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Phthalates and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid in human amniotic fluid: temporal trends and timing of amniocentesis in pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126355
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Jun;120(6):897-903
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Morten Søndergaard Jensen
Bent Nørgaard-Pedersen
Gunnar Toft
David M Hougaard
Jens Peter Bonde
Arieh Cohen
Ane Marie Thulstrup
Richard Ivell
Ravinder Anand-Ivell
Christian H Lindh
Bo A G Jönsson
Author Affiliation
Danish Ramazzini Centre, Department of Occupational Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. morten@sondergaard-jensen.dk
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Jun;120(6):897-903
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alkanesulfonic Acids - analysis
Amniocentesis - methods
Amniotic Fluid - chemistry
Chromatography, Liquid
Denmark
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Female
Fluorocarbons - analysis
Gestational Age
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Phthalic Acids - analysis
Pregnancy
Abstract
Measures of prenatal environmental exposures are important, and amniotic fluid levels may directly reflect fetal exposures during hypothesized windows of vulnerability.
We aimed to detect various phthalate metabolites and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) in human amniotic fluid, to study temporal exposure trends, and to estimate potential associations with gestational week of amniocentesis and maternal age and parity at amniocentesis.
We studied 300 randomly selected second-trimester amniotic fluid samples from a Danish pregnancy-screening biobank covering 1980 through 1996. We used only samples from male offspring pregnancies. We assayed the environmental pollutants by liquid chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry and analyzed data using generalized linear regression models.
We detected the di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) metabolite mono(2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl) phthalate (5cx-MEPP) at a median concentration of 0.27 ng/mL [interquartile range (IQR): 0.20-0.37 ng/mL], the diisononyl phthalate (DiNP) metabolite mono(4-methyl-7-carboxyheptyl) phthalate (7cx-MMeHP) at 0.07 ng/mL (IQR: 0.05-0.11 ng/mL), and PFOS at 1.1 ng/mL (IQR: 0.66-1.60 ng/mL). An increase of 1 calendar year was associated with 3.5% lower [95% confidence interval (CI): -4.8%, -2.1%] 5cx-MEPP levels and with 7.1% higher (95% CI: 5.3%, 9.0%) 7cx-MMeHP levels. For each later gestational week of amniocentesis, 5cx-MEPP was 9.9% higher (95% CI: 4.8%, 15.2%), 7cx-MMeHP was 8.6% higher (95: CI: 2.7%, 14.9%), and PFOS was 9.4% higher (95: CI: 3.3%, 15.9%). We observed no associations with maternal age or parity.
Measured metabolite levels appeared to parallel decreasing DEHP exposure and increasing DiNP exposure during the study period. The environmental pollutant levels were positively associated with later gestational age at amniocentesis during pregnancy weeks 12-22.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22398305 View in PubMed
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Biomarkers of exposure in Monday morning urine samples as a long-term measure of exposure to aromatic diisocyanates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259224
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2014 May;87(4):365-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Håkan Tinnerberg
Karin Broberg
Christian H Lindh
Bo A G Jönsson
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2014 May;87(4):365-72
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - blood - urine
Biological Markers - blood - urine
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Genotype
Glutathione Transferase - genetics
Humans
Isocyanates - blood - urine
Male
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Polymorphism, Genetic
Sweden
Toluene 2,4-Diisocyanate - blood - urine
Abstract
Exposure to diisocyanates is a known occupational hazard. One method for monitoring occupational exposure is by analyzing biomarkers in hydrolyzed urine and plasma. The half-life of the biomarkers in plasma is about 3 weeks, and the urinary elimination is divided into one fast (hours) and one slow phases (weeks). Polymorphism in glutathione S-transferase enzymes (GST) is earlier shown to modify the metabolism. The aim of the study was to assess whether biomarkers of exposure in urine collected after two non-exposed days correlate with levels in plasma and whether they can be used as a measure for long-term exposure to aromatic diisocyanates and further whether polymorphisms in GST influenced the correlations.
Biomarkers of exposure was analyzed in urine and blood samples collected from 24 workers, exposed to at least one of toluene-, methylenediphenyl- or naphthalene diisocyanate, on a Monday morning after at least two unexposed days. Moreover, genotype was determined for 19 of the workers.
The corresponding specific gravity-adjusted biomarkers in urine and plasma levels for the different diisocyanates correlated well (r between 0.689 and 0.988). When taking all samples together, the correlation coefficient was 0.926. Polymorphism in the GSTM1 genotype seemed to modify the association.
Urine collected after two unexposed days can possibly be used as long-term biomarker of exposure for aromatic diisocyanates.
PubMed ID
23558852 View in PubMed
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Association of maternal serum concentrations of 2,2', 4,4'5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene (p,p'-DDE) levels with birth weight, gestational age and preterm births in Inuit and European populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141020
Source
Environ Health. 2010;9:56
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Bogdan J Wojtyniak
Daniel Rabczenko
Bo A G Jönsson
Valentyna Zvezday
Henning S Pedersen
Lars Rylander
Gunnar Toft
Jan K Ludwicki
Katarzyna Góralczyk
Anna Lesovaya
Lars Hagmar
Jens Peter Bonde
Author Affiliation
Department-Centre of Monitoring and Analyses of Population Health, National Institute of Public Health-National Institute of Hygiene, Warsaw, Poland. bogdan@pzh.gov.pl
Source
Environ Health. 2010;9:56
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Birth Weight - drug effects
Cohort Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood - toxicity
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Gestational Age
Greenland
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood - toxicity
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - growth & development
Inuits
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Poland
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Ukraine
Abstract
Epidemiological studies on the association between maternal exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and fetal growth alteration report inconsistent findings which weights in favor of additional studies.
Blood samples were collected from interviewed pregnant women in Greenland (572), Kharkiv (611) and Warsaw (258) and were analyzed for CB-153 and p,p'-DDE by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Data on birth weight, gestational age and preterm birth were obtained for 1322 singleton live births. We examined the association between natural log-transformed serum POPs concentration and birth weight and gestational age using multiple linear regression and the association with prematurity using logistic regression controlling for potential confounding factors.
The median serum concentrations of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE were for Inuit mothers 105.6 and 298.9, for Kharkiv mothers 27.0 and 645.4 and for Warsaw mothers 10.7 and 365.2 ng/g lipids, respectively. Increase in CB-153 concentration by one unit on the log scale in Inuit mothers serum was associated with significant decrease in infant birth weight of -59 g and gestational age by -0.2 week. Decreases observed in the cohorts in Kharkiv (-10 g and -0.1 week) and in Warsaw (-49 g and -0.2 week) were not statistically significant. Increase in p,p'-DDE concentration by one unit on the log scale was associated with a statistically significant decrease in infant birth weight of -39.4 g and -104.3 g and shortening of gestational age of -0.2 week and -0.6 week in the Inuit and Warsaw cohorts, respectively. In the Kharkiv cohort decrease in birth weight (-30.5 g) was not significant, however a shortening of gestational age of -0.2 week per increase in p,p'-DDE concentration by one unit on the log scale was of the borderline significance. There was no significant association between CB-153 and p,p'-DDE concentrations and risk of preterm birth however, in all cohorts the odds ratio was above 1.
In utero exposure to POPs may reduce birth weight and gestational age of newborns however, new insights as to why results vary across studies were not apparent.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20819217 View in PubMed
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Association between pregnancy loss and urinary phthalate levels around the time of conception.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129391
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Mar;120(3):458-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Gunnar Toft
Bo A G Jönsson
Christian H Lindh
Tina Kold Jensen
Niels H Hjollund
Anne Vested
Jens Peter Bonde
Author Affiliation
Danish Ramazzini Center, Department of Occupational Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. guntof@rm.dk
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Mar;120(3):458-63
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - chemically induced - epidemiology
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity - urine
Female
Fertilization
Humans
Phthalic Acids - metabolism - toxicity - urine
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
Animal studies indicate that some phthalate metabolites may harm female reproductive function.
We assessed the associations between exposure to phthalate metabolites and pregnancy loss.
Using a previously established cohort of couples planning their first pregnancy, we analyzed four primary and two oxidized secondary phthalate metabolites in urine samples collected on day 10 after the first day of the last menstrual period before conception occurred (n = 128) and during the previous cycle (if any, n = 111). Subclinical embryonal loss was identified by repeated measurement of urinary human chorionic gonadotropin, and information on clinical spontaneous abortions was obtained by telephone interview with the mother.
Pregnancy loss (n = 48) was increased among women with urinary concentration of monoethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP) in the upper tertile in the conception sample compared with women in the lowest tertile [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.9; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1, 7.6]. The corresponding OR for subclinical embryonal loss (n = 32) was 40.7 (95% CI: 4.5, 369.5).
The phthalate metabolite MEHP was associated with higher occurrence of pregnancy loss. Because this is the first human study to show this association and the sample size is small, the findings need to be corroborated in independent studies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22113848 View in PubMed
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Levels of 2-thiothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (TTCA) and effect modification of polymorphisms of glutathione-related genes in vulcanization workers in the southern Sweden rubber industries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164876
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2007 Jul;80(7):589-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Lena S Jönsson
Karin Broberg
Ulf Bergendorf
Anna Axmon
Margareta Littorin
Bo A G Jönsson
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine and Psychiatric Epidemiology, University Hospital, 221 85, Lund, Sweden. lena_s.jonsson@med.lu.se
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2007 Jul;80(7):589-98
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - toxicity
Female
Genotype
Glutamate-Cysteine Ligase - genetics
Glutathione - genetics - metabolism
Glutathione Transferase - genetics
Humans
Industry
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Rubber
Sweden - epidemiology
Thiazolidines - toxicity - urine
Abstract
Workers in the rubber industry are exposed to a complex mixture of hazardous substances and have increased risk of developing several diseases. However, there is no up to date survey examining the exposure in the Swedish rubber industry. One of the toxic compounds in the industry is carbon disulfide (CS(2)), which is biotransformed to 2-thiothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (TTCA). TTCA is used as a biomarker of CS(2) exposure, but there seem to exist inter- and intraindividual variability; which could partly be due to genetic variation. The aim of the study was to determine TTCA levels and the modifying effects of glutathione-related genes in a group of Swedish rubber workers.
Urine was collected from both exposed workers and controls during the last 4 h of the work shift. The level of TTCA in urine was analyzed by liquid chromatograpy tandem mass spectrometry. Genotyping of the single nucleotide polymorphisms GCLC-129, GCLM-588, GSTA1-52, GSTP1-105 and GSTP1-114 and deletions of GSTM1 and GSTT1 were performed with real-time PCR or ordinary PCR and subsequent agarose electrophoresis.
The highest levels of TTCA were found among workers curing with salt bath, hot air, microwaves or fluid-bed, and lower levels were found among workers curing with injection and compression molding. Furthermore, with respect to GSTM1 and GSTT1 there were statistically significant differences in TTCA-levels between genotypes among exposed workers but not among controls. The other five polymorphisms had no impact on the TTCA levels.
The present study demonstrates relatively high levels of TTCA in urine from Swedish rubber workers. Polymorphisms in GSTM1 and GSTT1 modify the levels.
PubMed ID
17333241 View in PubMed
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N-nitrosamines are associated with shorter telomere length.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137042
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2011 Jul;37(4):316-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Huiqi Li
Bo A G Jönsson
Christian H Lindh
Maria Albin
Karin Broberg
Author Affiliation
Section of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2011 Jul;37(4):316-24
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - poisoning
Carbon Disulfide - poisoning
Chromosome Aberrations - chemically induced
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Manufactured Materials
Middle Aged
Nitrosamines - poisoning
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - poisoning
Rubber
Sweden - epidemiology
Telomere - drug effects - metabolism
Toluidines - poisoning
Young Adult
Abstract
Telomeres are critical to maintain the integrity of the chromosomes, and telomere abnormalities are important features of carcinogenesis. Telomere length differs among individuals due to genetic and environmental factors. Aiming to examine the relationship between DNA-damaging agents and average telomere length in peripheral blood, we conducted a cross-sectional study among 157 workers working in the rubber industry in Sweden.
N-nitrosamines were measured in air by personal sampling on Thermosorb/N tubes and analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) for 60 individuals. Based on a similar working situation, the exposure was estimated for all workers. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were measured as the metabolite 1-hydroxypyrene (1-HP) in urine by LC. Carbon disulphide (CS2) was measured as the metabolite 2-thiothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (TTCA) in urine by LC/MS/MS. Toluidines (orto-, meta-, and para-) were measured in urine by gas chromatography (GC)/MS. The average telomere length in peripheral blood was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR).
There was a reduction in telomere length with increasing exposure to N-nitrosamines in air [measured (N=60) N-nitrosamines ?-coefficient= -10, (95% confidence interval [95% CI] -17- -1.9) P=0.016; estimated (N=157) N-nitrosamines ?-coefficient = -5.3, (95% CI -9.5- -0.97) P=0.016]. Also, there were negative associations between para-toluidine [?-coefficient= -0.031 (95% CI -0.055- -0.0063) P=0.014], as well as age ?-coefficient= -0.005 (95% CI -0.007- -0.002) P=0.001] and telomere length. There were no strong associations between other exposures and telomere length nor did smoking modify the effect.
N-nitrosamines exposure may lead to telomere shortening.
PubMed ID
21321788 View in PubMed
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Serum concentrations of perfluorinated alkyl acids and their associations with diet and personal characteristics among Swedish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108118
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2013 Dec;57(12):2206-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Helena Bjermo
Per Ola Darnerud
Monika Pearson
Heléne Enghardt Barbieri
Anna Karin Lindroos
Cecilia Nälsén
Christian H Lindh
Bo A G Jönsson
Anders Glynn
Author Affiliation
Department of Risk and Benefit Assessment, National Food Agency, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2013 Dec;57(12):2206-15
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alkanesulfonic Acids - blood
Breast Feeding
Caprylates - blood
Decanoic Acids - blood
Diet
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Female
Fish Products
Fluorocarbons - blood
Food Contamination
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
In this study, food is suggested as a major source of human exposure to perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAA). We investigated relations between serum levels of PFAA in adults and diet/lifestyle factors nationwide in Sweden.
In 2010-2011, adults (18-80 years, N = 270) recorded their diet for 4 days and answered a food frequency questionnaire. PFAA were measured in blood serum as well as v-3 fatty acids in plasma phospholipids as a biomarker for fish consumption. Higher levels of PFAA were associated with male sex, increased age, and higher education. Women reporting full breastfeeding for =12 months had 32-44% lower levels of perfluorooctane sulfonate, perfluorooctanoic acid, and perfluorohexane sulfonate than women who never nursed their infants full-time. Serum perfluorooctane sulfonate, perfluorononanoic acid, perfluorodecanoic acid, and perfluoroundecanoic acid were positively related to n-3 fatty acids in plasma (partial r = 0.19-0.34, p = 0.05).
The relatively strong correlations between biomarkers of fish consumption and certain PFAA suggest that PFAA exposure should be taken into account in health risk and benefit assessment of fish consumption. Breastfeeding appears to be a major source of elimination of certain PFAA among women, and consequently PFAA exposure of nursed infants could be significant.
PubMed ID
23934649 View in PubMed
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The SELMA study: a birth cohort study in Sweden following more than 2000 mother-child pairs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121724
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2012 Sep;26(5):456-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Carl-Gustaf Bornehag
Syed Moniruzzaman
Malin Larsson
Cecilia Boman Lindström
Mikael Hasselgren
Anna Bodin
Laura B von Kobyletzkic
Fredrik Carlstedt
Fredrik Lundin
Eewa Nånberg
Bo A G Jönsson
Torben Sigsgaard
Staffan Janson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Karlstad University, Sweden. carl-gustaf.bornehag@kau.se
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2012 Sep;26(5):456-67
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Life Style
Mothers
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Selection Bias
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics as Topic
Sweden
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
This paper describes the background, aim and study design for the Swedish SELMA study that aimed to investigate the importance of early life exposure during pregnancy and infancy to environmental factors with a major focus on endocrine disrupting chemicals for multiple chronic diseases/disorders in offspring.
The cohort was established by recruiting women in the 10th week of pregnancy. Blood and urine from the pregnant women and the child and air and dust from home environment from pregnancy and infancy period have been collected. Questionnaires were used to collect information on life styles, socio-economic status, living conditions, diet and medical history.
Of the 8394 reported pregnant women, 6658 were invited to participate in the study. Among the invited women, 2582 (39%) agreed to participate. Of the 4076 (61%) non-participants, 2091 women were invited to a non-respondent questionnaire in order to examine possible selection bias. We found a self-selection bias in the established cohort when compared with the non-participant group, e.g. participating families did smoke less (14% vs. 19%), had more frequent asthma and allergy symptoms in the family (58% vs. 38%), as well as higher education among the mothers (51% vs. 36%) and more often lived in single-family houses (67% vs. 60%).
These findings indicate that the participating families do not fully represent the study population and thus, the exposure in this population. However, there is no obvious reason that this selection bias will have an impact on identification of environmental risk factors.
PubMed ID
22882790 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prenatal phthalate exposures and anogenital distance in Swedish boys.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266508
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2015 Jan;123(1):101-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Carl-Gustaf Bornehag
Fredrik Carlstedt
Bo A G Jönsson
Christian H Lindh
Tina K Jensen
Anna Bodin
Carin Jonsson
Staffan Janson
Shanna H Swan
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2015 Jan;123(1):101-7
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Genitalia, Male - anatomy & histology - drug effects - growth & development
Humans
Infant
Male
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Phthalic Acids - toxicity - urine
Plasticizers - toxicity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First - urine
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Phthalates are used as plasticizers in soft polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and in a large number of consumer products. Because of reported health risks, diisononyl phthalate (DiNP) has been introduced as a replacement for di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) in soft PVC. This raises concerns because animal data suggest that DiNP may have antiandrogenic properties similar to those of DEHP. The anogenital distance (AGD)--the distance from the anus to the genitals--has been used to assess reproductive toxicity.
The objective of this study was to examine the associations between prenatal phthalate exposure and AGD in Swedish infants.
AGD was measured in 196 boys at 21 months of age, and first-trimester urine was analyzed for 10 phthalate metabolites of DEP (diethyl phthalate), DBP (dibutyl phthalate), DEHP, BBzP (benzylbutyl phthalate), as well as DiNP and creatinine. Data on covariates were collected by questionnaires.
The most significant associations were found between the shorter of two AGD measures (anoscrotal distance; AGDas) and DiNP metabolites and strongest for oh-MMeOP [mono-(4-methyl-7-hydroxyloctyl) phthalate] and oxo-MMeOP [mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate]. However, the AGDas reduction was small (4%) in relation to more than an interquartile range increase in DiNP exposure.
These findings call into question the safety of substituting DiNP for DEHP in soft PVC, particularly because a shorter male AGD has been shown to relate to male genital birth defects in children and impaired reproductive function in adult males and the fact that human levels of DiNP are increasing globally.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25353625 View in PubMed
Less detail

Environmental mercury exposure, semen quality and reproductive hormones in Greenlandic Inuit and European men: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118291
Source
Asian J Androl. 2013 Jan;15(1):97-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Emina Mocevic
Ina O Specht
Jacob L Marott
Aleksander Giwercman
Bo A G Jönsson
Gunnar Toft
Thomas Lundh
Jens Peter Bonde
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital Bispebjerg, Copenhagen NV DK-2400, Denmark. emoc0001@bbh.regionh.dk
Source
Asian J Androl. 2013 Jan;15(1):97-104
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Androgens - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental pollutants - blood
European Continental Ancestry Group
Follicle Stimulating Hormone - blood
Greenland
Humans
Inuits
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Mercury - blood - toxicity
Poland
Reproduction - drug effects
Semen Analysis
Sperm Count
Testosterone - blood
Ukraine
Abstract
Several animal studies indicate that mercury is a male reproductive toxicant, but human studies are few and contradictory. We examined semen characteristics and serum levels of reproductive hormones in relation to environmental exposure to mercury. Blood and semen samples were collected from 529 male partners of pregnant women living in Greenland, Poland and Ukraine between May 2002 and February 2004. The median concentration of the total content of mercury in whole blood was 9.2 ng ml(-1) in Greenland (0.2-385.8 ng ml(-1)), 1.0 ng ml(-1) in Poland (0.2-6.4 ng ml(-1)) and 1.0 ng ml(-1) in Ukraine (0.2-4.9 ng ml(-1)). We found a significantly positive association between the blood levels of mercury and serum concentration of inhibin B in men from Greenland (?=0.074, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.021 to 0.126) and in an analysis including men from all three regions (?=0.067, 95% CI=0.024 to 0.110). The association may be due to beneficial effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which are contained in seafood and fish. No significant association (P>0.05) was found between blood concentrations of mercury and any of the other measured semen characteristics (semen volume, total sperm count, sperm concentration, morphology and motility) and reproductive hormones (free androgen index (FAI), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone and LH ? testosterone) in any region. In conclusion, the findings do not provide evidence that environmental mercury exposure in Greenlandic and European men with median whole blood concentration up to 10 ng ml(-1) has adverse effects on biomarkers of male reproductive health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23223027 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lead, mercury, and cadmium in blood and their relation to diet among Swedish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115158
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2013 Jul;57:161-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Helena Bjermo
Salomon Sand
Cecilia Nälsén
Thomas Lundh
Heléne Enghardt Barbieri
Monika Pearson
Anna Karin Lindroos
Bo A G Jönsson
Lars Barregård
Per Ola Darnerud
Author Affiliation
National Food Agency, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2013 Jul;57:161-9
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body Burden
Cadmium - blood - urine
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Lead - blood
Life Style
Male
Mercury - blood
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Smoking
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to examine the body burden of lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), and cadmium (Cd) in blood among Swedish adults and the association between blood levels, diet and other lifestyle factors. The study was based on a subgroup (n=273) of the national survey Riksmaten 2010-2011 (4-day food records and questionnaire). Lead, Hg, and Cd were measured in whole blood, and Cd additionally in urine, by mass or fluorescence spectrometry methods. The median values (5-95th percentiles) of the metals in blood were as follows; Pb: 13.4 (5.8-28.6) µg/L, Hg: 1.13 (0.31-3.45) µg/L, and Cd: 0.19 (0.09-1.08) µg/L. All three metals increased with increasing age. Lead levels in blood were positively associated with intakes of game and alcohol, Hg was related to fish intake, and blood Cd related to smoking and low iron stores and to a low meat intake. Body burdens of the studied metals were generally below health based reference values, but several individuals had blood Pb levels above the reference point for possible nephrotoxic and developmental neurotoxic effects. As health effects cannot be excluded, individuals with high Pb exposure should aim at decreasing their body burden, both from food and from other exposure routes.
PubMed ID
23537601 View in PubMed
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Differences in serum levels of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE, and reproductive parameters between men living south and north in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133138
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 2011 Nov;32(3):261-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Trine B Haugen
Toril Tefre
Gunilla Malm
Bo A G Jönsson
Lars Rylander
Lars Hagmar
Cathrine Bjørsvik
Trine Henrichsen
Thomas Sæther
Yngve Figenschau
Aleksander Giwercman
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo University College, PO Box 4 St. Olavs plass, N-0130 Oslo, Norway. trine.b.haugen@hf.hio.no
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 2011 Nov;32(3):261-7
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Estradiol - blood
Follicle Stimulating Hormone - blood
Humans
Inhibins - blood
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Norway
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Reproduction
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - metabolism
Sperm Count
Sperm Motility
Testosterone - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Arctic is contaminated with persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs), and exposure to these compounds may differ between south and north in Norway. POPs may have negative impact on male reproductive characteristics. We compared serum levels of the CB-153 and p,p'-DDE in men who were born and had lived most of their lifetime south and north (close to or above the Arctic Circle) in Norway. We found no geographical differences in levels of CB-153 (south: 50 ng/g lipid (mean), north: 59 ng/g lipid; p=0.27) or sperm parameters. However, the levels of p,p'-DDE were higher in south than in north (81 ng/g lipid (mean) vs. 66 ng/g lipid; p=0.02), as were the levels of total and free testosterone. The FSH levels were lowest in south. A strong relationship between the CB-153 and the SHBG levels was observed. The regional differences observed for p,p'-DDE, testosterone and FSH were not reflected in the semen quality.
PubMed ID
21736938 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exposure-response relationships for hexahydrophthalic and methylhexahydrophthalic anhydrides with total plasma protein adducts as biomarkers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50681
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2003 Aug;29(4):297-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Seema Rosqvist
Jörn Nielsen
Hans Welinder
Lars Rylander
Christian H Lindh
Bo A G Jönsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2003 Aug;29(4):297-303
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - chemistry - toxicity
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Proteins - analysis
Comparative Study
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Epoxy Resins - chemistry - toxicity
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Phthalic Acids - chemistry - toxicity
Phthalic Anhydrides - chemistry - toxicity
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the exposure-response relationships of hexahydrophthalic anhydride (HHPA) and methylhexahydrophthalic anhydride (MHHPA) and evaluated the applicability of the total plasma protein adducts (TPPA) of these anhydrides as biomarkers of exposure and risk. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study of 139 workers in a plant manufacturing electrical capacitors, the long-term exposure to HHPA and MHHPA was assessed through the quantification of TPPA using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Smoking and medical histories were obtained through questionnaires. Work-related symptoms of the eyes and airways were recorded. Specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E (radioallergosorbent test) and IgG (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) were determined in serum. RESULTS: The mean level of the TPPA of HHPA was 840 fmol/ml and that of the TPPA of MHHPA was 1700 fmol/ml. There was no correlation between the TPPA of HHPA and the TPPA of MHHPA. Of all the workers, 19% were found to be positive for specific IgE and 17-19% for IgG. Positive associations were observed between HHPA exposure and specific IgE and IgG and between MHHPA exposure and specific IgG. Regarding work-related symptoms, 27% of the workers had symptoms of the nose, 21% had symptoms of the eyes, 11% had symptoms of the lower airways, and 8% had nose bleeding. There were significant exposure-response relationships for symptoms of the eyes and nose for HHPA exposure. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that there is an exposure-response relationship for HHPA both with specific antibodies and with work-related symptoms and down to adduct levels of 40 fmol/ml plasma. In addition, the results elucidate the potential power of TPPA as a relevant index of exposure and risk.
PubMed ID
12934723 View in PubMed
Less detail

Biological monitoring of exposure to toluene diisocyanate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177488
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2004 Oct;30(5):371-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Carl Johan Sennbro
Christian H Lindh
Håkan Tinnerberg
Hans Welinder
Margareta Littorin
Bo A G Jönsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. carl-johan.sennbro@ymed.lu.se
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2004 Oct;30(5):371-8
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Sweden
Toluene 2,4-Diisocyanate - blood - metabolism - urine
Abstract
Toluene diisocyanate (TDI) is used in the manufacture of polyurethane and is a potent inducer of diseases of the airways. In this study, 2,4- and 2,6-toluenediamine in hydrolyzed urine and plasma were evaluated as biomarkers of exposure to 2,4- and 2,6-TDI, respectively.
For 81 exposed workers from nine different plants, the personal 8-hour time-weighted-average exposure to TDI was monitored by a filter method with 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine. In parallel, urinary samples (U1) were collected during the last 4 hours of the workshift. On a different occasion, blood samples and additional urinary samples (U2) were collected from the exposed workers, and also from a reference group consisting of 121 unexposed workers. The biomarker levels were determined in urine and plasma by the use of alkaline hydrolysis.
There were strong associations between the personal air and biomarker levels, with correlation coefficients in the range of 0.75-0.88 for the U1 samples and in the range of 0.50-0.78 for the plasma samples. By weighted linear regression, the relations were calculated between the air and biomarker levels. The slopes of the obtained regression curves ranged from 1.8 to 2.7 m3/1 for air-urine and from 2.2 to 2.9 m3/1 for air-plasma, and the intercepts were all close to the origin of the coordinates. Through the extrapolation of these regression curves, biological exposure limits were calculated.
The biological monitoring methods and strategies presented in this report are useful for assessing exposure to TDI in practice.
Notes
Erratum In: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2005 Feb;31(1):84
PubMed ID
15534959 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation of exposure biomarkers from percutaneous absorption of N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178137
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2004 Aug;30(4):306-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Bengt Akesson
Martin A Carnerup
Bo A G Jönsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University Hospital, S-221 85 Lund, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2004 Aug;30(4):306-12
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Pyrrolidinones - analysis - toxicity
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate different biomarkers of exposure to N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), a widely used industrial chemical. For this purpose, differences in toxicokinetics between men and women and between pure and water-mixed NMP were evaluated after dermal absorption.
Six female and six male volunteers (groups 1 and 2) were topically exposed for 6 hours to 300 mg of NMP. An additional group of six male volunteers (group 3) was exposed to 300 mg of NMP in a 50% water solution. Blood and urine were sampled before, during, and up to 9 days after the exposure. Plasma and urine were analyzed using mass spectrometry.
For groups 1 and 2, 16% and 18% of the applied dose were recovered in the urine as the sum of NMP and its metabolites. For group 3, 4% was recovered. The maximal concentration of 5-hydroxy-N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (5-HNMP) was 10, 8.1, and 2.1 micromol/l for groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively, in plasma and 420, 360 and 62 micromol/l in urine adjusted for density. For 2-hydroxy-N-methylsuccinimide (2-HMSI), the maximal concentration was 5.4, 4.5, and 1.3 micromol/l for groups 1, 2 and 3, in plasma, respectively, and 110, 82 and 19 micromol/l in urine adjusted for density. For 5-HNMP there was a difference in time to reach the maximal concentration depending on whether pure NMP or 50% NMP in water was used. No such difference was seen for 2-HMSI. The differences in kinetics between male and female volunteers were small.
Preferably 2-HMSI should be used as the biomarker of exposure to NMP.
PubMed ID
15458014 View in PubMed
Less detail

Inter-population variations in concentrations, determinants of and correlations between 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene (p,p'-DDE): a cross-sectional study of 3161 men and women from Inuit and European populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3408
Source
Environ Health. 2005;4:27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Bo A G Jönsson
Lars Rylander
Christian Lindh
Anna Rignell-Hydbom
Aleksander Giwercman
Gunnar Toft
Henning S Pedersen
Jan K Ludwicki
Katarzyna Góralczyk
Valentyna Zvyezday
Marcello Spanò
Davide Bizzaro
Eva C Bonefeld-Jörgensen
Gian Carlo Manicardi
Jens Peter Bonde
Lars Hagmar
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden. bo_a.jonsson@med.lu.se
Source
Environ Health. 2005;4:27
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The study is part of a collaborative project (Inuendo), aiming to assess the impact of dietary persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs) on human fertility. The aims with the present study are to analyze inter-population variations in serum concentrations of 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene (p,p'-DDE), to assess inter-population variations in biomarker correlations, and to evaluate the relative impact of different determinants for the inter-individual variations in POP-biomarkers. METHOD: In study populations of 3161 adults, comprising Greenlandic Inuits, Swedish fishermen and their wives, and inhabitants from Warsaw, Poland and Kharkiv, Ukraine, serum concentrations of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE, were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. RESULTS: The median serum concentrations of CB-153 were for male and female Inuits 200 and 110, for Swedish fishermen 190 and their wives 84, for Kharkiv men and women 44 and 27, and for Warsaw men and women 17 and 11 ng/g lipids, respectively. The median serum concentrations of p,p'-DDE were for Kharkiv men and women 930 and 650, for male and female Inuits 560 and 300, for Warsaw men and women 530 and 380, and for Swedish fishermen 240 and their wives 140 ng/g lipids, respectively. The correlation coefficients between CB-153 and p,p'-DDE varied between 0.19 and 0.92, with the highest correlation among Inuits and the lowest among men from Warsaw. Men had averagely higher serum concentrations of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE, and there were positive associations between age and the POP-biomarkers, whereas the associations with BMI and smoking were inconsistent. Dietary seafood was of importance only in the Inuit and Swedish populations. CONCLUSION: CB-153 concentrations were much higher in Inuits and Swedish fishermen's populations than in the populations from Eastern Europe, whereas the pattern was different for p,p'-DDE showing highest concentrations in the Kharkiv population. The correlations between the POP-biomarkers varied considerably between the populations, underlining that exposure sources differ and that the choice of representative biomarkers of overall POP exposure has to be based on an analysis of the specific exposure situation for each population. Age and gender were consistent determinants of serum POPs; seafood was of importance only in the Inuit and Swedish populations.
PubMed ID
16283941 View in PubMed
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Xenoandrogenic activity in serum differs across European and Inuit populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159478
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Dec;115 Suppl 1:21-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Tanja Krüger
Philip S Hjelmborg
Bo A G Jönsson
Lars Hagmar
Aleksander Giwercman
Gian-Carlo Manicardi
Davide Bizzaro
Marcello Spanò
Anna Rignell-Hydbom
Henning S Pedersen
Gunnar Toft
Jens Peter Bonde
Eva C Bonefeld-Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Institute of Public Health, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Dec;115 Suppl 1:21-7
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Androgens - blood - toxicity
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood - toxicity
Endocrine Disruptors - blood - toxicity
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
Europe
European Continental Ancestry Group
Humans
Inuits
Life Style
Luciferases - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - toxicity
Receptors, Androgen - drug effects - metabolism
Signal Transduction
Abstract
Animal and in vitro studies have indicated that human male reproductive disorders can arise as a result of disrupted androgen receptor (AR) signalling by persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Our aim in the present study was to compare serum xenoandrogenic activity between study groups with different POP exposures and to evaluate correlations to the POP proxy markers 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene (p,p'-DDE).
We determined xenoandrogenic activity in the serum fraction containing the lipophilic POPs but free of endogenous hormones. Adult male serum (n = 261) from Greenland, Sweden, Warsaw (Poland), and Kharkiv (Ukraine) was analyzed. Xenoandrogenic activity was determined as the effect of serum extract alone (XAR) and in the presence of the synthetic AR agonist R1881 (XARcomp) on AR transactivated luciferase activity.
The study groups differed significantly with respect to XARcomp activity, which was increased in the Inuits and decreased in the European study groups; we observed no difference for XAR activity. We found the highest level of the AR antagonist p,p'-DDE in Kharkiv, and accordingly, this study group showed the highest percent of serum samples with decreased XARcomp activities. Furthermore, the percentage of serum samples with decreased XARcomp activities followed the p,p'-DDE serum level for the European study groups. No correlations between serum XAR or XARcomp activities and the two POP markers were revealed.
The differences in XARcomp serum activity between the study groups suggest differences in chemical exposure profiles, genetics, and/or lifestyle factors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18174946 View in PubMed
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Influence of glutathione-related genes on symptoms and immunologic markers among vulcanization workers in the southern Sweden rubber industries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159907
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2008 Jul;81(7):913-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Lena S Jönsson
Bo A G Jönsson
Anna Axmon
Margareta Littorin
Karin Broberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, 221 85, Lund, Sweden. lena_s.jonsson@med.lu.se
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2008 Jul;81(7):913-9
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - immunology
Analysis of Variance
Biological Markers - analysis - urine
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Glutathione Transferase - genetics
Humans
Immunity, Cellular
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Industry
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Questionnaires
Rubber
Sweden
Abstract
The aim was to elucidate the role of genetic variants on symptoms of the eyes and airways, headache and nausea, as well as on immunologic markers, among vulcanization workers in the contemporary Swedish rubber industry. Polymorphisms in genes, which are involved in the defense against reactive oxygen species and metabolism of toxic substances present in the vulcanization fumes, were analyzed.
One hundred and forty-five exposed and 117 unexposed workers were included in the study. Medical and occupational histories were obtained in structured interviews. Symptoms were recorded and immunologic markers analyzed in blood. Polymorphisms in glutathione-related genes (glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC)-129, glutamate cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM)-588, glutathione S-transferase alpha 1 (GSTA1)-52, GSTM1*O, GSTP1-105, GSTP1-114, and GSTT1*O) were analyzed by Taqman-based allelic discrimination and ordinary PCR.
A protective effect of GSTA1-52 (G/A + A/A) genotype on symptoms and immunologic cells, in particular among exposed workers, was suggested. Exposed workers with GSTT1*O had increased risk of nosebleed compared to exposed workers with GSTT1*1. Exposed workers with GSTP1-105 (ile/val + val/val) had decreased levels of total immunoglobulin E (IgE) compared to exposed workers with GSTP1-105 ile/ile. GCLC-129 variant genotype demonstrated increased levels of immunologic cells among exposed workers, although statistical significance was not reached.
Our data indicate that hereditary factors influence the susceptibility to symptoms and the immunologic response of workers in the rubber industry.
PubMed ID
18066575 View in PubMed
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