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9 records – page 1 of 1.

[From Chernobyl to Morsleben--a public health observation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20651
Source
Gesundheitswesen. 1999 Nov;61(11):578-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
B. Thriene
Author Affiliation
Hygieneinstitut Sachsen-Anhalt, Magdeburg. b.thriene@t-online.de
Source
Gesundheitswesen. 1999 Nov;61(11):578-83
Date
Nov-1999
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Child
English Abstract
Germany
Humans
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Monitoring - statistics & numerical data
Radioactive Fallout - statistics & numerical data
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology
Ukraine
Abstract
On April 26, 1986, a serious reactor accident occurred at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. A total radioactivity of 2 x 10(18) becquerel, i.e. 3.5% of the reactor inventory were released spreading throughout Europe. Radioactive tracers were iodine 131 (with a half-life of 8 days) and caesium 137 (with a half-life of 30 years). Measurements made in Magdeburg by the Institute of Hygiene on May 5th after a heavy thunderstorm indicated a considerable radioactive contamination. Measurements revealed 75,000 bq/kg in grasses, 44,000 bq/litre in storm water and 40,000 bq/kg in garden soil, however, these high values decreased to normal by the end of 1986. The paper describes a stay in Chernobyl in 1989 and the environmental and working conditions prevailing at site. An increase of the cancer rate in the contaminated areas was not observed until 1990; however, thyroid tumours increased in children in Belorussia after that time. The current caesium load of the soils in the area is 10(6) becquerel/cubic metre. As much as 480,000 bq/kg were measured in dried mushrooms picked in the autumn of 1997. Assuming a mean natural exposure to radiation of the population in Germany of 2.4 millisievert/year (mSv/a), the additional load caused by the Chernobyl accident was 5% in 1986, falling to below 0.1% in 1996. Today, 19 nuclear power plants are operating in Germany for power generation. Radioactive substances are used in medicine, research and industry. An opinion on the safety of transports and final dumping of radioactive waste is given, based on a visit to the Morsleben final dump site. The use of nuclear energy and a percentage replacement by renewable energies are discussed from a regional and global perspective (climate protection).
PubMed ID
10628087 View in PubMed
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[Meta-analysis of association between pentachlorophenol exposure and cancer risk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156427
Source
Wei Sheng Yan Jiu. 2008 Mar;37(2):151-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Weiwei Zheng
Ying Zhou
Weidong Qu
Hao Zhang
et al
Author Affiliation
Key Laboratory of the Public Health and Safety, Ministry of Education, Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China.
Source
Wei Sheng Yan Jiu. 2008 Mar;37(2):151-4
Date
Mar-2008
Language
Chinese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Pentachlorophenol - toxicity
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The epidemiological data based on the exposure of pentachlorophenol (PCP) and cancer incidence and mortality were analyzed to study the relationship between PCP exposure and cancer risk.
According to the online search of relevant literatures, Poisson regression was used to analyze mortality rates for major cancer sites and fixed-effect model was employed to assess cancer SMR. The dose-response relationship between PCP exposure and cancer risk was also analyzed.
Major cancer mortality rates of exposure populations researched in American and Canadian studies were approximate to or lower than national male cancer mortality rates respectively. The incidence rate of colorectal cancer in occupational exposure population was over 16.4 times in comparison with the population exposed from to drinking water and food. The pooled SMR value of kidney cancer was 1.34 (95% CI 1.02-1.77). The pooled RR for major cancer mortality increased with the rise of PCP exposure level.
A potential dose-response relationship between PCP exposure and cancer risk could exist. In comparison with to the population to exposed from the drinking water and food, the risk of colorectal cancer in occupational exposure population was higher. PCP may be one of the risk factors of the kidney cancer in occupational exposure population.
PubMed ID
18589595 View in PubMed
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[Exposure of anesthetists to sevoflurane and nitrous oxide during inhalation anesthesia induction in pediatric anesthesia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32897
Source
Anaesthesiol Reanim. 2000;25(1):12-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
C. Byhahn
U. Strouhal
K. Westphal
Author Affiliation
Klinik für Anästhesiologie, Intensivmedizin und Schmerztherapie, J.W. Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main.
Source
Anaesthesiol Reanim. 2000;25(1):12-6
Date
2000
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Anesthetics, Inhalation - analysis
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Methyl Ethers - analysis
Nitrous Oxide - analysis
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Abstract
Inhalational mask induction with nitrous oxide and sevoflurane in young children is an appropriate alternative to intravenous induction and is considered safe and of rapid onset. Disadvantages of this technique are environmental pollution and occupational exposure to the inhalation agents used. Moreover, the potential health hazards are not yet completely clear. The purpose of the present study was to examine the anaesthesiologist's occupational exposure to nitrous oxide and sevoflurane in paediatric anaesthesia and mask induction. Twenty children underwent inhalational induction with nitrous oxide and sevoflurane in the operating theatre (air exchange rate 20.2/h, anaesthetic waste gas scavenger 40 l/min). Anaesthesia was maintained with the same agents. Air samples were taken from the edge of the anaesthesiologist's mouth continuously every 90 seconds, and trace concentrations of nitrous oxide and sevoflurane were analyzed with a direct reading infrared spectrometer (Brüel & Kjaer 1302, Denmark). Measurements taken during anaesthesia showed an increase in the concentrations of the anaesthetics used, but these were low. The highest mean concentrations occurred during induction (3.35 +/- 4.23 ppm for sevoflurane and 37.09 +/- 11.65 ppm for nitrous oxide). The overall peak levels measured were 6.31 +/- 4.23 ppm for sevoflurane and 68.78 +/- 40.79 ppm for nitrous oxide. Though the induction period was short compared to the whole length of anaesthesia, its impact on the overall waste gas exposure was 46.3% for sevoflurane (nitrous oxide 40.6%). Nonetheless, applicable German health law regulations were never infringed. The trace concentrations measured during inhalational mask induction and maintenance of anaesthesia were very low. With regard to modern workplace laws and health care regulations, gaseous induction in paediatric anaesthesia does not threaten the personnel's health.
PubMed ID
10721196 View in PubMed
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[No clear-cutting for the production of cellulose]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49277
Source
Pflege Z. 1995 Jul;48(7):390-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
E. Gerster
Source
Pflege Z. 1995 Jul;48(7):390-5
Date
Jul-1995
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cellulose
Environmental health
Humans
Sweden
Trees
PubMed ID
7640794 View in PubMed
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[Anton Chekhov on the island of Sachalin (author's transl)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49482
Source
MMW Munch Med Wochenschr. 1974 Mar 29;116(13):667-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-29-1974

[Spot-light of the UN conference on human environment]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49499
Source
Med Monatsschr. 1972 Sep;26(9):401-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1972
Source
Med Monatsschr. 1972 Sep;26(9):401-2
Date
Sep-1972
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Congresses
Environmental health
Humans
Sweden
PubMed ID
5082174 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Some results of the scientific research of Ukrainian hygienists on community hygiene]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49538
Source
Gig Sanit. 1966 Jan;31(1):66-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1966
Author
D N Kaliuzhnyi
M M Ermolaev
Source
Gig Sanit. 1966 Jan;31(1):66-70
Date
Jan-1966
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental health
Humans
Hygiene
Public Health
Research
PubMed ID
5984339 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz. 2007 Feb;50(2):192-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Wichmann H-E
Gieger C.
Author Affiliation
GSF Institut für Epidemiologie, Neuherberg, BRD. wichmann@gsf.de
Source
Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz. 2007 Feb;50(2):192-9
Date
Feb-2007
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Databases, Genetic
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Genetic Diseases, Inborn - genetics
Genetic Privacy
Genetic Research
Genotype
Germany
Humans
Phenotype
Abstract
Biobanks are an important tool of genetic epidemiology, which investigates the role of genetic factors and their interaction with environmental factors (in a broad meaning) for the occurrence of diseases in human populations. Its aim is to understand the influence of genetics on the development of diseases, their course and the clinical implications, with the final goal to improve prevention, diagnostics and therapy. The extraordinary development of genetics in the last decades - with respect to the understanding of the meaning of genes for human health, as well as the availability of cost-effective high throughput methods in the lab, has opened enormous opportunities to study genetic factors. In addition, access to large samples of patients or from the population is needed. This can be realized via biobanks. Large biobanks with 500,000 or more participants are being established or planned in the UK, Japan, Australia, Sweden and the US. However, in Germany only two smaller activities are ongoing, KORA-gen in the south and POPGEN in the north. Possibilities to reach larger numbers for Germany, based on existing cohorts or disease networks, are discussed. For the implementation and use of biobanks, stringent ethical boundary conditions have to be taken into account. The opinion of the German National Ethics Council on Biobanks for Research as well as the new recommendations of the Telematic Platform (TMF), which has been developed in close collaboration with the Data Protection Officers, improve transparency and legal security.
PubMed ID
17285353 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Working conditions and health of locomotive engineers of the Finnish State Railways].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249540
Source
Z Gesamte Hyg. 1977 Oct;23(10):734-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1977

9 records – page 1 of 1.