper describes the background, aim and study design for the Swedish SELMA study that aimed to investigate the importance of early life exposure during pregnancy and infancy to environmental factors with a major focus on endocrine disrupting chemicals for multiple chronic diseases/disorders in offspring.
The cohort was established by recruiting women in the 10th week of pregnancy. Blood and urine from the pregnant women and the child and air and dust from home environment from pregnancy and infancy period have been collected. Questionnaires were used to collect information on life styles, socio-economic status, living conditions, diet and medical history.
Of the 8394 reported pregnant women, 6658 were invited to participate in the study. Among the invited women, 2582 (39%) agreed to participate. Of the 4076 (61%) non-participants, 2091 women were invited to a non-respondent questionnaire in order to examine possible selection bias. We found a self-selection bias in the established cohort when compared with the non-participant group, e.g. participating families did smoke less (14% vs. 19%), had more frequent asthma and allergy symptoms in the family (58% vs. 38%), as well as higher education among the mothers (51% vs. 36%) and more often lived in single-family houses (67% vs. 60%).
These findings indicate that the participating families do not fully represent the study population and thus, the exposure in this population. However, there is no obvious reason that this selection bias will have an impact on identification of environmental risk factors.
PubMed ID
22882790 View in PubMed
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Influence of glutathione-related genes on symptoms and immunologic markers among vulcanization workers in the southern Sweden rubber industries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159907
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2008 Jul;81(7):913-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Lena S Jönsson
Bo A G Jönsson
Anna Axmon
Margareta Littorin
Karin Broberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, 221 85, Lund, Sweden. lena_s.jonsson@med.lu.se
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2008 Jul;81(7):913-9
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - immunology
Analysis of Variance
Biological Markers - analysis - urine
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Glutathione Transferase - genetics
Humans
Immunity, Cellular
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Industry
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Questionnaires
Rubber
Sweden
Abstract
The aim was to elucidate the role of genetic variants on symptoms of the eyes and airways, headache and nausea, as well as on immunologic markers, among vulcanization workers in the contemporary Swedish rubber industry. Polymorphisms in genes, which are involved in the defense against reactive oxygen species and metabolism of toxic substances present in the vulcanization fumes, were analyzed.
One hundred and forty-five exposed and 117 unexposed workers were included in the study. Medical and occupational histories were obtained in structured interviews. Symptoms were recorded and immunologic markers analyzed in blood. Polymorphisms in glutathione-related genes (glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC)-129, glutamate cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM)-588, glutathione S-transferase alpha 1 (GSTA1)-52, GSTM1*O, GSTP1-105, GSTP1-114, and GSTT1*O) were analyzed by Taqman-based allelic discrimination and ordinary PCR.
A protective effect of GSTA1-52 (G/A + A/A) genotype on symptoms and immunologic cells, in particular among exposed workers, was suggested. Exposed workers with GSTT1*O had increased risk of nosebleed compared to exposed workers with GSTT1*1. Exposed workers with GSTP1-105 (ile/val + val/val) had decreased levels of total immunoglobulin E (IgE) compared to exposed workers with GSTP1-105 ile/ile. GCLC-129 variant genotype demonstrated increased levels of immunologic cells among exposed workers, although statistical significance was not reached.
Our data indicate that hereditary factors influence the susceptibility to symptoms and the immunologic response of workers in the rubber industry.
PubMed ID
18066575 View in PubMed
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