Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

[Meta-analysis of association between pentachlorophenol exposure and cancer risk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156427
Source
Wei Sheng Yan Jiu. 2008 Mar;37(2):151-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Weiwei Zheng
Ying Zhou
Weidong Qu
Hao Zhang
et al
Author Affiliation
Key Laboratory of the Public Health and Safety, Ministry of Education, Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China.
Source
Wei Sheng Yan Jiu. 2008 Mar;37(2):151-4
Date
Mar-2008
Language
Chinese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Pentachlorophenol - toxicity
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The epidemiological data based on the exposure of pentachlorophenol (PCP) and cancer incidence and mortality were analyzed to study the relationship between PCP exposure and cancer risk.
According to the online search of relevant literatures, Poisson regression was used to analyze mortality rates for major cancer sites and fixed-effect model was employed to assess cancer SMR. The dose-response relationship between PCP exposure and cancer risk was also analyzed.
Major cancer mortality rates of exposure populations researched in American and Canadian studies were approximate to or lower than national male cancer mortality rates respectively. The incidence rate of colorectal cancer in occupational exposure population was over 16.4 times in comparison with the population exposed from to drinking water and food. The pooled SMR value of kidney cancer was 1.34 (95% CI 1.02-1.77). The pooled RR for major cancer mortality increased with the rise of PCP exposure level.
A potential dose-response relationship between PCP exposure and cancer risk could exist. In comparison with to the population to exposed from the drinking water and food, the risk of colorectal cancer in occupational exposure population was higher. PCP may be one of the risk factors of the kidney cancer in occupational exposure population.
PubMed ID
18589595 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Political poisoning with dioxins--a weapon of chemical "disgracefulness"]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46959
Source
Harefuah. 2005 Oct;144(10):729-35, 749
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Arseny Finkelstein
Eran Rotman
Arik Eisenkraft
Amir Krivoy
Ido Laish
Zeev Tashma
Azik Hoffman
Yoav Yehezkelli
Author Affiliation
Medical Corps, IDF. a.fink@weizmann.ac.il
Source
Harefuah. 2005 Oct;144(10):729-35, 749
Date
Oct-2005
Language
Hebrew
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antidotes
Carcinogens
Dioxins - poisoning - toxicity
English Abstract
Humans
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - poisoning - toxicity
Abstract
The recent attempt to poison Ukrainian President, Viktor Yuschenko with dioxins, raised public concern regarding this toxic chemical. In industrial countries, there is a constitutive exposure of humans to dioxin compounds, which are formed as by-products in manufacturing processes of various chlorinated organic chemicals and in waste incinerators. Dioxins are extremely stable in the environment and have a low turnover rate in the body--sometimes they are detected years after the original exposure. Of the dioxins, the most notoriously famous is the TCDD (2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin). Dioxins exhibit high acute toxicity in various animal species. Humans, however, are considered less susceptible and so far there were no reported deaths following acute dioxin poisoning. Nevertheless, numerous adverse health effects are attributed to dioxin exposure. The most prominent is the chloracne--an acute acneiform eruption, usually appearing on facial skin. There is a solid evidence base that some dioxins are carcinogens. Other long-term deleterious effects of dioxin include: immunosuppression, effects on reproduction, impairments in developmental, neurological and cognitive functions in infants, increased risk for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases and various hormonal alterations. The action of dioxins resembles that of hormones, since their toxicity is mostly receptor-mediated. Dioxins manifest their toxicity in extremely low concentrations. Although there are compounds that exhibit their biological activity at even lower dose range (e.g. nerve gases), this potency of dioxins is considered extraordinary, since there is an every-day exposure to dioxins through environmental vectors mostly via the food chain. Until now, there is no antidotal cure for dioxins, but only symptomatic treatment combined with techniques that accelerate its excretion rate from the body.
PubMed ID
16281767 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Congenital malformations in children born after IVF]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29268
Source
Harefuah. 2005 Dec;144(12):852-8, 910
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Ory Hellmann
Yaakov Bentov
Author Affiliation
Physical Therapy Department, Faculty of Health Science, Ben-Gurion University, Beer Sheva. hellmann@walla.co.il
Source
Harefuah. 2005 Dec;144(12):852-8, 910
Date
Dec-2005
Language
Hebrew
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - epidemiology
Australia - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Fertilization in Vitro - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Maternal Age
Paternal Age
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Major congenital malformations are a leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Congenital malformations are caused by three factors: genetic, environmental or multifactorial, all of which are present in the context of artificial reproductive techniques. FINDINGS: In 1999 Bergh et al. conducted a retrospective study, which included all the children born following IVF treatment in Sweden. The relative risk found was RR = 1.39 [95% CI 1.25-1.54] and there was no stratification for maternal age and parity. In 2002 Hansen et al. conducted a well-established retrospective study in Western Australia. When only term singletons were included in the study, the OR found was OR = 2.1 [1.4-3.2] in the IVF group and OR = 2.2 [1.2-4] in the ICSI group. Results were stratified for maternal age, parity and offspring sex. A meta-analysis of 19 studies found a relative risk of 1.29 for major malformations among IVF pregnancies. DISCUSSION: Explanations for the increased risk of fetal malformations could be divided into three categories: first, the characteristics of the infertile population which include many risk factors: older age, lower parity, chronic diseases and infertility itself. Second, the techniques used to treat infertility are not physiologic. Third, the characteristics of the pregnancy achieved: the incidence of high-order pregnancies is much greater and this fact exposes the offspring to other risk factors such as preterm birth and low birth weight. CONCLUSIONS: Major advances in reproductive techniques offered hope for many couples, but they were also the reason for much concern regarding the outcome of the awaited offspring. The recent studies seem to justify some of those doubts.
PubMed ID
16400786 View in PubMed
Less detail