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10005 records – page 2 of 501.

Environmental health in the Baltic region--toxic metals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33091
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1999;25 Suppl 3:40-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
S. Skerfving
V. Bencko
M. Vahter
A. Schütz
L. Gerhardsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. staffan.skerfving@ymed.lu.se
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1999;25 Suppl 3:40-64
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arsenic - adverse effects - analysis - urine
Baltic States - epidemiology
Cadmium - adverse effects - analysis - blood
Central Nervous System Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Child
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Humans
Kidney Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Lead - adverse effects - analysis - blood
Male
Mercury - adverse effects - analysis - blood
Metals - adverse effects - analysis - blood
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Recent reports on concentrations of lead, cadmium, methylmercury, arsenic and nickel in some biological media in populations in the Baltic region are reviewed. In particular, children in parts of Poland, the Czech Republic, and Germany have uptakes of lead sufficient to cause adverse effects on the central nervous system and kidneys. Cadmium exposure is also high in Poland. Slight cadmium-induced effects on the kidneys have been reported from Germany and Sweden. Methylmercury uptake is dependent upon the intake of fish, in particular from contaminated lakes and rivers in Sweden and Finland, as well as the eastern coast of the Baltic Sea. There are some indications of immunotoxic effects associated with the intake of such fish. However, fish also contain other immunomodulating agents. Exposure to arsenic seems to be low everywhere in the Baltic region. There is high nickel exposure in northern Russia.
PubMed ID
10546807 View in PubMed
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[Environmental health and industrial pollution in the 1890s]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49194
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Dec 10;121(30):3561-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-2001
Author
A. Storesund
F. Rønning
Author Affiliation
Institutt for allmenn- og samfunnsmedisin Universitetet i Oslo Postboks 1130 Blindern 0318 Oslo. asbjorn.storesund@hit.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Dec 10;121(30):3561-5
Date
Dec-10-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chemical Industry - history
English Abstract
Environmental Health - history
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - history
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects - history - prevention & control
History, 19th Century
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Mining - history
Norway
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Pollution from industry assumed new dimensions when large-scale industry and mining were established in Norway towards the end of the nineteenth century. The present article discusses how the local health administration responded to the first extensive industrial pollution of air and water. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Two chemical factories producing wood pulp and one abandoned nickel mine are studied by means of information from court records and municipal archives. RESULTS: New forms of large quantity pollutants and their great spreading capacity were not anticipated in the Health Act of 1860. The legislation at the time had ambiguous points which made it difficult to apply in cases of industrial pollution. One major problem was reliable documentation of adverse health effects. INTERPRETATION: Neither central nor local medical authorities had adequate competence to exert the professional influence required. In spite of this, local health commissions acted with considerable authority in the early 1890s. Within a few years, however, the health aspects were down-played because of the strong economic and political interests behind the new industries. The principal difficulties emerging in the 1890s with industrial pollution eventually lasted for nearly one hundred years.
PubMed ID
11808018 View in PubMed
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Environmental health professionals and emergency preparedness: Canadian perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177334
Source
J Environ Health. 2004 Nov;67(4):31-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Sara L Forsting
Author Affiliation
DeKalb Advanced Practice Center, Center for Public Health Preparedness, DeKalb County Board of Health, Dacatur, GA 30030, USA. slforsting@gdph.state.ga.us
Source
J Environ Health. 2004 Nov;67(4):31-5
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disaster planning
Emergencies
Environmental health
Health Personnel
Humans
Public Health
Terrorism
United States
PubMed ID
15552703 View in PubMed
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Finnish research programme on environmental health 1998--2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177919
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2004;30 Suppl 2:5-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Soile Juuti
Jouko Tuomisto
Author Affiliation
Finnish Research Programme on Environmental Health (SYTTY), National Public Health Institute, Kuopio. sytty@ktl.fi
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2004;30 Suppl 2:5-6
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - prevention & control
Environmental health - trends
Environmental Medicine - trends
Finland
Humans
Research - trends
PubMed ID
15487679 View in PubMed
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Methods to help communities investigate environmental health issues

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76385
Source
Pimatisiwin: A Journal of Aboriginal and Indigenous Community Health. 2005 Spring; 3(1):33-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Spring 2005
Methods to Help Communities Investigate Environmental Health Issues Ella Haley Athabasca University Peppers in Port Maitland showing fluoride damage. Photo courtesy of Larry Gosnell. Methods to Help Communities Investigate Environmental Health Issues E. Haley Pimatisiwin: A Journal of
  1 document  
Author
Haley, E
Author Affiliation
Athabasca University
Source
Pimatisiwin: A Journal of Aboriginal and Indigenous Community Health. 2005 Spring; 3(1):33-58
Date
Spring 2005
Geographic Location
Canada
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
627684
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Epidemiology
Pollutants
Abstract
Many communities are concerned about the environmental impacts of industrial emissions on their health and local ecosystem. However, some communities are more successful than others in getting environmental health problems addressed. A number of communities have worked with social and scientific researchers doing a form of community based research called popular epidemiology. Several communities that have participated in this kind of research are examined in this paper.
Notes
Future issues of the journal will be published online: Future issues of the journal will be published online:
Documents
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Emerging public health issues in Alaska: occupational and environmental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4365
Source
Alaska Med. 1989 May-Jun;31(3):97-102
Publication Type
Article
Author
L D Weiss
J M Booker
D. Wigglesworth
Source
Alaska Med. 1989 May-Jun;31(3):97-102
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, occupational - mortality
Alaska
Hazardous Substances - poisoning
Hazardous Waste - prevention & control
Humans
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Abstract
The principal purpose of this article is to examine selected Alaskan occupational and environmental health problems and associated issues. Specifically, we focus on two traditional areas of interest in occupational and environmental health: 1) Job-related injuries, illnesses, and fatalities, and 2) accidental spills and uncontrolled waste sites involving hazardous materials. In 1986 the Alaska Department of Labor reported 13,154 recordable occupational injuries and illnesses among workers in the private sector. The injury rate for private sector workers was 10.2 cases per 100, compared to a rate of 7.9 for the U.S. private sector as a whole. There are approximately 550 known hazardous waste sites in Alaska identified by military, other federal, or state sources. One study documents 1,330 hazardous materials incidents in Alaska during a one year period. Effective public health policy for these occupational and environmental health hazards requires the development of an adequate database and a specific plan of action for the future.
PubMed ID
2669551 View in PubMed
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[Training and specialization of public health physicians in environmental health]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49469
Source
Zdravookhr Ross Fed. 1975 Aug;(8):33-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1975

Environmental health concerns in urban and rural family practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205033
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1998 Jul;44:1466-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998
Author
M D Sanborn
E A Scott
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, McMaster University.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1998 Jul;44:1466-72
Date
Jul-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental health
Family Practice - education - methods
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Information Services
Male
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Rural Health
Urban health
Abstract
To describe environmental health problems encountered in some Ontario family practices and to describe differences between the environmental concerns of urban (small and large) and rural physicians.
A self-completed questionnaire was mailed to 536 family physicians with hospital affiliations in three areas of Ontario.
Family practices (rural, small urban, and large urban) in Ontario.
Of 521 eligible community family physicians with hospital affiliations, 214 returned usable questionnaires for a 41% response rate.
Environmental health problems encountered in practice were measured using questions about physician concerns, reported patient questions, physician-identified high-risk groups, problems related to environmental exposure, self-rated knowledge, and current and preferred sources of information on environmental health effects.
Physicians were highly concerned and reported many patient questions about the health effects of environmental exposures. Pregnant women, agricultural workers, and children were considered important at-risk groups. Self-ratings of knowledge were generally very low. Rural physicians were concerned about agricultural pesticide exposure and their patients about moldy hay. Urban physicians had different concerns about lead and reported patient concerns about exposure to Great Lakes fish. All groups used similar sources of current environmental health information.
Family physicians who participated in this study identified important patient and professional concerns about environmental health issues and reported a lack of resources to meet those concerns. This study provides information to family medicine residency programs and continuing medical education providers to help them enhance their focus on environmental health.
Notes
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 1990 Jan-Feb;6(1):6-112340192
Cites: Conn Med. 1994 Mar;58(3):131-58039379
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1994 May;84(5):846-98179060
Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1993 Jun;147(6):682-48506840
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1996 Apr;42:594-6, 606-98653022
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 1995 Jul;37(7):807-117552464
Cites: Aust Fam Physician. 1995 Aug;24(8):1433, 1436-97677611
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Sep 6;274(9):700-57650822
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 1995 Jan-Feb;11(1):54-87748587
Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 1999 Jan;45:33, 3510889852
Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 1998 Jul;44:1427-8, 1434-69678265
PubMed ID
9678275 View in PubMed
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Public policy analysis to redress urban environmental health inequities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125940
Source
Policy Polit Nurs Pract. 2011 Nov;12(4):245-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Andrea Chircop
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Andrea.chircop@dal.ca
Source
Policy Polit Nurs Pract. 2011 Nov;12(4):245-53
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child Day Care Centers - supply & distribution
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Health Policy
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Infant
Poverty
Urban health
Urban Health Services
Young Adult
Abstract
Public policies may not have been designed to disadvantage certain populations, but the effects of some policies create unintended health inequities. The nature of community health nurses' daily work provides a privileged position to witness the lived experiences and effects of policy-produced social and health inequities. This privileged position requires policy competence including analytical skills to connect lived experiences to public policy. The purpose of this article is to present an example of an urban ethnography that explicates inequity-producing effects of public policy and is intended to inform necessary policy changes. This study sheds light on how issues of childcare, housing, nutrition, and urban infrastructure in the context of poverty are fundamental to the larger issues of environmental health. This policy analysis documents how the Day Care Act of Nova Scotia, Canada explicates patriarchal and neoliberal gender and class assumptions that have implications for mothers' health decisions.
PubMed ID
22438161 View in PubMed
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Cultural environmental health risk perception in the Canadian north

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2904
Source
Pages 543-549 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Cultural Environmental Health Risk Perception in the Canadian North John O'Neil\ Annalee Yassi2 , and Brenda Elias1 1 Northern Health Research Unit, Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada 2 Occupational and Environmental Health Unit, Department of
  1 document  
Author
O'Neil, J.
Yassi, A.
Elias, B.
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
Source
Pages 543-549 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Canada
Contaminants
Cultural values
Indigenous peoples
Risk perception
Saskatchewan
Abstract
This paper examines perceptions of various sources of environmental health risk in one Aboriginal community in Northern Canada to better understand how community members view those risks. The central question addressed is whether there is a pattern of perception, or form of cultural rationality, that informs risk perception generally, or are health risk perceptions created in an ad hoc manner, depending on local circumstances. A case study approach, involving both ethnographic and survey methods, was employed in three aboriginal communities in Quebec, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. This paper reports on one of those communities. Distinct cultural patterns of perception were found: a pattern that recognizes contingencies and conditions that produce dangerous circumstances--a pattern that is open to new forms of knowledge and sensitive to uncertainty.
Documents
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[Doctors suffering from contradictory opinions about environmental health problems].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178695
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(13):1643-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Jouko Tuomisto
Author Affiliation
Kansanterveyslaitos, Kuopio. jouko.tuomisto@ktl.fi
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(13):1643-4
Date
2004
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Environmental health
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Risk assessment
PubMed ID
15326970 View in PubMed
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Electric power and environmental health in Alaska Native villages

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1109
Source
Public Health Reports. 1964 Dec;79(12):1087-1092
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1964
  1 website  
Author
Hickey, J.L.S.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Public Health Reports. 1964 Dec;79(12):1087-1092
Date
Dec-1964
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Barrow
Bethel
District of Columbia
Economics
Electric power
Enteritis
Environmental health
Health Surveys
Kanakanak
Kotzebue
Water supply
Abstract
Environmental health in the United States has improved hand in hand with the increased availability of electric power. Although a direct causal relationship may be lacking, there is no doubt that power has contributed vastly to the factors consideredimportant to better environmental health. Large segments of the Alaska community, however, are power starved. The inhabitantsof remote Alaska Native villages year after year have had few of the environmental health benefits and conveniences that power brings. The present status of power and specific ways in which electric power could benefit environmental health and might be made available in those villages where it is lacking are outlinedhere.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 790.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 105.
Online Resources
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[Rhoca-Gil and the view on the environmental health]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49251
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Nov 20;117(28):4123
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-20-1997
Author
B. Hareide
Author Affiliation
Statens institutt for folkehelse, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Nov 20;117(28):4123
Date
Nov-20-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Construction Materials - adverse effects
Norway
Risk factors
Water Pollutants, Chemical - adverse effects
PubMed ID
9441451 View in PubMed
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[An unethical and unscientific survey on environmental health effects]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49280
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Mar 8;92(10):958
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-8-1995
Author
I. Hellström
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Mar 8;92(10):958
Date
Mar-8-1995
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental health
Epidemiologic Methods
Ethics, Medical
Health Surveys
Humans
Questionnaires
Sweden
PubMed ID
7885093 View in PubMed
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[Environmental health promotion in municipalities--resources, organization and activities]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49302
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Aug 30;113(20):2591-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-1993
Author
J G Maeland
F. Boonstra
Author Affiliation
Nasjonalforeningens Hemil-senter, Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Aug 30;113(20):2591-6
Date
Aug-30-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
English Abstract
Environmental health
Health education
Health planning
Health promotion
Health Resources
Humans
Norway
Preventive Health Services - economics - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Municipal Health Services Act with amendments from 1988 defines environmental health promotion activities directed at physical, chemical, biological and social factors as mandatory for the local Norwegian health authorities. In addition, the municipal health services are responsible for health surveillance and for initiating cross-sectorial preventive measures. In 1991, we undertook a national survey among the Norwegian municipal health services to monitor planning activities, manpower resources, cross-sectorial cooperation, and project-oriented activities within the field of environmental health promotion. Less than one-third of the municipalities employed technically trained hygienic personnel. However, three of four municipalities had carried out some environmental health promotion projects within the last two years. The following factors were all independently related to level of environmental health promotion activity: the availability of technical assistance, the level of cross-sectorial cooperation and the size of the population in the municipality. We conclude that this area of health promotion should be improved by better planning, a higher level of technical hygienic competence within the municipal health services, more inter-sectorial cooperation and greater emphasis on visible projects of limited duration.
PubMed ID
8236183 View in PubMed
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Environmental health in the polar regions -- (two case studies).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature702
Source
Pages 55-73 in Science in Alaska, 1965. Proceedings, 16th Alaskan Science Conference.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1966
Author
Drobny, N.L.
Author Affiliation
U.S. Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory (Port Hueneme, California)
Source
Pages 55-73 in Science in Alaska, 1965. Proceedings, 16th Alaskan Science Conference.
Date
1966
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alakanuk
Kasigluk
Kipnuk
Noatak
Shishmaref
Waste management
Sewage systems
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 788.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 101.
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The Environmental Health Program of the Alaska Area Native Health Service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4398
Source
Alaska Med. 1969 Dec;11(4):128-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1969
Author
C R Bowman
Source
Alaska Med. 1969 Dec;11(4):128-9
Date
Dec-1969
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Environmental health
Inuits
Public Health Administration
PubMed ID
5369103 View in PubMed
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[Preventive health services in the county of Buskerud--environmental health services]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49261
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Sep 30;116(23):2799-801
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-1996
Author
M. Rognerud
O. Lappegard
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for samfunnsmedisin Statens helsetilsyn, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Sep 30;116(23):2799-801
Date
Sep-30-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
English Abstract
Environmental health
Health promotion
Humans
Norway
Preventive Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration - standards
Questionnaires
Abstract
Local environmental health services are essential for meeting many national health objectives. In order to assess the quality of the local environmental health services and the effects of national funding of local projects (The Master Plan), a questionnaire was distributed to the 21 local medical officers in the county of Buskerud in March 1995. 15 out of 20 responders stated that the local environmental health services do not meet legal standards. Local authorities seem to be unable or unwilling to commit sufficient personnel and money to environmental health services. This study indicates that national funds have helped to improve the services, especially in areas given national priority.
PubMed ID
8928169 View in PubMed
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[Environmental pollution and congenital abnormalities according to the data of environmental health monitoring]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49323
Source
Gig Sanit. 1992 Jul-Aug;(7-8):6-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
B Ia Reznik
I P Minkov
V Ia Prudkii
M N Kriven'kaia
A N Kil'dysheva
B N Grinfel'd
V N Aleksandrov
Source
Gig Sanit. 1992 Jul-Aug;(7-8):6-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - etiology
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Radioactive Pollutants - adverse effects
Ukraine
Abstract
Study of the environmental pollution (ambient air, drinking water, food and fodder) in southern Ukraine industrial region and study of congenital developmental defects were carried out. 78,678 newborns were examined. The most significant environmental factors responsible for congenital developmental defects, as authors proposed, were the ambient air pollution and environmental radioactivity.
PubMed ID
1468672 View in PubMed
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Identifying and managing adverse environmental health effects: a new series.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190248
Source
CMAJ. 2002 Apr 16;166(8):1041-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-16-2002
Author
Erica Weir
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 2002 Apr 16;166(8):1041-3
Date
Apr-16-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Canada
Child
Environmental Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Humans
Physician's Role
Risk factors
Notes
Cites: Chest. 1999 Aug;116(2):586-710453903
Cites: Clin Chem. 2000 Aug;46(8 Pt 1):1171-810926899
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Nov 28;163(11):1471-611192656
Cites: Can Commun Dis Rep. 2000 Oct 15;26(20):170-311211701
Cites: Science. 1981 Aug 21;213(4510):922-47256288
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1985;442:240-502409856
Cites: IARC Sci Publ. 1986;(77):173-823596706
Cites: Toxicol Ind Health. 1989 Oct;5(5):635-462815099
Cites: Adv Exp Med Biol. 1996;387:213-98794215
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1996 Dec;30(6):647-548914711
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 1997 Feb;29(2):232-89018188
Cites: Clin Chem. 1997 Jul;43(7):1251-29216473
Cites: Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1998 Jan;124(1):1139440795
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1998 Jul;44:1466-729678275
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1998 May;55(5):356-99764114
Cites: J AOAC Int. 1999 May-Jun;82(3):716-2410367390
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1999 Mar;56(3):152-810448322
Comment On: CMAJ. 2002 Apr 16;166(8):1049-5512002983
PubMed ID
12002981 View in PubMed
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10005 records – page 2 of 501.